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'A garden is a friend you can visit anytime.'

Anon

 

texture thanks to PaintedWorksByKB

Water-lily in the Double Walled Garden at the National Botanic Garden of Wales, Llanarthne, near Camarthen, Wales.

 

View On Black.

Nikon F80 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 + Kodak Elite Chrome 100 Cross Processed.

 

The central area of the beautifully restored Victorian double-walled garden is divided into quadrants, each with their own raised Lilly Pond. These days, peering along the surface of ponds and puddles has become a well established post-flickr photographic habit. :)

 

The National Botanic Gardens of Wales almost ran out of money and closed on St Davids Day (01st March - The National Day of Wales) 2004. Fortunately an army of friends and volunteers rallied to the cause and have turned around the fortunes. it is well worth a visit - in fact it is well worth several visits if you are in the area or passing through. The biome designed by Norman Foster is an obvious draw for those with an architectural bent; but actually there's plenty to see. You can easily lose a day there roaming the grounds, exploring the original restored Victorian double walled vegetable, fruit & herb garden, the greenhouses, ponds and water features, or checking out sculpture, visiting exhibitions and eating huge great slabs of home-made cake and mugs of tea for an excellent price.

Water Discovery Centre:

Perched on stilts above the edge of Pwyll yr Ardd is a wooden building.

Packed full of microscopes and study aids, this is a place of learning.

Schoolchildren get the chance to explore a treasure chest of natural wonders.

Day and evening courses bring in adults to make, identify and find out things.

Teachers come here to learn how to teach outdoors.

Families have fun making wonderful creations from plants during the school holidays.

  

The National Botanic Garden of Wales (NBGW) is situated near Llanarthney in the Towy Valley, Carmarthenshire, Wales. The garden is both a visitor attraction and a centre for botanical research and conservation, and features the world's largest single-span glasshouse measuring 110 m (360 ft) long by 60 m (200 ft) wide.

 

NBGW seeks "to develop a viable world-class national botanic garden dedicated to the research and conservation of biodiversity and its sustainable utilisation, to lifelong learning and to the enjoyment of the visitor." NBGW is a Registered Charity reliant upon funding from visitors, friends, grants and gifts. From 2008-2009 onwards, the garden will be receiving £550,000 revenue support per annum from the Welsh Assembly Government. Significant start-up costs were shared with the UK Millennium Fund.

I misjudged how far back i should have been from ...meh... - but it's kind of serendipitous where I was, as it has cut his head off perfectly! Sorry ...meh..., and you were so good for posing for me!

Water, from a fountain, frozen in flight at The National Garden of Wales. The droplets are holding together through surface tension. Every part of every droplet is free-falling at 9.81 m/s2.

 

Further information about the garden at: www.gardenofwales.org.uk

strange effects is either an odd double exposure of the viv picking up things behind me.... it was a matte concrete wall, not reflective at all.... further proof that my vivitar is haunted!

 

at the National Botanic Garden of Wales

The National Botanic Garden of Wales (NBGW) is situated near Llanarthney in the Towy Valley, Carmarthenshire, Wales. The garden is both a visitor attraction and a centre for botanical research and conservation, and features the world's largest single-span glasshouse measuring 110 m (360 ft) long by 60 m (200 ft) wide.

 

In 1978, interest had been captured by local walkers, who were keen to revive the splendour of what they could see around them. Setting up a fund raising scheme, the little money raised led to the rediscovery of a number of historical features.

 

The idea for a National Botanic Garden of Wales originated from the Welsh artist, William Wilkins, whose aunt had described to him the ruins of an elaborate water features she had discovered while walking in the local woods at Pont Felin Gat. Under the guidance of the Welsh Historic Gardens Trust, an application was made to the Millennium Commission to fund Britain’s first national botanic garden for 200 years.

 

Virtually on the site of Cockerell's mansion, the Great Glasshouse now forms the centrepiece. Much of the original water-scape has been restored, and extended by introducing cascades to the western approach to the Glasshouse. The extraordinary original view the east side of the mansion offered over the grounds has been restored, extending as originally to Paxton's Tower in the distance. Many experts have commented that this view gives visitors an ability to see and hence understand something of what the great landscape architects of the end of the eighteenth century understood by the word “Picturesque”.

 

The Garden was opened to the public for the first time on 24 May 2000, and was officially opened on 21 July by the Prince of Wales. In 2003, the garden ran into serious financial difficulties, and in 2004 it accepted a financial package from the Welsh Assembly Government, Carmarthenshire County Council and the Millennium Commission to secure its future.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Botanic_Garden_of_Wales

 

www.gardenofwales.org.uk/

The National Botanic Garden of Wales (NBGW) is situated near Llanarthney in the Towy Valley, Carmarthenshire, Wales. The garden is both a visitor attraction and a centre for botanical research and conservation, and features the world's largest single-span glasshouse measuring 110 m (360 ft) long by 60 m (200 ft) wide.

 

NBGW seeks "to develop a viable world-class national botanic garden dedicated to the research and conservation of biodiversity and its sustainable utilisation, to lifelong learning and to the enjoyment of the visitor." NBGW is a Registered Charity reliant upon funding from visitors, friends, grants and gifts. From 2008-2009 onwards, the garden will be receiving £550,000 revenue support per annum from the Welsh Assembly Government. Significant start-up costs were shared with the UK Millennium Fund.

 

In 1978, interest had been captured by local walkers, who were keen to revive the splendour of what they could see around them. Setting up a fund raising scheme, the little money raised led to the rediscovery of a number of historical features.

 

The idea for a National Botanic Garden of Wales originated from the Welsh artist, William Wilkins, whose aunt had described to him the ruins of an elaborate water features she had discovered while walking in the local woods at Pont Felin Gat. Under the guidance of the Welsh Historic Gardens Trust, an application was made to the Millennium Commission to fund Britain’s first national botanic garden for 200 years.

 

Virtually on the site of Cockerell's mansion, the Great Glasshouse now forms the centrepiece. Much of the original water-scape has been restored, and extended by introducing cascades to the western approach to the Glasshouse. The extraordinary original view the east side of the mansion offered over the grounds has been restored, extending as originally to Paxton's Tower in the distance. Many experts have commented that this view gives visitors an ability to see and hence understand something of what the great landscape architects of the end of the eighteenth century understood by the word “Picturesque”.

 

The Garden was opened to the public for the first time on 24 May 2000, and was officially opened on 21 July by the Prince of Wales. In 2003, the garden ran into serious financial difficulties, and in 2004 it accepted a financial package from the Welsh Assembly Government, Carmarthenshire County Council and the Millennium Commission to secure its future.

 

The site extends to 568 acres (2.30 km2), and among the garden's rare and threatened plants is the whitebeam Sorbus leyana. 21st Century approaches to recycling and conservation have been used in the design of the centre: biomass recycling is used to provide heating for some of the facilities such as the visitor centre and glasshouses.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Botanic_Garden_of_Wales

 

www.gardenofwales.org.uk/

In the Great Glasshouse at the National Botanic Garden of Wales, a location for the filming of the 2009 Doctor Who story, The Waters of Mars

Nikon F80 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 + Kodak Max 400.

 

The National Botanic Gardens of Wales almost ran out of money and closed on St Davids Day (01st March - The National Day of Wales) 2004. Fortunately an army of friends and volunteers rallied to the cause and have turned around the fortunes. it is well worth a visit - in fact it is well worth several visits if you are in the area or passing through. The biome designed by Norman Foster is an obvious draw for those with an architectural bent; but actually there's plenty to see. You can easily lose a day there roaming the grounds, exploring the original restored Victorian double walled vegetable, fruit & herb garden, the greenhouses, ponds and water features, or checking out sculpture, visiting exhibitions and eating huge great slabs of home-made cake and mugs of tea for an excellent price.

 

Polaroid SX-70 Land Camera Model 1 + 600 Film + ND Filter

 

Pola No 110.

 

The National Botanic Gardens of Wales almost ran out of money and closed on St Davids Day (01st March - The National Day of Wales) 2004. Fortunately an army of friends and volunteers rallied to the cause and have turned around the fortunes. it is well worth a visit - in fact it is well worth several visits if you are in the area or passing through. The Great Glass House (biome) designed by Norman Foster is an obvious draw for those with an architectural bent; but actually there's plenty to see. You can easily lose a day there roaming the grounds, exploring the original restored Victorian double walled vegetable, fruit & herb garden, the greenhouses, ponds and water features, or checking out sculpture, visiting exhibitions and eating huge great slabs of home-made cake and mugs of tea for an excellent price.

 

I wish I'd been a tiny bit further away...

Nikon F80 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 + Kodak Max 400.

 

The National Botanic Gardens of Wales almost ran out of money and closed on St Davids Day (01st March - The National Day of Wales) 2004. Fortunately an army of friends and volunteers rallied to the cause and have turned around the fortunes. it is well worth a visit - in fact it is well worth several visits if you are in the area or passing through. The biome designed by Norman Foster is an obvious draw for those with an architectural bent; but actually there's plenty to see. You can easily lose a day there roaming the grounds, exploring the original restored Victorian double walled vegetable, fruit & herb garden, the greenhouses, ponds and water features, or checking out sculpture, visiting exhibitions and eating huge great slabs of home-made cake and mugs of tea for an excellent price.

 

In the Great Glasshouse at the National Botanic Garden of Wales, a location for the filming of the 2009 Doctor Who story, The Waters of Mars

*hairbear had to roll down the steep steep Norman Foster hill!

 

taken on my supersampler - 4 lenses, takes 4 shots onto the same negative over 2 seconds - at the National Botanic Garden of Wales

Nikon F80 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 + Kodak Elite Chrome 100 Cross Processed.

 

It was quite tricky trying to take this picture actually, for these engraved dragons run horizontally right across the glass entrance doors. (I don't think it is just about exposing us to a corporate logo, but it also stops people walking straight through the glass into the landscape outside...) These doors have a sensitive movement sensor and slide back and forth to open and close as people pass by. In order to take the picture you have to position yourself, wait for the doors to close again and line up the shot, that triggers the sensor so you have to wait whilst holding your shooting position until the doors close AGAIN and then hit the shutter before the doors open - again.

 

The number of times you set the doors off before the shot is taken is dependent upon:

a) how much caffeine you have taken that day.

b) how much alcohol you have coursing through your veins from the night before.

c) how well you know your camera.

d) how many people walk past you and through the doors whilst shaking their head.

e) how self conscious you are.

f) how long it takes you to lose your patience and resist the urge to have a tantrum.

g) how long you've been involved with flickr.

h) how badly you need cake.

 

The National Botanic Gardens of Wales almost ran out of money and closed on St Davids Day (01st March - The National Day of Wales) 2004. Fortunately an army of friends and volunteers rallied to the cause and have turned around the fortunes. it is well worth a visit - in fact it is well worth several visits if you are in the area or passing through. The biome designed byNorman Foster is an obvious draw for those with an architectural bent; but actually there's plenty to see. You can easily lose a day there roaming the grounds, exploring the original restored Victorian double walled vegetable, fruit & herb garden, the greenhouses, ponds and water features, or checking out sculpture, visiting exhibitions and eating huge great slabs of home-made cake and mugs of tea for an excellent price.

 

In the Great Glasshouse at the National Botanic Garden of Wales, a location for the filming of the 2009 Doctor Who story, The Waters of Mars

Close up of dispensary drawers. This entire old dispensary was dismantled and moved from Holyhead to the NBC a little while ago. Catrin still remembers when the actual shop in Holyhead was open and looked like this.

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