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Color of this one is in the comments, Which one you like the most?

 

Day 74 of 365

 

Aperture - f/18

Speed - 30sec

Focal Length - 45mm

ISO 200

Taken with 5D mk-ii + 24-105mm f/4L IS USM

Lightroom 3.5 for post

 

Update: Explore #39 - Jan 6, 2012

It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light.

Aristotle Onassis

  

Singapore at Night. Long exposure.

 

Easy stroll with my young who slowly developing some interest in photography.

 

Enjoy, Mario.

 

Thank you for your comments, suggestions and favorites.

Wonderful art deco stained glass windows in an abandoned building.

 

Thanks to Blacklodge. www.flickr.com/photos/thebadseed/.

A long exposure of the MediaPark in Köln.

 

[ Visit me on Facebook ]

in Paris

 

My pictures at GettyImages

 

© Andi Mezger

 

Nikon D90 with Nikkor 18-55mm/3.5-5.6G: 24mm - ISO200 - 25s - f11

Alright, I went out again last night to give this another attempt and had a blast again. I liked my images from the tunnels the first time but this time I wanted to do it out in the open to see how far I could get the sparks to fly. This was on a road between an apt complex and an empty lot. I also opened the aperture more and decreased my ISO from the first time to make it more crisp. Otherwise, steel wool was in a wire whisk attached to a dog leash. Opened my shutter and started spinning.

 

20 sec

F/11

ISO 200

 

My gear:

000 grade steel wool(from hardware store)

Wire whisk from my kitchen

Dog leash

Lighter

Nikon D-90

Tripod

Jeans, hoodie, hat, glasses

Is there anything better? That feeling when standing above this magnificent glass wall and watching the transition from day to night, from natural to artificial light & from the light to dark colors, was really amazing. Watching the sun drops behind the horizon on one side while bouncing the light off of this great cityscape on the other side is just pure magic! To gather and showcase the whole light range, from sunset to night is only possible with the time blend technique. I captured multiple exposures over the corse of 1.5h and than blended the best light from each of them in attempt to get you closer to what I was experiencing that night. What do you think?

View On Black (large won't hurt'cha')

 

Possibility: open a second window and play music while reading. www.youtube.com/watch?v=L5BkLQ2Pw_4&feature=fvst ~ "Love on a Real Train" – Tangerine Dream

 

You’d better believe that artists and photogs see things the rest of the world misses. Ain’t it grand? But, it would appear, I’m just preaching to the choir.

 

Thursday night, January 8. About 9pm. Just past Damen Street on west 99th street, in the Beverly neighborhood of Chicago, the warning gate on the railroad tracks lit up flashing red and the gates came down. A Metra commuter train was coming into the station.

 

My car was first in line this time; right up against the warning gate. I put it into park to wait it out. Sometimes, being stuck at a railroad crossing is a bit of a pain in the ass.

 

But, this night, it wasn’t. I began to notice things. It was snowing, I was warm and toasty, and there was an almost full moon darting in and out of the clouds, There were lights of differing colors darting about: flourescent green from the train’s windows, silver and blue from its sides, greenish-yellow from the station's window, and the eerie ochre-yellow of street lamps, punctuated here and there with clean whites from headlights and the night lights under the overhang of the station's roof.

 

I’ve always liked the wooden architecture of this old-timey commuter station too.

 

What was there not to love in this scene? Tangerine Dream’s “Love on a Real Train” was playing on my CD. The music, mixing with the sound of the warning bells and steam brake lines emitted from under the train, only served to heighten the beauty of it all.

 

Of course, I had a camera: I always have a camera. In this case the little Sony T200. It ain’t the D300, but it does a wonderful job on certain kinds of scenes.

 

Anyway, they say “it ain’t the camera, boy, but the photog what be wielding it.” Sometimes, in some hands, that seems to be true. On just enough occasions, true enough in mine.

 

I didn’t jump out of the car as I didn’t want snow melt on the lens. So, I put the camera right up to the windshield so the focus wouldn’t get fooled by the glass. I’ve had that happen: messed up some nice shots. Tell you what! Want a tech challenge? Try timing a slow-shutter, night shot in-between windshield wiper movements! :-)

 

The T200 has a nice, big and bright, three-inch display screen on the back of the camera: no view finder. It’s a nice feature to have when you can’t get your eye to a viewfinder to compose a shot.

 

And, I got some shots – through the windshield and the side window. The commuters, heading home to lives I sometimes wonder about, cleared out. Some of them looked at me too: possibly wondering "what the hell is he takin' pictures of?" Then, the train pulled off and the warning gates went up. I continued driving home - in the snow, with a smile on my face, as I kinda’ felt I had captured the mood of a quiet, winter’s moment on a velvety, snowy evening.

 

Think I did.

 

"Scratchy Window" texture courtesy of Jill: www.flickr.com/photos/borealnz/2473360890/in/set-72157610...

A mushroom trapped in glass. Here the third and favorite so far from my experiments in refractograms. What do you see let me know what you think. If you would like a print of any of my work just message me. dereklawrence138.myportfolio.com

© All Rights Reserved.

 

The nights can be oh so long when you are second guessing decisions you have made.

 

Somewhere in the long night ...

 

Some people can write poetry to express feelings ... a photographer does it with pictures.

It seems like you can see the Bank of China tower from everywhere in Hong Kong. Even if the building itself is hidden, it's reflection appears all the time in the many glass-fronted buildings around the city.

 

I came to know this area pretty well over the (total) few weeks I've been there. It's quite a laid back area to its neighbours, and I was thankful for that.

 

Scaffolding in the exact place I was planning to take the shot *almost* managed to ruin the evening, but thankfully I can bend both myself and my tripod into very uncomfortable positions.

 

-

 

Hong Kong! Again! After the first time not working out so well (mostly due to my condition) me and my best friend Michael returned to do the bits we missed out on and generally have a few different experiences than before.

 

-

 

Facebook :: Twitter :: Website

www.fotografik33.com

Le palais du Louvre est un ancien palais royal situé à Paris sur la rive droite de la Seine, entre le jardin des Tuileries et l'église Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois. S'étendant sur une surface bâtie de plus de 135 000 m², le palais du Louvre est le plus grand palais européen, et le second plus grand bâtiment du continent après le Palais du Parlement roumain. Il abrite aujourd'hui l'un des plus riches musées d'art du monde : le Musée du Louvre.

La construction du Louvre est indissociable de l'histoire de la ville de Paris. Elle s'étend sur plus de 800 ans, bien que le plan général du palais ait été imaginé dès la Renaissance. Charles V y établit sa résidence, donnant au palais un statut qu'il a conservé jusqu'au règne de Louis XIV.

Avec 8,9 millions de visiteurs annuels en 2011, c'est le site culturel le plus visité en France devant la tour Eiffel, la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris étant en tête des monuments à l'accès libre avec 13,6 millions de visiteurs estimés.

De 1981 à 1999, le palais fait l'objet d'importants travaux de modernisation désignés sous le nom de Grand Louvre et entrant dans le cadre des « Grands Travaux » définis par le président de la République François Mitterrand. Ces aménagements consistant à rendre la totalité du palais à sa fonction de musée (jusqu'en 1989, une partie de celui-ci abritait également le ministère des Finances), sont caractérisés par la construction de la pyramide de verre (inaugurée le 30 mars 1989), située au milieu de la cour Napoléon, œuvre de l'architecte sino-américain Ieoh Ming Pei et qui mène à un grand hall d'accueil souterrain. Une copie en plomb de la Statue équestre de Louis XIV sous les traits de Marcus Curtius par Le Bernin et Girardon est alors ajoutée.

 

The Louvre Palace, on the Right Bank of the Seine in Paris, is a former royal palace situated between the Tuileries Gardens and the church of Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois. Its origins date back to the medieval period, and its present structure has evolved in stages since the 16th century. It was the actual seat of power in France until Louis XIV moved to Versailles in 1682, bringing the government with him. The Louvre remained the nominal, or formal, seat of government until the end of the Ancien Régime in 1789. Since then it has housed the celebrated Musée du Louvre as well as various government departments.

The current Louvre Palace is an almost rectangular structure, composed of the square Cour Carrée and two wings which wrap the Cour Napoléon to the north and south. In the heart of the complex is the Louvre Pyramid, above the visitors' centre. The museum is divided into three wings: the Sully Wing to the east, which contains the Cour Carrée and the oldest parts of the Louvre; the Richelieu Wing to the north; and the Denon Wing, which borders the Seine to the south.

In 1983, French President François Mitterrand proposed the Grand Louvre plan to renovate the building and move the Finance Ministry out, allowing displays throughout the building. American architect I. M. Pei was awarded the project and proposed a modernist glass pyramid for the central courtyard. The pyramid and its underground lobby were inaugurated on 15 October 1988. Controversial at first, it has become an accepted Parisian architectural landmark. The second phase of the Grand Louvre plan, La Pyramide Inversée (The Inverted Pyramid), was completed in 1993. As of 2002, attendance had doubled since completion.

The Crystal Mosque or Masjid Kristal is a mosque in Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia. A grand structure made of steel, glass and crystal. The mosque is located at Islamic Heritage Park on the island of Wan Man. The mosque was constructed between 2006 and 2008. It was officially opened on 8 February 2008 by 13th Yang di-Pertuan Agong, Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin of Terengganu. It has the capacity to accommodate over 1,500 worshipers at a time. - From Wikipedia

 

© Copyright @ris_@bdullah  2014 | All rights reserved.

Do not use, copy or edit any of my materials without my written permission.

Would appreciate not having large/animated multi invite codes.

Taken on Canon 5D Mark II

Lens: 50mm 1.8

Iso 100

Long Exposure

 

© 2013 by Grey Fox Photography. All rights reserved. Use without permission is illegal. Contact me at Followthegreyfox@gmail.com If You Want To Use A Pic.

Took a few shots of a yoga movie playing in the window of a Lululemon store - before I went in shopping:)

A colour photo taken of a movie playing through a glass window. The Sepia tones and aging effect helped to mask the window reflections and glare.

The words at the bottom of the window say: "What pose would you love to learn? a master class to elevate your practice - details inside"

Abrázame

 

======= continuation from the poem before==============================

 

I'm lying on the carpet and reading up the ceiling,

wanting to drink a glass of lilac wine.

I don't drink and I don't want to get high...

because your face could go away...

 

sweet darling I am waiting

with a candle light and fragrant dry flowers,

when will you coming,

I am afraid that I will lose...

 

Here I am again,

thinking something that I shouldn't think

wanting something that I shouldn't want

Oh... I better drink all these desires in,

Oh where are you, answer me sweet darling..

 

Take my hand and lead me to your arms,

dance with waves on the floor of LOVE

 

Larose

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  

Sidewalk dining Philadelphia PA

-

Fujifilm X100S camera/lens

-

Nik for noise reduction and pre-sharpening

Photoshop with blended masked Impression and Glow layers for saturation and edge emphasis

Pixelmator to add SteamPunkBits2 texture, mirro, and blend it

LR5 for highlight adjustments

Regno Unito, Londra, The Shard, Inverno 2016

 

Lo Shard è un grattacielo di 72 piani a Londra progettato dall'architetto italiano Renzo Piano ed inaugurato il 5 luglio 2012. Con i suoi 309,6 metri di altezza, la Shard è l'edificio più alto dell'Unione europea. Si può raggiungere il 69esimo piano dove la vista di Londra si apre davanti a voi a360 gradi e fino a 64 km e dove il passato, il presente e il futuro della città saranno visibili e spiegati tramite display. Per la vista migliore in città si può salire al livello 72, a 244m, il livello più alto per il pubblico. Qua potrete apprezzare i suoni della città e, alzando gli occhi, vedrete i frammenti di vetro che formano la parte superiore di questo grattacielo che scompaiono verso il cielo.

 

The Shard is a 72-storey skyscraper in London from the italian architect Renzo Piano inaugurated on 5 July 2012. Standing 309.6 metres high, the Shard is the tallest building in the European Union. Then journey to Level 69 where the view is revealed and London opens out before you. Here, in the sky above London, you’ll experience an astonishing 360 degree, 64km (40mile) view over the city and beyond where the past, present and future of London will be unfurled beneath you, brought to life in multimedia displays.

For the best view in town, ascend to Level 72, at 244m, the highest public level of The Shard. You’ll be exposed to the elements with sounds of the city around you. Looking up, you’ll see the shards of glass that form the top of this skyscraper as they disappear upwards into the sky.

 

www.fotografik33.com

Le palais du Louvre est un ancien palais royal situé à Paris sur la rive droite de la Seine, entre le jardin des Tuileries et l'église Saint-Germain-l'Auxerrois. S'étendant sur une surface bâtie de plus de 135 000 m², le palais du Louvre est le plus grand palais européen, et le second plus grand bâtiment du continent après le Palais du Parlement roumain. Il abrite aujourd'hui l'un des plus riches musées d'art du monde : le Musée du Louvre.

La construction du Louvre est indissociable de l'histoire de la ville de Paris. Elle s'étend sur plus de 800 ans, bien que le plan général du palais ait été imaginé dès la Renaissance. Charles V y établit sa résidence, donnant au palais un statut qu'il a conservé jusqu'au règne de Louis XIV.

Avec 8,9 millions de visiteurs annuels en 2011, c'est le site culturel le plus visité en France devant la tour Eiffel, la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris étant en tête des monuments à l'accès libre avec 13,6 millions de visiteurs estimés.

De 1981 à 1999, le palais fait l'objet d'importants travaux de modernisation désignés sous le nom de Grand Louvre et entrant dans le cadre des « Grands Travaux » définis par le président de la République François Mitterrand. Ces aménagements consistant à rendre la totalité du palais à sa fonction de musée (jusqu'en 1989, une partie de celui-ci abritait également le ministère des Finances), sont caractérisés par la construction de la pyramide de verre (inaugurée le 30 mars 1989), située au milieu de la cour Napoléon, œuvre de l'architecte sino-américain Ieoh Ming Pei et qui mène à un grand hall d'accueil souterrain. Une copie en plomb de la Statue équestre de Louis XIV sous les traits de Marcus Curtius par Le Bernin et Girardon est alors ajoutée.

 

The Louvre Palace, on the Right Bank of the Seine in Paris, is a former royal palace situated between the Tuileries Gardens and the church of Saint-Germain l'Auxerrois. Its origins date back to the medieval period, and its present structure has evolved in stages since the 16th century. It was the actual seat of power in France until Louis XIV moved to Versailles in 1682, bringing the government with him. The Louvre remained the nominal, or formal, seat of government until the end of the Ancien Régime in 1789. Since then it has housed the celebrated Musée du Louvre as well as various government departments.

The current Louvre Palace is an almost rectangular structure, composed of the square Cour Carrée and two wings which wrap the Cour Napoléon to the north and south. In the heart of the complex is the Louvre Pyramid, above the visitors' centre. The museum is divided into three wings: the Sully Wing to the east, which contains the Cour Carrée and the oldest parts of the Louvre; the Richelieu Wing to the north; and the Denon Wing, which borders the Seine to the south.

In 1983, French President François Mitterrand proposed the Grand Louvre plan to renovate the building and move the Finance Ministry out, allowing displays throughout the building. American architect I. M. Pei was awarded the project and proposed a modernist glass pyramid for the central courtyard. The pyramid and its underground lobby were inaugurated on 15 October 1988. Controversial at first, it has become an accepted Parisian architectural landmark. The second phase of the Grand Louvre plan, La Pyramide Inversée (The Inverted Pyramid), was completed in 1993. As of 2002, attendance had doubled since completion.

a mirror reflection in the bay of Victoria BC...one at night and one by day...its like you can really see the garden undersea from above the water...how cool...

Light City Baltimore 2017 - Artists: OVO Collective

Belgium

With all apologies to Led Zeppelin, this is classic Central Oregon. This is probably the most well known abandoned homestead in the state, and likely the most photographed both during the day and at night. But that's because it's a really, really cool house that still shows off its distinctive Victorian architecture and shingle patterns.

 

I bet it would actually have been a decent place to live back in the day. It's beyond repair now, and serves as a fantastic reminder that commerce in Oregon was not nearly as concentrated in the metro area in the past. The land is still worked as vigorously as ever, but by fewer people, more machines and a growing number of computers. I'm not really a Luddite at all, but I like these images of the past, even if they are viewed through rose-coloured glasses. At any rate, though, you only have to take a look at the light pollution from The Dalles to realize what century it is.

 

Thanks for viewing!

I was standing about 10 feet back and did a little light painting to give the bottles some life. The window glass appears quite wavy and blurry. Nothing is straight here and no window pane is the same size too.

A mushroom trapped in glass. Here the third and favorite so far from my experiments in refractograms. What do you see let me know what you think. If you would like a print of any of my work just message me. dereklawrence138.myportfolio.com via 500px ift.tt/2muW0so

And another view of the Paul-Löbe-Haus in Berlin at night.

 

[ Visit me on Facebook ]

To take this picture, I set my camera on the table, pressed the shutter, then ran in front of it and used the flashlight on my phone to draw a heart. The bottom third of the photo is the glass table, which the light reflected off of, and I thought that it was an interesting reflection effect that looked cool.

 

I set the ISO at 800 because it was pretty dark (at night and all the lights were off), but I also had a pretty long exposure time of 6 seconds (I started with 10 but ended up going with 6 because I thought 10 put more of the emphasis on the background than on the heart I was drawing). I stopped down to f/5.6 to get a larger depth of field.

 

In post production, I reduced the exposure a little bit and cropped the picture in order to cut out some of the distracting stuff (namely, couches & such) in the background.

Given the success of this image, I would say the investment in the Nikkor 14-24mm lens is justified, really awesome glass.

night view. lighted fountain jets against the background of Bogdan Khmelnitsky Bridge in Moscow.

:copyright: All Rights Reserved

 

Vancouver's largest premier shopping mall. Approx.100 stores and shops, most located on an underground level.

Firelies darting,

Flashing through the air,

Find a big glass jar.

Catch them if ...

Lights of Lily Hotel (France)

This is from last night, too. I managed to include both Harbour Bridge and Opera House.

 

We just went for a drink after work. Just like 3 months ago. This time, instead of climbing up the bridge after 3 pints of beer, I went down to the water after drinking only 2 schooners (Aussie term for the large glass) of beer. After drinking, always works well.

 

From tomorrow night we have a big light show all in Sydney for 2 weeks. It was a quiet night yesterday before the big event and I quite liked the atmosphere.

 

From Kirribilli NSW Australia

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