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May Theme: "My Home Arizona" - "Web of Horrors" - Arizona Funnel-web Spider with prey

©R.C. Clark: Dancing Snake Nature Photography

All rights reserved - Rio Rico, AZ

#PeaceLoveConservation

This funnel web spider was waiting for prey and anxiously working its chelicerae. This was the day before a big change in the weather and a lot of wind and cold. I came back to the same spot the next day and the web and spider were gone. I lke the grittiness of this photo - that is courtesy of my flash batteries dying. I needed to push the ISO to still maintain sharpness with the wind and the spider's movements. HA 27 everyone!

This is a large, common funnel web spider in Taiwan, the size of the palm of your hand. I've found it hard to identify it from information online, but I think it is either Macrothele holsti or M. gigas.

I always thought these were wolf spiders. Though, the metaphor doesn't really hold up, unless you know of wolves that build a den for themselves and trap rabbits and gophers in a sticky web and then rush out of the den and bite the critters in the head.

 

Nay, this is a funnel-weaver spider, not to be confused with the funnel web spider, which apparently is an angry Australian animal. I swear, you people in Australia have a continent filled with angry, venomous beasts. All manner of crazy spiders and snakes. I'm surprised the wallabies don't have venom sacks and mandibles.

 

Anyway, these little funnel-weavers (or "grass spiders") are very shy. Reclusive, even though they're not recluses (whew). I had to sit there for a while just to get this shot.

 

A point of continuity -- this is the web two pics previous, the one with the glimmering dew all over it.

 

Peek-a-boo.

October 8, 2019

 

A large funnel web spider (Agelenidae) has made a comfy home in the hydrangeas. It's a perfect stealthy lair to catch unsuspecting little flies as they look for Autumn sweets on a dwindling numbers of attractive petals.

 

(An Arachtober spider submission #9 - 2019)

 

Brewster, Massachusetts

Cape Cod - USA

 

Photo by brucetopher

© Bruce Christopher 2018

All Rights Reserved

 

...always learning - critiques welcome.

Tools: Canon 7D & iPhone 6s.

No use without permission.

Please email for usage info.

 

Captured this Funnel Web Spider in the hedges at moms house. I took this with my 50 mm Macro Minolta lens. Spokane, WA.

Die Trichternetzspinne kommt im Großraum Sydney vor, nämlich von Newcastle im Norden bis Nowra im Süden und den Blue Mountains im Westen. Manche Trichterspinnenarten sind nur im Regenwald vorzufinden, andere gelangen auch in städtische Siedlungen. Auf der Partnersuche begeben sich die „Funnelwebs“ bis in Swimmingpools oder Häuser, wo sie sich bevorzugt in leeren Konservendosen und dunkler Kleidung verstecken.

 

Die gefährliche Spinne ähnelt in Größe und Statur der Vogelspinne, allerdings sind die Beine der Trichternetzspinne weniger behaart und laufen spitz zusammen. Auch der Körper erscheint fast haarlos und glänzt dunkel metallisch. Ohne Beine erreicht das Tier eine Länge von 1,50 bis 4,50 Zentimetern. Im Australia Reptile Park wird ein Gegengift hergestellt, das vor allem Kindern und alten Menschen das Leben retten kann. Bei einem Biss treten starke Schmerzen, Erbrechen oder Atemnot auf und auch Taubheitsgefühl oder Bewusstlosigkeit kann die Folge sein. Ein sofortiger Druckverband oberhalb der Wunde und ein rascher Transport ins Krankenhaus erhöhen die Chancen, den Biss zu überleben, um ein Vielfaches.

- - -

The funnel-web spider occurs in the greater Sydney area, namely from Newcastle in the north to Nowra in the south and the Blue Mountains in the west. Some funnel spider species can only be found in the rainforest, others also find their way into urban settlements. When looking for a partner, the “funnel webs” go to swimming pools or houses, where they prefer to hide in empty cans and dark clothing.

 

The dangerous spider is similar in size and stature to the tarantula, but the legs of the funnel-web spider are less hairy and taper to a point. The body also appears almost hairless and has a dark metallic sheen. Without legs, the animal reaches a length of 1.50 to 4.50 centimeters. An antidote is produced in Australia Reptile Park that can save the lives of children and the elderly in particular. A bite causes severe pain, vomiting or shortness of breath, and numbness or loss of consciousness can result. An immediate pressure bandage above the wound and rapid transport to the hospital increase the chances of surviving the bite many times over.

Blue Mountains funnel-web spider - Hadronyche versuta

 

Springwood - NSW

Australia

Australia's Red Back Spider is our 2nd most venomous spider although not aggressive, the 1st being the Funnel Web Spider, (we found 3 in an hour recently and they are aggressive) they are both very common. The Red Back is closely related to the Black Widow in the USA and the Katipo in New Zealand.

A frontal shot of the spider and the funnel web its guarding. You can see how its nestled nicely under the upper leaf - a pretty secure home.

 

Arachtober 31b

Funnel Web Spider - Agelenopsis

Coal Creek Trail

Lafayette, CO

A fun fact I discovered when identifying this spider. It's fast. So fast that it can run up to 1.73 feet (about half a mile) per second. That's mind-boggling. (As with all my work, constructive critique is welcome and faves are appreciated.)

A funnel web spider has a customer on the rim of his web.

talk about fast! Arizona funnel Web spider

funnel Web spider...waiting on dinner.

The spider, (family Agelenidae) hides inside the mouth of the funnel and waits for unsuspecting prey.

 

Pima County, Arizona.

We don't actually have any funnel web spiders in the UK. The Sydney Funnel-web Spider (Atrax robustus) and the Northern Funnel-web Spider (Hadronyche formidabilis) are both found on the other side of the planet in Australasia. However, that doesn't stop people's imaginations running wild when they see a funnel-shaped spider web in their garden hedge. (so what bit me on the ass last year is still a mystery!!!}....¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Lol!!!!

 

At this time of the year, the funnel webs in our gardens are normally the work of Labyrinth spiders. Labyrinths are common, shy little critters, and being a dull grey-brown colour they go largely unnoticed. It's only when they start building their webs that they draw attention to themselves.

 

At one end of the web there's a funnel shaped retreat. It's this funnel which can cause people to worry unnecessarily. In fact the web is really quite a magical piece of defensive architecture, designed to protect the spiders eggs.

 

¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪¸¸.•*¨*•♫♪❤❤

 

© All rights reserved Steve Fitch. Please do not use this image on websites, blogs or any other media without my explicit written permission.

Two funnel-web spiders, possibly Labyrinth spiders (Agelena labyrinthica)

Agelena is a genus of agelenid spiders that trap their prey by weaving entangling non-sticky funnel webs. The genus is limited to the Old world, where it occurs from Africa to Japan. (Wikipedia)

7 July 2018, Malvern & Brueton Park LNR, Solihull

" This is not a species that believes in tidying up the scraps of food after lunch.... just leaves them outside the front door :-) "

 

Thank you most kindly for stopping by to view my work.

If you find you have a few words to say about what I have done they will be much appreciated.

My best regards to you.... Martin

I have tried many times to get an image of a labyrinth spider and today the sun shone in the right place and the little fellah sat sunning itself. Many I know call these funnel-web spiders which thank goodness they are not because they are extremely poisonous. Labyrinth spiders are the nice UK variety.

I saw a web shining in the sun and figured, that must be a webworm colony. But now that we started the Web Wednesdays group, I decided to go shoot it. When I got close, a big funnel web spider came running out to see if I was edible. Thanks Ash and Conall for the idea of the new group leading me to find my first funnel web spider.

 

Bugguide doesn't have much on Funnel Weavers so the best I can ID is Agelenidae family.

Atracinae. Said to be the world’s deadliest spider!

 

This was found in my friends garden just up the road. My thanks to David Kemp for his help!

October 12, 2019

 

Interwoven strands of a funnel web spider are laden with raindrops from days of dreary weather - a natural intricate sculpture on a hydrangea flower.

 

Brewster, Massachusetts

Cape Cod - USA

 

Photo by brucetopher

© Bruce Christopher 2018

All Rights Reserved

 

...always learning - critiques welcome.

Tools: Canon 7D & iPhone 6s.

No use without permission.

Please email for usage info.

 

A Funnel Web Spider retreats to its lair. This one was near my home. Thanks again for inviting me to this group three years ago. This has been an amazing Arachtober and I've really enjoyed the amazing talent and variety of spiders this year.

 

Arachtober 31c

Funnel Web Spider - Agelenopsis

Bush Near My Home

Lafayette, CO

Is this the poisonous funnel Web spider? Appreciate comments from experts.

"I see YOU" - Arizona Funnel-web Spider

©R.C. Clark: Dancing Snake Nature Photography

All rights reserved

Tucson, AZ.

DancingSnakeNaturePhotography@Yahoo.Com

One Tree Hill. Thurrock.Essex. (commonly mistaken for the Funnel Web Spider because of its web shaped like a funnel. but found in Australia not the UK)

Atrax robustus -Sydney Funnel Web Spider, 7 x shot handheld focus stack shot with 5Dsr and EF 50mm f 1.8 on macro tubes.

Taken very late at night last summer using a macro bracket I made especially for night shooting. This is a mosquito with mites sitting on my basement bulkhead door, outside below my kitchen window. I was trying out the bracket using a pre-aimed LED flashlight as a focus-assist light, hunting for Nursery Web Spiders. There were loads of mosquitoes around, some landing and biting any time I remained still to pop off a shot at a spider. I was working under a security light and noticed one mosquito seemed to have a small pin-point of red on it, becoming visible when it turned a certain way. When It settled on the door I was able to examine it through the viewfinder and noticed it was carrying several mites. The lens I was using... a 105mm f/2.5 Nikkor, wasn't going to provide enough magnification so I hurried indoors to rig up something that would... an older 200mm Micro-Nikkor (1981). Fitting it with a 20x Nikon industrial "Profile-Projector" lens got me the magnification I wanted. I returned outside and found... nothing. The mosquito had flown and what might have been a decent shot flew away with it. A half hour later I was working with the 200mm / 20x lens set-up on a small funnel web spider and found the same mosquito had returned, settling on a different spot on the door. Popping off one shot spooked the mosquito, sending it and its mites off into the night.

 

This image required a significant amount of work to make it halfway presentable. In my haste to rig up the lens combination used, I had mounted the Profile-projector lens a bit "skewed". The 52mm empty filter ring I had fitted it with was made of a kind of very hard plastic, and as a result was slightly cross-threaded when I hurriedly screwed it onto the 200mm. The resulting image was soft and suffered from a heavy dose of chromatic aberration, making the pic nearly a "throw-away". A great deal of cloning and selective desaturation was needed to get it to where it is. The plastic ring was tossed and replaced with a metal one.

 

Nikon D40, 200mm f/4 Micro-Nikkor set at f22, focused at infinity, with a Nikon 20x "Profile-Projector" lens mounted on the 200mm. Speed 1/2000 sec. Lighting provided by an SB-23 Speedlight flashed through a "mini" diffuser made from the white plastic bowl that comes in a "Healthy Choice" frozen dinner.

 

DSC-3259

Technically not a funnel spider, though we call them that all the time. Funnel-web spiders: native to Australia, deadly and aggressive. These guys: currently native to just about every square inch of this part of Arizona, not dangerous at all, and super shy. You breathe, and they vanish into their funnels.

 

Taken at Boyce Thompson Arboretum.

Our yard is quite obviously a spider preserve. In particular, we are home to countless funnel web spiders (again, not the venomous funnel spiders). They love our fence and our planters like I love Thai food, which is to say considerably. So, anyway, whenever it rains or I use the hose or morning dew does what it do so well, the webs get sodden with many drops.

" This is not a species that believes in tidying up the scraps of food after lunch.... just leaves them outside the front door :-) "

 

Thank you most kindly for stopping by to view my work.

If you find you have a few words to say about what I have done they will be much appreciated.

My best regards to you.... Martin

"Funnel web spider" on gorse at Bedruthan Cornwall.

IDs please? Is it a labyrinth spider?

 

Encontrei essa belíssima e pequena aranha (20mm) repousando sobre uma folha praticamente imóvel e resolvi aplicar a técnica de empilhamento de foco (focus stacking). Foram feitas 25 fotografias mas por causa de alguns movimentos feitos pela aranha fui obrigado à descartar 4 cliques, felizmente o resultado não ficou comprometido.

 

Just behind this beauty is her cave in this leaf. Moments later she shot back in there. I'm pretty sure this is a funnel web spider. It was about medium sized - larger than an orb weaver.

With prey....Lake Katherine

Easy to identify by their funnel web. These little hunters are meek and non-aggressive and help control the populations of the many species they consume. Their eggs and young, often are eaten by other predators. The funnel not only enables these spiders to surprise their prey but also helps them hide from their many predators. Spiders prey on numerous insects that are pests to humans so please don't kill them.

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Labyrinth or Funnel-web Spider (Agelena labyrinthica)

Cold Blooded October...Arizona Funnel-web Spider

©R.C. Clark: Dancing Snake Nature Photography

All rights reserved

West Tucson, AZ

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