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GOLD AT THE FREEWAY'S END

The Hollywood Freeway is one of the principal freeways of Los Angeles, California (the boundaries of which it does not leave) and one of the busiest in the United States. It is the principal route through the Cahuenga Pass, the primary shortcut between the Los Angeles Basin and the San Fernando Valley. It is considered one of the most important freeways in the history of Los Angeles and instrumental in the development of the San Fernando Valley. It is the second oldest freeway in Los Angeles (after the Arroyo Seco Parkway). From its southern end at the East Los Angeles Interchange to its intersection with the Ventura Freeway in the southeastern San Fernando Valley (the Hollywood Split), it is signed as part of U.S. Route 101. It is then signed as State Route 170 north to its terminus at the Golden State Freeway (Interstate 5).

Plans for the Hollywood Freeway officially began in 1924 when Los Angeles voters approved a "stop-free express highway" between Downtown Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley. The first segment of the Hollywood Freeway built was a one and a half mile stretch through the Cahuenga Pass. That segment opened on June 15, 1940. It was then known as the "Cahuenga Pass Freeway." Pacific Electric Railway trolleys ran down the center of this freeway until 1952. The next section of the freeway that stretched from the San Fernando Valley to Downtown Los Angeles opened on April 16, 1954 at a cost of $55 million. The final section, north of the Ventura Freeway to the Golden State Freeway was completed in 1968.

A year after the Hollywood Freeway opened, it was used by an average of 183,000 vehicles a day, almost double the capacity it was designed to carry. Actor Bob Hope called it the "biggest parking lot in the world" in his routine.

The segment through Hollywood was the first to be built through a heavily populated area and requiring the moving or demolition of many buildings, including Rudolph Valentino's former home in Whitley Heights. The freeway was also designed to curve around KTTV Studios and Hollywood Presbyterian Church. Much of the rubble and debris from the buildings removed for the freeway's construction was dumped into Chávez Ravine, the current home to Dodger Stadium.

In 1967, the Hollywood Freeway was the first freeway in California that had ramp meters.

Near the Vermont Avenue exit, there's a seemingly over-wide center strip now filled with trees. This is where the never-built Beverly Hills Freeway was to merge with the Hollywood Freeway. Plans for the Beverly Hills Freeway were halted in the 1970s.

The Hollywood Freeway is an expansion of the original Cahuenga Parkway, a short six-lane freeway that ran through the Cahuenga Pass between Hollywood and Studio City. The Cahuenga Parkway featured Pacific Electric Railway "Red Car" tracks in its median, but by the 1950s these tracks were out of service due to radical reductions in Red Car service. The Pacific Electric right-of-way later accommodated an additional lane in each direction.

The second location of Los Angeles High School was in the path of the freeway. The school moved to its third and current location in 1917. The school buildings were converted into a school for boys with truancy problems until 1948, when it was demolished to make way for the freeway.

 

Just another day in Portland . . .

 

Yes... I added the jet in post processing . . .

If your into airplane window photos take a look at my others: www.flickr.com/photos/andygocher/sets/72157639839254326/

 

Take a look at my top 50 shots: www.flickr.com/photos/andygocher/sets/72157646224415497/

Light trails in evening peak hour traffic on Melbourne's Eastern Freeway, July 2015.

A double exposure made entirely 'in-camera' using WB and DR customization and s camera inversion technique. Made handheld without use of a tripod. Made in Killarney, Johannesbur,

The Hollywood Freeway is one of the principal freeways of Los Angeles, California (the boundaries of which it does not leave) and one of the busiest in the United States. It is the principal route through the Cahuenga Pass, the primary shortcut between the Los Angeles Basin and the San Fernando Valley. It is considered one of the most important freeways in the history of Los Angeles and instrumental in the development of the San Fernando Valley. It is the second oldest freeway in Los Angeles (after the Arroyo Seco Parkway). From its southern end at the East Los Angeles Interchange to its intersection with the Ventura Freeway in the southeastern San Fernando Valley (the Hollywood Split), it is signed as part of U.S. Route 101. It is then signed as State Route 170 north to its terminus at the Golden State Freeway (Interstate 5).

Plans for the Hollywood Freeway officially began in 1924 when Los Angeles voters approved a "stop-free express highway" between Downtown Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley. The first segment of the Hollywood Freeway built was a one and a half mile stretch through the Cahuenga Pass. That segment opened on June 15, 1940. It was then known as the "Cahuenga Pass Freeway." Pacific Electric Railway trolleys ran down the center of this freeway until 1952. The next section of the freeway that stretched from the San Fernando Valley to Downtown Los Angeles opened on April 16, 1954 at a cost of $55 million. The final section, north of the Ventura Freeway to the Golden State Freeway was completed in 1968.

A year after the Hollywood Freeway opened, it was used by an average of 183,000 vehicles a day, almost double the capacity it was designed to carry. Actor Bob Hope called it the "biggest parking lot in the world" in his routine.

The segment through Hollywood was the first to be built through a heavily populated area and requiring the moving or demolition of many buildings, including Rudolph Valentino's former home in Whitley Heights. The freeway was also designed to curve around KTTV Studios and Hollywood Presbyterian Church. Much of the rubble and debris from the buildings removed for the freeway's construction was dumped into Chávez Ravine, the current home to Dodger Stadium.

In 1967, the Hollywood Freeway was the first freeway in California that had ramp meters.

Near the Vermont Avenue exit, there's a seemingly over-wide center strip now filled with trees. This is where the never-built Beverly Hills Freeway was to merge with the Hollywood Freeway. Plans for the Beverly Hills Freeway were halted in the 1970s.

The Hollywood Freeway is an expansion of the original Cahuenga Parkway, a short six-lane freeway that ran through the Cahuenga Pass between Hollywood and Studio City. The Cahuenga Parkway featured Pacific Electric Railway "Red Car" tracks in its median, but by the 1950s these tracks were out of service due to radical reductions in Red Car service. The Pacific Electric right-of-way later accommodated an additional lane in each direction.

The second location of Los Angeles High School was in the path of the freeway. The school moved to its third and current location in 1917. The school buildings were converted into a school for boys with truancy problems until 1948, when it was demolished to make way for the freeway.

 

6th Street looking down on the 110 Freeway South

Downtown Los Angeles, CA

01-06-19

 

By 3pm, when I took this photo, I'd already photographed the skyline from Kenneth Hahn Recreation area, and walked around the canals of Venice, plus shot some vistas from the 70th floor of the Wilshire Grand (the second building from the left in this picture.)

 

One of my "destinations" were the bridges over the 110. I specifically wanted to get shots of the buildings with the freeway and clouds in the sky.

 

Of course by the time I got here, the clouds were almost gone, and ol' Mr. Sol decides to get center stage in my photo. I tried as much as I could to hide him with a palm tree.

 

Freeway at dusk, two-way traffic with light trails.

 

154/365

www.instagram.com/guasch_foto_grafic/

While crossing the boulevard I paused to catch the view. No cars, no buses only a fantastic vanishing point offering a photo-op!! Shot taken with the Lightroom app camera and processed with Lightroom.

Phoenix, Arizona

Stitched Panorama

 

Resolution: 20962 x 7312

153 Megapixels

 

FlickrFriday#Freeway

For years, five days a week I am for a two hours on this freeway. I know every hole on this road.

Have a great day and thank you for visiting.

Olympus XA3

Kodak Gold 200-1 5096

Have joined a camera club and this is taken at their long exposure tutorial.

seen from the car as we drive into Vancouver AGAIN :)

Eisenhower Expressway (I-290) in Oak Park Illinois

Mount Shasta over the I-5 freeway somewhere south of Yreka, California. This is from a bridge over the road, a freeway exit that serves only local roads.

 

The road photo means I will be traveling soon, it's only for one week, this time I will have a new laptop with me instead of the iPad, so I will be able to upload and participate along the way, unless the laptop or wifi sucks, or something goes wrong.

A close up of one of Dale Chihuly wonderful and amazing blown glass creations. This one is at the Palm Springs Art Museum. How it goes together is a creative maze indeed.

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FREEWAY is a Hopper Dredger that was built in 2015 and is sailing under the flag of Cyprus. Quoted from the Marine Traffic website

 

the richmond san rafael bridge - san quentin, california

Prints are now available here in a range of sizes and formats including:

 

- Matted Print

- Laminated Print

- Mounted Print

- Canvas Print

- Framed Print

Summer Vacation Photo Shoot

A freeway to nature and a free experience.

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