new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged eiði

In the middle of nowhere, I found this very photogenic scene.

 

Instagram | Twitter

Risin and Kellingin (Risin og Kellingin) are two sea stacks on the northern coast of Eysturoy in the Faroe Islands close to Eiði. The name also means The Giant and the Witch and they stand at a height of 71 and 68m tall respectively. You can check out this link to know more about the legend: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Risin_og_Kellingin

Sundini sound and Tjørnuvík bay, north Streymoy (Faroe Islands).

 

--

VIDEO → Total Solar Eclipse 2015 in Faroe Islands (Timelapse)

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Nature, travel, photography: MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Coming from Eiði we stopped shortly after the turnoff to Funningur in a small parking lot. Despite changing weather conditions and rain, we climbed towards the Middagsfjall mountain and had unrestricted views of the long Funningsfjørður fjord.

Slættaratindur is the tallest mountain the the Faroe Islands.

 

(20190822093557-5D30149f)

View towards Eiði from the slopes of Slættaratindur.

 

(20190822084012-5D30098f)

Färöer-Inseln, Sommer 2019

Risin og Kellingin (Risin and Kellingin) are two sea stacks just off the northern coast of the island of Eysturoy in the Faroe Islands close to the town of Eiði. The name Risin og Kellingin means The Giant and the Witch (or Hag) and relates to an old legend about their origins. The Giant (Risin) is the 71m stack further from the coast, and the witch (Kellingin) is the 68m pointed stack nearer land, standing with her legs apart.

Coming from Eiði we stopped shortly after the turnoff to Funningur in a small parking lot. Despite changing weather conditions and rain, we climbed towards the Middagsfjall mountain and had unrestricted views of the long Funningsfjørður fjord.

Tjørnuvík is located at the far end of the world, just north of Streymoy Island. After a stopover at Fossá, the highest waterfall in the Faroe Islands, I drove there. Finally, the road is even single-track - and after many many curves I looked down to the bay of Tjørnuvík with its black sandy beach. From here you can enjoy a clear view of the two stone pillars Risin og Kellingin (giant and female), which stand on the northern coast of Eysturoy at Eiði in the North Atlantic.

www.chrisibbotsonphotography.com

www.facebook.com/chrisibbotsonphotography

 

Risin and Kellingin (Risin og Kellingin) are two sea stacks on the northern coast of Eysturoy in the Faroe Islands close to Eiði. The name also means The Giant and the Witch and they stand at a height of 71 and 68m tall respectively. Compare them to the enormous vertical cliffs beside them to get a feel for how majestic the Faroe Islands are.

 

Legend tells us that giants in Iceland wanted the Faroes, as they struggled to pull the island Eiðiskollur mountain split. They continued to struggle throughout the night unaware of the passing of time. As sunrise came a shaft of sunlight caught the giants and turned them to stone.

“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.”

~Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

Eiði, Faroe Islands

Risin og Kellingin (Risin and Kellingin) are two sea stacks just off the northern coast of the island of Eysturoy in the Faroe Islands close to the town of Eiði. The name Risin og Kellingin means The Giant and the Witch (or Hag) and relates to an old legend about their origins. The Giant (Risin) is the 71m stack further from the coast, and the witch (Kellingin) is the 68m pointed stack nearer land, standing with her legs apart.

  

A legend tells how, once upon a time, the giants in Iceland were envious and decided that they wanted the Faroes. So the giant and the witch (his wife in some versions of the story) were sent down to the Faroe Islands to bring them back.

They reached the north-westernmost mountain Eiðiskollur (see map), and the giant stayed in the sea while the witch climbed up the mountain with a heavy rope to tie the islands together so that she could push them onto the giant's back. However, when she attached the rope to the mountain and pulled, the northern part of the mountain split. Further attempts were also unsuccessful, and they struggled through the night, but the base of the mountain was firm and they could not move it.

Eiði (pop. 670) is a town on the island Eysturoy in the Faroe Islands. In the center of town is a large stone church dating from 1881.

Risin og Kellingin (Risin and Kellingin) are two sea stacks just off the northern coast of the island of Eysturoy in the Faroe Islands close to the town of Eiði. The name Risin og Kellingin means The Giant and the Witch (or Hag) and relates to an old legend about their origins. The Giant (Risin) is the 71m stack further from the coast, and the witch (Kellingin) is the 68m pointed stack nearer land, standing with her legs apart. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Risin_og_Kellingin

Drangar, Vestmannaeyjar (Westmen isles), S-Iceland.

 

This one is a part of my mini-series from Vestmannaeyjar. The other ones are here: www.flickr.com/photos/andriel/tags/vestmannaeyjar

 

25 sec 17mm f11 iso 50

 

View Large & Black

and since I am a b&w fan this is the b&w version even larger:

farm4.static.flickr.com/3622/3488142917_41fa7f8c5d_o.jpg

From Kolgrafafjörður in W-Iceland. A beautiful day with a clear view, but the whole fjord stinks at the moment after some 30,000 tons of herring died there in a freak natural event a little more than a month ago. A decaying fish slush covers much of the coastline, and the local farmers need to hold their noses and clean their windows of herring scales after a windy day.

Never turn off the radio in the Faroe Islands.

 

While we were driving north from Tórshavn to the G! Festival in Gøta, the festival announced an indefinite weather delay. Magnus, who had passed us on his way north to Eiði, called us to tell about it. On the correct assumption that we did not listen to the radio.

 

So we visited him in Eiði to wait out the weather there.

 

At 21:02 the sun suddenly exposed the whitecaps at sea. At 21:14, the festival announced that they would start with Moto Boy at 21:30.

Der Sundini ist eine natürliche Meerenge der Färöer. Sie trennt die beiden Hauptinseln Streymoy im Westen und Eysturoy im Osten.

 

Der Name Sundini ist der bestimmte Plural von sund (Sund) und meint also „die Sunde“. Da der Sund einem extrem starken Gezeitenstrom ausgesetzt ist, gab er der „Strominsel“ Streymoy ihren Namen. Die schmalste Stelle des Sunds heißt daher auch við Streymin „am Strom“ oder „bei der Strömung“.

 

Die Region an beiden Ufern des Sunds nennt man das Sundalag. Damit nicht identisch ist die Sunda kommuna, die nur einen Teil des Sundalags ausmacht.

 

Der Sundini beginnt im Süden bei der Linie Kollafjørður im Westen und Morskranes im Osten. Die südliche Verlängerung des Gewässers heißt Tangafjørður.

 

Etwa auf der Mitte des Sundini gibt es eine Brücke, die scherzhaft „einzige Brücke über den Atlantik“ genannt wird. Ihr färöischer Name ist Brúgvin um Streymin, „die Brücke über den Strom“. Sie wurde 1973 eröffnet, ist 220 m lang und verbindet Nesvík im Westen mit Oyrarbakki/Norðskáli im Osten. Es ist die einzige Verbindung der beiden Hauptinseln miteinander.

 

Im Norden mündet der Sund bei den Orten Tjørnuvík im Westen und Eiði im Osten in den offenen Nordatlantik.

 

Quelle: Wikipedia

Bitte Lupe benutzen!

All rights reserved

Copyright Fabienne Fauré Photography.

All rights reserved

Copyright Fabienne Fauré Photography.

Once upon a time, an Icelandic chief witch sent a giant (82 meters tall) and his wife, a witch (68 meters tall), to the Faroe Islands to steal the islands and bring them back to Iceland. Off they went in the dusk and arrived in the north-westernmost part of the Faroe Islands. They decided to tie a rope around a mountain called Eiðiskollur, and pull the Faroe Islands towards Iceland.

 

They struggled and worked hard to get the rope in place. Their first attempt was unsuccessful because part of the mountain split. However, they were determined and worked all night to make it work.

 

Like all creatures of the night, the giant and the witch knew they had to hide before the sun came up, for fear of being turned into stone. This particular night, they were so pre-occupied with their task that they failed to notice the first beams of sunlight appearing on the dark horizon. Inevitably, they were turned into stone. Ever since, the giant and the witch have stood, staring westward, longing for their home country.

 

These stone stacks are located close to Eiði. This view is from Tjørnuvík on the island of Streymoy.

“My life is shaped by the urgent need to wander and observe, and my camera is my passport.” ~Steve McCurry

 

Missing those captivating sheep islands. Near Eiði, Faroe Islands on a cliff hike 1,000ft above the ocean.

Rechts der „Der Riese und das (Troll)Weib“, zwei jeweils 70 Meter hohe Felsen vor der Steilküste

des Kaps Kollur mit dem Berg Eiðiskollur (352 Meter). Das ganze liegt 2 Kilometer nördlich des Ortes

Eiði im Norden der Insel Eysturoy. Rechts der Wasserfall an der Klippe ist die Nordspitze der Insel.

Eysturoy - Faroe Islands

The weather in the Faroe Islands was the most erratic weather I have experienced. One minute it was sunny, then the next raining and then sunny again - often resulting in beautiful rainbows. I also experienced extreme wind, hail and dustings of snow.

 

7/100

Eiði, Faroe Islands 2010

ND110, 179 sec. exposure

  

Faroe Islands

Eysturoy Island

Eiði

Sheeps are used to weather change at Feroe Islands and they don't stop doing their regular life for a bit of snow :-)

www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10153075145880369&l=c...

 

Image shot close to the entrance. But my laser measured the cave to 201 m.

 

My late father-in-law wrote that the cave is about 75 to 100 meters. He did not exaggerate - I trust my laser more than him in these matters.

 

He also wrote that the Lovat Scouts had bass drum aprons made from seals hunted outside this cave. (Leopard skin was hard to get in the Faroes during WWII.) Two beautiful black males of unknown species (not the usual grey seal),

Press "L".

 

Pentax 67ii, SMC 200mm f4, Heliopan sh-pmc CPL, Hitech Orange, Lee GND 0.9 SE, Kodak EIR Aerochrome self-developed in Fuji Hunt Chrome 6X (6-bath E6-) kit, wet-mounted drumscan (scanned through PhotoMultiplier Tubes - PMTs - no CCD nor CMOS used in the light detection process).

 

...::: 4nalog :::...

Las islas Faroé son la gema del atlántico, con montañas escarpadas, acantilados impresionantes y vistas que te dejan sin aliento. Esta foto es un resumen de esos atributos, tomada desde una montaña cerca del pequeño pueblo de Funningur, hay que subir un camino entre rocas, barro y un viento que estremece por casi 300 metros, luego de eso aparece una de las postales más hermosas de esta Isla, sin duda el esfuerzo vale la pena.

www.ricardomartinez.cl

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 46 47