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Recipe here

 

I'm taking a break from Flickr. To those of you who celebrate Christmas, happy holidays.

from Kristen Suzannes' Raw Holidays Recipes E-book

I made my dad one of his favourite Christmas confections - fruitcake - out of another one of his favourites - home made mincemeat! This sucker took up a whole 11" springform with barely any room to spare, and clocked in at just over 6 lbs. It's a combination of two recipes from historic Toronto Star clipouts!

 

Pictured with a Canadian dime for size comparison.

 

www.yummysmells.ca/2009/12/not-miss-fogartys-christmas-ca...

Like crack in it's own right... and since it's eggless you could theoretically indulge!

 

I put together these home made Thin Mints for fellow foodie Bon (http://www.flickr.com/photos/43114256@N00/) this Christmas. Adapted slightly from Baking Bites, these are a BETTER rendition of one of the great Girl Scout cookies from our childhood!

 

yummysmells.blogspot.com/2009/12/making-thin-mint_18.html

Coquito: Puerto Rican Eggnog (eggless version). Recipe on my blog, Baking is my Zen.

bakingismyzen.wordpress.com/2012/12/01/coquito-puerto-ric...

 

Check out other bloggers Coquito recipes too. Let’s share the Coquito LOVE.

 

Erica of Poo Loves Boo

www.poolovesboo.com/2010/12/holiday-tradition-coquito.html

 

Fara of Little Things Creations

littlethingscreations.blogspot.com/2011/12/recipe-coquito...

 

Michelle of Krumble Cakes & Sweets

krumblecakesandsweets.blogspot.com/2012/11/coquito-tradit...

 

Interested in other alcoholic drinks which you can serve for the holidays? Check out a website called Speaking Latino.

www.speakinglatino.com/

 

An eggless chocolate chip cookie dough mixture within a dark chocolate shell? Yes please! Check out the recipe here! [Goes live 12/05]

An eggless chocolate chip cookie dough mixture within a dark chocolate shell? Yes please! Check out the recipe here! [Goes live 12/05]

I made my dad one of his favourite Christmas confections - fruitcake - out of another one of his favourites - home made mincemeat! This sucker took up a whole 11" springform with barely any room to spare, and clocked in at just over 6 lbs. It's a combination of two recipes from historic Toronto Star clipouts!

 

Pictured with a Canadian dime for size comparison.

 

www.yummysmells.ca/2009/12/not-miss-fogartys-christmas-ca...

Christmas eating habits have revealed the extent to which our food, drink and lifestyle have evolved since WWI.

 

World War I

 

What a First World War Chirtsmas dinner would have looked like. Dinners were thrifty but filling. Diners could pick from sweet 'treats' made from homegrown vegetables - such Mock Plum Pudding made from grated garden carrost, mixed peel and minced raisins, or Trench Pudding, a heavy, stodgy steamed rice pudding designed to fill you up. To sweeten? Jam - made, of course, from carrots.

 

Before the Great War, class played a huge role in society - even at Christmas time. Before the war, the rich, waited on by servants, could enjoy a nine or ten course meal while the poor often could only scrape together bread and margarine.

 

The war meant, however, that poorer families saw standards rise in terms of their everyday diet (as workers were fed officially by the factories), while the rich were forced to eat a much more restricted diet than they’d previously been used to.

 

In 1914, everyday lives were much more physically demanding. Without most of the modern appliances that we take for granted today, even the act of making Christmas dinner took a huge amount of energy, while the lack of central heating meant staying warm used up more calories. People needed more food to do more physical activity than we do today.

 

Despite this, generally they still consumed less, and ate healthier food. Alcohol was restricted, furthered by the 9pm pub close time.

 

At Christmas, while the number of courses varied depending on how wealthy you were, most households would have served a soup course, a stuffed bird (goose was much more popular than turkey) and beef (cheaper cuts were stewed rather than roasted), served with Yorkshire puddings.

 

Vegetables could be scarce unless you grew your own, but potatoes and turnips were popular. Dessert was a plum pudding, mince pies and a savoury cheese dish, while the rich would have enjoyed fruit and nuts.

 

World War II

 

World War II Unlike WWI, during WWII strict rationing was in place - but it didn't really have an adverse effect on people’s health. A typical Chirstmas dinner would have included roast rabbit, carrots and tinned peas. If families were lucky they would also have had chard, potatoes, red cabbage.

 

Unlike WWI, during WWII strict rationing was in place. Surprisingly this didn’t necessarily have an adverse effect on people’s health. In fact, by the end of the war, British people had never been healthier.

 

Increased knowledge of vitamins and the nutritional value of foods, a very fair system of rationing and government education programmes, ensured that people ate well with what they had.

 

Food shortages led to people growing their own fruit and vegetables to supplement their meals (the Government began a ‘Dig for Victory’ campaign to encourage home-vegetable plots), while people became more inventive ‘mock’ food and with substituting available foods for those that had virtually disappeared such as bananas and pineapple.

 

Like WWI, the preparation of Christmas dinner was a long process, with people saving up dried fruit and key ingredients for weeks or even months before.

 

Petrol rationing meant that everyone either walked or cycled, making the collection of ingredients particularly difficult – very different from today’s supermarket dash!

 

With rationing in full force, the difference between Christmas dinner between the very poor and the very rich was slight.

 

Those who could, still tried to get goose or turkey, however if that wasn’t available, they would eat mutton or beef.

 

However, meat rations were dictated by price, so many families had to decide whether they wanted quality or quantity.

 

Wartime recipes were published to help housewives make the most out of their fat and sugar rations, including for treats such as wartime Christmas pudding, wartime mincemeat, eggless sponges, mock turkey and carrot jam.

 

With dried fruit in short supply, you would have to choose between your pudding, cake and mincemeat tarts. People consumed slightly more than usual on Christmas day – mainly because due to some saved-up beer being consumed - however calorie consumption remained around the same as during everyday life.

 

Today

 

Turkey is still seen as the traditional choice (despite only becoming very popular after the two wars), while Christmas pudding and mince-pies remain favourites.

 

While some parts of Christmas have changed drastically since the end of WWII, many of our mealtime traditions have stayed the same. Christmas dinner remains one of the most old-fashioned meals of the year.

 

Turkey is still seen as the traditional choice (despite only becoming very popular after the two wars), while Christmas pudding and mince-pies remain favourites.

 

While preparing Christmas dinner required much more effort during WWI and II, with everything being made from scratch, today we are much more reliant on modern kitchen equipment and pre-prepared food.

 

Unlike previous generations, who generally had more courses - and always had a soup course - our Christmas meal consists of three courses on average. However, we are much more likely to snack on a range of different foods throughout the day, something previous generations never did.

 

On our Christmas dinner table we’re likely to find a turkey, served with sausages or chipolatas. Unlike in WWII, when a huge variety of home grown vegetables would have been served, we are most likely to eat roast potatoes with brussels sprouts and parsnips. Traditional fruit and nuts have been almost forgotten in favour of snacks such as crisps and peanuts, while we are seeing a rise in pre-prepared desserts and chocolates.

 

Unlike during wartime, alcohol now plays a big role in our Christmas day, with wine, sparkling wine and beer being favourites. It is estimated that we now consume almost 6,000 calories at Christmas dinner - almost double that consumed during war times. This high calorie intake, combined with much less physical activity over the Christmas period, means we need to be more aware than ever about what we are eating.

 

Christmas in the future

 

In the future, it is likely that some of the more traditional Christmas foods will become less popular, if not completely die out. A rise in meat-free food is likely to become increasingly common. Likewise, less common protein-based foods, such as quorn or even insects, will potentially become more popular.

 

In the future, it is likely that some of the more traditional Christmas foods will become less popular, if not completely die out.

 

Desserts such as Christmas pudding and mince pies, although synonymous with Christmas now, are less likely to be seen on our table.

 

Chocolate is becoming increasingly popular and it is likely that dessert will consist of a box of chocolate or chocolate dessert.

However, with cocoa supplies more restricted, this chocolate dessert will be seen as a treat.

 

With meat supplies also due to become an increasingly important issue, it is likely we will see a rise in more sustainable options. With many Brits becoming more ethically-minded about where their food is sourced from, a rise in meat-free food is likely to become increasingly common.

 

Likewise, less common protein-based foods, such as quorn or even insects, will potentially become more popular.

 

With the decline of the Sunday roast, it is also likely that roast potatoes will only be consumed on special occasions, such as Christmas, while other vegetables, such as sweet potatoes will have become more common. Food for thought, no doubt!.

 

Insects will become more popular food choices? Locust leg doesn't quite have the same oomph as a turkey one.

An eggless chocolate chip cookie dough mixture within a dark chocolate shell? Yes please! Check out the recipe here! [Goes live 12/05]

Like crack in it's own right... and since it's eggless you could theoretically indulge!

 

I put together these home made Thin Mints for fellow foodie Bon (http://www.flickr.com/photos/43114256@N00/) this Christmas. Adapted slightly from Baking Bites, these are a BETTER rendition of one of the great Girl Scout cookies from our childhood!

 

yummysmells.blogspot.com/2009/12/making-thin-mint_18.html

I made my dad one of his favourite Christmas confections - fruitcake - out of another one of his favourites - home made mincemeat! This sucker took up a whole 11" springform with barely any room to spare, and clocked in at just over 6 lbs. It's a combination of two recipes from historic Toronto Star clipouts!

 

Pictured with a Canadian dime for size comparison.

 

www.yummysmells.ca/2009/12/not-miss-fogartys-christmas-ca...

'War Cakes' - eggless, butterless, milkless - in honour of the opening of Robert Kusmirowski's 'Bunker'.

 

These tasted so moist and Christmas-y! Recipe from Ann Jackson's 'Heart of the Home'.

An eggless chocolate chip cookie dough mixture within a dark chocolate shell? Yes please! Check out the recipe here! [Goes live 12/05]

Steamed Eggless Traditional Christmas Cake or pudding recipe.

Recipe Link: asmallbite.com/eggless-christmas-fruit-cake-recipe-plum-c...

 

Eggless Christmas Fruit Cake Recipe / Plum Cake is usually light or dark brown in colour, have crumbled texture, enriched with dry fruits and nuts. It is said dry fruit and nuts are soaked in rum / wine before six months itself and allowed to ferment. But this version I have given below is an eggless, non alcoholic version. The cake is so flavourful and delicious, but because of my craziness to taste the cake, I cut the cake before cooling and it got crumbled. So I baked a second batch and ended up with rework. But I feel its worth trying it. Wish you all a Merry Christmas.

Recipe Link: asmallbite.com/choco-chip-cookies-recipe-eggless-chocolat...

 

This choco chip cookies recipe is also called as drop cookies from the United states invented by chef Ruth Graves Wakefield in 1938. Though I have done lot of baking items from cookies, muffins, cakes till pizza’s all through these years and have at least little knowledge in baking, I was somewhat skeptical to post baking recipes. But I myself don’t know the reason? As christmas and New year festives are round the corner, I am getting so many request from my viewers to post some related recipes and here is the first baking post eggless chocolate chip cookies in ‘asmallbite’. Also stay tuned for some more interesting recipes.

Steamed Eggless Traditional Christmas Cake or pudding recipe.

Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe – Eggless – Easy Christmas Recipes – Made Easy – 1

Choclate Chip Cookies – Made Easy

Soundtrack:- “People Like You” by...

 

recipeflow.com/chocolate-chip-cookies-recipe-eggless-easy...

Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe – Eggless – Easy Christmas Recipes – Made Easy – 1

Choclate Chip Cookies – Made Easy

Soundtrack:- “People Like You” by...

 

recipeflow.com/chocolate-chip-cookies-recipe-eggless-easy...

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