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Great Jones St is a street in lower Manhattan's NoHo district,essentially known as 3rd St between Broadway and Bowery.The street was named after Samuel Jones,a lawyer who with Richard Varick,was credited for revising New York State's statutes.For that Jones is known as "The Father of the New York State Bar".Jones was a member of New York State Assembly from 1796 to 1799,and also served as the state's first Comptroller.Jones deeded the site of the street to the city on the stipulation that any street that ran through it would be named after him (how vain was he!).However,when the street was created in 1789 the city already had a Jones St in Greenwich Village named after Gardner Jones,Samuel's brother-in-law.So to not confuse the two streets Samuel Jones suggested that his be called (well) Greater Jones (and why not!).Another theory is that the street was called "Greater" because it was the wider of the two Jones streets.

We were told numerous times how it rained essentially every day in July. Clearly that was not the case in the days leading up to our tour, as the stream of dust from the tour buses clearly shows. I loved the variety of seasonal looks in this park, with fall here and wintery in the previous post below.

Wikipedia says:

Crab apples are essentially immature apples. ... Some apple trees were simply bred to produce larger fruit . A common misconception is that crab apples are toxic. This is not the case, as long as you don't eat the core and seeds, just like with bigger apples, they're perfectly edible:)

And I say:

They also have endless other benefits...food for bees and other insects, we plant for erosion control and did I mention how pretty they are?:) My garden is full of them - I raise them from cuttings and seeds whenever I can. Such a humble and non demanding little tree!

This is an essentially French style brought to Canada during the mid to late 19th century from the Second Empire in France of Napoléon III. The First Empire collapsed in 1815, the monarchy was then restored, and the Second Empire was led by Napoléon III, nephew of Napoléon I, from 1852 to 1870. This style is lavish, grand and complex. It enjoyed a huge success in large public buildings for a short while, then for reasons that are difficult to grasp, it went out of fashion. Sadly, many of the public buildings were demolished.

  

I stumbled into an article written by a Chinese scholar who has been living in America for forty years - it was in Chinese and this is essentially a machine translation :

 

I mentioned in my last article that Britain had dominated the world earlier than the United States by 100 years. But Britain has now outlived her ultimate prosperity being stagnant overall but nonetheless wealthy. On the other hand, the way United States took over the world's hegemony was more abrupt, and it's decline is so much faster. In terms of major social, political, and economic indicators, the degree of zombification and decay in US has left the United Kingdom way behind.

 

What I mean by zombification is particularly relevant in terms of vertical mobility as far as the whole economy is concerned. The chance of the children from the lower class getting into the middle class, with the middle class students merging with the elites are so slim. By elites, I am not referring to the cultural elites, either scholarly or ideologically, but the oligarchs who dominate and monopolize all the economic achievements, what the Americans call the "top 1% ". Ever since the late stage of Cold War, American society, which originally exemplify high vertical mobility, geared into a reversal. After the Cold War, this process continued to accelerate. Today, the United States is stuck with the lowest social mobility among the the advanced countries. To make things worse, not only is there a wide and deep divergence dividing the classes up, actually not only is the lower class but even the middle class are also being ransacked systemically, so that the gap is getting wider and wider. Say for instance, the median income as a whole in US has become basically stagnant for the past 30 years. And more than 90% of the economic growth in the period went into the pocket of the top 1%. Such phenomena also happened in the United Kingdom, but only to a lesser extent by far.

 

I have been saying for the last few years that such a change started in early 1970s when the American oligarchs pushed back against President Johnson ’s “Great Society" policies. Actually, there were three main axis:

 

1) Deteriorating quality of the public education has left the middle and lower class students with a higher hurdle when competing for university placement, so they are categorically excluded from the elite class. This problem comes not only from the lousy Libtard "education experts" but also through the encouragement and indulgence of the vested class both by means of propaganda and political shaping. The United Kingdom has at least recognized the severity and has set about making reforms; the United States is devoid of both the will and the capability to reform.

 

2) De-industrialization and financialization of the economy came just too rapid, making the transition of the middle class impossible. Financial sector is inherently disposed to monopolize the whole of market profits. Globalization has further promoted the outsourcing of manufacturing jobs, a great impetus to give up employment in lieu of higher profits. Under Liberal Economics-led policies, both countries are pushed to the extreme in the pursuit of forever higher return rate. Britain and US work from shoulder to shoulder in this respect. As such, the salaried class are left with no choice other than either unemployment or the impotence to demand any salary increase or both. Britain has at least universal health insurance and other welfare protections whereas the United States is somewhat inferior to the Third World countries in these aspects.

 

3) The rotting of the ruling class and the foolishness of voters from the lower and lower middle class complement each other, ensuring that any reforming force is "turned the other way round", cracking and deepening the division even further. I have already illustrated this process several times before logically and with supporting evidence, but the development of the past two years, and the retrogression especially after the election of President Trump ( such thing as tax cuts for the wealthy people), nonetheless is beyond the imagination of any people of the right mind. Such historic populism is phenomenal, it's a great leap forward from quantitative to qualitative change !

 

***

See w th your own Eyes How Viruses Spread in Air : you can jump in from min.2 onwards

www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WOiVqbWzIc&t=201s

 

Michelangeli plays Galuppi - Sonata

(1962)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRVg_qqcRSw

(? year )

www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDVEihRst1c

(1965, remastered)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=SraXVQRpIZg

 

Scarlatti by Clara Haskil

www.youtube.com/watch?v=277kOiSj8QQ

www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYX26WNq6w0

 

Erik Satie : Paris in Oil Paintings

www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fuIMye31Gw

 

The Basilica of the National Vow (Spanish: Basílica del Voto Nacional) is a Roman Catholic church located in the historic center of Quito, Ecuador.

 

It is the largest neo-Gothic basilica in the Americas.

  

***

 

Essentially the Basilica del Voto Nacional is an attraction in Quito, Ecuador, that has not yet been completed. If asked, locals will tell visitors about the legend that once construction on the Basilica del Voto Nacional is completed in full, it is believed that the world will come to an end. But after a hundred years of construction, the fact that it is technically incomplete is of no concern, as it is one of the most breathtaking structures in all Ecuador.

 

Constructed on San Juan Hill, the Basilica del Voto Nacional looms over the city and can be seen from anywhere in Quito. This breathtaking Catholic Church was the idea of Father Julio Maria Matovelle, and after years of persuasion, a design was commissioned from Emilio Tarlier, a French architect, who also oversaw construction. Inspired by a wonderful cathedral that was built in Bourges, Tarlier began drawing up the plans in 1890, which they alone took six years to complete. On 10 July 1892, construction work on the Basilica del Voto Nacional begun, to become the biggest gothic cathedral in Latin America.

 

The church structure is a hundred and fifty meters in length, thirty-five meters in height and thirty-five meters in width. The votive chapels are fifteen meters in height with the dome at seventy three-meters and the towers being more than a staggering seventy-eight meters. Some visitors, who are not afraid of heights, are welcome to climb all the way up onto the roof of the building to enjoy a hundred and seventeen meter panoramic view of the city below. For those who are not thrilled by the outlook of climbing hundreds of stairs will be relieved to know that there is a lift available inside the main church tower. On the outside of the church visitors will see a variety of gargoyles that have been created through inspiration found in the animals of Ecuador, featuring iguanas, tortoises and armadillos. Entrance fees to a few parts of the church is asked, but this gives visitors access to a large portion of the church, including the twenty four chapels, clock tower and bell tower. Refreshments can be enjoyed on the third floor of the church after exploring the beauty and magnificence of the Basilica del Voto Nacional.

  

***

  

In Quito, a full-length bronze monument was erected in García Moreno Square, which is located in front of the National Vow Basilica, built on the occasion of the consecration of Ecuador to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, which took place during his second presidency.

“Sensuality is the most expensive taste and luxury in the world.”

― Lebo Grand

 

Hair: Doux

Eye Accessory: Azoury

Necklace: Kibitz

Outfit: le fil casse

For an update:

I was going to go on, essentially, a camping trip this coming week, but that got cancelled due to the coronavirus...so, instead, since I decided to remain off RL work for the week anyway, maaaybe spousecakes and I may venture out of the house on a series of day trips around where we live--assuming anywhere is open and all.

 

Also, my 'S' key on my laptop is more than likely going out. It has a delay when you click it or it doesn't register at all sometimes--or it takes an extremely hard and held down push to make it go through (which is how I've had to type through all of this.)

 

And life is going but it's sort of dumb right now. To try and make myself feel better, I redesigned my avi again. xD

 

Maitreya can't do a 'plush' shape no matter what skin you put on--at least I think. Maybe at the right angle in the right picture it can look just so, but if I'm going to wear it for now then I'll just return to a shape similar to the one I had the first time I wore Maitreya.

 

For that, I thought about redoing a bit more than just the shape and skin. I really dig these ears and I love my horns, but I've also considered swapping those and adding neko or kitsune features instead. Not quite sure just yet!

 

Hopefully no one misses me too much! And I hope all of you stay safe! I'll be back at it with bringing you the best-of-me blog posts from all my lovely sponsors after the week's over!

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

For credits:

Hair: [monso] My Hair - Kula (Pop)

Bodysuit: Eliavah - Dragonsin Set (Roselia)

Skin: Enfer Sombre - Mika (Porcelain)

Eyes: {S0NG} - Orb Eyes (Gacha) (Honey)

Ears: CerbresXing - Withered Bezerker Ears

Ear Tats: Insomnia Angel - Tattoo Applier (Japanese Art)

Brows: Immortuos - Minima Brows

Lipstick: lychee - naberrie lipstick

Eyeshadow: Suicidal Unborn - E-Girl Eye Makeup

Nails: Avanti - Deja Nails

Pose: CowTea/Mewsery - Contagion

  

---- ̗̀Ϻomo ̖́-ღ

This is an essentially French style brought to Canada during the mid to late 19th century from the Second Empire in France of Napoléon III. The First Empire collapsed in 1815, the monarchy was then restored, and the Second Empire was led by Napoléon III, nephew of Napoléon I, from 1852 to 1870. This style is lavish, grand and complex. It enjoyed a huge success in large public buildings for a short while, then for reasons that are difficult to grasp, it went out of fashion. Sadly, many of the public buildings were demolished.

Essentially the saltwater fish of the bug world, leafhoppers are probably one of the most beautiful insects out there.

 

Blue green sharpshooter

Luzzus are essentially traditional Maltese fishing boats. They are typically painted in traditional bright colours including blue,

yellow, red and green. You can normally spot a rather large number of luzzus in Malta’s seaside villages.

There is quite a lot of superstition surrounding the luzzu, the most prominent of them all being the painted or engraved pair of eyes on the front of the boat. These eyes are believed to be a modern survival of an old Phoenician tradition, and are normally referred to as the Eye of Orisis, or the Eye of Horus – the Phoenicians’ god of protection from evil. They are a symbol of protection and good health, and are believed to protect the fishermen from any harm while they are out at sea.

In addition to this, luzzus are normally inherited from a person’s father and grandfather. However, although the exact colours of each luzzu vary from one another, the colours of each luzzu are normally kept exactly the same due to superstitious belief. Therefore, when the old paint is completely stripped off the boat every five years, in order for the fisherman to closely inspect his boat for anything that needs to be replaced, the boat is then re-painted in exactly the same colours that the person’s father and grandfather had used.

Part of the Donald Judd exhibit, MOMA, NYC. This artist essentially arranges boxes in space. In this case there was a row of evenly spaced dull metallic boxes evenly spaced across the space. Since the exhibit is very bare and simple I sought out something interesting in the room and found that the many lights in the ceiling were making interesting shadows on the floor. I particularly liked the effect between the boxes and with a careful frame to remove some of the geometry. I took this from above the boxes on an angle to get the area where ceiling and wall meet reflected. This blurred reflection effectively becomes the horizon of a landscape, and yet is divided by a modernistic shadow and light array that could represent sun rays. There is a three dimensional anomaly between the landscape which seems to be distant yet is also the closest box surface.

 

ODC Yes, we can

 

Freezing motion

There are essentially two ways to freeze motion with a camera:

1.Use a Fast Shutter Speed such that the “sliver of time” you are capturing is very short and the object being captured moves very little, if at all, during the extremely short duration the shutter is open, or

2.Use the very Short Duration of a Flash so that the object you are photographing gets illuminated for a very small sliver of time. The duration time of an electronic flash can be extremely short. For example, a Speedlight like the Canon 580EXII at 1/128 power is less than 1/19,000th of a second!

 

Hilarious... had a lot of fun with this. I tried without flash... dismal results, but not really the right lens for the job, so resorted to flash. Even then, focus was not that good but hey, I tried :-) Spent an hour at least... Remote control and tripod, plenty of timing issues... After a break, I tried again, with a helper dropping the pepper, better result...

 

This is the professional's version... improvephotography.com/49616/a-beginners-guide-to-high-sp...

 

Essentially all we have here is a slightly blurry shot of the moon haha but i kinda like it due to the fact that this was taken at about midnight (don't wonder anywhere when you cant see anything) in 100mph winds while throwing it down with rain maaahooosive Waves, no cable realese, an over sized camera raincoat on a 50mm 1.8.

even tho this is one of the only 'good' shots i got from the beach, still, one hell of a night :D

Eve though it's essentially a water level route, the hills in this area didn't give the railroad much room to move. Lots of curves and several grades are found throughout the line south of Canton. South of Beloit, Iowa, the D&I starts climbing upgrade with loads for Sioux City. The Big Sioux River is just out of the picture to the left.

Purple Hairstreaks are one of our commonest hairstreaks, but they are not easy to see and even less easy to photograph. That's because they are essentially a treetop butterfly that only occasionally ventures down to ground level. They occasionally visit flowers but usually obtain their sugary fuel from aphid honeydew on tree leaves. Another habit that makes them difficult to see is that they are most active in the evenings, and on sunny mornings, often sitting motionless during the day. And one final annoying habit they have, is being rather shy of opening up their wings to flash their purple. They usually keep their wings clamped tight, which makes any open-winged shot a real prize. I arrived at a local oak wood at 7am today and the Purple Hairstreaks were already flying in the morning sunshine. I saw a number of them, both flying and perched very high in the oak trees. But after about an hour two of them descended to eye level and allowed me to take a few photographs. This was in a sunny glade of oak trees not far from Penistone in South Yorkshire.

 

This is a male with an even purple sheen across all four wings. Females have a much more intense iridescent purple around the base of the forewings, that reminds me of a Cadbury's Milk Chocolate foil wrapper. The rest of the female's wings are blackish. I have posted one in the comments below for comparison.

 

The scientific generic name has changed about four or five times since I first learnt its scientific name about 45 years ago; Thecla, Quercusia, Zephyrus, Neozephyrus and currently Favonius. Thankfully its specific name quercus has remained unchanged since Linnaeus first named it in 1758. The name "quercus" was given to reflect this butterfly's foodplant Oaks (Quercus robur and Q. petraea). The current generic name Favonius was first given to an Eastern Palaearctic hairstreak Favonius orientalis. Favonius means pertaining to the west wind, and the adjective favonian means mild, referring to weather when the wind is in the west. A previous generic name Zephyrus is also a Greek name for the west wind.

14th June 2015 - Hispano HA-1112 MIL Buchon taxis in on arrival at the RAF Cosford airshow.

 

The following description is taken from 'The Aircraft Restoration Company' website.

 

The Buchon is essentially a Rolls-Royce Merlin-engined Messerschmitt Bf109. The Luftwaffe-manned Condor Legion left around 40 Bf109B/E’s for the Spanish Air Force to use upon its return to Germany in 1939. In 1943 the Spanish government agreed a licence production with Messerschmitt to produce 200 Bf109G’s. A total of 25 dismantled airframes were sent to Spain in 1943 as pattern aircraft Click here for a larger image... for future production, although engines, propellers, tailplanes and armament failed to arrive. As the war worsened, Germany was unable to supply the remaining components for the airframes, the technical drawings or appropriate jigs. By late 1944, when neither missing parts nor engine were available from Germany, Hispano Aviacion modified the airframes and tried two different engines, the second French built engine being the more successful. Improving relations between the Spanish government and the West from 1952 onwards, saw a more powerful engine sourced from Britain, the two-speed Rolls Royce Merlin 500-45. The combination of ex-German airframe and British powerplant was successful and the first prototype flew its maiden flight on 30 December 1954. This particular aircraft was given the construction number 223 when built by Hispano Aviacion in Seville in 1959. Its service history has yet to come to light but unit code 7-54 stamped into a panel on the wing indicates that the Buchon served with Ala 7 at Tablada and El Corpero, although it remains uncertain whether the aircraft saw combat in the Spanish Sahara.

This aircraft was one of 27 purchased at auction from the Spanish Air Force by Spitfire Productions for use in the making of the 1968 film “Battle of Britain”. Wing tips were squared off, tail struts added and dummy machine guns fitted to the wings to more visually represent the Messerschmitt BF109E of the Battle of Britain period. Filming started in Spain, but later the 17 airworthy aircraft were flown via France to Duxford, UK. Throughout the summer of 1968, the 17 Buchons, 2 Heinkel Bombers and 9 Spitfires engaged in mock dogfights above East Anglia and The Wash. Upon completion of filming, the aircraft were Click here for a larger image...returned to their owners or in the case of the Buchons put up for disposal.

 

By now registered as G-AWHK, this particular Buchon was one of eleven taken by Texan pilot and aircraft collector Wilson C “Connie” Edwards as payment for flying services during the filming. It was shipped to his ranch in Texas where it flew briefly as N9938 before being placed on static display in 1971 with the Confederate Air Force in Detroit. Acquired by the Old Flying Machine Company, it arrived at Duxford In May 1996,re-registered as G-BWUE and sold on to The Real Aircraft Company at Breighton in Yorkshire, who initiated a full rebuild to airworthy condition. The aircraft was marked up as Hauptmann Werner Schroer’s Bf 109G-2/trop ‘Red 1’, which he flew whilst serving on the Greek island of Rhodes in early 1943.

 

Purchased by Spitfire Ltd. in November 2006, G-BWUE moved back to Duxford to be maintained by the Aircraft Restoration Company. The aircraft appeared regularly at airshows in the UK and was also used during the filming of ‘Valkyrie’ starring Tom Cruise. Now owned by Historic Flying Ltd., G-BWUE has been assembled and painted as Messerschmitt ‘Yellow 10’ as seen in the Battle of Britain film.

"Essentially, perspective is a form of abstraction. It simplifies the relationship between eye, brain and object. It is an ideal view, imagined as being seen by a one-eyed, motionless person who is clearly detached from what he sees. It makes a God of the spectator, who becomes the person on whom the whole world converges, the Unmoved Onlooker."

— Robert Hughes

The long range forecasts for March are predicting essentially the early end of the Winter, with no more measurable snow falls to come this season. That being said, this will be one of the most memorable Winters for me after the three feet of snow that fell at the end of January.

 

A Union Pacific SD70ACe sits at the Goodhart Road crossing with snow packed onto its face and icicles hanging from the railings and frame. This was the Sunday night after the storm had ended, and The locomotive is off NS 12R, which is tied down back beyond the curve at Shippensburg Airport. The crew used the leader to get from their train up to the first road crossing that had been plowed out after the storm ended so they could make it home by van.

# continuing to delve into another discovered archive as promised ( these are more of my odd, multi-exposure Supersampler images)consisting of thousands of images that were essentially an aspect of self-prescribed grief (pseudo) therapy. I say pseudo because of it's longer term efficaciousness. I'd feel tremendous while shooting. In fact the year before last, I spent the entirety of Christmas Eve and Christmas Day on the roof, armed with multiple cams and plenty of Big Red (Christmas cheer in Texas). So at times, it seemed a bit more like escapism, because after a marathon photo session, I'd often feel, well, the same as I had previously. Allow me to state that these are purely subjective observations, and faint sketches at best. To be fair to my own version/adaptation of the art as therapy notion, overall it did help me. I had been severely agoraphobic, and it gave me a fixation/obsession (these have always been requisite to my functionality/survival anyway -- I must be fun to hang out with! ;), a reason to open the door, habitually monitoring the moon's whereabouts, scheduling my times, and shooting all phases. That's how it started for me, deciding that my lunar imagery up until that point was mediocre and that I knew if I spent enough time, I could extract more craterous detail, for instance, and quite simply be more capable of rendering La Luna's peculiar, unique beauty. I accomplished those objectives, and kept giving myself new assignments, solar photography being a favorite, one overlapping hard with science, what has always captivated (when I was very young, it was archaeology, always something, once again -- I went out to a UT excavation site when I was 11, amazingly cool, enlightening experience)! But I kept expanding, and please forgive/forget what I previously said about escapism. Actually, I needed that, and issuing a statement explaining that it saved my life..... that wouldn't be exaggeration, and was and remains true. Apologies for verbosity, but if anyone feels that sort of grief that itself kills, please find your thing and keep it with you. This is rather out of character for me, but finding this cache of images opened up something very dark again ,(spoken as a lover of Poe, that sort of dark, and worse) reminding me that grief is experienced differently by everyone, and mine s is still with me, it's seemingly intractable DNA mutations. People and the Pop culture are easily turned and likewise quite easily can become jaded. My example is the song "Everybody Hurts" that even some hardcore r.e.m. fans confided they were sick of hearing and everything to do with it. Sad. A simple, very beautiful part of the culture now, a piece of Michael Stipe and his kindness and essential decency, and a reason my Mom always wanted to write him a letter. She and her Mom were the most sincerely decent, good (I address this from a philosophy perspective, where her approach was religion) people I've ever known, and Mom saw something in Stipe, calling him "a very kind man." The lyric "don't throw your hand" really loomed large in meaning and significance each day before 0500, and still does. Thank you, Michael Stipe, and thank you, my Flickr community, especially if by some..... miracle you've read this far! Salud.

California Towhees are essentially large sparrows, with a sparrow’s short, rounded wings, long tail, and thick, seed-cracking beak – but towhees are larger and bulkier. The long tail and short wings can give this bird an ungainly look in flight.

Again a composition essentially of lines

in a way

when they dry up

autumn leaves show

all the light they collected

during the year

-

but again they need

the sun's light

to be able to do that.

 

Some souls

close to the end

of their journey,

begin to shine

through their eyes,

their words and deeds,

but also in their

silence.

 

where they came from

what sustained them

what they will be, and

what they essentially

Are -

becomes visible

perceptible

until they finally

become one

with the light

again.

 

<3<3<3<3<3<3<3<3<3<3<3<3<3<3

 

thank you all!! <3

Ancient Greek religion was essentially propitiatory in nature: i.e., based on the notion that to avoid misfortune, one must constantly seek the favour of the relevant gods by prayers, gifts and sacrifices. To the ancient Greek, every natural feature, e.g. hill, lake, stream or wood, was controlled by a god. Thus a person about to swim in a river, for example, would say a prayer to the river-god, or make an offering to that god's shrine, to avoid the chance of drowning. The gods were considered immortal, could change shape, become invisible and travel anywhere instantaneously. But in many other respects they were considered similar to humans. They shared the whole range of human emotions, both positive and negative. Thus, in their attitudes towards humans, they could be both benevolent and malicious. As humans also, they had family and clan hierarchies. They could even mate with humans, and produce demi-gods

Essentially the same as Winter :)

the harvested grain, the ripened apple, the grape in the wine press. Autumn is the bright leaf in the woodland, the opened husk on the bittersweet berry, the froth of asters at the roadside :-)

Hal Borland, "Autumn," September 1967

 

acer, Amur maple, 'Red Wing', j c raulston arboretum, ncsu, raleigh, north carolina

Displaying at Cosby Victory Show 2018 was this well preserved Bouchon.

Hispano HA-1112-M1L Buchon G-AWHM was produced by La Hispano Aviacion in the 1950’s and was essentially a Messerschmitt BF109G with a British Rolls Royce Merlin engine installed.

The Portara, or the Great Door, is essentially a massive marble doorway, that stands proudly as teh jewel of Naxos. It lies close to the port, on the islet of Palatia which was once a hill. Back in the ancient times a strip of land connected the north side of Naxos port to the islet of Palatia. Today, the strip of land has been replaced by a causeway. Myth has it that the islet of Palatia was exactly where Ariadne, the Minoan princess was abandoned by her lover, Theseus after he killed Minotaur on the island of Crete.

Today, for essentially economic reasons, we consider gold to be the most precious metal. However, in ancient Peru, gold and silver were equally important. Likewise, textiles and shells such as Spondylus enjoyed the same prestige. The clothing of the rulers of ancient Peru consisted of various ornaments made of metal, gold, silver, copper and copper alloys.

14th June 2015 - Hispano HA-1112 MIL Buchon taxis in on arrival at the RAF Cosford airshow.

 

The following description is taken from 'The Aircraft Restoration Company' website.

 

The Buchon is essentially a Rolls-Royce Merlin-engined Messerschmitt Bf109. The Luftwaffe-manned Condor Legion left around 40 Bf109B/E’s for the Spanish Air Force to use upon its return to Germany in 1939. In 1943 the Spanish government agreed a licence production with Messerschmitt to produce 200 Bf109G’s. A total of 25 dismantled airframes were sent to Spain in 1943 as pattern aircraft Click here for a larger image... for future production, although engines, propellers, tailplanes and armament failed to arrive. As the war worsened, Germany was unable to supply the remaining components for the airframes, the technical drawings or appropriate jigs. By late 1944, when neither missing parts nor engine were available from Germany, Hispano Aviacion modified the airframes and tried two different engines, the second French built engine being the more successful. Improving relations between the Spanish government and the West from 1952 onwards, saw a more powerful engine sourced from Britain, the two-speed Rolls Royce Merlin 500-45. The combination of ex-German airframe and British powerplant was successful and the first prototype flew its maiden flight on 30 December 1954. This particular aircraft was given the construction number 223 when built by Hispano Aviacion in Seville in 1959. Its service history has yet to come to light but unit code 7-54 stamped into a panel on the wing indicates that the Buchon served with Ala 7 at Tablada and El Corpero, although it remains uncertain whether the aircraft saw combat in the Spanish Sahara.

This aircraft was one of 27 purchased at auction from the Spanish Air Force by Spitfire Productions for use in the making of the 1968 film “Battle of Britain”. Wing tips were squared off, tail struts added and dummy machine guns fitted to the wings to more visually represent the Messerschmitt BF109E of the Battle of Britain period. Filming started in Spain, but later the 17 airworthy aircraft were flown via France to Duxford, UK. Throughout the summer of 1968, the 17 Buchons, 2 Heinkel Bombers and 9 Spitfires engaged in mock dogfights above East Anglia and The Wash. Upon completion of filming, the aircraft were Click here for a larger image...returned to their owners or in the case of the Buchons put up for disposal.

 

By now registered as G-AWHK, this particular Buchon was one of eleven taken by Texan pilot and aircraft collector Wilson C “Connie” Edwards as payment for flying services during the filming. It was shipped to his ranch in Texas where it flew briefly as N9938 before being placed on static display in 1971 with the Confederate Air Force in Detroit. Acquired by the Old Flying Machine Company, it arrived at Duxford In May 1996,re-registered as G-BWUE and sold on to The Real Aircraft Company at Breighton in Yorkshire, who initiated a full rebuild to airworthy condition. The aircraft was marked up as Hauptmann Werner Schroer’s Bf 109G-2/trop ‘Red 1’, which he flew whilst serving on the Greek island of Rhodes in early 1943.

 

Purchased by Spitfire Ltd. in November 2006, G-BWUE moved back to Duxford to be maintained by the Aircraft Restoration Company. The aircraft appeared regularly at airshows in the UK and was also used during the filming of ‘Valkyrie’ starring Tom Cruise. Now owned by Historic Flying Ltd., G-BWUE has been assembled and painted as Messerschmitt ‘Yellow 10’ as seen in the Battle of Britain film.

Essentially a photo of someone else's art, so I guess I'm taking the easy way out tonight. And isn't it interesting, if you dig a little, how every little thing you shoot has its own story? This is the (recently restored) Rice Memorial Fountain, in the rain, in idyllic West Brookfield; not too far from where I hang my hat. Charlie wanted to stop for a closer look, so we did.

 

I hope everyone has a great day. If it's raining in the morning I'll probably just go home to bed.

The rebuilding in the 12th century resulted, essentially, in the current cathedral. Around 1130, probably because of further damage to the building, Bishop Burchard II began the demolition of the church build by his predecessor Burchard I and the construction of a new church. The whole eastwerk with its towers and cupola were completed by him in the period up to c.1144. The nave and westwerk were erected between 1160 and 1181 by his successors, Conrad I and Conrad II. The latter consecrated it on 2 May 1181.

 

The cathedral has features of the late romanesque style, such as being completely vaulted and is decorated in line with Burgundian-Cistercian influence. Several religious buildings of the area are modelled on the cathedral's decoration, such that one can speak of a "Worms Style." Additionally, the elevation resembles the Imperial cathedrals in Speyer and Mainz. The gradual progress of the rebuild can be charted with dendrochronology. Lamps were donated for the west choir in 1172 and Bishop Conrad II was buried there in 1192. In former times, the Johanneskirche (Worms) [de] stood on the south side of the cathedral and served as its parish church and baptismal chapel, until it was demolished in 1812.

If you still think large European rivers are natural, well, think again... most of them have been essentially turned into canals. You regularly see this kind of barge keeping them orderly and well mannered, usually with an excavator armed with a shovel or some branch cutting contraption...

This was made with my first roll on a recently acquired Seagull 203. I got it off eBay for less than about 15 Euros, its nondescript condition probably scared of the competition. The poor thing was indeed in a sorry state. Shutter terminally stuck, everything covered in a sticky grime, rangefinder completely off... but hey, how often do you find a coupled MF rangefinder for cheap? I thought I had fixed it until I realized at the end of the roll that I am missing the button to pull out the peg that holds the exposed film spool. And it needs to be attached with a nonstandard screw somewhere between M2 and M3. Still figuring out how to fix that. It's a decent folder, the possibility of choosing between 6x6 and 645 is a nice plus, the Chinese characters on it look real neat (my Chinese colleagues tell me they literally stand for "Sea" and "Gull"), but it's nowhere close to the feeling of quality the Perkeo oozes. The viewfinder's framing is rather approximative, and the way the way the shutter button gets blocked as soon as you move the rewind lever ever so slightly is rather annoying. Bottom line? I'm quite happy I got it.

 

Seagull 203, Ilford FP4 Plus developped in Rodinal 1+100 for over an hour at warm room temperature (forgot about that, it was actually stand developped!) and digitalized using kit zoom and extension tubes.

 

Thank you everyone for your visits, faves and comments, they are always appreciated :)

UP 6813 leads the CCKSH north in Grafton, WI, approaching a small dip in the track. The Shoreline Sub has quite a few of these dips in this otherwise flat stretch of Wisconsin railroading

Also known as the Scarlet Darter, this is essentially an African species that extends into Europe. The all-red male is becoming an increasingly common sight further north. All all ages the wings are clear, with a large amber patch at the hindwing base. There is no black on the legs, head or thorax. The pterostigma are yellowish-brown.

 

It is found quite widely in southern, central and western Europe, and is an occasional vagrant in the British Isles.

 

It will utilise almost any open, stagnant water, including rice paddies and brackish lagoons.

 

The flight period is from mid-June to early September in northern Europe.

 

Males are territorial at their breeding sites, perching like other darters with their wings well forward (Courtesy birdimages.net)

 

Thanks for viewing my photos and for any favourites and comments, it’s much appreciated.

Because Dartmoor essentially consists of impervious granite the water either sits on the surface (hence much of Dartmoor is boggy) or drains off in a series of streams and rivers. This stream is near Merrivale and flows to the south where it joins the River Walkham. It flows through a culvert under the B3357, which is just behind the camera. Several tors can be seen in the distance. Many of the water courses on Dartmoor are man-made and known as leats. One of the largest, dating from the 18th century, was used to bring drinking water to Devonport while others were used to provide water for use in mines and quarries.

This square essentially separates Chiado from Bairro Alto, the city's two liveliest districts. At its center is a monument topped by a statue of poet Luis de Camões and with eight other smaller figures from Portuguese culture below him.

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©2015 François de Nodrest / Pantchoa - All rights reserved.

I've learned more watching people in the streets than I did in 8 years of postsecondary education. That is sad but true.

 

My big takeaway? After all this watching.

 

People sure like to swipe their phones.

 

Living in essentially a glass box on the 27th floor we are quite blasé about sunsets. However, this one was a little more intriguing than usual, with its dashing gestural clouds racing across the sky.

(Downhill House, Northern Ireland)

 

This imposing structure is, essentially, just a pile of rocks.

 

If an engineer told you he was going to set off an explosion in a quarry, the force of which would propel the randomly shattered rocks into the precise arrangement necessary for this structure to appear from the falling rubble - I suspect you would think he was quite mad.

 

What if he told you that he would keep setting off explosions until a building like this appeared? How many times do you think he would have to repeat his experiment until the structure of a stately home would fall into place? It never would, right?

 

Evolutionists hold that, given enough time, the spontaneous appearance of life is inevitable. But, if you don't think an explosion in a quarry, which already contains all the necessary raw materials, would ever result in a structure like this, then why would you believe that an explosion could occur which would result in the incredible complexity of this universe and every living thing on this planet? An explosion, incidentally, which supposedly took place when nothing existed and from which everything that now exists came into being?

 

If a simple building made from rock screams "DESIGN", how much more does the human hand, the heart, the eye, or the nervous system? Even a single blade of the grass in this photo is infinitely more complex and finely tuned that the building which sits on it. The complexity of every living thing implies its design and, by implication, its Designer.

 

For the invisible things of him from the creation of the world are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even his eternal power and Godhead; so that they are without excuse: Because that, when they knew God, they glorified him not as God, neither were thankful; but became vain in their imaginations, and their foolish heart was darkened. Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools. (Romans 1:20-22)

Santorini is essentially what remains after an enormous volcanic eruption that destroyed the earliest settlements on a formerly single island, and created the current geological caldera. A giant central, rectangular lagoon, which measures about 12 by 7 km (7.5 by 4.3 mi), is surrounded by 300 m (980 ft) high, steep cliffs on three sides. The main island slopes downward to the Aegean Sea. On the fourth side, the lagoon is separated from the sea by another much smaller island called Therasia; the lagoon is connected to the sea in two places, in the northwest and southwest. The depth of the caldera, at 400m, makes it impossible for any but the largest ships to anchor anywhere in the protected bay; there is also a fisherman's harbour at Vlychada, on the southwestern coast. The island's principal port is Athinios. The capital, Fira, clings to the top of the cliff looking down on the lagoon.

A launching gantry, essentially a massive crane that holds up several concrete segments at once while crews place them, fasten them with post-tensioning cables and connect them to the piers, or concrete posts, already in place.

Weighing between 42.3 and 57.7 tonnes each, the concrete segments are manufactured in a factory in St-Eugène-de-Grantam by BPDL

Every piece is unique,they resemble each other very, much, but each of the 4,102 pieces are designed as a unique piece and have unique characteristics

It takes just two days to complete the span of 40 metres

Once a span is completed, the gantry is moved to the next concrete pier — a process that takes about five hours from start to finish, while the gantry’s supports are moved and the 500-tonne structure rolls into place

The current form of the castle is essentially that developed by the Knights Templar, who planned to develop a kingdom centred on Peniscola. James II of Aragon gave the castle to the Templars in 1294, together with the nearby castles of Pulpís and Xivert. The Templars began work that year, demolished the Muslim fortifications, and completely rebuilt the castle; the work was completed in 1307. In common with other Templar fortifications, the castle was laid out around an inner ward and possessed a chapel. Architectural features included barrel vaulting and round arches. The basic Templar core of the castle remains intact.

Some changes were made by Antipope Benedict XIII in order to modify it for use as a papal residence in the early 15th century.

The castle defences and the associated town fortifications were significantly upgraded from the early 16th century onwards, in line with advances in military technology. The castle was massively redeveloped by military engineer Giovanni Battista Antonelli in the 16th century.

 

La forma actual del castillo es esencialmente la desarrollada por los Caballeros Templarios, quienes planearon desarrollar un reino centrado en Peñiscola. Jaime II de Aragón dio el castillo a los templarios en 1294, junto con los castillos cercanos de Pulpís y Xivert. Los templarios comenzaron a trabajar ese año, derribaron las fortificaciones musulmanas y reconstruyeron completamente el castillo; el trabajo se completó en 1307. En común con otras fortificaciones de los templarios, el castillo se distribuyó alrededor de una sala interior y poseía una capilla. Las características arquitectónicas incluyen bóveda de cañón y arcos redondos. El núcleo templario básico del castillo permanece intacto.

El Antipapa Benedicto XIII realizó algunos cambios para modificarlo y utilizarlo como residencia papal a principios del siglo XV.

Las defensas del castillo y las fortificaciones asociadas de la ciudad fueron mejoradas significativamente desde principios del siglo XVI en adelante, en línea con los avances en tecnología militar. El castillo fue reconstruido masivamente por el ingeniero militar Giovanni Battista Antonelli en el siglo XVI.

 

Peníscola (Baix Maestrat. Castelló de La Plana)

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peniscola_Castle

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