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design thinking, d school lectur notes

I thought the stained glass and alcoves of Mem Chu would provide a nice HDR exposure range.

 

I’ll be heading over to the Stanford d.school later today for the Creating Infectious Action mini conference with Paul Saffo and some other blokes.

 

It’s a free event at Hewlett 201, 3:30-7:00pm. Here is the agenda.

treffen der d-school alumni

Students from the Stanford d.School visit the Citrix Santa Clara office to learn about our physical space and the future of the workplace with mobile workstyles.

 

Students took tours of our campus and participated in a design challenge - "How would you design the workplace of the future?"

 

Employees from Customer Experience joined as a panel to provide feedback to student designs.

 

Photographer credit: Steve Silvas

Students from the Stanford d.School visit the Citrix Santa Clara office to learn about our physical space and the future of the workplace with mobile workstyles.

 

Students took tours of our campus and participated in a design challenge - "How would you design the workplace of the future?"

 

Employees from Customer Experience joined as a panel to provide feedback to student designs.

 

Photographer credit: Steve Silvas

culturalbytes.com/post/108344896/design-thinking-as-a-cre...

I just discovered this whole field called "DESIGN THINKING." It's a process for designing practical and creative resolutions for an end action/product/program that brings about improvement for a group of people. What I like about this process is that it defines itself against ANALYTICAL THINKING - because design thinking is a "creative process based around the 'building up' of ideas. There are no judgments early on in design thinking. This eliminates the fear of failure and encourages maximum input and participation in the ideation and prototype phases."

NO JUDGEMENTS!!! This is big! So much of "analytical thinking" is about coming up with ideas that don't look or sound stupid and ideas with minimum chances of failure. But that prevents people from thinking creatively and working as a team because everyone is too invested in their ego or their discipline or their theory.

EVERYDAY KNOWLEDGE! What I like about this philosophy is that it mirrors how people think about solutions in everyday life before they are socialized into institutionalized forms of thinking that require theoretical considerations or busines models. All around the world people are engaging in design thinking! India has been really good at tracking innovations by ordinary people who don't have "design degrees" or have elite business social networks. Check out the National Innovation Foundation and Honeybee Network.

MULTIDISCIPLINARY THINKING!!! Yah I love things that promote multidisciplinary in a genuine way that values the role of professionals who work on understaning human values - so lookie I know where I fit in! There's me - ethnographer/sociologist/anthopologist! I have a place in this world - this is so exciting :) I love learning about new business models and technologies - but at the end of the day i'm not a technologist or a hard-core business person - but my entry into both of those worlds is from the perspective of understanding the cultural practices and beliefs of new users who are consuming new technologies. Companies, like Google and P&G, are using this process to understand new markets. This makes me excited that I am employable in non-academic sectors! (thanks Tania Menendez! for the link)

 

IT's ABOUT PEOPLE! Design thinking brings it all back to the humans - humans are the ones who use and interfact products - so this process is all about putting humans in all their capacities in the center.

The three approaches to Design Thinking are (cited from here):

1. Proactively understand customer needs and cultural norms unique to each country.

2. Use those insights to run low-fidelity, strategic experiments.

3. Use the resulting assumptions to drive the development of local business models, including product development, marketing and branding, sales and distribution, and manufacturing.

Stanford has a whole institute dedicated to Design Thinking- The Hasso Plattner School of Design at STandford, started by David Kelly, the founder of IDEO. The whole philosophy at IDEO is Design Thinking:

 

Because design is messy and non-linear, each project we do is bespoke. We customize it for the challenge at hand. The scoping of the project plan is when our approach starts to take shape, and where our partnership with you begins...An inherently shared approach, design thinking brings together people from different disciplines to effectively explore new ideas—ideas that are more human-centered, that are better able to be executed, and that generate valuable new outcomes.

 

And I love Tom Brown's (CEO of IDEO) blog on Design Thinking.

Team Tatu, Project Talanta

Stanford D-school interior elements.

Design and fabrication by Because We Can

www.becausewecan.org/Stanford_Dschool

Stanford D-school interior elements.

Design and fabrication by Because We Can

www.becausewecan.org/Stanford_Dschool

Team Kitchen Sink, Project mChango

 

sms reminders for improving muti-stage vaccine compliance

 

and larger vision of becoming mobile electronic vaccination record

Stanford D-school interior elements.

Design and fabrication by Because We Can

www.becausewecan.org/Stanford_Dschool

Team Tatu, Project Talanta

d.school opening at Stanford.

 

The walls can be shuffled about the cavernous spaces.

 

As Hasso Plattner from SAP strolled through this section he exclaimed "we need to copy this."

Photos by HPI School of Design Thinking

Stanford D-school interior elements.

Design and fabrication by Because We Can

www.becausewecan.org/Stanford_Dschool

The duct tape & aluminum foil dress was fashion forward.

 

I found a design alcove downstairs with the dress sketched on a whiteboard and rolls of duct tape laying around.

 

Everything about this place makes you want to go back to school again.

Workshop bibliotheque dschool

Sam Goldman and Ned Tozun were delighted to win the DFJ Venture Challenge today. They now have $250K to pursue their dream: to make kerosene lanterns a part of history, where they belong.

 

www.dlightdesign.com provides cheap solid-state lighting to the developing world, where 2 billion people live without access to electricity, and use kerosene lamps and candles for lighting.

 

Ironically, kerosene lighting is one of the most expensive ways to light a home (consuming up to 30% of family income in many cases).

 

Kerosene lamps kill or seriously burn millions of children per year, and are a leading cause of indoor air pollution.

 

Over a five-year period, one kerosene lamp releases one ton of CO2 into the air (equivalent to driving a car from SF to NYC).

 

With their portable power light, d.light hopes to be able to boost safety, health, productivity and education while saving cost.

 

Here you see their reaction to the applause.

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