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The Mallard, or Wild duck (Anas platyrhynchos[1]), probably the best-known and most recognizable of all ducks, is a dabbling duck which breeds throughout the temperate and sub-tropical Americas, Europe, Asia, New Zealand (where it is currently the most common duck species), and Australia.

 

The male birds have a bright green head, while the female's is light brown. The Mallard lives in wetlands, eats water plants, and is gregarious. It is also migratory. The Mallard is the ancestor of all domestic ducks, and can interbreed with other species of genus Anas.[2] This interbreeding is causing rarer species of ducks to become genetically diluted.

 

The Mallard is 56–65 centimetres (22–26 in) long, has a wingspan of 81–98 centimetres (32–39 in), and weighs 0.9–1.2 kilograms (32–42 oz). The breeding male is unmistakable, with a bright green head, black rear end and a yellowish orange (can also contain some red) bill tipped with black (as opposed to the dark brown bill in females), and is also nature's most feared duck. The female Mallard is light brown, like most female dabbling ducks. However, both the female and male Mallards have distinct purple speculum edged with white, prominent in flight or at rest (though temporarily shed during the annual summer moult). In non-breeding (eclipse) plumage the drake becomes drab, looking more like the female, but still distinguishable by its yellow bill and reddish breast.

 

In captivity, domestic ducks come in wild-type plumages, white, and other colours. Most of these colour variants are also known in domestic Mallards not bred as livestock, but kept as pets, aviary birds, etc., where they are rare but increasing in availability.

 

A noisy species, the male has a nasal call, the female has a "quack" stereotypically associated with ducks.[3]

 

The Mallard is a rare example of both Allen's Rule and Bergmann's Rule in birds. Bergmann's Rule, which states that polar forms tend to be larger than related ones from warmer climates, has numerous examples in birds. Allen's Rule says that appendages like ears tend to be smaller in polar forms to minimize heat loss, and larger in tropical and desert equivalents to facilitate heat diffusion, and that the polar taxa are stockier overall. Examples of this rule in birds are rare, as they lack external ears. However, the bill of ducks is very well supplied with blood vessels and is vulnerable to cold.

 

Almost done processing my duck images from AZ. Promise!

The Mallard, or Wild duck (Anas platyrhynchos[1]), probably the best-known and most recognizable of all ducks, is a dabbling duck which breeds throughout the temperate and sub-tropical Americas, Europe, Asia, New Zealand (where it is currently the most common duck species), and Australia.

 

The male birds have a bright green head, while the female's is light brown. The Mallard lives in wetlands, eats water plants, and is gregarious. It is also migratory. The Mallard is the ancestor of all domestic ducks, and can interbreed with other species of genus Anas.[2] This interbreeding is causing rarer species of ducks to become genetically diluted.

 

The Mallard is 56–65 centimetres (22–26 in) long, has a wingspan of 81–98 centimetres (32–39 in), and weighs 0.9–1.2 kilograms (32–42 oz). The breeding male is unmistakable, with a bright green head, black rear end and a yellowish orange (can also contain some red) bill tipped with black (as opposed to the dark brown bill in females), and is also nature's most feared duck. The female Mallard is light brown, like most female dabbling ducks. However, both the female and male Mallards have distinct purple speculum edged with white, prominent in flight or at rest (though temporarily shed during the annual summer moult). In non-breeding (eclipse) plumage the drake becomes drab, looking more like the female, but still distinguishable by its yellow bill and reddish breast.

 

In captivity, domestic ducks come in wild-type plumages, white, and other colours. Most of these colour variants are also known in domestic Mallards not bred as livestock, but kept as pets, aviary birds, etc., where they are rare but increasing in availability.

 

A noisy species, the male has a nasal call, the female has a "quack" stereotypically associated with ducks.[3]

 

The Mallard is a rare example of both Allen's Rule and Bergmann's Rule in birds. Bergmann's Rule, which states that polar forms tend to be larger than related ones from warmer climates, has numerous examples in birds. Allen's Rule says that appendages like ears tend to be smaller in polar forms to minimize heat loss, and larger in tropical and desert equivalents to facilitate heat diffusion, and that the polar taxa are stockier overall. Examples of this rule in birds are rare, as they lack external ears. However, the bill of ducks is very well supplied with blood vessels and is vulnerable to cold.

 

A ruddy duck makes his own ripples by vibrating his chest.

Mandarin ducks in the UK, are the descendants of captive-bred ducks which escaped or were deliberately released.

They are now established in small flocks in south, central and eastern England,

( small numbers occur in Wales, Northern England and Scotland too.)

They like lakes with plenty of overhanging trees and bushes.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ez3070161

 

Duck floating on the surface of the forest lake

From the archives,,, two different marshes,,,,, two different Wood Ducks.

Duck Fight!

Northern Shovelers Duking it out for the right to breed.

Wood Duck (Aix Sposa)

 

I just think they are so incredibly beautiful.

 

Nikon D500 - 300 f/4 prime - ISO 400 - f/7.1 - 1/1250

 

Please consider investing in the private conservation of critical habitats. Check out nature.org (Nature Conservancy) for one great option.

 

My page: Melissa James Photography

I never tire of the beautiful Wood Duck. This one made me smile and I hope it makes you smile too.

This duck must have wanted it's photo taken, considering that you'd think it would of done something about that odd feather on it's head first haha.

My favourite duck times two.

One of at least 4 male Mandarin duck (Aix galericulata) at the Eyeworth pond near Fritham. Its mate was so like the female Wood duck it was hard to tell them apart.

Taken at Hornsby Bend, Austin, Texas.

Male Wood Duck in a spring rain.

Many thanks for your kind comments, appreciated, Trev

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SNAPDECISIONS !'s most interesting photos on Flickriver

Landa Park, New Braunfels, Comal County, Texas

Male Mallard Duck

The Wood Duck is one of the most stunningly pretty of all waterfowl. Males are iridescent chestnut and green, with ornate patterns on nearly every feather; the elegant females have a distinctive profile and delicate white pattern around the eye. These birds live in wooded swamps, where they nest in holes in trees or in nest boxes put up around lake margins. They are one of the few duck species equipped with strong claws that can grip bark and perch on branches.

Steamer Point Nature Reserve near Highcliffe Christchurch Dorset and a female duck and her mirror perfect reflection.

Yay! My first wood duck! to ever even see one in person and/or to capture one with my camera.....it was very bright out...so I had to tinker with this one in Lightroom..and also applied one of Rebecca Lily's Lightroom Presets, Fresh Perspective...Rebecca has amazing presets for Lightroom..please see Rebecca Lily's Profile for more info...

 

I always forget to use a polarize filter on bright and super sunny days...which this was definitely a day of hot and bright sunlight...taken at the L.A. Arboretum in Arcadia...90 plus degrees...as I arrived at 11:30...and walked almost the whole 137 acres of property...with two cameras, 4 lenses including my fave 100-400mm lens..and my purse, which I had two lenses stashed away in. All this after only getting 4 hours of sleep the night before...I was sweating so bad..into my eyes, etc. There were hummingbirds there too..but I was too hot to stand around and wait for them to come to the flowers, etc. no shade to speak of...I will definitely want to return to this place in cooler weather...lots of photo ops..Anyway, around 2:30 as I was visiting the Queen Anne Cottage..I noticed the reflections of this pond and decided to take some shots when I got thru looking at the house ... so I did my tour..taking pics of the stuff inside this old house thru the glass windows..and then walked to the pond..as I approached .. I saw there was a duck in the pond..and then when I got him in my view..I saw that red eye! He was gliding along at a pretty good clip..so i just kept taking pics until he rounded the bend. There really wasn't any time for making manual setting adjustments to the camera..so I was lucky to get any shots at all I suppose..and getting these pics really made my day...Happy Gorgeous Green Thursday! I have been waiting for this day to come since last Friday! ;-D...and could wait no longer...posting late Wednesday night! Ta-Da!

  

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Ducks on Loch Lomond at Luss

  

DSD_6141

Duck - off home

 

Kamera: Fujifilm Finepix HS50 EXR

:copyright: 2017-03 by Richard von Lenzano

richard.von.lenzano@gmail.com

Mandarin Duck - Cleethorpes.

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