new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged fisheries+wharf

@Copyright Allison George. All Rights Reserved

Norwegian Fisheries Museum is a seaside warehouse from 1730, which has been used as a store for stockfish, cod liver oil, and much more.

 

There are a multitude of rooms, galleries and staircases, with log timber walls and sloping floors.

 

Here one can experience a Bergen stockfish warehouse in its original form, with many fine details. The exhibitions tells the story of the wharf around Sandvikstorget. The various rooms contain temporary exhibitions about notching and building handwork, wall paintings from the 1700s, and the goods that once were stored in the warehouse â stockfish and herring. Here you will also find an exhibition about the motor brand Sabb from Laksevåg in Bergen, the all-time bestseller in Norway.

 

Source:

fiskerimuseum.museumvest.no/en/

I am still unable to share the history of this vessel which has spent time under water and now sits waiting for what comes next. This is a 10 frame melded panorama in Lightroom which has been carefully edited to show what I 'saw' when framing the shots. via 500px ift.tt/2xibCGx

While enjoying the usual amazing sunset (next photo) at one of my favorites spots the other evening, I turned around and caught my shadow looming large on the door of the abandoned smoke house on the beach.

 

It's interesting that I've been coming to this deserted cove for years to enjoy the end of day and have rarely seen another person. A stretch of ocean front like this would be very prime real estate in most parts of North America. Not so in Nova Scotia or Newfoundland. After the inshore fishery collapsed, many shorelines are dotted with deserted flakes, wharves and fish plants like this one....shadows and ghosts of a once proud and thriving industry.

Looking East at sunset from my home in Tors Cove, NL.

 

Thanks for the Explore! This evening marked my 1 month wedding anniversary, but unfortunately my photog wife was away on business! The sun hadn't been seen for 3 days when the fog started to lift and catch amazing colour from horizon to horizon. Some locals are on what remains of our wharf splitting their fish after an evening on the recreational cod fishery.

 

ryanjmurphyphotography.com

 

Great Shiplock

  

The great lock, built between 1850-1854, connected the James River with the Richmond Docks, completing the James River and Kanawha Canal system that bypassed seven miles of falls and continued 197 miles through Virginia’s western mountain ranges. This park is the lowest of the historic Kanawha Canal locks.

 

The island is named for the early Episcopal chapel there, active prior to the 1741 founding of St. John’s Episcopal Church (north of here on Church Hill). For many years, when the island was lower in elevation, a good portion of it was often submerged and used as the Sandy Bar fishery. In the late 19th century, Mrs. Jane King’s Ice Co. warehouse and wharf were located at the upper end. The island’s most famous occupant was William R. Trigg’s shipyard, established at the turn of the 20th century. Trigg produced both naval and commercial vessels.

  

To me there is still a certain dignity that is exuded from this structure. I have a great deal of respect for it and of what it stands for. The traditional "stage" was the center of work in the inshore fishery once the fish came ashore. It would be interesting to listen to this old structure (in Goose Cove on the Northern Peninsula) talk if it could tell stories of by-gone years.

A collapsed, abandoned wharf and canopy in Stock Cove, Newfoundland. A sad commentary on a once thriving inshore fishery.

The Hundred Islands National Park (Pangasinan: Kapulo-puloan or Taytay-Bakes) is a national park in the Republic of the Philippines. The protected area is located in the city of Alaminos, in the province of Pangasinan in northern Philippines. The islands, totaling 124 at low tide and 123 at high tide, are scattered in Lingayen Gulf covering an area of 16.76 square kilometres (6.47 sq mi). Only three of them have been developed for tourism: Governor Island, Quezon Island, and Children's Island. The Lucap wharf in Alaminos, the entrance to the National Park, is about 240 kilometres (150 mi) north of Manila, the capital of the Philippines.

   

The national park was created by Presidential Proclamation No. 667, covering an area of 16.76 square kilometres (6.47 sq mi) and signed by President Manuel L. Quezon on January 18, 1940, for the benefit and enjoyment of the people of the Philippines and known as the Hundred Islands National Park (HINP). The Republic Act No. 3655 signed on June 22, 1962, created the Hundred Islands Conservation and Development Authority (HICDA), for the conservation, development and management of HINP. The park including Lucap Bay was transferred from HICDA to the Philippine Tourism Authority (PTA) by virtue of Section 35 of Presidential Decree No. 564

   

On April 27, 1982 under Proclamation No. 2183, the national park including Lucap Bay and its foreshore areas, beginning from Sitio Telbang to the east to Sitio Recudo to the west, were declared as a Tourist Zone and Marine Reserve under the control and administration of the PTA. Subsequently under the Presidential Proclamation No. 2237 enacted on November 6, 1982, the parcels of land reserve for the Marine Fisheries Multi-Purpose Farm (created under Proclamation No. 1282 of June 21, 1974) were withdrawn and were also placed under the control and supervision of the Tourism Authority for development purposes

 

The Executive Order No. 436 signed by President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo on June 21, 2005 transferred the administration, management, maintenance and operation of the whole Hundred Islands National Park (HINP), including all the activities, facilities and improvements thereafter, from the Philippine Tourism Authority (PTA) to the city government of Alaminos, Pangasinan in pursuit of Republic Act No. 7160, otherwise known as the Local Government Code of 1991, which encouraged the transfer of power and authority from the national government to local government units, in line with the government’s devolution program mandated by the Constitution.

  

Sjøhus, (sea houses, litterally translated) are industrial buildings from the times when boats were the only efficient way of transport. These cladded, timber frame buildings were used for all kinds of purposes connected to trade and fisheries on the Norwegian coast. The typical protruding part of the gable (vindehus) is protecting the hoist mechanism. Herring (sild) fisheries were so important for the earlier economic growth on the western coast it was the obvious choice for an advert on the wall.

This is one of innumerable snapshots, photos and images that have been taken by so many people at the extremely popular Peggy's Cove site in south western Nova Scotia. It is a tranquil, natural inlet located along the shoreline of St. Margaret's Bay. It has been somewhat minimally altered over time, especially at its entrance (to add protection from high surf and erosion). Notwithstanding the changes along its perimeter, it still retains much of its cultural and historic legacy and attraction. It is truly amazing how so many photographers and painters interpret and portray it. The cove shows many different facets throughout the day, during changes in time, light, tides, weather and seasons. Visitors and locals keep coming back over-and-over again. There are people that come to Peggy's during virtually ever day of the year. It is extremely popular and valuable to tourism and local businesses. There continues to be a small and active inshore fishery being carried out from the wharves, docks and moorings of Peggy's Cove.

New Bedford State Pier 3 Fisherman's Wharf

October 25th, 2014

 

On the right is one of Oceans Fleet's fishing vessels.

Some info on the company:

"From The Sea – Our Fleet

At the Dock

 

Our fleet usually has a crew of 5-7 fishermen including the captain and most work a “trip” of 7-9 days harvesting scallops. The long liners spend 7-10 days harvesting swordfish & tuna, and 2-4 days of harvesting for our lobster and crab vessels. Our fleet is constantly being maintained to have the latest safety equipment to ensure that out crew works in the safest environment. Our “sea” team consist of over 100 dedicated and experienced fishermen, most following in the footsteps of their fathers and grandfathers!

 

Our fleet has modern handling and storage facilities; in fact we outfitted our scallop shucking rooms with climate control to manage the heat of the long summer days, thus increasing the quality of the scallops.

 

Our fleet works in complete association with NOAA and the National Marine Fisheries harvest the catch in the required areas to ensure the future of this natural resource. We track our fleet from the moment they leave the dock to the moment they tie up on the return.

 

A number of our fleet is outfitted with freezers. These vessels hand shuck, grade and pack fresh scallops and immediately freeze them on the boat. Truly one of the best tasting scallops, we are able to offer traceability to the vessel, location and date of harvest.

 

F/V Freedom:

Year of Completion: 2000

Hauling Port: New Bedford, MA

Gross Tonnage: 114-GRT

Length: 64.7 ft Breadth: 26.0 ft

Draft Depth: 12.0 ft

Fishery Type: Scalloper Vessel’s Captain: Martin Harris

 

SOURCE: www.eatscallops.com/our_fleet/fv-freedom/

Great Shiplock

 

The great lock, built between 1850-1854, connected the James River with the Richmond Docks, completing the James River and Kanawha Canal system that bypassed seven miles of falls and continued 197 miles through Virginia’s western mountain ranges. This park is the lowest of the historic Kanawha Canal locks.

 

The island is named for the early Episcopal chapel there, active prior to the 1741 founding of St. John’s Episcopal Church (north of here on Church Hill). For many years, when the island was lower in elevation, a good portion of it was often submerged and used as the Sandy Bar fishery. In the late 19th century, Mrs. Jane King’s Ice Co. warehouse and wharf were located at the upper end. The island’s most famous occupant was William R. Trigg’s shipyard, established at the turn of the 20th century. Trigg produced both naval and commercial vessels.

  

((This picture shows the old train track that was used to transport supplies in this area when ships were being built.))

 

www.markcarmodyphotography.com/blog

 

King Edward Point (also known as KEP ) is the capital of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands with port facilities (wharf) on the northeastern coast of the island of South Georgia. It is sometimes confusedly referred to as Grytviken, which is the site of the disused whaling station, nearby at the head of King Edward Cove. Since 1909, KEP has been the residence of a British Magistrate administering the island. A series of civilian Marine Officers was appointed to carry out customs and fisheries duties for the South Georgia Government from 1991, and were billeted with the small garrison.

 

On 22 March 2001, the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) reopened the station on behalf of the Government of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands (GSGSSI). Most of the old, dilapidated (and arguably historic) buildings were destroyed to make way for new ones, with the exception of Discovery House (1925) and the Gaol (1912).

 

Grytviken (Swedish for "the Pot Bay") is a settlement named in 1902 by the Swedish surveyor Johan Gunnar Andersson who found old English try pots used to render seal oil at the site. It is the best harbour on the island, consisting of a bay (King Edward Cove) within a bay (Cumberland East Bay). The site is quite sheltered, provides a substantial area of flat land suitable for building, and has a good supply of fresh water. It is about 1,400km from the Falkland Islands.

 

Currently nine BAS personnel overwinter at the KEP station, rising to around 18 in summer. Two Government Officers plus partners are stationed on KEP, overlapping by about three months during the busy winter fishing season. Summer staff from the Museum at Grytviken are also accommodated at KEP.

 

The continued occupation of the station serves a political purpose as well: it helps to maintain British sovereignty against Argentina's claim for ownership of the territory.

 

The chief activities of the station are applied fisheries research on behalf of the GSGSSI, to assist its policies for sustainable management of the commercial fishery, and to provide logistic support for the Government Officer(s). (wikipedia)

 

KEP is in the foreground, where the buildings mark the British Antarctic Survey base, while Grytvikan whaling station is in the background. The steeple of the Whalers Church is visible over the buildings. The Boss's grave is out of picture on the left.

This photo was taken Tokyo Bay from a Toyomi fisheries wharf. The houseboat which goes into Tokyo Bay through the side of the Harumi wharf passed, and the lighting of the ship drew the aurora of reflected light on the sea surface.

 

豊海水産埠頭からの東京湾。晴海埠頭の横を通り東京湾に入る屋形船が目の前を通過して、船の照明が海面に反射光のオーロラを描いてくれました。

 

FUJIFILM X-T1

FUJIFILM XF10-24mm

Excerpt from www.historicplaces.ca:

 

Description of Historic Place

 

Ryan Premises National Historic Site of Canada is a cultural landscape associated with the fishery. It consists of domestic and commercial structures typical of a 19th-century Newfoundland mercantile complex in their original setting by the sea, adjacent to the intersection of Ryan’s Hill and Old Catalina Road, in Bonavista.

 

Heritage Value

 

Ryan Premises was designated a national historic site of Canada in 1987 because:

- it was the site which best combined thematic associations with Canada’s Atlantic fisheries with extant resources;

- the Ryans, whose headquarters it was, were deeply involved in the whole range of the fisheries over a long time period;

- the richness of the fisheries-related resources in the community of Bonavista contributes to its overwhelming sense of history.

 

The heritage value of Ryan Premises lies in its long association with the Atlantic fishery and in its related physical resources, including the buildings in their setting in the historic community of Bonavista. The Ryan’s company was established in Bonavista in 1857 as James Ryan. Over the years, the company expanded its activities to King’s Cove (1874, as James Ryan and Company) and Trinity (1906, as Ryan Brothers) to accommodate the Labrador fishery. The company continued to engage in the salt fishery until 1978. It is now operated as a historic site open to the public.

 

Character-Defining Elements

 

Key elements contributing to the heritage value of the site include:

- the setting of the complex in the historic town of Bonavista;

- the relationship of the built resources to each other and to the harbour;

- the profile and layout of the complex;

- the size and completeness of the complex as a typical Newfoundland mercantile outport fisheries station, particularly the diverse functions of the buildings including a Retail Shop, a Retail Store, Fish Store, Salt Store, Proprietor’s House, Carriage House, and Tenement House;

- the individual buildings with their rectangular massing, relatively large scale and pitched roofs, minimal detailing in response to functional requirements (varied only in the addition of a verandah and more elaborate chimney on the Proprietor’s House), use of traditional materials such as stone foundations, clapboard siding, shingle roofs, surviving evidence of their early interior layouts and original materials;

- the integrity, composition and presence of man-made landscape features and archaeological remnants such as garden remnants, fences, wharfs, cribbing, roads, pathways, and buildings like the fish flake, sawmill, barns, garage, telegraph office, powder magazine;

- the integrity, composition and presence of natural landscape features such as the pebble beach, the shore, indigenous vegetation;

- the integrity, composition and presence of moveable features associated with the complex including surviving domestic furnishings, retail merchandise, retail furnishings and equipment, fish processing equipment such as ropes, scales, weights, blocks, tools, fish bars and barrels;

- historic viewplanes between the buildings and to other buildings, remnants of buildings, structures and archaeological resources that once formed part of the complex such as the lumberyard area, remains of the cooperage, the land-side fish flake, from the complex to the sea and to sheds and other structures associated with the fishery.

PLEASE, no multi invitations or self promotion in your comments, THEY WILL BE DELETED. My photos are FREE for anyone to use, just give me credit and it would be nice if you let me know, thanks - NONE OF MY PICTURES ARE HDR.

 

This replica lighthouse is in the town of Pictou and modeled after the historic Caribou Lighthouse that once stood on a nearby point. It is the home of one of the largest collections of lighthouse information and memorabilia in Canada.

 

It is also the home of the Northumberland Fisheries Museum. Contains the Irwin Collection of over 18,000 photos and 20 years of research and artifacts.

 

Atlantic Canada fishing boats.

為了保持身體的輕盈與暢快,最近要把一些累積已久的宿X,ㄜ,不對,庫存給排出來了~(掩面兼淚奔)~

 

看看,天氣會不會這樣就會好一點~(牽拖就是了)

 

Bali Ferry Vale, Tamsui & Bali, Taipei

新北市,淡水&八里,淡水河八里渡船頭~

 

無止盡的晨昏 Chapter VI 番外篇

 

Located next to the Left Bank Club in Bali, the Bali Yacht Wharf officially opened on 25 September 2005, and is the first of its kind in Taiwan. Occupying an area of 2,300 pings, the wharf will be combined with the Left Bank Club, the Suibizai Park and the Shisanhang Museum of Archeology to form the culture-based Bali Left Bank Cultural Belt.

 

As Taiwan's first wharf tailored for yachting, it is an ideal training venue for base-level yachters and a spot for displaying local features, thus promoting the yachting sport of New Taipei City, the water sports of Taiwan, and the new local features.

right on the border of tanzania, vanga is a different sort of fishing town with big boats, engines and a mainly deep sea fishery

Most of the boats have berthed and their catch unloaded. This one had just been given a wash. The stalls and crowd are behind me and to my right. This is a busy place from midnight until early morning.

#201001-33 ~ B l a c k m a g i c ~

PLEASE, NO invitations or self promotions, THEY WILL BE DELETED. My photos are FREE to use, just give me credit and it would be nice if you let me know, thanks.

 

Peggy's Cove is a small community located on the eastern shore of St. Margaret's Bay in Nova Scotia, which is famous for the Lighthouse (established 1868).

 

From its founding, the community's economy revolved around the fishery. However, tourism began to overtake fishing in economic importance following the Second World War. Today, Peggy's Cove is primarily a tourist attraction, although its inhabitants still fish for lobster, and the community maintains undeveloped appearance.

Dusk in Trinity Trinity has been a viable North Atlantic community for hundreds of years. Its defensible harbour, with abundant room for the ships of the day and shores well suited for outbuildings, wharves and fish-flakes, made it ideal for the early migratory fishery. Later, merchants from Poole, England, made Trinity the base for a new-world fishery.

 

During the 1720's Trinity was home to about 30 permanent families and host to 200-300 seasonal fishermen per year. By 1869, the population peaked at more than 800 people. Until recently, the inshore, Grand Bank and Labrador fisheries sustained the community. Lumbering, coopering, shipbuilding and other trades have been prominent. Historically, education was an important component of the community, with navigation and business education being taught at Trinity's Commercial School. Eventually, this school was merged with the grade school into a general High School. The teachers who taught in these schools included some of Newfoundland's leading educators and scholars.

 

The preservation of Trinity's cultural and built heritage has made it perhaps the most notable "heritage community" in the province. Sustainable growth in existing and new businesses, including theatre, is clearly evident as Trinitarians, along with residents of the surrounding communities, play host to thousands of visitors per year.

 

Trinity is centrally located and generally within an hour's drive of other points of interest on the Bonavista Peninsula. It is about 3 hours by road from the capital city, St. John's.

Sjøhus, (sea houses, litterally translated) are industrial buildings from the times when boats were the only efficient way of transport. These cladded, timber frame buildings were used for all kinds of purposes connected to trade and fisheries on the Norwegian coast. The typical protruding part of the gable (vindehus) is protecting the hoist mechanism. Herring (sild) fisheries were so important for the earlier economic growth on the western coast it was the obvious choice for an advert on the wall.

Newfoundland Trinity has been a viable North Atlantic community for hundreds of years. Its defensible harbour, with abundant room for the ships of the day and shores well suited for outbuildings, wharves and fish-flakes, made it ideal for the early migratory fishery. Later, merchants from Poole, England, made Trinity the base for a new-world fishery.

 

During the 1720's Trinity was home to about 30 permanent families and host to 200-300 seasonal fishermen per year. By 1869, the population peaked at more than 800 people. Until recently, the inshore, Grand Bank and Labrador fisheries sustained the community. Lumbering, coopering, shipbuilding and other trades have been prominent. Historically, education was an important component of the community, with navigation and business education being taught at Trinity's Commercial School. Eventually, this school was merged with the grade school into a general High School. The teachers who taught in these schools included some of Newfoundland's leading educators and scholars.

 

The preservation of Trinity's cultural and built heritage has made it perhaps the most notable "heritage community" in the province. Sustainable growth in existing and new businesses, including theatre, is clearly evident as Trinitarians, along with residents of the surrounding communities, play host to thousands of visitors per year.

 

Trinity is centrally located and generally within an hour's drive of other points of interest on the Bonavista Peninsula. It is about 3 hours by road from the capital city, St. John's.

Trinity has been a viable North Atlantic community for hundreds of years. Its defensible harbour, with abundant room for the ships of the day and shores well suited for outbuildings, wharves and fish-flakes, made it ideal for the early migratory fishery. Later, merchants from Poole, England, made Trinity the base for a new-world fishery.

 

During the 1720's Trinity was home to about 30 permanent families and host to 200-300 seasonal fishermen per year. By 1869, the population peaked at more than 800 people. Until recently, the inshore, Grand Bank and Labrador fisheries sustained the community. Lumbering, coopering, shipbuilding and other trades have been prominent. Historically, education was an important component of the community, with navigation and business education being taught at Trinity's Commercial School. Eventually, this school was merged with the grade school into a general High School. The teachers who taught in these schools included some of Newfoundland's leading educators and scholars.

 

The preservation of Trinity's cultural and built heritage has made it perhaps the most notable "heritage community" in the province. Sustainable growth in existing and new businesses, including theatre, is clearly evident as Trinitarians, along with residents of the surrounding communities, play host to thousands of visitors per year.

 

Trinity is centrally located and generally within an hour's drive of other points of interest on the Bonavista Peninsula. It is about 3 hours by road from the capital city, St. John's.

 

www.townoftrinity.com

Fireworks, to end off another wonderful festival! One thing I find difficult about where I took my fireworks photos is that the boat house in the front is on a slant, so it kind of still looks slanted to me, despite the rest of the harbour in the back being straight hahhah. Maybe it's just me, though.

 

Petty Harbour- Maddox Cove 4th Annual Arts and Heritage Festival.

PLEASE, NO invitations or self promotions, THEY WILL BE DELETED. My photos are FREE to use, just give me credit and it would be nice if you let me know, thanks.

 

Fishing boat, "Harbour Mist" sits at the wharf in Peggy's Cove.

 

Peggy's Cove is a small community located on the eastern shore of St. Margaret's Bay in Nova Scotia, which is famous for the Lighthouse (established 1868).

 

From its founding, the community's economy revolved around the fishery. However, tourism began to overtake fishing in economic importance following the Second World War. Today, Peggy's Cove is primarily a tourist attraction, although its inhabitants still fish for lobster, and the community maintains undeveloped appearance.

This DSLR version is actually less successful than the one I took with my iPhone 5. In-phone HDR + VSCOcam can make a pretty mean team, and Aperture's filters can sometimes leave one wanting.

 

In any case, this was a reasonably large series of wharves on the way to Cape Forchu, on the Yarmouth Bar that juts out ever so slightly into the Atlantic. As with all my other Yarmouth destinations that day, it was utterly overwhelmed by fog. I tried to make the best of it and, combined with B&W processing, I think some of them convey a mood.

Portugal, Algarve, Sotavento, Santa Luzia, Maintenance wharf, fishing boats, Sulcador, Bem Aenturada (slightly cut from T,R&B)

 

Shot at the ship maintenance wharf in delightful Santa Luzia, a freguesia of Tavira. It`s a fishing village bordering one of the elongated lagunes of the Ria Formosa. It specializes in octopus (polvo) and with good reason is known as "o capital do polvo" (the octopus capital) of the Sotavento.

 

On the FG is the 'Sulcador' We became first beware of this classic wooden fishing boat some fourteen years ago because she was laid up on the beach. Her propeller had snagged a long piece of rope and she just looked a little tired. But she wasn't used anymore, put on sale ('vende se') and slowly withered away. After some years she was hauled to the bone yard part of the local ship wharf. Typical for wrecks of wooden boats her deckhouse caved in first and after that her metal mast tumbled down. When she was moved again she lost her structural integrity. After that the process of disintegration continued steadily. What you see here is her broken stern and deck. On deck you can see a rusty part of the ship's steering apparatus.

 

Earlier captures (2012 and 2011) of the Sulcador are here and here.

 

In the BG on the other side of the conrcete slip way is the 'Bem Aventurado', she`s feautured in her old livery: here.

  

This Is shot is taken on the small crafts wharf on Change Islands NL, this would be the first time i had ever visited the island and it was a great experience and proved to be pretty educational, there is just 1 community on the island, which now contains about just 250 ppl, like a lot of Newfoundland communities in its heyday Change Island relied on Fishing for the vast majority of its local economy, unfortunately due to a terrible storm of circumstances the fishery as we all know is in hard shape, and this lovely island is suffering because of it, I just cant imagine, I had fish and chips at the one restaurant on the island, which was awesome by the way, and the lady that runs it was explaining to us that this year there was just 2 students graduaating, really pretty sad, and I thought this photo of the wharf so full on such a beautiful day at the end of June was a good testament to how much Newfoundland has changed, and in parts of Newfoundland like this one, the changes are certainly not for the better.

 

Change Islands Newfoundland, Pls View Large

It was such a perfect day to walk around town, thanks to my down jacket and warm boots.

 

Trinity has been a viable North Atlantic community for hundreds of years. Its defensible harbour, with abundant room for the ships of the day and shores well suited for outbuildings, wharves and fish-flakes, made it ideal for the early migratory fishery. Later, merchants from Poole, England, made Trinity the base for a new-world fishery.

 

During the 1720's Trinity was home to about 30 permanent families and host to 200-300 seasonal fishermen per year. By 1869, the population peaked at more than 800 people. Until recently, the inshore, Grand Bank and Labrador fisheries sustained the community. Lumbering, coopering, shipbuilding and other trades have been prominent. Historically, education was an important component of the community, with navigation and business education being taught at Trinity's Commercial School. Eventually, this school was merged with the grade school into a general High School. The teachers who taught in these schools included some of Newfoundland's leading educators and scholars.

 

The preservation of Trinity's cultural and built heritage has made it perhaps the most notable "heritage community" in the province. Sustainable growth in existing and new businesses, including theatre, is clearly evident as Trinitarians, along with residents of the surrounding communities, play host to thousands of visitors per year.

 

Trinity is centrally located and generally within an hour's drive of other points of interest on the Bonavista Peninsula. It is about 3 hours by road from the capital city, St. John's.

 

www.townoftrinity.com

Identifier: industrialhistor00boll

Title: Industrial history of the United States, from the earliest settlements to the present time: being a complete survey of American industries, embracing agriculture and horticulture; including the cultivation of cotton, tobacco, wheat; the raising of horses, neat-cattle, etc.; all the important manufactures, shipping and fisheries, railroads, mines and mining, and oil; also a history of the coal-miners and the Molly Maguires; banks, insurance, and commerce; trade-unions, strikes, and eight-hour movement; together with a description of Canadian industries

Year: 1878 (1870s)

Authors: Bolles, Albert Sidney, 1846-1939

Subjects: Industries Industries

Publisher: Norwich, Conn. : The Henry Bill pub. Company

Contributing Library: Harold B. Lee Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Brigham Young University

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

uld not be sustainedexcept by the extension of its lines to the West, it devoted a part of its earn-ings to building the Philadelphia and Erie Road, and the completion of variousbranch lines in the State which would bring traffic to the main stem. In 1869the company assumed control of the chain of roads constituting the Pittsburgh,Fort Wayne, and Chicago route to Chicago as lessee for nine hundred andninety-nine years. The same year it secured a line under its own control toCincinnati, Louisville, and St. Louis by lease. It leased the Northern Centralin 1870, thus gaining connections with Baltimore and with Canandaigua, N.Y.;and in 1871 it secured control of the united railroads of New Jersey, thusgetting a direct line to New York. The company now owns twenty-twobranches, and controls branches and extensions by lease. Its policy has beendictated by such sound judgment, that no part of this vast network of lines isa burden upon the company, or any thing except a useful tributary to its

 

Text Appearing After Image:

WATEU-TANK. eight miles of canal. Philadel-phia was unable to competewith New Yorks unbrokenroutes by rail and canal; and-accordingly a company wasformed to build a railroad fromHarrisburgh to Pittsburgh. In1857 the State sold its main lineof works to the PennsylvaniaRailroad Company for $7,500,-000 (they cost $12,000,000),and rail communication fromPhiladelphia to Pittsburgh thenbecame continuous and efficient.During the late war, the Penn-sylvania Road made enormousprofits ; and recognizing the fact OF THE UNITED STATES. 655 business. Its capital stock is now about $53,000,000, and its total liabilitiesabout $116,000,000. The company has a grain-elevator at Baltimore, two atPhiladelphia, and two at Erie, Penn.; and at New York it has millions ofdollars invested in wharves, warehouses, cattle-yards, oil-depots, and otherterminal facilities required by a large and varied commerce. Philadelphia isthe principal point of export, however, the company having established fromthat port a lin

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Trident Seafoods Plant, Guemes Channel. 4 image stack composite with a 30 second exposure time for each image.

"Standard Oil erected a dock and plant on Anacortes waterfront at 2nd and O Avenue in November 1909. The 2-17-1910 ANACORTES AMERICAN reported, "Selling 40,000 gallons oil a month. Standard Oil doing a tremendous business from recently erected plant. Dock and plant erected three months ago on waterfront between Curtis wharf and Robinson fisheries." Anacortes Museum

Four eastern-rigged side draggers are tied up at Fisherman's Wharf in Gloucester on a mid-August morning in 1982. The 48-foot Linda B. was built of wood in Quincy MA in 1949 and fished the inshore grounds . She's no longer fishing. The 66-foot Debbie Rose fished the middle grounds. This wooden vessel was built in 1941 in South Bristol ME. She was later sold down to New Bedford for scalloping. The wooden St. Mary was also built in South Bristol ME in 1951. This 56-foot vessel fished the inshore grounds and was later sold to a Boston fisherman. I have no write-up on the Sea Fox. From my photo taken with a 110 Rolli

PLEASE, NO invitations or self promotions, THEY WILL BE DELETED. My photos are FREE to use, just give me credit and it would be nice if you let me know, thanks.

 

Fishing boats tied up at the Fox Point wharf.

 

For over 100 years, Fox Point has been a fishing centre. Fox Point’s fishery was diverse, with catches of tuna, lobster, mackerel, haddock, cod and swordfish.

 

Today, Fox Point’s fishing fleet centers on the lobster, mackerel and tuna fisheries.

Trinity has been a viable North Atlantic community for hundreds of years. Its defensible harbour, with abundant room for the ships of the day and shores well suited for outbuildings, wharves and fish-flakes, made it ideal for the early migratory fishery. Later, merchants from Poole, England, made Trinity the base for a new-world fishery.

 

During the 1720's Trinity was home to about 30 permanent families and host to 200-300 seasonal fishermen per year. By 1869, the population peaked at more than 800 people. Until recently, the inshore, Grand Bank and Labrador fisheries sustained the community. Lumbering, coopering, shipbuilding and other trades have been prominent. Historically, education was an important component of the community, with navigation and business education being taught at Trinity's Commercial School. Eventually, this school was merged with the grade school into a general High School. The teachers who taught in these schools included some of Newfoundland's leading educators and scholars.

 

The preservation of Trinity's cultural and built heritage has made it perhaps the most notable "heritage community" in the province. Sustainable growth in existing and new businesses, including theatre, is clearly evident as Trinitarians, along with residents of the surrounding communities, play host to thousands of visitors per year.

 

Trinity is centrally located and generally within an hour's drive of other points of interest on the Bonavista Peninsula. It is about 3 hours by road from the capital city, St. John's.

Midnight.. deck hands at work on a fishing boat berthed at the Fisheries wharf, Kota Kinabalu.

 

#201008-23 ~Lightbox~

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 19 20