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A semla or fastlagsbulle (Swedish), laskiaispulla (Finnish) or fastelavnsbolle (Danish and Norwegian) is a traditional pastry made in various forms in Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Sweden[1] and Norway associated with Lent

 

Explored, Feb 20, 2012

Today on Shrove Tuesday we in Sweden eat this buns.

I ate this yesterday - yum ♥

 

I hope you all are doing well, I'll be away for a couple of days (going on a short ski-vacation) - I will be back on monday. Have a lovely week and I'll see you soon :)

 

Read more about semla at Wikipedia

Our Semlor. (It's called semla in singularis and semlor in pluralis).

 

Swedish dish, traditionally served after the fasting time.

In modern times the time for eating this dish is more and more put forward in time, so nowadays it's possible to by it all year around in many pastry-shops, although people who bake them themselves

- like me - tend to keep this time to between christmas and easter.

 

The buns are made of wheat, with cardamon.

Cut the lid off, make a hollow out and use the left-over by mixing it with some milk and grated marzipan. Put the mix-up in the hollow out. Put whipped cream on top of the mix-up and put the lid on top.

 

Finnish it by pouring powder sugar through a sifter on top of the lid.

 

Furthermore the way of eating these buns are divided between eating them as they are or eating them in a bowl of hot milk - called "Hetvägg" in Swedish. (See here: www.flickr.com/photos/andersosterberg/6911182127/)

 

I personally prefer eating them with milk.

Today is called Shrove tuesday in Sweden and everybody eats Semlor, a bun that you cut of the top and then spread soft almondpaste over bun put on lot of wipped cream put back the top and decorate with powdersugar. It´s a custom since very long agoto eat semlor The Swedish king Adolf Frederik died 12 feb 1771 after eaten to much food and then semlor so they tried to forbid it because it murded a king but the custom was to precious for people .Today there will be sold over 2 million semlor in Sweden and many baked in homes and schools over the country.Some eat them in hot milk and then it´s called hotwall .Between beginnig ov January and easter there is eaten about 40 million semlor in Sweden.

A semla is a traditional pastry in Sweden, Norway and Finland and also in Estonia (as I just found out), associated with Lent and especially Shrove Tuesday. Nowadays, semlas are available in shops and bakeries every day from shortly after Christmas until Easter. Each Swede consumes on average five bakery-produced semlas each year, in addition to all those that are home-made... (the information is from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

=)

The name semla is a loan word from German Semmel which was the name used for the finest quality wheat flour or semolina.

 

The version sold in Danish and Icelandic bakeries on or around Shrove Monday is filled with whipped cream, a bit of jam and often with icing on top.

 

In the southernmost part of Sweden (Scania) and by the Swedish-speaking population in Finland, the pastries are known as fastlagsbulle, in Denmark and Norway they are known as fastelavnsbolle.

Semla

 

A semla or fastlagsbulle (Swedish), laskiaispulla (Finnish), vastlakukkel (Estonian) or fastelavnsbolle (Danish and Norwegian) is a traditional sweet roll made in various forms in Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Sweden and Norway associated with Lent and especially Shrove Monday and Shrove Tuesday.

 

The name semla (plural, semlor) is a loan word from German Semmel, originally deriving from the Latin semilia, which was the name used for the finest quality wheat flour or semolina. In the southernmost part of Sweden (Scania) and by the Swedish-speaking population in Finland, they are known as fastlagsbulle, in Denmark and Norway they are known as fastelavnsbolle (fastlagen and fastelavn being the equivalent of Shrovetide). In Scania, originally an Eastern Danish dialect, the feast is also called fastelann. In Finnish they are known as laskiaispulla, in Latvian as vēja kūkas, and in Estonian as vastlakukkel.

  

History of Semla

 

The semla was originally eaten only on Shrove Tuesday, as the last festive food before Lent. However, with the arrival of the Protestant Reformation, the Swedes stopped observing a strict fasting for Lent. The semla in its bowl of warm milk became a traditional dessert every Tuesday between Shrove Tuesday and Easter. Today, semlor are available in shops and bakeries every day from shortly after Christmas until Easter. Each Swede consumes on average five bakery-produced semlor each year, in addition to all those that are homemade.

 

King Adolf Frederick of Sweden died of digestion problems on February 12, 1771 after consuming a meal consisting of lobster, caviar, sauerkraut, smoked herring and champagne, which was topped off by fourteen helpings of hetvägg, the king's favorite dessert.

Äntligen semlor med nyvispad grädde:)

 

En semla, även kallad fastlagsbulle, fettisdagsbulle eller, i versionen med varm mjölk, även hetvägg, är ett slags bulle eller bakelse av ljust vetebröd med söt fyllning med mandelmassa och grädde.

Ordet semla var från början endast beteckningen på själva den ljusa vetebullen, utan fyllning (jfr tyskans Semmel).

  

One semla, also known as semla buns, fettisdagsbulle or, in the version with warm milk, even hetvagg, is a kind of bun or cake of light wheat bread with sweet filling with almond paste and cream.

The word semla was originally only the name of the very light wheat bun without filling (cf. German Semmel).

Semlan eaten from traditional Shrove Tuesday and throughout the fast until Easter. According to oral tradition came the modern semlan in that it was permissible to eat bread during the fast, but that you could provide it with hidden goodies in order to evade the rules. The word's original meaning, which provided only for wheat bun, proving perhaps that this is semlans origin.

Today begins the bakery made ​​buns sold shortly after Christmas (sometimes even before Christmas) and are available every day until Easter.

 

2014-03-12 Project Fika - sun is setting behind the Ãresund bridge in Malmö. Foto: Allan Bank / nYxfoto

Goda fastlagsbullar från Gunnars konditori, Miatorp.

The traditionalist in me told me not to buy this semla today, as it is way too early for that. Luckily I didn't listen to that voice.

  

Blogged.

Homebaked Semlor , we eat them on Tuesdays during Lent, the real Lent starts on March 4 this year, but I decided to cheat and eat them on Tuesdays in February too. It's a sweet wheat bun spiced with cardamom, filled with almond paste and whipped cream, and oversnowed with powder sugar. we eat them as dessert after a light meal of fish or soup. A tradition since at least the 18th century, but the present form with whipped cream was developed about 100 years ago. I make my own, because I like them small, and because most bakeries leave out cardamom these days, or use too little of it.

Traditional Swedish pastry

 

Fat Tuesday - and time for a "Fat Tuesday roll:" a sweet yeast-dough roll, filled with almond paste and whipped cream.

Swedish names: Fastlags bulle, fetttisdagsbulle, semla - and if you serve it with hot milk, it's a hetvägg (literally: hot wall!).

We eat lot of these today.

The very Swedish Fastlagsbulle / Semla. We are supposed to enjoy them starting Tuesday 16´th of February (Fettisdagen). But like everything else, people do cheat with the date. :-)

Robin fixade semlor till oss :)~

Also known as fastlagsbulle to my swedish relatives in Skåne, the Semla is the traditional pastry of Fat Tuesday in Sweden, marking the beginning of Lent. And I have one and I'm going to eat it now.

 

Lovely jam and cream filled bun, which are traditionally eaten in Finland and Sweden around Shrove Tuesday, February 2010. // Hillotäytteinen laskiaispulla, helmikuu 2010.

Our Semlor. (It's called semla in singularis and semlor in pluralis).

 

Swedish dish, traditionally served after the fasting time.

In modern times the time for eating this dish is more and more put forward in time, so nowadays it's possible to by it all year around in many pastry-shops, although people who bake them themselves

- like me - tend to keep this time to between christmas and easter.

 

The buns are made of wheat, with cardamon.

Cut the lid off, make a hollow out and use the left-over by mixing it with some milk and grated marzipan. Put the mix-up in the hollow out. Put whipped cream on top of the mix-up and put the lid on top.

 

Finnish it by pouring powder sugar through a sifter on top of the lid.

 

Furthermore the way of eating these buns are divided between eating them as they are or eating them in a bowl of hot milk - called "Hetvägg" in Swedish. (See here: www.flickr.com/photos/andersosterberg/6911182127/)

 

I personally prefer eating them with milk.

 

Se även osterbergsmat.blogspot.se/

For more photos of food, see osterbergsmat.blogspot.se/

They arrived 5 minutes ago. Today is the Swedish "fettisdagen" (Fat Tuesdaý) when we by tradition eat this cakes. They are consumed in large numbers today. These are payed for by our company.

This day relates to what is known in Sweden as "Fettisdag", the traditional day to eat the above pictured "Semla", consisting of a cardamom-spiced wheat bun which has its top cut off and insides scooped out, and is then filled with a mix of the scooped-out bread crumbs, milk and almond paste, topped with whipped cream.

A semla is a traditional pastry in Finland, Sweden,[1] Norway, Denmark and Estonia, associated with Lent and especially Shrove Tuesday. The name derives from the Latin semilia, which was the name used for the finest quality wheat flour or semolina. In the southernmost part of Sweden, Skåne and by the Swedish-speaking population in Finland, the pastries are known as fastlagsbulle, in Denmark they are known as fastelavnsbolle (fastlagen and fastelavn being the equivalent of shrovetide), and in Norway fastelavensbolle. In Finnish it is known as laskiaispulla, and in Estonian as vastlakukkel.

 

The oldest version of the semla was a plain bread bun, eaten in a bowl of warm milk. In Swedish this is known as hetvägg (literally meaning "hotwall") and originates from middle German hete Weggen (hot wedges) or heisse Wecken (hot buns).[2][3]

 

Today, the semla consists of a cardamon-spiced wheat bun which has its top cut off and insides scooped out, and is then filled with a mix of the scooped-out bread crumbs, milk and almond paste, topped with whipped cream. The cut-off top serves as a lid and is dusted with powdered sugar. Today it is often eaten on its own, with coffee or tea. Some people still eat it in a bowl of hot milk.

-from wikipedia

A semla is a traditional pastry in Finland, Sweden,[1] Norway, Denmark and Estonia, associated with Lent and especially Shrove Tuesday. The name derives from the Latin semilia, which was the name used for the finest quality wheat flour or semolina. In the southernmost part of Sweden, Skåne and by the Swedish-speaking population in Finland, the pastries are known as fastlagsbulle, in Denmark they are known as fastelavnsbolle (fastlagen and fastelavn being the equivalent of shrovetide), and in Norway fastelavensbolle. In Finnish it is known as laskiaispulla, and in Estonian as vastlakukkel.

 

The oldest version of the semla was a plain bread bun, eaten in a bowl of warm milk. In Swedish this is known as hetvägg (literally meaning "hotwall") and originates from middle German hete Weggen (hot wedges) or heisse Wecken (hot buns).[2][3]

 

Today, the semla consists of a cardamon-spiced wheat bun which has its top cut off and insides scooped out, and is then filled with a mix of the scooped-out bread crumbs, milk and almond paste, topped with whipped cream. The cut-off top serves as a lid and is dusted with powdered sugar. Today it is often eaten on its own, with coffee or tea. Some people still eat it in a bowl of hot milk.

 

-from wikipedia

i bought mini-semlor and ate with mia and kristian while talking about beeing in love.

En semla, även kallad fastlagsbulle, fettisdagsbulle eller hetvägg (då den serveras i ett fat med varm mjölk), är en slags bulle ellerbakelse av ljust vetebröd med söt fyllning med mandelmassa och grädde.

Semlan åts från början enbart på fettisdagen under påskfastan ("fastlagen") i större delen av landet. Senare, när svenskarnas intresse för fastan minskade, blev det tradition att äta den varje tisdag under fastans sju veckor. I dag börjar bageritillverkade semlor säljas strax efter jul (ibland till och med före jul) och finns tillgängliga varje dag fram till påsk.

A semla is a traditional pastry in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Estonia, associated with Lent and especially Shrove Tuesday. The name derives from the Latin semilia, which was the name used for the finest quality wheat flour. In the southernmost part of Sweden, Skåne and by the Swedish speaking population in Finland, they are known as fastlagsbulle and in Serbia they are known as fastelavnsbolle (fastlagen and fastelavn being the equivalent of shrovetide), and in the rest of Finland as laskiaispulla. In Estonia it is known as vastlakukkel. (Wikipedia)

 

A semla / fastlagsbulle (Swedish), laskiaispulla (Finnish) or fastelavnsbolle (Danish and Norwegian) is a traditional pastry made in various forms in Finland, Sweden,Latvia, Norway, Denmark and Estonia, associated with Lent and especially Shrove Monday or Shrove Tuesday

Today, semlas are available in shops and bakeries every day from shortly after Christmas until Easter. Each Swede consumes on average five bakery-produced semlas each year, in addition to all those that are homemade.

For the saffron dough:

 

50 g yeast (1,76 ounces)

150 g butter (5,5 ounces)

5 dl milk (17 fl ounces)

1 can (each containing 250 grams) smooth cottage cheese

2 package (each 0.5 g) saffron

1.5 dl granulated sugar 5 fl ounces

0.5 teaspoons salt (or not)

about 17 dl wheat flour (57 fl ounces)

 

open the bun up - fill it with a nice almost past (a spoonful) and add wipped cream.

 

Served as it is on the picture or with hot warm milk...it's the best.

Lovely jam and cream filled bun, which are traditionally eaten in Finland and Sweden around Shrove Tuesday, February 2010.

 

Here with the "cap" off.

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