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Zetzellia is smaller and less active than the phytoseiids. It is bright yellow, although its gut can take on a reddish hue after feeding. Figure 4 in NYS IPM fact sheet Predatory Mites (Zetzellia mali), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43122. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Males and females are identical. Wingspread ranges from 17- 28 mm (2/a- 1 inch). The forewing is narrow and somewhat triangular; the hind wing is broad and fringed on the trailing edge. Figure 1 in NYS IPM fact sheet American Plum Borer (Euzophera semifuneralis (Walker)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43068. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Der "Rundling" in Leipzig-Lößnig

The so-called Rundling is a fine example of 1930s residential housing. With all its buildings arranged in a circle around a central area, the Rundling offered modern and affordable housing for large, working-class families

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Der "Rundling" in Leipzig-Lößnig

The so-called Rundling is a fine example of 1930s residential housing. With all its buildings arranged in a circle around a central area, the Rundling offered modern and affordable housing for large, working-class families

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Nahe der Straße am Ende der Stadt ragt der Bagger schon aus dem Loch heraus

 

www.faz.net/s/Rub594835B672714A1DB1A121534F010EE1/Doc~E82...

Declining Red Delicious/G.935 trees infected with Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) and Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV) in a nursery in fall 2015. The budwood used for grafting was the source of the two viruses. Note the stunted growth, browning of leaves, reduced terminal growth or terminal dieback of six infected trees (left of the wooden post) compared to seven healthy trees (right of the wooden post). Figure 1 in NYS IPM fact sheet Apple Chlorotic Leaf Spot Virus, in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43944. Photo by D. I. Breth & E. M. Tee. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Eggs are laid in groups of a few to nearly 150, but a typical egg mass usually contains about 40 eggs deposited in oval patches that measure 3.0 by 5.0 mm (1 /16 by 3/16 in.). Figure 2 in NYS IPM fact sheet Redbanded Leafroller (Argyrotaenia velutinana (Walker)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43125. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

To monitor, shake flowers or fruit over lightcolored saucers and count the nymphs caught. Treatment is needed at levels of 1 to 2 nymphs per inflorescence. Figure 8 in NYS IPM Small Fruit fact sheet Tarnished Plant Bug (Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/52258. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Small dark red or purple spots, about 1/8” (3 mm) or less in diameter, first appear on the upper side of infected leaves. Under heavy disease pressure, spots (lesions) may be so numerous that some of them grow together. Individual lesions eventually turn dark brown in the center and may remain surrounded by a thin band of green tissue when the rest of the leaf turns yellow. Figure 1 in NYS IPM fact sheet Cherry Leaf Spot (Blumeriella jaapii (Rehm) Arx), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43084. Photo by W. Wilcox. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

They typically penetrate the live wood where the current and last year’s growth meet, or at buds on current year wood. Figure 3 in NYS IPM fact sheet Grape Cane Borer (Amphicerus bicaudatus), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43097. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

On dark skinned varieties such as Red Delicious, minor blemishes may become less noticeable, and even disappear, as the fruit ripens. But severe blemishes and malformation of the fruit or minor blemishes on lighter-skinned varieties will make the fruit unmarketable. Check out NYS IPM fact sheet Phytophagous Mirid Bugs (Campylomma verbasci (Meyer) & Atractotomus mali (Meyer)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43117. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

More severe feeding on buds, blossoms, and developing berries can result in fruit that is deformed or undersized. Figure 7 in NYS IPM fact sheet Small Fruit Tarnished Plant Bug (Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/52258. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Larvae feed on the buds from full bud swell through bud break and until the shoots are 10 to 15 cm long. Figure 5 in NYS IPM fact sheet Climbing Cutworms - Family: Noctuidae, in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43085. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

The black vine weevil sometimes has small flecks of yellow on its black body and can reach 1 cm (0.4 in.) in length. Check out the NYS IPM fact sheet Root Weevils (Otiorhynchus sulcatus (Fabricius)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43126. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Symptoms visible aboveground vary among tree species and locations but include poor growth with sparse, off-color foliage wilt, and collapse. Figure 2 in NYS IPM fact sheet Phytophthora Root and Crown Rot (Phytophthora spp. (deBary)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43116. Photo by W. Wilcox. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Small dark red or purple spots, about 1/8” (3 mm) or less in diameter, first appear on the upper side of infected leaves. Under heavy disease pressure, spots (lesions) may be so numerous that some of them grow together. Individual lesions eventually turn dark brown in the center and may remain surrounded by a thin band of green tissue when the rest of the leaf turns yellow. Check out NYS IPM fact sheet Cherry Leaf Spot (Blumeriella jaapii (Rehm) Arx), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43084. Photo by W. Wilcox. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Distorted leaves and damaged fruit. Figure 5 in NYS IPM fact sheet Meadow Spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius (L.)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43209. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Injury to fruit falls into several categories: picture is of surface feeding and oviposition wounds from overwintered beetles that can scar and/or misshape the fruit by harvest. Figure 6 in NYS IPM fact sheet Plum Curculio (Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43118. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

The larvae and summer adults feed on the tender leaf tissues but avoid the leaf veins. Figure 6 in NYS IPM fact sheet Grape Flea Beetle (Altica chalybea (Illiger)), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43101. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

On the underside of the leaf, lesions may appear slightly concave and are frequently covered with a fine white mass, particularly after periods of wet or humid weather. Check out NYS IPM fact sheet Cherry Leaf Spot (Blumeriella jaapii (Rehm) Arx), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43084. Photo by W. Wilcox. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

The young larva feeds on tissue surrounding the egg cavity. Later it feeds along the center of the shoot in the pith above or below the gall. Figure 5 in NYS IPM fact sheet Grape Cane Gallmaker (Ampeloglypter sesostris (LeConte)), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43098. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Dark, sunken cankers expand along the limbs, producing large amounts of amber-colored or dark brown gum at their edges; often, dead twigs or pruning stubs (in photograph) can be seen at the center of such cankers. Figure 3 in NYS IPM fact sheet Perennial Canker (Leucostoma cincta (Fr. Ex Fr.) Höhn & Leucostoma persoonii Höhn), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43115. Photo by W. Wilcox. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

The lesions turn black with yellow margins as the leaves get older. Figure 4 in NYS IPM fact sheet Phomopsis Cane and Leaf Spot of Grape (Phomopsis viticola (Sacc.) Sacc. ), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43104. Photo by R. Pearson. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

The tissue surrounding the feeding puncture turns pale white and eventually dies. Feeding injury shows up first along the veins. Figure 6 in NYS IPM fact sheet Grape Leafhopper (Erythroneura comes (Say)), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43102. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Lesions on shoots, leaves, and rachises are the most common symptom of the disease. Infections on shoots give rise to elongate lesions or cracks that are most numerous on the first six basal internodes. Figure 1 in NYS IPM fact sheet Phomopsis Cane and Leaf Spot of Grape (Phomopsis viticola (Sacc.) Sacc. ), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43104. Photo by R. Pearson. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Adults are brown to black in color, cylindrical, and 1cm long. Figure 1 in NYS IPM fact sheet Grape Cane Borer (Amphicerus bicaudatus), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43097. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Beetles are about 1.5 mm (1/16 in.) in length and are brown with a lighter colored X-shaped marking across the wings. Figure 1 in NYS IPM fact sheet Strawberry Sap Beetle (Stelidota geminata (Say)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43132. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Overwintering adults attack the swelling buds by boring into them and hollowing out the inside. Figure 5 in NYS IPM fact sheet Grape Flea Beetle (Altica chalybea (Illiger)), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43101. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Close-up of a diseased leaf. Figure 5b in NYS IPM fact sheet Grapevine Red Blotch Disease, in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43123. Photo by M. Fuchs. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Some of the adult features such as legs and snout are already clearly visible in the pupal stage. Figure 6 in NYS IPM fact sheet Grape Cane Girdler (Ampeloglypter ater (LeConte)), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43099. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

A soft scale female (a potential vector) with white egg sac collected in a vineyard near Seneca Lake. Figure 3a in NYS IPM fact sheet Grape Leafroll Disease, in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43103. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

The female severs the bud to prevent it from opening and exposing the egg or larva. If the bud does not fall to the ground, it wilts and turns brown while hanging from the stem by a few strands of plant tissue. Figure 6 in NYS IPM fact sheet Strawberry Bud Weevil (Clipper) (Anthonomus signatus Say), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43131. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

The overwintering eggs give rise to only female aphids known as stem mothers which give birth to living young. Figure 3 in NYS IPM fact sheet Rosy Apple Aphid (Dysaphis plantaginea (Passerini)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43127. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

When green shoots are infected, the fungus lesions appear dark brown to black. Figure 4 in NYS IPM fact sheet Grapevine Powdery Mildew (Uncinula necator (Schw.) Burr.), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43121. Photo by R. Pearson. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Diseased plants are stunted and produce few runners. New leaves may be a dull bluish green in color, whereas older leaves sometimes turn red, orange, or yellow. Figure 2 in NYS IPM fact sheet Red Stele of Strawberry (Phytophthora fragariae (Hickman)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43124. Photo by W. Wilcox. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

The most serious damage that grape rootworm causes to grapevines is not generally seen – caused by larvae feeding on the roots. Figure 6 in NYS IPM fact sheet Grape Rootworm (Fidia viticida Walsh), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43105. Photo by J. Ogrodnick. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Under moist conditions in the early spring, the fungus forms small mushroomlike fruiting bodies from the mummies that have remained on the soil surface. Figure 6 in NYS IPM fact sheet Mummyberry Disease (Monilinia vaccinii-corymbosi (Reade) Honey), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43110. Photo by A. Stretch. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Older larvae damage flower clusters during bloom and continue to feed on developing fruit and leaves for 1-2 weeks after petal fall. Figure 4 in NYS IPM fact sheet Green Fruitworm (Orthosia hibisci (Guenee)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43106. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Renewed tree growth eventually causes a new ring of callus to be formed, and this annual cycle of callus formation and canker expansion leads to the production of concentric callus rings around the initial infection site. Figure 7 in NYS IPM fact sheet Perennial Canker (Leucostoma cincta (Fr. Ex Fr.) Höhn & Leucostoma persoonii Höhn), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43115. Photo by W. Wilcox. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Slicing infected berries will reveal darkened inner tissues. Figure 5 in NYS IPM fact sheet Leather Rot (Phytophthora cactorum (Lebert and Cohn) Schroeter), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43107. Photo by W. Wilcox. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

The female deposits a single egg in the nearly mature bud, and punctures the bud with her snout, which severs the bud from its stem. Figure 3 in NYS IPM fact sheet Strawberry Bud Weevil (Clipper) (Anthonomus signatus Say), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43131. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Young nymphs are pale green and resemble aphids, except that their legs are more robust, their movements are more rapid, and they have no abdominal cornicles (backward-pointing structures that resemble short stems). Figure 3 in NYS IPM fact sheet Tarnished Plant Bug (Tree Fruit) (Lygus lineolaris (Palisot de Beauvois)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43133. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Larvae are light cream colored with a black head and caudal (rear) shield. The head and shield become lighter as the larva matures until they are pale brown in the mature fifth-instar stage. The larva increases in size by approximately 1.4 times during each in star so that when mature it is 9 to 11 mm long. Figure 4 in NYS IPM fact sheet European Apple Sawfly (Hoplocampa testudinea (Klug)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43091. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Soon after hatching, the larvae begin to burrow into the soft burrknot tissue, or areas under bark scales. As the larvae feed, reddish-brown frass is pushed to the surface, where it collects, held together by silk. Figure 5 in NYS IPM fact sheet Dogwood Borer (Synanthedon scitula (Harris)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43088. Photo by J. Ogrodnick & H. Riedl. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Larvae deliberately feed on the seeds of the fruit. As larval development nears completion, they eat out an exit tunnel, which they plug with frass. Figure 4 in NYS IPM fact sheet Codling Moth (Cydia pomonella (L.)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43086. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

The first summer brood larvae feed on the surface of developing fruit in late July and early August. Figure 6 in NYS IPM fact sheet Obliquebanded Leafroller (Choristoneura rosaceana (Harris)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43111. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Cankers on trunks can extend below the soil line, and cankers originating from an old infected trunk may extend from the base of adjacent renewal trunks up toward the head of the vine. Figure 2 in NYS IPM fact sheet Eutypa Dieback (Eutypa armeniacae Hansf. & Carter), in eCommons, Cornell University at hdl.handle.net/1813/43093. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

Larvae are white or cream colored with a yellowish-brown to dark brown head. When half to full grown, the prothorasic and anal shields become yellow to dark brown in color. Figure 3 in NYS IPM fact sheet Peachtree Borer (Synanthedon exitiosa (Say)), in eCommons, Cornell University at ecommons.cornell.edu/handle/1813/43113. Photo by NYSAES, Cornell University. More information is on nysipm.cornell.edu/agriculture/fruits and Cornell Fruit Resources fruit.cornell.edu.

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