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The port city of Essaouira characterized by its white walls and blue fishing boats.

 

More on Morocco at www.flickr.com/photos/132192297@N04/albums/72157655284097031.

The port city of Essaouira, a fortified town with deep Portugese roots. More on Morocco at www.flickr.com/photos/132192297@N04/albums/72157655284097031.

The port city of Essaouira, a fortified town with deep Portugese roots. More on Morocco at www.flickr.com/photos/132192297@N04/albums/72157655284097031.

A long exposition of the ancient city of Essaouira, illuminated by its warm lights. The city was reflecting itself on the water of the Atlantic Ocean. Some clouds were slowly moving from the sea to the inland meanwhile the first stars were beginning to shine. I was in front of a scene worthy for a tale from the Arabian Nights, even I was in Morocco. The only question is: did I get the shot?

2 days in Essaouira Morocco: bit.ly/2daysinessaouira

 

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Essaouira lighthouse

A lighthouse is a tower, building, or other type of structure designed to emit light from a system of lamps and lenses, and to serve as a navigational aid for maritime pilots at sea or on inland waterways.

Lighthouses mark dangerous coastlines, hazardous shoals, reefs, and safe entries to harbors, and can assist in aerial navigation. Once widely used, the number of operational lighthouses has declined due to the expense of maintenance and use of electronic navigational systems.

Before the development of clearly defined ports, mariners were guided by fires built on hilltops. Since raising the fire would improve the visibility, placing the fire on a platform became a practice that led to the development of the lighthouse. In antiquity, the lighthouse functioned more as an entrance marker to ports than as a warning signal for reefs and promontories, unlike many modern lighthouses. The most famous lighthouse structure from antiquity was the Pharos of Alexandria, although it collapsed during an earthquake centuries later.

The intact Tower of Hercules at A Coruña, Spain gives insight into ancient lighthouse construction; other evidence about lighthouses exists in depictions on coins and mosaics, of which many represent the lighthouse at Ostia. Coins from Alexandria, Ostia, and Laodicea in Syria also exist.

The modern era of lighthouses began at the turn of the 18th century, as lighthouse construction boomed in lockstep with burgeoning levels of transatlantic commerce. Advances in structural engineering and new and efficient lighting equipment allowed for the creation of larger and more powerful lighthouses, including ones exposed to the sea. The function of lighthouses shifted toward the provision of a visible warning against shipping hazards, such as rocks or reefs.

The Eddystone Rocks were a major shipwreck hazard for mariners sailing through the English Channel. The first lighthouse built there was an octagonal wooden structure, anchored by 12 iron stanchions secured in the rock, and was built by Henry Winstanley from 1696 to 1698. His lighthouse was the first tower in the world to have been fully exposed to the open sea.

The civil engineer, John Smeaton, rebuilt the lighthouse from 1756–59; his tower marked a major step forward in the design of lighthouses and remained in use until 1877. He modelled the shape of his lighthouse on that of an oak tree, using granite blocks. He pioneered the use of "hydraulic lime," a form of concrete that will set under water, and developed a technique of securing the granite blocks together using dovetail joints and marble dowels. The dovetailing feature served to improve the structural stability, although Smeaton also had to taper the thickness of the tower towards the top, for which he curved the tower inwards on a gentle gradient. This profile had the added advantage of allowing some of the energy of the waves to dissipate on impact with the walls. His lighthouse was the prototype for the modern lighthouse and influenced all subsequent engineers.

One such influence was Robert Stevenson, himself a seminal figure in the development of lighthouse design and construction.[6] His greatest achievement was the construction of the Bell Rock Lighthouse in 1810, one of the most impressive feats of engineering of the age. This structure was based upon Smeaton's design, but with several improved features, such as the incorporation of rotating lights, alternating between red and white.Stevenson worked for the Northern Lighthouse Board for nearly fifty years during which time he designed and oversaw the construction and later improvement of numerous lighthouses. He innovated in the choice of light sources, mountings, reflector design, the use of Fresnel lenses, and in rotation and shuttering systems providing lighthouses with individual signatures allowing them to be identified by seafarers. He also invented the movable jib and the balance crane as a necessary part for lighthouse construction.

Alexander Mitchell designed the first screw-pile lighthouse – his lighthouse was built on piles that were screwed into the sandy or muddy seabed. Construction of his design began in 1838 at the mouth of the Thames and was known as the Maplin Sands lighthouse, and first lit in 1841. Although its construction began later, the Wyre Light in Fleetwood, Lancashire, was the first to be lit

  

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2 days in Essaouira Morocco: bit.ly/2daysinessaouira

 

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Mogador Essaouira, est une ville portuaire et une commune du Maroc, chef-lieu de la province d'Essaouira, au sein de la région de Marrakech-Safi. Elle est située au bord de l'océan Atlantique et compte 77 966 habitants en 2014. Wikipédia

2 days in Essaouira Morocco: bit.ly/2daysinessaouira

 

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Please don't use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my explicit permission. © All rights reserved

My travel in Morocco (December 2009 - January 2010)

 

Essaouira, the ancient Mogador, Atlantic coast of Morocco

 

The Medina of Essaouira (formerly "Mogador") is a UNESCO World Heritage Listed city, as an example of a late 18th century fortified town, as transferred to North Africa.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essaouira

 

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2 days in Essaouira Morocco: bit.ly/2daysinessaouira

 

Please follow my travel adventures on:

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« Essaouira ; un mot d’amour tout particulier à celle dont le sourire ne s’éteint jamais, le soleil de la culture et la musique brûle pour toujours dans ses monuments historiques et ses verdures . Essaouira, beauté angélique ou tout est magnifique, attrayant et chargé de douceur. »

  

2 days in Essaouira Morocco: bit.ly/2daysinessaouira

 

Please follow my travel adventures on:

Instagram - @rtwgirl_, my Blog, Twitter or Facebook.

2 days in Essaouira Morocco: bit.ly/2daysinessaouira

 

Please follow my travel adventures on:

Instagram - @rtwgirl_, my Blog, Twitter or Facebook.

2 days in Essaouira Morocco: bit.ly/2daysinessaouira

 

Please follow my travel adventures on:

Instagram - @rtwgirl_, my Blog, Twitter or Facebook.

It is the coastal wind – the beautifully named alizee, or taros in Berber – that has allowed Essaouira (pronounced ‘essa-weera’, or ‘es-Sweera’ in Arabic) to retain its traditional culture and character. For most of the year, the wind blows so hard here that relaxing on the beach is impossible, meaning that the town is bypassed by the hordes of beach tourists who descend on other Atlantic Coast destinations in summer. Known as the ‘Wind City of Africa’, it attracts plenty of windsurfers between April and November, but the majority of visitors come here in spring and autumn to wander through the spice-scented lanes and palm-lined avenues of the fortified medina, browse the many art galleries and boutiques, relax in some of the country's best hotels and watch fishing nets being mended and traditional boats being constructed in the hugely atmospheric port. Or be pestered to death by an over friendly Moroccan who wants it be your guide, if you pleez. How time flies. It was 10 years ago we went here, and I'm only just posting this picture now.

Essaouira (Berber: ⵎⵓⴳⴰⴹⵓⵔ Taṣṣurt, Arabic: الصويرة‎, as-Ṣawīra) is a city in the western Moroccan economic region of Marrakech-Tensift-Al Haouz, on the Atlantic coast.

 

The city was known in the time of 11th-century Geographer al-Bakri and, as he reported, was called Sidi Megdoul. In the 16th-century, a corruption of this name became known to the Portuguese as Mogador or Mogadore. The Berber and Arabic names mean the wall, a reference to the fortress walls that originally enclosed the city.

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