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The New York Times Bldg NYC

2007 - Designed by Renzo Piano and FXFowle

Since it opened in 1969, Alice Tully Hall has been home to the New York Film Festival and the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Performances take place on the Adrienne Arsht Stage, within the warm wood veneers of the Starr Theater. In addition to world-class chamber music, Alice Tully Hall hosts numerous virtuoso concerts on its cathedral-sized, Swiss-made pipe organ.

Following a highly anticipated renovation and expansion in 2009, the hall now has a three-story glass lobby which features a café and bar, and a cantilevered extension juts out over a sunken plaza at the corner of Broadway and 65th Street, now a meeting place for Lincoln Center visitors and the general public.

 

Architects: Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with FXFOWLE Architects

 

Location: 1941 Broadway, New York, NY 10023, United States

 

Project Year: 2009

 

Designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FXFOWLE Architects, completed 2007.

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

The New York Times Building, a 52-story tower opened on on November 19, 2007 on the east side of Eighth Avenue between 40th and 41st Street, was completed to the design of Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FXFOWLE Architects. In conjunction with the expanded Heart Tower, the site selection signaled the westward expansion of midtown, and kept its chief tenant--the New York Times Company--in Times Square, an area which for which it lent its name following a move to 42nd Street in 1904.

 

The site for the building was obtained by the Empire State Development Corporation through eminent domain in 2001. With a mandate to acquire and redevelop blighted properties in Times Square, ten existing buildings were condemned by the EDC and purchased, behind court order, from owners who in some cases did not want to sell. Once the 80,000 square-foot site was assembled, it was leased to the New York Times Company and Forest City Ratner for below market value at $85.6 million over 99 years.

 

The tower rises 748 feet (228 m) from the street to its roof, with the exterior curtain wall extending 92 feet higher to 840 feet (256 m), and a mast rising to 1,046 feet (319 m). The steel-framed building, cruciform in plan, utilizes a screen of 1-5/8" (41.3mm) ceramic rods mounted on the exterior of the glass curtain wall on the east, west and south facades, creating a curtain wall that reflects light and changes color throughout the day. The rod spacing increases from the base to the top, providing greater transparency as the building rises. The steel framing and bracing is exposed at the four corner "notches" of the building. The ground floor features a garden, open to the sky.

 

The building is promoted as a "Green" structure, though it is not LEED certified. The design incorporates many features for increased energy efficiency. The curtain wall, fully glazed with low-e glass, maximizes natural light within the building while the ceramic-rod screen helps block direct sunlight and reduce cooling loads. Mechanized shades controlled by sensors reduce glare, while more than 18,000 individually-dimmable fluorescent fixtures supplement natural light, providing a real energy savings of 30 percent. A natural gas co-generation plant provides 40 percent of the electrical power to the New York Times space within the building, with the waste heat used for heating and cooling. Floors occupied by the New York Times utilize a raised floor system which allows for underfloor air distribution, which requires less cooling than a conventional ducted system. The building also incorporated free-air cooling, bringing in outside air when it is cooler than the interior space.

 

In 2007, the New York Times Building was ranked #68 on the AIA 150 America's Favorite Architecture list.

The New York Times Tower makes an elegant statement in part of Manhattan that could be best described as ordinary. Rising above the chaos of everyday life, the simple composition of a podium surrounding a courtyard and the soaring 52-storey tower is clad in ceramic rods that increase in spacing from bottom to top of the tower.

 

The building is the first major construction along a stretch of 8th Avenue in decades and was also the first significant addition to the New York City skyline in several years, when it opened in 2007.

 

Heralded as landmark in sustainable building design, though (maybe refreshingly) not LEED-certified, the screen of ceramic rods provide shading and reduce cooling loads - in conjunction with occupancy sensors and mechanically operated shades, provide energy savings approaching 30%.

 

The tower provides no parking since most employees arrive by public transit, however added indoor space for 20 bicycles in December 2007.

The New York Times Building NYC

Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FXFOWLE Architects

winning the NYC Driver-less Future Challenge

bustler.net/news/tags/competition/326/5798/fxfowle-s-publ...

sketched using Mental Canvas

The Old McGraw Hill Building (1932) - James Hood - Art Deco

 

11 Times Square (2011) - Dan Kaplan of FXFOWLE - Modern

Alchemy Properties’ award winning glass tower 35XV is located at 35 West 15th Street and offers 54 state of the art residences of the finest construction. Designed by FXFowle Architects, the building features an architecturally unique glass curtainwall which affords un-obstructed, awe-inspiring panoramic views from every unit. Residences begin on the 8th floor and rise at an angle towards the sky, offering dramatic 10’ ceiling heights with sun drenched interiors.

 

St. Francis Xavier Church is a Roman Catholic church in Manhattan at 30-36 West 16th Street between Fifth Avenue and the Avenue of the Americas in the Flatiron District neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. Built in 1886.

Today in 2016

The New York Times Building

 

The tower was designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FXFOWLE Architects, with Gensler providing interior design. The lighting design for the building's nighttime identity was designed by the Office for Visual Interaction Inc.[11] The tower rises 748 feet (228 m) from the street to its roof, with the exterior curtain wall extending 92 feet (28 m) higher to 840 feet (256 m), and a mast rising to 1,046 feet (318.8 m). As of 2010, the building was tied with the Chrysler Building as the fourth-tallest building in New York City, due to the unfinished One World Trade Center exceeding their height. The tower is also the tenth-tallest building in the United States.

  

Website: www.edichen.com

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Follow my travel and photography blog to explore more secret location in New York City: www.laidbackperson.com

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Called "New York's first skymark," by developer Alchemy Properties, the building under construction on West 15th Street is designed by FXFOWLE Architects.

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

The 2009 renovation of the Julliard School Building by Diller Scofidio + Renfro and FXFOWLE included this canterlevered extenstion projecting over Broadway.

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 940ft (287 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 940ft (287 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Location: Olaya Street, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

  

The Shot:

Nikon D90

Nikkor Wide Lens 10-24mm

Manual Mood

f/8

1/200 Sec.

iso 100

  

Software:

: : Lightroom:

- Increasing the saturation of the cranes.

- Increasing the Overall Contrast.

- Increase the Brightness of the Curtain Wall

- Deceasing the Saturation of the "White Vertical Cladding"

  

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The New York Times Building NYC

Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FXFOWLE Architects

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

The New York Times Building NYC

Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FXFOWLE Architects

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 940ft (287 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 940ft (287 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop and FXFOWLE Architects, completed 2007.

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 940ft (287 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 940ft (287 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

14 May 2019, US, New York: The building of the State of Liberty Museum. In the background you can see the skyline of New York. Every year, around 4.3 million people visit the Statue of Liberty on Liberty Island, an island in the port of New York. For reasons of space, however, not all visitors can sit in the pedestal or even in the crown. On Thursday, 16.05.2019 a single museum will open next to the statue for the first time. (to dpa-KORR ""Lady Liberty" gets a new museum") Photo: Christina Horsten/dpa (Photo by Christina Horsten/picture alliance via Getty Images)

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 940ft (287 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 940ft (287 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 940ft (287 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 1,050ft (320 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

Architect: FXFowle Architects

Height: 940ft (287 m)

Floors: 66

Type: Office/Retail

Certification: LEED Platinum

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