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Back to one of my favourite photo places after a long time and the clouds turned up to make the visit worth while :o)

 

Creator: Adler and Sullivan (Stock Exchange Building)

 

Description: Detail of the entrance arch of the Stock Exchange Building. The building, once located at 30 North LaSalle Street, was demolished in 1972. Its entrance arch was donated to The Art Institute of Chicago and is on display on its grounds.

Photograph credit: Brubaker, C. William, undated

 

Date: 1893-1894 (Stock Exchange Building)

Geographic coverage: Loop (Chicago, Ill.)

 

Collection: C. William Brubaker Collection (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Repository: University of Illinois at Chicago. Library. Special Collections Department

 

Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 801 South Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Phone: (312) 996-2742; email: lib-permissions@uic.edu.

File Name: bru001_12_gF.jpg

 

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_bru.php?CIS...

 

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

Local call number: DGM0029

  

Title: First National Bank in Key West

  

Date: April 1961

  

Physical descrip: 1 slide - col.

  

Series Title: Don and Gladys Marks Collection

  

Repository: State Library and Archives of Florida, 500 S. Bronough St., Tallahassee, FL 32399-0250 USA. Contact: 850.245.6700. Archives@dos.state.fl.us

  

Persistent URL: www.floridamemory.com/items/show/267889

 

Creator: Murphy/Jahn (Firm) (Chicago Board of Trade addition)

 

Description: Undated view of the atrium of the Chicago Board of Trade addition, with its elevator.

Photograph credit: Brubaker, C. William

 

Date: 1980-1983 (Chicago Board of Trade addition)

Geographic coverage: Loop (Chicago, Ill.)

 

Collection: C. William Brubaker Collection (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Repository: University of Illinois at Chicago. Library. Special Collections Department

 

Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 801 South Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Phone: (312) 996-2742; email: lib-permissions@uic.edu.

File Name: bru003_07_hF.jp2

 

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_bru.php?CIS...

Please click here to view this large!

 

This picture was shot on a tripod with three exposures (-2..0..+2 EV). I used Photomatix to create the HDR with tone mapping and detail enhanced. I increased the overall saturation with Hue/Saturation in Photoshop. Curve adjustment to increase the overall contrast. 1 layer mask in soft light mode at 50% gray, using brush tool to lighten and darken some areas of the image, to bring out details. Used Nik Sharpener Pro to sharpen image. Applied Photo Pop filter in Topaz Adjust and fade effect to 50%.

 

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The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

At the blue hour this place certainly looks extravagant in every aspect... The construction of ORQ was regarded as a major engineering and technical feat, given the constraints of the site and presence of a MRT line running beneath its North Tower. It was awarded the Building and Construction Authority's Design and Engineering Safety Excellence Award in May 2008.

 

In 2009, ORQ was also awarded the Green Mark Gold Award by the Building and Construction Authority for its sustainable features.

 

pp: Topazlab for contrast & colors. Stitch from 3 horizontal images with CS3

Special thanks to flickr buddie David Tan for assisting me on this with his Nikon D4.

It's my first test on a full frame to be honest I was blown away by the results...

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- The Treasury Department said Monday it had invested $15 billion in another seven banks, including two companies that recently completed large takeovers of other banks.

Under the $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program, Treasury has allocated $250 billion for capital investments in banks.

Treasury lends funds to banks in exchange for preferred shares, warrants, and high-paying dividends. The aim: to encourage strapped-for-cash financial institutions to lend more ... Read more...

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

This is the eastern end of 800 Bourke Street, the headquarters of the National Australia Bank (NAB).

 

This contemporary home to the bank's Australian head office is located on a prime, north-facing waterfront site in the Docklands Precinct in Melbourne. It incorporates key design elements of a modern workplace such as large open plan floors, open atria, operable windows, balconies, terraces, sunshades and extensive use of natural light.

 

The 58,800 square metre campus houses 3,500 office workers and 120 retail staff. It features eight retail shops and restaurants and parking for 426 cars. It was completed in 2004.

 

NAB is one of the four largest financial institutions in Australia in terms of market capitalisation and customers.

 

Although the tram stop in front of the building above is labelled "Bourke Street", this is actually on the Habour Esplanade. Bourke Street itself is off to the left of the image and runs at right angles to the Esplanade.

The Colac branch of the Union Bank of Australasia was built in the town's prominent high street shopping precinct at number 15 Murray Street. The Union Bank of Australasia was in good company, with other major banks just a short distance away.

 

Completed in 1916 at a cost of £2,689.00, the designer for the former Union Bank of Australasia building was the noted bank architect Walter Richmond Butler (1864 - 1949) who also designed matching bank premises in the Victorian country towns of Shepparton, Yarram and Toora, as well as a much grander example of a Union Bank in the Victorian village of Loch. Built of red brick, the architecture of the bank was given the term "Modernistic", as compared to contemporary Federation design in the prevailing Queen Anne style, it was very simple, uncluttered and modern in appearance. However Walter Richmond Bulter studied and trained in Arts and Crafts design, and you can see this clearly that this is the prevailing architectural style of the building. The former Union Bank of Australasia building is constructed of red brick, which was the most common building material used in Arts and Crafts design. The windows, which are simple and feature leadlight mullioned glass rather than stained glass are also typical of the Arts and Crafts movement, as is the stuccoed brick band that runs around the middle of the building like a girdle.

 

The former Union Bank of Australasia building was also home to the bank manager of the branch, who would have resided with his family on the upper floor of the bank. A central bay balcony (how enclosed) would have offered lovely views of the grand buildings on the other side of the road including the Shire Hall and Post Office.

 

Since its closure, the former Union Bank of Australasia has become an antique shop that runs a brisque trade in such a prominent locale.

 

Walter Richmond Butler was rightly considered an architect of great talent, and many of his clients were wealthy pastoralists and businessmen. His country-house designs include "Blackwood" (1891), near Penshurst, for R. B. Ritchie, "Wangarella" (1894), near Deniliquin, New South Wales, for Thomas Millear, and "Newminster Park" (1901), near Camperdown, for A. S. Chirnside. Equally distinguished large houses were designed for the Melbourne suburbs: "Warrawee" (1906), Toorak, for A. Rutter Clark; "Thanes" (1907), Kooyong, for F. Wallach; "Kamillaroi" (1907) for Baron Clive Baillieu, and extensions to "Edzell" (1917) for George Russell, both in St Georges Road, Toorak. These are all fine examples of picturesque gabled houses in the domestic revival genre. Butler was also involved with domestic designs using a modified classical vocabulary, as in his remodelling of "Billilla" (1905), Brighton, for W. Weatherley, which incorporates panels of flat-leafed foliage. His ardent admiration for R. N. Shaw is reflected in his eclectic works. Butler also regarded himself as a garden architect. As architect to the diocese of Melbourne from 1895, he designed the extensions to "Bishopscourt" (1902), East Melbourne. His other church work includes St Albans (1899), Armadale, the Wangaratta Cathedral (1907), and the colourful porch and tower to Christ Church (c.1910), Benalla. For the Union Bank of Australia he designed many branch banks and was also associated with several tall city buildings such as Collins House (1910) and the exceptionally fine Queensland Insurance Building (1911). For Dame Nellie Melba Butler designed the Italianate lodge and gatehouse at "Coombe Cottage" (1925) at Coldstream.

 

Located approximately 150 kilometres to the south-west of Melbourne, past Geelong is the small Western District city of Colac. The area was originally settled by Europeans in 1837 by pastoralist Hugh Murray. A small community sprung up on the southern shore of a large lake amid the volcanic plains. The community was proclaimed a town, Lake Colac, in 1848, named after the lake upon which it perches. The post office opened in 1848 as Lake Colac and was renamed Colac in 1854 when the city changed its name. The township grew over the years, its wealth generated by the booming grazing industries of the large estates of the Western District and the dairy industry that accompanied it. Colac has a long high street shopping precinct, several churches, botanic gardens, a Masonic hall and a smattering of large properties within its boundaries, showing the conspicuous wealth of the city. Today Colac is still a commercial centre for the agricultural district that surrounds it with a population of around 10,000 people. Although not strictly a tourist town, Colac has many beautiful surviving historical buildings or interest, tree lined streets. Colac is known as “the Gateway to the Otways” (a reference to the Otway Ranges and surrounding forest area that is located just to the south of the town).

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

1999 --- Open Cry Trading, Chicago Board of Trade by Mark McMahon --- Image by © Franklin McMahon/CORBIS

Creator: Adler and Sullivan (Stock Exchange Building)

 

Description: View of the rear of the Stock Exchange Building at 30 North LaSalle Street. The building was demolished in 1972.

Photograph credit: Brubaker, C. William, 1970

 

Date: 1893-1894 (Stock Exchange Building)

Geographic coverage: Loop (Chicago, Ill.)

 

Collection: C. William Brubaker Collection (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Repository: University of Illinois at Chicago. Library. Special Collections Department

 

Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 801 South Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Phone: (312) 996-2742; email: lib-permissions@uic.edu.

File Name: bru001_12_mF.jpg

 

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_bru.php?CIS...

 

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

Creator: Murphy/Jahn (Firm) (Chicago Board of Trade addition)

 

Description: Undated view of the atrium of the Chicago Board of Trade addition, showing John Warner Norton's Ceres mural which once decorated the trading room of the old building, now installed here on a steel framework.

Photograph credit: Brubaker, C. William

 

Date: 1980-1983 (Chicago Board of Trade addition)

Geographic coverage: Loop (Chicago, Ill.)

 

Collection: C. William Brubaker Collection (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Repository: University of Illinois at Chicago. Library. Special Collections Department

 

Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 801 South Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Phone: (312) 996-2742; email: lib-permissions@uic.edu.

File Name: bru003_07_iF.jp2

 

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_bru.php?CIS...

Creator: Adler and Sullivan (Stock Exchange Building)

 

Description: View of the entrance to the Stock Exchange Building at 30 North LaSalle Street in 1962. The building was demolished in 1972. The building's entrance arch was donated to The Art Institute of Chicago and is on display on its grounds.

Photograph credit: Brubaker, C. William, 1962

 

Date: 1893-1894 (Stock Exchange Building)

Geographic coverage: Loop (Chicago, Ill.)

 

Collection: C. William Brubaker Collection (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Repository: University of Illinois at Chicago. Library. Special Collections Department

 

Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 801 South Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Phone: (312) 996-2742; email: lib-permissions@uic.edu.

File Name: bru001_12_nF.jpg

 

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_bru.php?CIS...

 

The "Great Southern Advocate" reported on 6 March 1902 that the contract had been let for the construction of the Union Bank at Loch, and it is believed that the bank was completed later that year. The building was designed by the noted bank architect, Mr. Walter Richmond Butler (1864 – 1949), who also designed the former Union Bank at Toora in 1907. The former Union Bank is a characteristic and fine example of Butler's work and the progressive Federation design themes illustrate the different approach of Butler to contemporary design during that period, which contrasts starkly with the highly conservative designs of other banks constructed in the Shire of Worryal at the same time such as the former Colonial Bank in Mirboo North, built in Classical style in 1907, and the former Bank of Victoria (1906) in Toora.

 

The Union Bank first established an agency in Loch in 1900 and the opening of the Loch Butter

Factory that same year was probably a factor in the construction of the imposing new premises in

1902. The size and quality of the building reflected the significance of Loch as an important local commercial centre at that time. In 1953, the bank amalgamated with the Bank of Australasia to become the ANZ bank, which continued to operate at this branch until it was closed in 1979.

 

Historically, it is the oldest extant bank in the Shire. It demonstrates the early development of Loch as an important commercial centre as well as the development of banking in the region. Aesthetically, it is one of two banks designed by W. R. Butler, one of the notable bank architects of his time, which are the finest examples of their type and period within the Shire and demonstrate his skill as a designer. It is a local landmark in Loch and one of the most important elements of the historic Victoria Road streetscape.

 

The former Union Bank of Australasia is a two storey red brick structure with a transverse parapet gable roof. The residence is contained within the upper floor and a parallel single storey gable and skillion at the rear. It is set back from the front, but is built up to the side street with a wide garden area to the opposite side. The upper and lower floors are separated by a wide roughcast spandrel below the upper windows (now rendered smooth at the front). The façade is symmetrically arranged with a wide three centred arch window (now missing the original frames and sashes) on either side of the rendered central door panel on the ground floor and a pair of narrow double hung windows on either side of a central window in the upper. The eaves are projected over the upper floor further reducing its height. The wide central door panel is capped with ogee scrolled hood moulds contained within the rendered spandrel. It originally had a semi-circular arched entry with Lombardic moulds to a recessed porch. A large tabbed and corbelled brick chimney, with terra cotta pots, is located slightly to west of centre in the front plane of the roof. The end elevations with rendered bands at the upper level are articulated by a gable end octagonal pier extending above the parapet ridge and flanked by slotted louvre vents. A pair of symmetrical windows is located in each floor. The secondary rear gable is treated similarly but without the central pier and with only one central window. The two gable parapets and the parapet to the rear skillion are capped at their eaves levels with rendered spheres. At the east side, there is a projecting entry to the residence, built in, possibly in the interwar period.

 

Since its closure, the former Union Bank of Australasia has had many new guises including a fairies and crystals esoteric gift shop, a very up-market antique shop, a boutique bed and breakfast and an a la carte restaurant.

 

Walter Richmond Butler was rightly considered an architect of great talent, and many of his clients were wealthy pastoralists and businessmen. His country-house designs include Blackwood (1891), near Penshurst, for R. B. Ritchie, Wangarella (1894), near Deniliquin, New South Wales, for Thomas Millear, and Newminster Park (1901), near Camperdown, for A. S. Chirnside. Equally distinguished large houses were designed for the Melbourne suburbs: Warrawee (1906), Toorak, for A. Rutter Clark; Thanes (1907), Kooyong, for F. Wallach; Kamillaroi (1907) for Baron Clive Baillieu, and extensions to Edzell (1917) for George Russell, both in St Georges Road, Toorak. These are all fine examples of picturesque gabled houses in the domestic revival genre. Butler was also involved with domestic designs using a modified classical vocabulary, as in his remodelling of Billilla (1905), Brighton, for W. Weatherley, which incorporates panels of flat-leafed foliage. His ardent admiration for R. N. Shaw is reflected in his eclectic works. Butler also regarded himself as a garden architect. As architect to the diocese of Melbourne from 1895, he designed the extensions to Bishopscourt (1902), East Melbourne. His other church work includes St Albans (1899), Armadale, the Wangaratta Cathedral (1907), and the colourful porch and tower to Christ Church (c.1910), Benalla. For the Union Bank of Australia he designed many branch banks and was also associated with several tall city buildings such as Collins House (1910) and the exceptionally fine Queensland Insurance Building (1911). For Dame Nellie Melba Butler designed the Italianate lodge and gatehouse at Coombe Cottage (1925) at Coldstream.

 

Loch is a town in the South Gippsland region of Victoria, Australia which was established in 1876. The town was named in honour of the Governor of Victoria, Henry Loch. Loch was established with the coming of the steam railway that connected it with Melbourne. Early in Loch's development, the townspeople recognised the need for a local and accessible school to provide the fluctuating numbers of children with an elementary and socialising education. Petitions were sent to the Victorian Department of Education for this purpose and by 1889 the school had been constructed and a Head Teacher, Francis William Clarke, appointed. In many ways the history of this school and its teacher provide valuable information about living in what was then an isolated town, and the efforts of its residents to establish a sense of place and community. Today Loch has had a major makeover and is no longer the dairy and market hamlet as it used to be. Loch Village, as it is now known as, is the garden village of South Gippsland and is well known for its picturesque beauty and small village bucolic charm. It has a thriving craft community with cosy cafes, charming curio stores, antique shops and galleries. The township is set back from the highway amongst colourful cottage gardens that spill out cheekily onto the street.

The Colac branch of the Union Bank of Australasia was built in the town's prominent high street shopping precinct at number 15 Murray Street. The Union Bank of Australasia was in good company, with other major banks just a short distance away.

 

Completed in 1916 at a cost of £2,689.00, the designer for the former Union Bank of Australasia building was the noted bank architect Walter Richmond Butler (1864 - 1949) who also designed matching bank premises in the Victorian country towns of Shepparton, Yarram and Toora, as well as a much grander example of a Union Bank in the Victorian village of Loch. Built of red brick, the architecture of the bank was given the term "Modernistic", as compared to contemporary Federation design in the prevailing Queen Anne style, it was very simple, uncluttered and modern in appearance. However Walter Richmond Bulter studied and trained in Arts and Crafts design, and you can see this clearly that this is the prevailing architectural style of the building. The former Union Bank of Australasia building is constructed of red brick, which was the most common building material used in Arts and Crafts design. The windows, which are simple and feature leadlight mullioned glass rather than stained glass are also typical of the Arts and Crafts movement, as is the stuccoed brick band that runs around the middle of the building like a girdle.

 

The former Union Bank of Australasia building was also home to the bank manager of the branch, who would have resided with his family on the upper floor of the bank. A central bay balcony (how enclosed) would have offered lovely views of the grand buildings on the other side of the road including the Shire Hall and Post Office.

 

Since its closure, the former Union Bank of Australasia has become an antique shop that runs a brisque trade in such a prominent locale.

 

Walter Richmond Butler was rightly considered an architect of great talent, and many of his clients were wealthy pastoralists and businessmen. His country-house designs include "Blackwood" (1891), near Penshurst, for R. B. Ritchie, "Wangarella" (1894), near Deniliquin, New South Wales, for Thomas Millear, and "Newminster Park" (1901), near Camperdown, for A. S. Chirnside. Equally distinguished large houses were designed for the Melbourne suburbs: "Warrawee" (1906), Toorak, for A. Rutter Clark; "Thanes" (1907), Kooyong, for F. Wallach; "Kamillaroi" (1907) for Baron Clive Baillieu, and extensions to "Edzell" (1917) for George Russell, both in St Georges Road, Toorak. These are all fine examples of picturesque gabled houses in the domestic revival genre. Butler was also involved with domestic designs using a modified classical vocabulary, as in his remodelling of "Billilla" (1905), Brighton, for W. Weatherley, which incorporates panels of flat-leafed foliage. His ardent admiration for R. N. Shaw is reflected in his eclectic works. Butler also regarded himself as a garden architect. As architect to the diocese of Melbourne from 1895, he designed the extensions to "Bishopscourt" (1902), East Melbourne. His other church work includes St Albans (1899), Armadale, the Wangaratta Cathedral (1907), and the colourful porch and tower to Christ Church (c.1910), Benalla. For the Union Bank of Australia he designed many branch banks and was also associated with several tall city buildings such as Collins House (1910) and the exceptionally fine Queensland Insurance Building (1911). For Dame Nellie Melba Butler designed the Italianate lodge and gatehouse at "Coombe Cottage" (1925) at Coldstream.

 

Located approximately 150 kilometres to the south-west of Melbourne, past Geelong is the small Western District city of Colac. The area was originally settled by Europeans in 1837 by pastoralist Hugh Murray. A small community sprung up on the southern shore of a large lake amid the volcanic plains. The community was proclaimed a town, Lake Colac, in 1848, named after the lake upon which it perches. The post office opened in 1848 as Lake Colac and was renamed Colac in 1854 when the city changed its name. The township grew over the years, its wealth generated by the booming grazing industries of the large estates of the Western District and the dairy industry that accompanied it. Colac has a long high street shopping precinct, several churches, botanic gardens, a Masonic hall and a smattering of large properties within its boundaries, showing the conspicuous wealth of the city. Today Colac is still a commercial centre for the agricultural district that surrounds it with a population of around 10,000 people. Although not strictly a tourist town, Colac has many beautiful surviving historical buildings or interest, tree lined streets. Colac is known as “the Gateway to the Otways” (a reference to the Otway Ranges and surrounding forest area that is located just to the south of the town).

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The "Great Southern Advocate" reported on 6 March 1902 that the contract had been let for the construction of the Union Bank at Loch, and it is believed that the bank was completed later that year. The building was designed by the noted bank architect, Mr. Walter Richmond Butler (1864 – 1949), who also designed the former Union Bank at Toora in 1907. The former Union Bank is a characteristic and fine example of Butler's work and the progressive Federation design themes illustrate the different approach of Butler to contemporary design during that period, which contrasts starkly with the highly conservative designs of other banks constructed in the Shire of Worryal at the same time such as the former Colonial Bank in Mirboo North, built in Classical style in 1907, and the former Bank of Victoria (1906) in Toora.

 

The Union Bank first established an agency in Loch in 1900 and the opening of the Loch Butter

Factory that same year was probably a factor in the construction of the imposing new premises in

1902. The size and quality of the building reflected the significance of Loch as an important local commercial centre at that time. In 1953, the bank amalgamated with the Bank of Australasia to become the ANZ bank, which continued to operate at this branch until it was closed in 1979.

 

Historically, it is the oldest extant bank in the Shire. It demonstrates the early development of Loch as an important commercial centre as well as the development of banking in the region. Aesthetically, it is one of two banks designed by W. R. Butler, one of the notable bank architects of his time, which are the finest examples of their type and period within the Shire and demonstrate his skill as a designer. It is a local landmark in Loch and one of the most important elements of the historic Victoria Road streetscape.

 

The former Union Bank of Australasia is a two storey red brick structure with a transverse parapet gable roof. The residence is contained within the upper floor and a parallel single storey gable and skillion at the rear. It is set back from the front, but is built up to the side street with a wide garden area to the opposite side. The upper and lower floors are separated by a wide roughcast spandrel below the upper windows (now rendered smooth at the front). The façade is symmetrically arranged with a wide three centred arch window (now missing the original frames and sashes) on either side of the rendered central door panel on the ground floor and a pair of narrow double hung windows on either side of a central window in the upper. The eaves are projected over the upper floor further reducing its height. The wide central door panel is capped with ogee scrolled hood moulds contained within the rendered spandrel. It originally had a semi-circular arched entry with Lombardic moulds to a recessed porch. A large tabbed and corbelled brick chimney, with terra cotta pots, is located slightly to west of centre in the front plane of the roof. The end elevations with rendered bands at the upper level are articulated by a gable end octagonal pier extending above the parapet ridge and flanked by slotted louvre vents. A pair of symmetrical windows is located in each floor. The secondary rear gable is treated similarly but without the central pier and with only one central window. The two gable parapets and the parapet to the rear skillion are capped at their eaves levels with rendered spheres. At the east side, there is a projecting entry to the residence, built in, possibly in the interwar period.

 

Since its closure, the former Union Bank of Australasia has had many new guises including a fairies and crystals esoteric gift shop, a very up-market antique shop, a boutique bed and breakfast and an a la carte restaurant.

 

Walter Richmond Butler was rightly considered an architect of great talent, and many of his clients were wealthy pastoralists and businessmen. His country-house designs include Blackwood (1891), near Penshurst, for R. B. Ritchie, Wangarella (1894), near Deniliquin, New South Wales, for Thomas Millear, and Newminster Park (1901), near Camperdown, for A. S. Chirnside. Equally distinguished large houses were designed for the Melbourne suburbs: Warrawee (1906), Toorak, for A. Rutter Clark; Thanes (1907), Kooyong, for F. Wallach; Kamillaroi (1907) for Baron Clive Baillieu, and extensions to Edzell (1917) for George Russell, both in St Georges Road, Toorak. These are all fine examples of picturesque gabled houses in the domestic revival genre. Butler was also involved with domestic designs using a modified classical vocabulary, as in his remodelling of Billilla (1905), Brighton, for W. Weatherley, which incorporates panels of flat-leafed foliage. His ardent admiration for R. N. Shaw is reflected in his eclectic works. Butler also regarded himself as a garden architect. As architect to the diocese of Melbourne from 1895, he designed the extensions to Bishopscourt (1902), East Melbourne. His other church work includes St Albans (1899), Armadale, the Wangaratta Cathedral (1907), and the colourful porch and tower to Christ Church (c.1910), Benalla. For the Union Bank of Australia he designed many branch banks and was also associated with several tall city buildings such as Collins House (1910) and the exceptionally fine Queensland Insurance Building (1911). For Dame Nellie Melba Butler designed the Italianate lodge and gatehouse at Coombe Cottage (1925) at Coldstream.

 

Loch is a town in the South Gippsland region of Victoria, Australia which was established in 1876. The town was named in honour of the Governor of Victoria, Henry Loch. Loch was established with the coming of the steam railway that connected it with Melbourne. Early in Loch's development, the townspeople recognised the need for a local and accessible school to provide the fluctuating numbers of children with an elementary and socialising education. Petitions were sent to the Victorian Department of Education for this purpose and by 1889 the school had been constructed and a Head Teacher, Francis William Clarke, appointed. In many ways the history of this school and its teacher provide valuable information about living in what was then an isolated town, and the efforts of its residents to establish a sense of place and community. Today Loch has had a major makeover and is no longer the dairy and market hamlet as it used to be. Loch Village, as it is now known as, is the garden village of South Gippsland and is well known for its picturesque beauty and small village bucolic charm. It has a thriving craft community with cosy cafes, charming curio stores, antique shops and galleries. The township is set back from the highway amongst colourful cottage gardens that spill out cheekily onto the street.

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

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Creator: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (Harris Trust and Savings Bank)

 

Description: View looking up the side of the West Tower of the Harris Trust and Savings Bank. Located at 115 S. LaSalle Street, the building is the newest of three comprising the Harris Trust complex.

Photograph credit: Brubaker, C. William

 

Date: 1974

Geographic coverage: Loop (Chicago, Ill.)

 

Collection: C. William Brubaker Collection (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Repository: University of Illinois at Chicago. Library. Special Collections Department

 

Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 801 South Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Phone: (312) 996-2742; email: lib-permissions@uic.edu.

File Name: bru003_11_oF

 

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_bru.php?CIS...

Creator: Adler and Sullivan (Stock Exchange Building)

 

Description: View of the Stock Exchange Building at 30 North LaSalle Street. The building was demolished in 1972.

Photograph credit: Brubaker, C. William, c. 1962

 

Date: 1893-1894 (Stock Exchange Building)

Geographic coverage: Loop (Chicago, Ill.)

 

Collection: C. William Brubaker Collection (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Repository: University of Illinois at Chicago. Library. Special Collections Department

 

Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 801 South Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Phone: (312) 996-2742; email: lib-permissions@uic.edu.

File Name: bru001_12_jF.jpg

 

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_bru.php?CIS...

Cultural show at the 48th Annual Meeting's Opening Session. Monday, 4 May 2015.

 

Read more on:

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

Annual Meetings of the Board of Governors

The "Great Southern Advocate" reported on 6 March 1902 that the contract had been let for the construction of the Union Bank at Loch, and it is believed that the bank was completed later that year. The building was designed by the noted bank architect, Mr. Walter Richmond Butler (1864 – 1949), who also designed the former Union Bank at Toora in 1907. The former Union Bank is a characteristic and fine example of Butler's work and the progressive Federation design themes illustrate the different approach of Butler to contemporary design during that period, which contrasts starkly with the highly conservative designs of other banks constructed in the Shire of Worryal at the same time such as the former Colonial Bank in Mirboo North, built in Classical style in 1907, and the former Bank of Victoria (1906) in Toora.

 

The Union Bank first established an agency in Loch in 1900 and the opening of the Loch Butter

Factory that same year was probably a factor in the construction of the imposing new premises in

1902. The size and quality of the building reflected the significance of Loch as an important local commercial centre at that time. In 1953, the bank amalgamated with the Bank of Australasia to become the ANZ bank, which continued to operate at this branch until it was closed in 1979.

 

Historically, it is the oldest extant bank in the Shire. It demonstrates the early development of Loch as an important commercial centre as well as the development of banking in the region. Aesthetically, it is one of two banks designed by W. R. Butler, one of the notable bank architects of his time, which are the finest examples of their type and period within the Shire and demonstrate his skill as a designer. It is a local landmark in Loch and one of the most important elements of the historic Victoria Road streetscape.

 

The former Union Bank of Australasia is a two storey red brick structure with a transverse parapet gable roof. The residence is contained within the upper floor and a parallel single storey gable and skillion at the rear. It is set back from the front, but is built up to the side street with a wide garden area to the opposite side. The upper and lower floors are separated by a wide roughcast spandrel below the upper windows (now rendered smooth at the front). The façade is symmetrically arranged with a wide three centred arch window (now missing the original frames and sashes) on either side of the rendered central door panel on the ground floor and a pair of narrow double hung windows on either side of a central window in the upper. The eaves are projected over the upper floor further reducing its height. The wide central door panel is capped with ogee scrolled hood moulds contained within the rendered spandrel. It originally had a semi-circular arched entry with Lombardic moulds to a recessed porch. A large tabbed and corbelled brick chimney, with terra cotta pots, is located slightly to west of centre in the front plane of the roof. The end elevations with rendered bands at the upper level are articulated by a gable end octagonal pier extending above the parapet ridge and flanked by slotted louvre vents. A pair of symmetrical windows is located in each floor. The secondary rear gable is treated similarly but without the central pier and with only one central window. The two gable parapets and the parapet to the rear skillion are capped at their eaves levels with rendered spheres. At the east side, there is a projecting entry to the residence, built in, possibly in the interwar period.

 

Since its closure, the former Union Bank of Australasia has had many new guises including a fairies and crystals esoteric gift shop, a very up-market antique shop, a boutique bed and breakfast and an a la carte restaurant.

 

Walter Richmond Butler was rightly considered an architect of great talent, and many of his clients were wealthy pastoralists and businessmen. His country-house designs include Blackwood (1891), near Penshurst, for R. B. Ritchie, Wangarella (1894), near Deniliquin, New South Wales, for Thomas Millear, and Newminster Park (1901), near Camperdown, for A. S. Chirnside. Equally distinguished large houses were designed for the Melbourne suburbs: Warrawee (1906), Toorak, for A. Rutter Clark; Thanes (1907), Kooyong, for F. Wallach; Kamillaroi (1907) for Baron Clive Baillieu, and extensions to Edzell (1917) for George Russell, both in St Georges Road, Toorak. These are all fine examples of picturesque gabled houses in the domestic revival genre. Butler was also involved with domestic designs using a modified classical vocabulary, as in his remodelling of Billilla (1905), Brighton, for W. Weatherley, which incorporates panels of flat-leafed foliage. His ardent admiration for R. N. Shaw is reflected in his eclectic works. Butler also regarded himself as a garden architect. As architect to the diocese of Melbourne from 1895, he designed the extensions to Bishopscourt (1902), East Melbourne. His other church work includes St Albans (1899), Armadale, the Wangaratta Cathedral (1907), and the colourful porch and tower to Christ Church (c.1910), Benalla. For the Union Bank of Australia he designed many branch banks and was also associated with several tall city buildings such as Collins House (1910) and the exceptionally fine Queensland Insurance Building (1911). For Dame Nellie Melba Butler designed the Italianate lodge and gatehouse at Coombe Cottage (1925) at Coldstream.

 

Loch is a town in the South Gippsland region of Victoria, Australia which was established in 1876. The town was named in honour of the Governor of Victoria, Henry Loch. Loch was established with the coming of the steam railway that connected it with Melbourne. Early in Loch's development, the townspeople recognised the need for a local and accessible school to provide the fluctuating numbers of children with an elementary and socialising education. Petitions were sent to the Victorian Department of Education for this purpose and by 1889 the school had been constructed and a Head Teacher, Francis William Clarke, appointed. In many ways the history of this school and its teacher provide valuable information about living in what was then an isolated town, and the efforts of its residents to establish a sense of place and community. Today Loch has had a major makeover and is no longer the dairy and market hamlet as it used to be. Loch Village, as it is now known as, is the garden village of South Gippsland and is well known for its picturesque beauty and small village bucolic charm. It has a thriving craft community with cosy cafes, charming curio stores, antique shops and galleries. The township is set back from the highway amongst colourful cottage gardens that spill out cheekily onto the street.

The earliest National Bank of Australia in Colac established its premises in the town's main thoroughfare at 28 Murray Street in a two storey brick building erected in 1865 to a design by the architect, Leonard Terry. In 1886 the Leonard Terry bank was demolished to make way for the present two storey stucco and brick building which was completed in August 1887.

 

Designed by self-trained local Colac architect Alexander Hamilton (1825 - 1901), the current National Bank of Australia building is a good example of transitional boom Classicism architecture. Builders Taylor and Ellis of Ballarat erected the bank at a cost of £3,500.00. The building, which stands detached and complete like the nearby Colac Shire Hall has an iron palisade fence. The design, with rusticated ground floor facade, Corinthian porch, unusual enframed windows and pronounced parapet entablature, is illustrative of trends in bank architecture in the mid 1880s in Victoria and is one of Mr. Hamilton's most significant and scholarly works.

 

The bank has seen many uses over the years, and was at one stage in its life a gentleman's club for wealthy local landowners to socialise in. Today the National Bank of Australia has moved to more modern premises in Colac, but the building houses professional suites as befits a building which such a fine architectural pedigree.

 

Alexander Hamilton was born in Moffat, Scotland, but migrated to Australia in 1852. Originally based in Melbourne, he went to the Western District town of Mortlake before moving in 1871 to Colac where he was amongst other professions a millwright, builder and an architect. Alexander Hamilton really concentrated on his profession as an architect when he arrived in Colac and made his name in the area as a number of older homesteads and buildings in the district were built under his instruction and supervision. These include "Illewarra House" which was built for for John Calvert in 1873, "Tarndwarncoort" for Alexander Dennis in 1877 and "Talindert" for James Manifold in 1890. Mr. Hamilton also designed the Presbyterian manse in Colac in 1883 and the Bank of Australasia in Beeac in 1888.

 

Located approximately 150 kilometres to the south-west of Melbourne, past Geelong is the small Western District city of Colac. The area was originally settled by Europeans in 1837 by pastoralist Hugh Murray. A small community sprung up on the southern shore of a large lake amid the volcanic plains. The community was proclaimed a town, Lake Colac, in 1848, named after the lake upon which it perches. The post office opened in 1848 as Lake Colac and was renamed Colac in 1854 when the city changed its name. The township grew over the years, its wealth generated by the booming grazing industries of the large estates of the Western District and the dairy industry that accompanied it. Colac has a long high street shopping precinct, several churches, botanic gardens, a Masonic hall and a smattering of large properties within its boundaries, showing the conspicuous wealth of the city. Today Colac is still a commercial centre for the agricultural district that surrounds it with a population of around 10,000 people. Although not strictly a tourist town, Colac has many beautiful surviving historical buildings or interest, tree lined streets. Colac is known as “the Gateway to the Otways” (a reference to the Otway Ranges and surrounding forest area that is located just to the south of the town).

 

For some reason, I liked the shadows from the streetlights in this photo. It's right across from the Department of Treasury. Not sure if Secretary Geitner was in the office. Pictured above is one of the PNC Bank branches, located in the former headquarters of Riggs Bank, on Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C.

 

For more shots around DC, check out my set.

 

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The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

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“Thou shalt not wrest judgment; thou shalt not respect persons, neither take a gift: for a gift doth blind the eyes of the wise, and pervert the words of the righteous.”

—Deuteronomy 16:19 (KJV)

 

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

The "Great Southern Advocate" reported on 6 March 1902 that the contract had been let for the construction of the Union Bank at Loch, and it is believed that the bank was completed later that year. The building was designed by the noted bank architect, Mr. Walter Richmond Butler (1864 – 1949), who also designed the former Union Bank at Toora in 1907. The former Union Bank is a characteristic and fine example of Butler's work and the progressive Federation design themes illustrate the different approach of Butler to contemporary design during that period, which contrasts starkly with the highly conservative designs of other banks constructed in the Shire of Worryal at the same time such as the former Colonial Bank in Mirboo North, built in Classical style in 1907, and the former Bank of Victoria (1906) in Toora.

 

The Union Bank first established an agency in Loch in 1900 and the opening of the Loch Butter

Factory that same year was probably a factor in the construction of the imposing new premises in

1902. The size and quality of the building reflected the significance of Loch as an important local commercial centre at that time. In 1953, the bank amalgamated with the Bank of Australasia to become the ANZ bank, which continued to operate at this branch until it was closed in 1979.

 

Historically, it is the oldest extant bank in the Shire. It demonstrates the early development of Loch as an important commercial centre as well as the development of banking in the region. Aesthetically, it is one of two banks designed by W. R. Butler, one of the notable bank architects of his time, which are the finest examples of their type and period within the Shire and demonstrate his skill as a designer. It is a local landmark in Loch and one of the most important elements of the historic Victoria Road streetscape.

 

The former Union Bank of Australasia is a two storey red brick structure with a transverse parapet gable roof. The residence is contained within the upper floor and a parallel single storey gable and skillion at the rear. It is set back from the front, but is built up to the side street with a wide garden area to the opposite side. The upper and lower floors are separated by a wide roughcast spandrel below the upper windows (now rendered smooth at the front). The façade is symmetrically arranged with a wide three centred arch window (now missing the original frames and sashes) on either side of the rendered central door panel on the ground floor and a pair of narrow double hung windows on either side of a central window in the upper. The eaves are projected over the upper floor further reducing its height. The wide central door panel is capped with ogee scrolled hood moulds contained within the rendered spandrel. It originally had a semi-circular arched entry with Lombardic moulds to a recessed porch. A large tabbed and corbelled brick chimney, with terra cotta pots, is located slightly to west of centre in the front plane of the roof. The end elevations with rendered bands at the upper level are articulated by a gable end octagonal pier extending above the parapet ridge and flanked by slotted louvre vents. A pair of symmetrical windows is located in each floor. The secondary rear gable is treated similarly but without the central pier and with only one central window. The two gable parapets and the parapet to the rear skillion are capped at their eaves levels with rendered spheres. At the east side, there is a projecting entry to the residence, built in, possibly in the interwar period.

 

Since its closure, the former Union Bank of Australasia has had many new guises including a fairies and crystals esoteric gift shop, a very up-market antique shop, a boutique bed and breakfast and an a la carte restaurant.

 

Walter Richmond Butler was rightly considered an architect of great talent, and many of his clients were wealthy pastoralists and businessmen. His country-house designs include Blackwood (1891), near Penshurst, for R. B. Ritchie, Wangarella (1894), near Deniliquin, New South Wales, for Thomas Millear, and Newminster Park (1901), near Camperdown, for A. S. Chirnside. Equally distinguished large houses were designed for the Melbourne suburbs: Warrawee (1906), Toorak, for A. Rutter Clark; Thanes (1907), Kooyong, for F. Wallach; Kamillaroi (1907) for Baron Clive Baillieu, and extensions to Edzell (1917) for George Russell, both in St Georges Road, Toorak. These are all fine examples of picturesque gabled houses in the domestic revival genre. Butler was also involved with domestic designs using a modified classical vocabulary, as in his remodelling of Billilla (1905), Brighton, for W. Weatherley, which incorporates panels of flat-leafed foliage. His ardent admiration for R. N. Shaw is reflected in his eclectic works. Butler also regarded himself as a garden architect. As architect to the diocese of Melbourne from 1895, he designed the extensions to Bishopscourt (1902), East Melbourne. His other church work includes St Albans (1899), Armadale, the Wangaratta Cathedral (1907), and the colourful porch and tower to Christ Church (c.1910), Benalla. For the Union Bank of Australia he designed many branch banks and was also associated with several tall city buildings such as Collins House (1910) and the exceptionally fine Queensland Insurance Building (1911). For Dame Nellie Melba Butler designed the Italianate lodge and gatehouse at Coombe Cottage (1925) at Coldstream.

 

Loch is a town in the South Gippsland region of Victoria, Australia which was established in 1876. The town was named in honour of the Governor of Victoria, Henry Loch. Loch was established with the coming of the steam railway that connected it with Melbourne. Early in Loch's development, the townspeople recognised the need for a local and accessible school to provide the fluctuating numbers of children with an elementary and socialising education. Petitions were sent to the Victorian Department of Education for this purpose and by 1889 the school had been constructed and a Head Teacher, Francis William Clarke, appointed. In many ways the history of this school and its teacher provide valuable information about living in what was then an isolated town, and the efforts of its residents to establish a sense of place and community. Today Loch has had a major makeover and is no longer the dairy and market hamlet as it used to be. Loch Village, as it is now known as, is the garden village of South Gippsland and is well known for its picturesque beauty and small village bucolic charm. It has a thriving craft community with cosy cafes, charming curio stores, antique shops and galleries. The township is set back from the highway amongst colourful cottage gardens that spill out cheekily onto the street.

Creator: Adler and Sullivan (Stock Exchange Building)

 

Description: View of the rear of the Stock Exchange Building at 30 North LaSalle Street. The building was demolished in 1972.

Photograph credit: Brubaker, C. William, 1970

 

Date: 1893-1894 (Stock Exchange Building)

Geographic coverage: Loop (Chicago, Ill.)

 

Collection: C. William Brubaker Collection (University of Illinois at Chicago)

Repository: University of Illinois at Chicago. Library. Special Collections Department

 

Rights: This image may be used freely, with attribution, for research, study and educational purposes. For permission to publish, distribute, or use this image for any other purpose, please contact Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago Library, 801 South Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Phone: (312) 996-2742; email: lib-permissions@uic.edu.

File Name: bru001_12_kF.jpg

 

For more images from the collection, visit collections.carli.illinois.edu/cdm4/index_uic_bru.php?CIS...

The City of London is an area of London. In the medieval period it constituted most of London, but the conurbation has grown far beyond it. As the City's boundaries have remained almost unchanged since the Middle Ages, it is now only a tiny part of the metropolis, though it remains a notable part of central London, holds city status in its own right, and is a separate ceremonial county.

 

Visit my site to see my other images: www.DmiSmiPhoto.com

 

© DmiSmiPhoto - All Rights Reserved

International House of Cards --- Image by

This bank building built in Colac's premier thoroughfare, Murray Street, used to be the State Savings Bank of Victoria.

 

The State Savings Bank of Victoria has been built in the Classical Revival style which is derived from Italian palazzo design. The two storey building's ground floor is detailed in smooth rustication with voussoirs. The plain first floor is enlivened by aedicules using prominent pillar detailing and triangular pediments.

 

The State Savings Bank of Victoria has long since ceased operation, however the building is still used as a bank in Twenty-First Century Colac. Today it serves as the town's branch of the Rabobank.

 

The State Savings Bank of Victoria was established in 1842 and existed until 1990. A government controlled savings bank had been founded on 1 January 1842 as the Savings Bank of Port Philip. The independent Savings Banks developed over time from this original banking establishment and this development was recognised formerly in 1912. The bank was established as the State Savings Bank of Victoria. In 1980 its name was changed to the State Bank until its eventual sale and subsequent dissolution in 1990 when it was taken over by the Commonwealth Bank.

 

Located approximately 150 kilometres to the south-west of Melbourne, past Geelong is the small Western District city of Colac. The area was originally settled by Europeans in 1837 by pastoralist Hugh Murray. A small community sprung up on the southern shore of a large lake amid the volcanic plains. The community was proclaimed a town, Lake Colac, in 1848, named after the lake upon which it perches. The post office opened in 1848 as Lake Colac and was renamed Colac in 1854 when the city changed its name. The township grew over the years, its wealth generated by the booming grazing industries of the large estates of the Western District and the dairy industry that accompanied it. Colac has a long high street shopping precinct, several churches, botanic gardens, a Masonic hall and a smattering of large properties within its boundaries, showing the conspicuous wealth of the city. Today Colac is still a commercial centre for the agricultural district that surrounds it with a population of around 10,000 people. Although not strictly a tourist town, Colac has many beautiful surviving historical buildings or interest, tree lined streets. Colac is known as “the Gateway to the Otways” (a reference to the Otway Ranges and surrounding forest area that is located just to the south of the town).

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