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July is all summer-time here. Bees, blueberries and lilies. Not to mention sweet peas.

 

After a couple of weeks where we focused on some photoshoots and book pitches, as things move forward with these projects - the garden continues to remind us that there is no stopping. I don't know if it's because this is some extraordinary summer here in New England, or if it's because this is my first summer not sitting in the sterile confines of an air conditioned office with no windows (probably the later!), but outdoors - it feels as if it is 1987 again - and not just because teal and purple are coming back!

 

I like to take cutting from our many coleus, they root in just a week and a half and I can spread them throughout the garden and in containers.

 

Having the luxury of time - early morning sunrise, mid day iced tea, late evening fireflies - the garden feels more alive than ever. I'ver been taking on little projects (both freelance design projects, as well as personal ones) so I'm still busy. I even designed my first major garden for a work colleague, which ended up being a serious undertaking with tractors, rock movers and thousands of plants. It came out beautiful if I say so myself, but next summer will be the real test. Look out Oudolf!

In my home garden, now that the secret photoshoot is over (it went remarkably well and the photos looked so beautiful - I can hardly wait until next summer!), I can focus more on my book and all of the other projects which went on hold for a few weeks. We had a few garden clubs call to ask if they could come for a garden tour, but I declined - knowing that next June we would be going through the same thing again. It's so hard to get a garden like ours in shape for 'fancy people'. True plant people understand, and overlook the extra flats of tomatoes that never made it into the garden, or the old crumbled bags of promix on the deck shoved under a lawn chair - not to mention the towers of black plastic pots everywhere.

 

A special seedling that I bought at Bunker Farm in Vermont - I lost the label though - any thoughts?

 

Sweet Pea season is so short, only a month if not a few weeks, but we are thrilled with this years' results.

 

For those whom spend more time in a car, a plane or in a cubicle often forget is that there is this world out there - a world where the fireflies come out at dusk (usually when I was commuting home on a long, one hour drive), a world where wild blueberries scent the air along with native rhododendrons (azalea species in the woodland) - and yes, blueberries have a scent when the warm sun gently releases the fragrance - maybe the best reason why one should never eat refrigerated blueberry, although, the hybrid store-bought berries only hint of this flavor and scent, at room temperature, one can barely detect it. Details, details.

 

My seed raised Rhodochiton atrosanguineum is looking fine. I was able to winter it over as a seedling in the greenhouse, but now that it is warm outside, it's beginning to show its color.

 

In some ways, the season of summer has many periods, the early summer of June, the high summer of late August with it's tomatoes, droning night insects and abundance of produce, but the July summer is different. For only three weeks or so, at least here in the North East, July Summer provides us with a sense of endlessness.

 

The last of the cut flower sweet peas are filling the vases of the house.

 

A hopeful season, young plants and even some seedlings are still growing, the foliage on most trees has not yet matured, insects are hatching still, many bird species are on their second or even third broods, and the days are long - even though the longest day of the year happened just two weeks ago around the June, Summer Solstice, the day length remains longest of the year until next week when the slowly grow shorter, even though the warmest temperatures of the year have yet to grace us with the dog days of summer. That comes early August.

 

Nasturtium 'Hermine Grashoff' thrives in a pot of sweet peas. This sterile rarity can only be shared by cuttings, an old cultivar, for those who have it, it is cherished. It must be kept through the winter in a greenhouse, or perhaps a cool windowsill. I struck a dozen cuttings from my mother plant this spring, and planted them together.

 

Mid July marks many milestones for the gardener. The daylillies and true lilies are beginning to open, the first summer vegetables are coming in, especially the early summer Cole crops of kohlrabi, early and mid-season cabbage, and the last of the peas. The well planned veg garden can really show off in July as shell peas complete their season and second crops are planted in newly prepared ground where spring lettuce or early beets once stood.

 

Epic Celtuce - maybe the only vegetable you have never tasted? Time to change that, right? I'm addicted.

 

In vegetable growing areas things are progressing nicely. I learned that Celtuce will split if it gets too mature and too wet, so while the first harvest was amazing - all crispy and sweet, the second harvest a week later was a disaster - so chalk up another learning opportunity! Celtuce, or stem lettuce will however always be on my spring rotation schedule. It's worth growing a yummy vegetable that one cannot find in the market.

 

The wet summer allowed the kohrabi to grow uninterrupted by drought, producing large, tender bulbs. I allowed the purple variety to grow larger, and at this size they are still not woody.

 

Kohlrabi is a crop that I have raised here since I was a junior high student. My parents had never heard of it, but I assume I was inspired by someone exhibiting it at the Worcester County Horticultural Society mid-summer shows back then in the 70's at Horticultural Hall, so I needed to grow it so that I could never and compete. Today, it still reminds me of those summers. Carefully weeding around the purple kohlrabi so that I would not ruin the bloom on the bulbous stem, and then carefully harvesting it by pulling the plant out by the root and not the ball.

 

Some varieties of Kohlrabi are bred to grow large. This one, called 'Kossack' is one of them. This one is still young.

 

Few vegetables taste as good fresh picked (you know - with the water boiling on the stove before you go out to pick - as the old-timers say!) as kohlrabi. Sweet corn comes to mind for most people, but there are many vegetables that taste extraordinarily better when only moments old. Peas definitely taste better when instantly picked and cooked, dressed with just sweet butter and sea salt - these are the simply joys of keeping a summer garden.

We stock up on good butter too - not commercial brands like Land O Lakes, because of the added water, but good Vermont butter (Cabot is close to perfect with it's higher milk fat) - next week we are attending the Vermont Cheese Makers Festival, and will surely be coming home with not only cheese, but amazing local butter. Keeping it simple, but oh, so fresh and pure. If you bother to choose heirloom or fine seed, tend to your plants with care, why not carry that through to the kitchen? Especially if there are only three ingredients in your dish. Go all the way.

 

Yes, I grow a bit of corn. You might be surprised how well sweet corn will do in a small space. Set a 1 foot apart on a grid, this 10 x 10 foot bed will give us a few meals this summer, as well as decorative stalks for fall decoration.

 

I'm still planting seed in the vegetable garden as well, as many of you are. Second crops of beans, transplanting melons that were keeping warm in the greenhouse, pole beans and dry shell beans replace the sweet peas (the cut flower ones) on the trellis and netting rows, and fall crops are being ready to be planted.

This is the sign of an experienced gardener - not just merely crop rotation, but crop planning and it all comes down to experience and planning. This week, we harvested the last of the English peas or shell peas, the last of the broad (or Lava) beans and far too many stem lettuce which all matured at once (at least the ones that didn't split from the rain and heat).

The extra peas (yes, we had a surplus - can you believe that!) we blanched and froze in 2 cup zip-lock bags (I mean, only 6 cups but still!) , as well as the extra broad beans which I blanched and froze for winter. We're not big on freezing, coming from a family that canned more than they froze - a bit old school I know. So, beside from berries, those are the only vegetables we freeze for winter enjoyment, everything else from the garden is canned in a pressure cooker.

 

The broad beans (or lava beans) enjoyed our long, cool spring and early summer. Here in New England, we never know what weather will plague us! This year, the broad beans performed so well, that I had to pinch out the growing tips to let them focus on maturing pods in time, and to reduce aphids which prefer the tender new growth.

 

I can't tell you how much I despise frozen beans or frozen zucchini. I crave canned yellow wax beans however. I love the mushy, salty grey flavor, don't ask me why. I suppose because I grew up on it. I find frozen veggies tasteless, if not squeaky which balances well with their rubbery texture I know. My mom always said that the sign of a lazy or inexperienced gardener or cook is that they freeze their vegetables rather than can them!). I'm sure to get notes on that, but remember, my mom who was born in 1919 was a depression era mom and taught canning at our extension service. She expected that we all would learn how to properly pick and can wild mushrooms and wax beans.

Even though I am home for this summer, the tasks and chores feel endless, but I do feel as if I can do them when I wish with less stress - often weeding early in the morning before the sun rises, or late in the evening as I am one of those guys whom mosquito's hate (not so for Joe!). It's been a wet summer here. with thunderstorms most every day so we've been blessed with water - only having to water once so far (unlike last year).

 

We're running out of space, so Joe decided to dig up the 'ol golf green', a putting green that once used to be the jewel in the crown of our garden (when my parents lived here) but now nothing much to look at as the special mower broke and was too expensive to replace. Our trusty Troy Bilt rototiller came out and in a few hours we turned this once lawn into a melon and dahlia bed (for this year - we have plans for it).

 

Staying current with the garden is always a challenge, although I created a box with seeds organized in it by variety and type, and one category for fall planting which means July). This week or next I will be sowing many fall crops including rutabaga, turnips, beets and winter cabbage. Winter growing plants for the greenhouse as well as summer biennials must be sown now as well, so I took some time to sow two additional varieties of Reseda odorata (Mignonette) for potted greenhouse plants that will bloom in late winter, as well as schizanthus and Primula obconic and P malacoides - two winter blooming primroses for the greenhouse.

 

I'm growing around 30 varieties of chili peppers this year, and many are in pots which they perform perfectly well in if I use fresh professional potting mix (never last years').

 

For two guys who really like mild to moderately hot peppers, I am raising numerous pots and plants of some of the hottest chili peppers this year. Inspired by Dr. Amy Goldman's collections that we marveled at late last summer while visiting her amazing farm in upstate New York we decided that we needed to amp up our chili knowledge. The plants are beautiful as it is, and we know that pepper appreciation takes some time (and some burned lips) to improve our Scoville Unit tolerance.

It's a trend though, we know, for many local growers offered plants of 'Carolina Reaper' "the ghost peppers', 'Hinklehatz' (I know - the name alone!) and many peppers with names that derive from, well, Hell, or the word 'Satin'.

I do like hot sauce so that is on my fall hobby list (no that I need to add to that list!), and at the very least, the plants look gorgeous in most every Guy Wolff pot that we have, for I didn't need to set out rows of hot peppers anywhere - those rows have been dedicated to varieties like 'Sweet Cherry' or jalapeño varieties- more our speed.

 

Here in the north, Okra does best in large pots. I am growing many varieties this year, and they are just beginning to take off with the hot and humid weather.

 

Thanks for everyone who wrote me about my book proposal - I can't say much about this current one, but I can say that we are at contract stage, and all looks great - I am very excited to be approached and offered such a deal - I hope that it all works out, I'm sure that it will. I will be busy photographing veggies and how-to shots for the next year, but it will be worth it. Stay tuned for release dates, titles, etc over the next two years.

 

Red currants and gooseberries are ripening, but only enough this year for cereal or garnish as this is their second year.

 

Much of the yard was cleaned up for this photo shoot we hosted, so new gravel had to be spread on the walks. Now that we are past that, Joe begins digging up the golf green for another garden.

  

Daph moves a little slower after corralling the chickens back to their coop - one of her jobs, she thinks.

 

Grout Hill Farm in New Hampshire, and the garden of garden designer and author Kristian Fenderson and Alston Barrett - a garden chock full of rare trees and plants, and only open rarely for garden tours - it was open this past weekend for a very special event.

 

Also this past weekend we visited the garden of Kris Fenderson and Alston Barrett. Kris has been our dearest friend for decades but this visit came with sorrow - Alston, Kris's partner for many decades years was struck and killed by a car just 2 weeks ago while preparing for this garden tour, which he loved so much. A fundraiser for Friends of Grout Hill, a non-profit dedicated to the preservation this farm and garden which they both have created of which moneys support local charity events.

 

The garden is open rarely- every other year for a special a benefit for the town they live in in Southern New Hampshire near the border of Vermont, and sometimes for Garden Conservancy tours - a difficult decisions I'm sure, but Kris felt that the garden tour must still go on as Alston would have wanted it that way (we gardeners are tough stock!).

 

Driving there we hit a terrible thunderstorm with hail and wind making the drive almost impossible, but once we began up Kris and Alston's dirt road and driveway that lead up the hill to this magnificent and special garden, the sky cleared and everything turned spectacular and glorious, sparkling from the rain as cooling breezed blew away the clouds.

 

Joe admiring the stone steps behind the house.

 

Kris is well known as an expert on the genus primula, and although many attend his rare tours hoping to see the Himalayan Blue Poppies of which he is notorious for (a 40 year old colony), it's his primroses that are the real gems. Here, blue Primula capitata. The street was full of candelabra types and many species were planted around the garden.

 

As we were leaving Kris and and Altons' farm, I saw this taped to a mature Amur Cork Tree (the property is like an arboretum with countless specimens of rare or interesting trees). Clearly, it was hastily attached to this trunk with a soulful purpose and message which we can call appreciate.

 

www.growingwithplants.com/2017/07/mid-summer-magnificence...

Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_28_1

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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1 »T '• 18 than a pound of cure." The natural preventive for all these difiEerent spots, fairy ring, etc., is nothing but fresh, dry air and careful watering. This should convince us that syringing is to be discontinued as soon as the weather prevents us, in early winter, from giv- ing sufficient fresh air to keep the at- mosphere pure. But now, while we are trying to pre- vent fungous diseases, we cultivate red spider. This is quite a problem, as the only real preventive for this obnoxious little animal is cold water, with thirty pounds of pressure behind it. I fight it in fall, when the days are still bright and sunny, and give it a rest un- til the days get longer and warmer, so I can open the ventilators to dry the plants after a good soaking. In fact, I would rather have a little rust than a dose of spider. I must not forget our other living friend, the green fly. I call it friend. It is a friend as com- pared with the other fellows we have to put up with. There is no excuse for its being in the greenhouses, as only a little smudge every week will keep it out entirely. Of course, if it gets its own way it will spoil the foliage and may even take enough substance out of the buds to cause them to split. Here I must say, however, that this is not the only cause of splitting. I think un- even temperature is what chiefly does the work. Of course, some varieties are more subject to it than others, so it can not bo prevented entirely. As to chemical remedies for all these differ- ent troubles, I have little to say. I have tried a few of them, but with rather poor results. So I prefer to stick to prevention; let others take to cure, if they choose. Benches or Solid Beds? Which are best for carnations, solid beds or raised benches? To this ques- tion I must give the same answer as 1 have given many times before. In solid beds I can grow good stock if I am half asleep, but when I grew them in raised benches I found it necessary to be wide awake all the time. This difference lies in the watering. If you can keep away from the hose long enough to give them a chance to dry out once in a while, solid beds are all right. As to the varieties to grow, I leave that to each grower himself. He knows best which are the most profit- able for him to grow and which bring him the most money, or which his trade demands. As to new kinds, I will say it is nice to have something new every year, for the pleasure you get out of it, but I do not think it profitable for the smaller grower to invest much in things that he does not know, because every dollar spent has to be made again. It is up to the larger' grower to try everything that is promising, and he, if he strikes something good, has the room to make all he can out of it. Timing the Crops. In order to regulate our crops to ad- vantage, we should try to have the heaviest cut in midwinter, be oflf crop in Lent and come in again heavier for Decoration time, when flowers as a rule are not too plentiful. To accomplish this, a little pruning is essential. Dur- ing winter, while taking cuttings, I trim out all weak growth which is likely to come in bloom at a wrong time. This helps to strengthen the re- maining shoots for a good spring crop. The Weekly Florists' Review. May 25, 1911. At this time of the year it is far bet- ter to have a slightly smaller number of flowers and to have them good. This will also help to keep the faker from the streets; 25-cent sales will not be necessary, and yet we will realize more money for our goods in the end. If all the growers work toward this end, a great deal can be accomplished. I know the retailer will appreciate it. It is pretty hard to ask 75 cents or even 50 cents a dozen for carnations if on the other side of the street they are sold for 25 cents. ^l»%J^^'im^(mi^(di^f^i^f^i^<^i^<^^-i^-^^ IMPRESSIONS

 

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OF AMERICA .<<%.<»^.<«%.<^4^<#^<<^-fer»>^fe-4^»)-fer»>-fer»>H^r»>Hfe»>Hg^ I J By a. Prickett, Tottenham, England. On reaching New York, American friends piloted us around the wholesale florists' stores in the city. All doors were thrown open to us and we were interested in the methods explained to us. Our eyes were opened to the large quantities of roses and carnations han- dled. Cold chambers at all the estab- lishments are useful for holding over unsold stock until the following day. In all the cities we visited the florists were most cordial in their welcomes. Their nurseries and seed stores exceed- ed my expectations, not only in the quantities of flowers grown but in the methods that prevailed. The green- houses and heating arrangements are far ahead of anything I have seen in the old country. At Chicago, an unin- terrupted view of five acres of carna- tions under glass, planted out on raised beds, was a sight never to be forgotten. I think their methods of greenhou.e building are in advance of ours; with them money seems to be no object. The Boston show was a grand affair, but in my opinion the old country can go one better, excepting, perhaps, on roses and carnations. In the nurseries the plants for market are not so good as grown around London for Covent Garden market. Cut roses, carnations and sweet peas were grand for the time of the year. By John S. Gunu, Birmingham. In giving my impressions of America, the one which stands out the most prominent and which gave me the most pleasure, was the hearty welcome ex- tended to us by all the florists and growers we met there, and the genial and good fellowship that they h.-id for each other. I should think that the cut flower trade has grown very rapidly during the last ten years, on account of the immense glass structures that have been erected during that time, espe- cially for roses and carnations, which are grown to the highest perfection, although some of the varieties of roses would be unsuitable for our British cut flower trade. All plants seem to be looked upon from a cut flower stand- point only. Any varieties that do not give a good and continuous crop are discarded by the grower, which loaves the florist with little variety. Our visit to Boston show was of great interest, as it gave ns a more general idea of what is grown in this country. As we expected, the roses and carnations were very fine, as also were the sweet peas. Plenty of the latter, shown on the first prize table of Mr. Sim, had stems eighteen inches and over, carrying large flowers, all winter flowering varieties. They were very good indeed. Two other very fine ex- hibits were those of Mr. Eoland's; one a group of acacias, well flowered, in- cluding some choice varieties; the other rambler roses, well grown and of a good color. The plant trade of America, gen- erally, seems to be in the har^ds of the various seedsmen, who impbrt large quantities of roses and flowering shrubs from Holland. Plants used for bedding seem to be coleus, fuchsias, heliotropes, geraniuins, etc. These ajp grown in large quantities by one or two grow- ers, who supply the seedsmen direct as required. There is also a large quantity of dahlias in the best varieties grown for this trade. Cannas and gladioli are planted very largely, these are grown for the retail trade in California. No attempt seems to be made at villa gar- dening beyond leveling the turf and planting one or two rambler roses and clematis to grow over the verandas. This gives the suburbs of the large cities a very bare and impoverished appearance. There is much food for thought at the way things are done in the United States and the quickness with which they seem to clinch on to an idea and carry it through. By J. Brown, Stamford, England. At Philadelphia we were the guests of W. Atlee Burpee, who took us for a motor drive around the city and parks. An inspection of his seed establishment followed. We were surprised to find such a large, well-ordered establish- ment, from which enormous quantities of seeds are distributed to all parts. We also visited the nurseries of Henry Dreer, a well-managed place, with many acres of glass, where palms, ferns, roses and stove and greenhouse plants gen- erally are represented in tens of thou- sands. Our visit to Vincents' nurseries at White Marsh we looked forward to with pleasure, and we were not disap- pointed. Enormous quantities of ge- raniums are sent out, also dahlias, can- nas, etc., and celery and other vege- table plants. Messrs. Vincent must dis- tribute millions of plants in a year. The sons are all good business 'men. Yes, altogether a smart business place. While at Washington, a fine city, with magnificent buildings, we visited the nurseries of the Gude brothers. Amer- ican Beauty roses are a great feature, also carnations, liliums, hydrangeas, etc. I have very pleasant memories of all I saw in Washington.

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_25_1

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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About This Book: Catalog Entry

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6S The Weekly Florists^ Review* Decbmbeb 23, 1900. DETROIT. The Market Merry Christmas! Every indication at present points to a Christmas business that will outclass all previous years. Christmas choppers are beginning to realize the ad- vantage of doing their buying earlier, and the flower store men of this city have also felt that the public is buying earlier this year. This is but Sunday, still a visit to the retail stores will show you many ferns, palms, jardinieres, etc., with ' * sold'' tickets on them. There is little to say about the cut flower stock. Flowers of every descrip- tion have been none too plentiful for some time. Last week there was a big demand for valley, roses, violets, orchids, etc., as there were several debutantes. There was also considerable funeral work and it is a tough proposition to make up large designs with but few white flow- ers, and these worth their weight in gold. No doubt there will be plenty of flowers after Christmas. There was much more truth than poetry in the paper of Charles Fox of Phila- delphia, published in the Review Decem- ber 9. The writer got the opinion of sev- •eral prominent store men of this city on this article and each one thought it splen- did and hoped the time was not far dis- tant when the growers would wake up to the fact that the outrageous prices asked at Christmas were most detrimental to our business. The high price of ground pine has created a demand for laurel festooning, the latter being more in evidence than ■ever before. Many of the better stores are also becoming tired of ground pine garlands. Varioua Notes. A glance at some of the store windows of the florists this week is all that is necessary to tell one that it is Christmas time. Poinsettias, natural and almost natural, without which Christmas would be almost impossible, are of course the predominating feature in nearly every -window. In one of Breitmeyer's windows is a fine display of Dresden china. Sullivan's window is prettily trimmed with gar- lands, bells, poinsettias, etc. W. B. Brown is strong on brassware and is mak- ing a good showing of this. An uncle of Herman Knope died in Chicago last week and Herman went to •Chicago, intending to attend the funeral, but his own children being sick with •flcarlet fever he stayed but one day. The Twentieth Century Club building was twice beautifully decorated this week. Monday the decorations were done by B. Schroeter and Tuesday by Breitmeyer's. H. S. €reeolioase Heating. NO FUEL SHORTAGE. In order to relieve the mind of the public in the northwest and prove that there is no danger of a coal famine, the St. Paul roads have begun to haul coal from the Illinois fields to the Twin ■Cities in train loads. Enough coal will be poured into the northwest to prove that the railroads are able to handle all the fuel that is needed. For the purpose of further relieving the public appre- hension which has arisen on account of the statements with respect to the coal

 

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No More Ruined Stock No More Sleepless Nights ThiB little ADJUSTABLE THERMOSTAT does the work. Set the instrument at the minimum temperature wanted. It will ring a bell at the head of your bed when that temperature is reached. Loyd C. BuQcb. of Fredonia. Kan., writes: "I have used this kind of Thermo- stat four years and it has never failed. I set it at the minimum temperature I want, and KG to bed and sleep soundly until my bell at the head of my bed wakes me." Complete outfit, only $2.50 Includes TbermoBtat, alarm bell, 2 dry battery cells, 150 ft. insulated wire, switch, tape and staples. Full instructions for installation with each outfit. Anybody can put it up. Manhattan Electrical Supply Co. 188 Fifth Ave., CHICAQO, ILL. Mention The Review when you write. WILKS Hot Water Bolfers Are The Most Economical BoUer tor GreenliouseB t: tt No night fireman required with our Self-feeding Ho^> Water Boilers. tnd for Cataloiue and Prices 8. WILKS MFG. CO. 3523 Shields Ave., CHICAGO Mention The Review when you write. situation, railroad managers have had a canvass made of the mines along their lines. The result is the statement that none of the Illinois mines is running full time, on account of the slack demand for coal. STEAM FOR THREE HOUSES. Enclosed you ■will find a plan of my greenhouses, which will be built next spring. I should like to know how to heat these with steam, and also what kind and size of boiler would be best. I should like a low pressure system. The boiler room will be five feet deep. The greenhouse walls will be of concrete, four and one-half feet high, with eighteen inches of glass in the south wall. The two large houses will have solid beds of concrete construction, one foot high. The houses will be used for chrysanthemums and sweet peas, or lilies. I am located in northern Illinois. J. E. F. As near as can be determined from the plan, there are two houses about 24x117 feet and one house 12x117 feet. The ridge is nearly twelve feet high in the wider houses and nine feet high in the narrow house. To heat these houses to 50 degrees a boiler with a rating of about twenty-five horse-power will be desirable, as, in addi- tion to supplying 1,200 square feet of radiating surface for the greenhouses, there is a large oflBce to heat. In the wider houses it will be well to run a 2-inch overhead main and then use eight 1^4-inch returns. The returns can be on the walls and along the side of the Leaks Ruin Stock Don't Have Them Our Emergency Pipe Clamps are made of malleable Iron and are guaranteed to make QUICK, SURE RE- PAIRS of all splits or rust boles on pipe. ■|V'!ll I;,.///

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_3

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

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;,*>---jt-?.-.-^;.f'"A-*f-.:#-f 566 The Weekly Florists^ Review^ MAY 4, 1899. which he cut about 19,000 flowers that netted him an average of about ?10 a hundred. He went into lilies rather heavier than usual, feeling that as Easter was early he would make a fair strike. If he succeeded In getting them all In on time. He will grow only half as many for next Easter, which will be later (April 15), feeling that more crops will be in on time and that consequently he will have more competition In the market. Last year he had half 7x9 and half 9x11 Japanese longiflorum. Next year he will have all 9x11 bulbs. This size will produce 6 to 8 flowers while the 7x9 produce only 4 to 5 and the plants require the same space and expense in handling. And when there are splits among the large bulbs the Indi- vidual parts are strong enough to produce something which is not apt to be the case with splits among the smaller bulbs. He notes flve distinct varieties among the Japanese longiflorum. One known as Takeslma Is very distinct. The foliage is narrow, stem brown and not quite so tall as that of the type and flowers borne In a circle. It force* very readily, produces more flowers from a bulb of equal size and the bulbs seldom split. He had only 1,000 Harrisii the past season and lost half of these from disease. He has not yet succeeded in finding a remedy for the disease though he has tried a number of things that were recommended. He believes that even should the mites be killed aftCT the bulbs are received it is too late to prevent the disease as the damage has been done before the bulbs arrive. And killing the mites is exceedingly difficult for they bur- row into the tissues of the plant in such a way that it is practically im- possible to reach them all without destroying the bulb. The grower of the bulbs must eradicate the mites from the soil of his flelds in order to insure bulbs free from the pest. If he could obtain Harrisii free from disease he would have no use for the longi- florum, as the Harrisii produces much more freely.

 

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For Decoration Day. Decoration Day will soon be here and we think a few words about the oooasion will be most appropriate. Now, dear friends. Decoration Day, both from a sentimental as well as a business point of view, should mean more than It does to the florist; the purpose of the event is most essential- ly floricultural. It is a day upon which the nation turns to us for the wreaths to place on the graves of Its heroic dead, and it must be admitted that we very often—yes, too often—only feebly respond to the call. We are too prone to look upon the sublime cusrtom of decorating the graves of the brave and the true in a sordid light; we demand full payment for all we do. We de- pend upon the sentiment of the people for a living, yet we hate to be con- sidered sentimental. We cannot help thinking how much the florists could do to make the Day and the Act more glorious by merely devoting a little thought to It, and, my friends, there is no reason why we should neglect It. We have noticed with a good deal of regret, too, that the custom of deco- rating the public monuments is yearly decreasing; there are two possible rea- sons responsible for this—bad taste In decorating and over-<5hargIng; both could easily be avoided. We have oft- en seen garlands of laurel twisted around the body and head of a statue of Washington, making the most ri- diculous picture; again, potted plants would be put under Lincoln's arm, tin- foiled anchors on Farragut's sword, and wreaths of flowers 'round Grant's neck; and, mind you, these things were done by men who called them- selves florists. When we think of these desecrations we are inclined to for- give, nay, to thank, the Grand Army Posts and other societies for stopping it Now, how nice it would be, and how little it would cost, if the Florists' Club In each city would artistically decorate Washington's monument on Decoration Day; it would be a grateful act; it would educate the public; it would induce other societies to deco- rate other monuments—yes. It would remind even individuals that they had a duty to perform, and In numerous other ways tend to increase the de- mand for flowers and greens that day. The materials for the decoration would be gladly given by the members and the best artists in your city should be asked to arrange them. Again, we will see G. A. R. Posts march to cemeteries with all manner of artiflcial stuff; this could be changed, for the sentiment expressed in natural and beautiful flowers will always win where grateful hearts are appealed to. See if you cannot get the Grand Army Post or Sons of Veterans in your district to each carry a small wreath when they go to decorate the graves. You can make the wreaths cheaply and act generously with them; they will not be inclined to forget it; their trade will repay you for what- ever degree of generosity you show, though I believe there are very many that would be willing to pay you well for the suggestion and satisfactory execution of it. Now, let us consider what these wreaths should be; in size they should be from 9 to 12 inches, and they must be made on one strong wire, not the usual frame. Suppose they want a cheap one; well, we can make that very pretty, indeed, by tying Leu- cothoe sprays around the wire, ar- ranging the sprays to meet at the top in laureate style; at the bottom, where the stemg meet, we can place two miniature flags or a bow of flag-rib- bon; be particular about the finish; for a few cents you can make a beau- tiful little wreath of this material. If something choicer Is wanted, then make the wreaths of laurel, either common laurel or bay leaves; you must wire the leaves separately and arrange them on the wire ring, hav- ing them face one way from both sides; a few red roses or a small silk or cotton flag should be attached to the bottom of the wreath. If small wreaths of flowers are desired, you can first green the rings with some cheap green like Princess Pine or retino- spora (smilax may be too expensive), then get blue corn flowers, red carna- tions and white sweet peas; don't mix these flowers, but make one third of the front of the wreath one color; then you will have the national colors and there will be some meaning to your design. Perhaps sprays or boutonnieres may be adopted; if so, make them either one color or of the national colors. Avoid dried and dyed flowers and any artiflcial effects, as they do not convey the same meaning as natural flowers do, and, more Important still, they degrade true art and otherwise injure our trade. Of course, we will have some monu- ments to decorate, and there is a prin- ciple we should always recognize; it is not necessary that we should demean the sculptor's work by ours. No, no; we should always situdy out how we can enhance the beauty of the whole by a proper application of our art; we should never decorate the figure on a monument; our work should be con- fined to the pedestal, and the name of ili.*^'^tiA.'M^^.^.^-:.~,^,.^.j^i-^i;,i/..,.ii:^.-.:^<^ . '■filial iifit-t- —» - ■ ■■■-i-- ■-■ ^ .^—.^j^.^.-. taittf^bii^amilik/lkUiiSM^iUiiL^iLUtitiM tdritai^l^UAii^MMaiMllJIdMiil^liJliyiMiM

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_19_1

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Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

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542 The Weekly Florists' Review* jANUAuy 10, 1907. rating a cathedral. Not only is Mr. Beyer able to execute any order lie may get but he is thoroughly acquainted with the purchasing power of a dollar under varying conditions and applies himself closely to business, two qualifications which go a long way toward success. He has made good progress since he started for himself at South Bend. He early found he had not the patronage that would stand the prices charged for the best stock in high class metropolitan stores, but that a satisfactory volume of business could be done with dependable stock, living prices, and on this line he is steadily developing his business. SEASONABLE FLOWER SEEDS. "Will you kindly inform me what flower seeds can be sown for both Easter and Decoration day? W. C. E. We know of few, if any, flower seeds that can be sown as late as this and be in flower at Easter, unless it be the candytuft, which you should sow at once in flats and when an inch or so high transplant in four or five inches of soil, six inches apart, in a cool house and on a light bench. In plants or roots there is a greater variety that could be brought in by Easter if planted and started at once. There are astilbe and freesia, be- sides many hardy shrubs that there is plenty of time to start yet for Easter, and deutzia and lilac. But I really can- not think of any seeds that can be sown now that would be useful or profitable. Sweet peas can be sown now in a light, sunny house and would be in flower for Decoration day, and cold storage Japan lilies, if procured at once, started and kept in a cool house, would come in by the end of May. The above is too big a query. Ask us something more specific. W. S.

 

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CARNATION NOTES-EAST. Continued Use of Propagating; Sand. As has many times been stated in these notes, cleanliness is essential in all ope- rations connected with propagation, and to express more clearly the full meaning of the word, it may be well to state that there are at least three degrees of clean- liness: tolerably clean, clean and spot- lessly clean—the latter, figuratively speaking, being the degree to strive for. This is especially true as regards those details which have to do with maintain- ing the sand in good condition for suc- cessive batches of cuttings. My recent advice, to leave the propa- gating sand outdoors until near the time needed was with the object of exposing it to the action of frost. This, I be- lieve, is not only, for all practical pur- poses, as beneficial as sterilization, but, as is the case with soil, it is in a certain sense improved mechanically, or physi- cally, as you may choose. After being screened to remove peb- bles, sticks and all other foreign matter possible, a still further inspection should be made during filling and leveling in the bench to make sure no matter subject to decay remains. Before firming it is our practice to flush the bench; that is, to apply suffi- cient clear, cold water to flood the whole. In passing off the water will carry out small particles of soil or clay if present. Prepare cuttings in a place apart from the propagating house, at least from the bench, to guard against any trimmings getting into the sand. Any and all in a batch of well cared for cuttings showing signs of wilt should be removed. The chances are they will decay, causing trouble, and even if revived and eventu- ally rooted they will turn out cripples. During the interval between insert- ing in sand and rooting, give two or three weak applications of ammoniacal copper solution, A teaspoonful to five gallons of water is about the proper strength. These are not extra applica- tions of water, but the addition of the solution to the regular watering, and applied in the same manner, it being as- sumed that this operation is done with a fine rose. After removing a rooted batch, loosen up the sand to a depth of an inch* or so by raking, allowing a few days to air out; and if during this time the sun can have full play on the space, all the better. This depends, however, on the weather, arrangements of shade, etc. With all careful preparation and due attention to every detail calculated to prevent trouble, there is no positive as- surance that we shall be free from it. To gain success we must also have strong, healthy stock from which to obtain cut- tings. There must be no laxity on the part of a grower in his attention to wa- tering, temperature, shading and, to touch once more on that perhaps thread- bare subject, cleanliness. How often, alas! do we see the paths of a propagat- ing house strewn with discarded cut- tings, or other refuse, the sashbars sadly in need of a scrubbing and, if nothing more, a coat of whitewash. To allow carelessness to enter into the work of propagation, thinking to remedy the evil, more than likely to occur by fre- quent change of sand, seems to me a waste of time and raw material. Geo. S. Osborn. BENCHING A LOV HOUSE. I want to bench a low house for car- nations. The house is four feet at the gutters. I use steam heat. I want to make the benches as low as possible and get the best results. How low should that be? Will it be best to put the heat- ing pipes under the benches? P. H. You do not give enough data about your.house for me to form an opinion as to arrangement of benches and pipes. If it is a single, or detached, house, with glass under the gutter on the south side, there should be no trouble. You can make the benches as low as you like in that case. But if the sides are boarded up to the gutters, then you will not be able to get much out of the south bench in the way of cut blooms. Either taie off the boards on the south side and put in glass down to within eighteen inches of the ground, or else raise that bench high enough so that it will get the sun all winter and, if it is not far enough away from the glass for blooming plants then use it for low-growing stock, such as your young carnation plants, etc. When there is no shading to be taken into ac- count, then the height of your benches should be governed by what you may consider the most convenient to work. Allow at least thirty inches for head- room, but more will be better. The steam pipes do not need to be under the benches; in fact, they should not be unless there is enough room so they can be a foot away from the bench soil. Otherwise you will have trouble in keeping the soil from drying out at the bottom. Distribute them evenly through the house; that is the main point. A. F. J. B. FEEDING CARNATIONS. I want to feed my carnations. What proportion of pulverized sheep manure would you use in the soil for this pur- pose? F. E. M. Mix your pulverized sheep manure with soil, say about one part manure to two parts of screened soil. Spread this on the bench about half an inch thick and water soon after. This makes an excel- lent food if your plants are in good con- dition for it. A. F. J. B. GOOD COMPANIONS. We are going to plant a part of one house to Enchantress next summer and would like to know if Lady Bountiful, for white, would do to plant in the other part. Will they stand the same tempera- ture and treatment? A. E. & S. Yes, Lady Bountiful will do splendidly in the same house with Enchantress. Both enjoy the same temperature. Plant Bountiful where the light is the strong- est and Enchantress where there is the most shade from the roof, etc. Bounti- ful will come more free from that pink mottling you sometimes see when the light is weak in cold weather, while En- chantress will have a -better color when not subjected to the glaring sunlight. A. F. J. B. SPLIT CARNATION FLOWERS. Improved methods in growing carna- tions and the introduction of improved varieties, though having made great progress in the last decade, have not as yet mitigated to any great degree the provoking habit of the divine flower of producing a large percentage of mal- formed blooms, commonly termed splits. How to mend these flowers so as to en- able the grower to obtain as high a price for them as possible has no doubt en- gaged the best attention of not a few carnation specialists. Split carnations are a product of every carnation growing establishment, which, we are safe to say, will be with us for some years to come at least, and what careful cultural meth- ods fail to accomplish while the blooms are developing on the plants must be provided for after they are cut. A little device upon which a patent has been applied for by the inventor, A. J. Baur, of Erie, Pa., does the work, is practically invisible and leaves the

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_47_2

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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56 The Florists' Review January 6, 1921 VIOLETS In lots of 5 dozen bunches or more, $1.00 per dozen. ROSES RUSSELL and OPHELIA predominating, at right prices. Also a lar^e cut of FREESIAS, NARCISSI, Paper Whiles, We also carry a flue line of .lonquils. Daffodils, etc., etc. D171?r\ HACt^lTI^Q Scotch Heather, extra fine for shipi)ing. txaLLtU DAoIVCjIO Pluinosus, Adiantuiii, Woodwardia Ferns. Ijeautifully decorated in the soft pastel shades. This line Hellclirysuui (dried), "(Oo per lar^'e buucii. is paramount to any other. Order a sample shipment. J. A. AXELL, Wholesale Commmission Fiotut. 463 Bush St., Sail Fraiicisco, Cal.

 

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ZINNIA ASPARAGUS AspanitfUH S|ir<»iiK:«'ri--(Ahsolutt'ly 1921 crop, now in the pickinK). Flump need, guaranteed to grow. Hand pit-ked. I mmmIs, $ 1.00. ANpariiKTiiN K<iiif;if4»llii.s. Wchave completely tfsted this and (ind that commercially it is jroinjr to be a winner. Shoots very sturdy, from 2 to -i feet in heitfht. WomJerful for fresco decoration and charminff in buu0 N«'ecl8, ^ I .. R. G. FRASER & SON, * '"U?.\!:'?;rowI.."s"" Pasadena, California ASTERS Fraser's Dahlia-Flowered Zinnia Has all the Dahlia polorinBrs, including]: shades unknown to Zinnias heretofore. The exact size of the famous show dahlia, blossoms being: from 6 to 8 inches in diunu'ter. Ti-a<l« iiiu'kot.#l.(H) ASTKItS—(Amerlrnn Ilenuty). This ia one Aster that can be grown both in early spring and in late fall. It is, therefore, the peer of Asters for the florist. Offered in olil rose, September pink, purple, lavender andmixeil. Trade imi-k«'t, 50o. ASTi:i{S—(l"rasor'n California tresro). Very fluffy and borne on unusually strong stem. You have alwayr had visions of such an aster. We are offering it in rose, pink, white, blue, lavender and mixed. Trade |ia>t, ">lanted this year and the quality was of the best. The E. C. Amling Co. has now ample room in the new store and rejiorts an exccllont Christmas business. Tiie rush at this time has somewhat delayed the work of lixing uj) the new oflico and other details, hut this will have atten- tion ;it once. The demaiul for xalley, both in pots iind cut, is {'xccjit ion;illv good Inrc. II. K. K. ■ SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. The Market. The fear that good stock would be scarce for the holiday season was un- grounded. Christmas eve the rainy w(>ather was replaceil by a day of old- time California sunshine, and the out- door stock immediately benefited. Vio- lets are now i)lentiful and are in excel- lent sha]ie for shijiping. A few mums were still available for New Year's. Roses are dear, but they are of excel- lent quality and are fairly plentiful, both long ami sliort-steTiiined. Growers wild held back their ruses for Clivistm.as did nfit reckon with the unseasonably cold spell that lasted during most of Dect'mber. The roses that slniuld have been on the m.arket came in just before New Year's. However, there jtroved to be suflicient roses to fill the exception- ally he.'ivy Christmas demand. Narcissi have benefited by the rains, which proveil detrimental to the mums. Freesias. I';i]iei- Whites ;ind Chinese lilies were abundantly displayed in the market last week. There were enough carnations to fill the demand. Last week there was a hreathing sjiell, but shijiping for New Year's was good and ;ill the stock was in excellent condition for carrying well. Some of the nurs- eries were almost cleaned out of potted Some Specials POINSETTIAS, VIOLETS, SPENCER SWEET PEAS. RED RUSCUS FOR BASKET WORK. Potted Cyclamens, Wreaths and Greens of all kinds. California Floral Company WholeMale Dealera in Cut Flower* 217 Winston St. LOS ANGELES, CAL. THE BEST IN THE WEST Asparagus Sprengeri Sprays $1.25 per 100 HARRY BAILEY, R. F. D. No. 6 Los Angeles, Cal. California Dahlias and Cannas DAHLIA SEED THE LA TEST AND BEST G. S. ARCHER, Los Angeles, Cal. 400 North MarcBfo Ave Alhambra ]ilaiits in blddin by the heavy Christmas dem.'iiid. These are coining in again now in excellent condition. Various Notes. Members of the supervisors' jiolicc committee have agreed ujion a recom- mendation for a Sunday closing ordi- nance that will close many lines of busi- ness not generally considered necessary to the Suiidav life of the comnuinitv. Current Price List CUT FLOWERS EFFECTIVK JANUAKV !l, 1921. Subject to chiiiiKe without notice. IIOSKS Short Medium Long Special Housier Itenntr .|0.12 $o.2(l SO.liO S0.45 Colunibiii 12 .20 .SO 4.) Ophelia 12 .'io .no .40 I>r. Snutli 12 .20 .;iO .40 Sliawy«>r lo .is .25 :!.", Wiisntcli 10 .]H .2.-, .:« lied Slia\vy»>r 10 .is .2.5 ';i.5 White Slinwyer... .10 .is .''^ ';j.5 Wliite Killariiey. .10 .is !}.-) .35 CARNATIONS Best Shorts and Splits STKVIA $0.7.5per bunch SFKKN<JKKI and I'LIJMOSUS, .75 per bunch IIAKDY KKKNS 25 per bunch No charge for packing. Koxes at cost. .$0.10 . .(J6 Wilier Floral Co. FARMINGTON, UTAH Flower and fruit stands do not fall un- der the ban. The San Francisco florists, however, have voluntarily decided to

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_35_2

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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ERie. PAm AU orders carefully and promptly filled. directors were James L. Miller and W. J. Patterson. Aids were E. H. Borow- ski, Martin Wax, John R. Ness, Henry Penn and Arthur Clarke. Varioiis Notes. The Horticultural Club held a meet- iug and dinner at the Parker House March 12, with the majority of the members present and these guests: H. H. Bartsch, president of the Gardeners' and Florists' Club; E. Doubleday, of the firm of Doubleday, Page & Co., New York; Louis C. Elson, of the New Eng- land Conservatory of Music; Leonard Barron, New York; Chief Justice Aiken, of the Superior court, and W. R. Nicholson. President Farquhar intro- duced Patrick Welch, who gave an ad- dress on the recent S. A. F. meeting in Chicago. Some of the newest Spencer sweet peas, from William Sim, deco- rated the tables. Geo. W. Marshall, of Medfield, has rented from Woodman Bros., of Danvers, four centrally located greenhouses in that town. Hitchings & Co. built the principal greenhouses and store and they are quite up to date. Mr. Mar- shall will occupy them at once and will grow a general line of stock for retail trade. Danvers is a flourishing town of 10,000 population. John Barr, of South Natick, is de- lighted with Carnation Matchless. He grew 3,000 plants and says he has not had twenty-five split flowers this sea- son. He will give Champion another trial to prove it further. He will plant Alice in quantity next season, with smaller lots of Good Cheer and Pink Sensation. Hoffman had the decorations, which were unusually extensive, for the spring openings of two of Boston's largest dry goods stores, Jordan, Marsh Co., and Filene's. At the latter store he used great numbers of well grown cinerarias arranged in large concrete urns, seven or more plants of solid colors in each, which looked particu- larly well. Prunus triloba and other deciduous shrubs, also rambler roses and bulbous subjects, were used in

 

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S. A. Anderson 440 Main St., BUFTALO, N. Y. Anderson service means fresh, sturdy stock, and prompt deliveries in Buffalo. Lockport Niagara Falls and Western New York. Member of the Florists' Telesxaph Delivery.

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_31_3

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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F^v -I-. 154 The Florists' Review Mabch 13, 1913. SUPERIOR QUALITY GOOD THICKNESS PROIMPT SHIPMENT GREENHOUSE GLASS We carry a large stock of both Single and Double Strength sizes hand-made glass, especially selected for the Greenhouse trade. This glass is of superior quality, good thickness and well packed. Write us for prices before placing your order— we can save you money. BAUR WINDOW GLASS CO.. Eaton, Indiana Mention The Rt*Tlew wben you wrlf. NEW HAVEN, CONN. The Market. Business was much better during the last week and the Lenten season so far has had little or no effect in the cut flower trade. Eoses and carnations are coming in more plentifully and are choice. Violets and sweet peas have been in good demand. Azaleas and bulb- ous stock sell well. Funeral orders con- tinue to be quite heavy. Various Notes. Champion & Co. report funeral orders as being heavy. This week they have several wedding decorations. At Jas. Bruce's range on Kensington street everything is in fine shape. He is cutting choice carnations just now and by next week his roses will be in full crop. Bedding stock is thrifty. There always is an attractive window display in the store of the S. H. Moore Oo. Funeral orders are reported as be- ing heavy. At the i>lant of the Doolittle Floral Co. stock is in fine shape for Easter. The lilies will just be right and the house of azaleas is right on the dot. Roses are coming along nicely and will be in heavy crop around Easter. Bed- ding stock, which is grown in immense quantities, is strong and thrifty. Charles Munro reports funeral orders as exceptionally heavy and sweet peas and violets in special demand. This week he has two large decoration or- ders, one for Malley's, New Haven's largest dry goods store, and one for Mendell & Freedman's spring opening. Andrew McCrea reports business as being entirely satisfactory. Thos. Pattison, the West Haven flo- rist, is shipping exceptionally choice callas. He reports a heavy demand for bulbous stock. He is cutting choice White Wonder carnations at present. Boses will be in heavy crop at Easter and he expects the larger percentage of his lilies to be on time. At Jos. J. Sokol's plant everything is in good shape. His houses of lilies are exceptionally fine and the Spirsea Oladstone is certainly a grand lot. Car- nations continue in heavy crop. At Johnson's plant in Whitneyville stock is coming along nicely. For his Easter trade he has a nice lot of lilies, «pir8eas, azaleas, cinerarias and primu- las. Business is reported as being quite satisfactory. Mr. Johnson disposes of all the stock he can grow in his local retail trade. M. B. F. THAT WIRE FENCE ol" YOURS can be quickly and •atlsffactorlly built or rapalrad WITH THIS '^RED DEVIL" fence tool STOP JOINT

 

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It'a No. i900—It In. Ions, drop-forsad tool ataol, sun-matal finlahad. It will do any- thlns In tha wira ffanca bulldlnc Una—pull, band, drivaorcut ataplaa or wira; In fact, any ^atunt" you hava on a wira fanca. It'a a "RED DEVIL" tool, aold by hardware daal- ara avarywhara. avan In your town. Aak your daalar for "RED DEVIL" No. 1900. If lie haan't It, taka no aubatltuta. Sand ue $1.20 and ONE oampla will ba aant yau prepaid.^ SMITH & HEMENWAY CO.. 151 CHAMBERS ST.. N. Y. The 6ADR CARNAnON CUP for SPLIT CARNAnONS EASIEST, QUICKEST, HANDIEST, BEST Does its work perfectly and stops there. Cannot injore the flower. A safe article to send out on ten days' free trial. A postal brinirs it to you prepaid. Priu perOatfit. S2.50. CRm per M, SI.00; 2M. $1.50; 5M. S3.25; 10M. S8.00: 2SM, $12.50; 50M. $20.00. A. J. BAUR» AmarillOy Texas Seranton Florist Supply Co., Scranton, Pa. DuPuy & Farcuaon, Montreal, Canada Arthur Moll, Sedan am Taunue Qarmany or Seedamen Mention The Rpvlew when you write. No loss if you mend your split cama- tions with Superior Carnation STAPLES 50c par lOOO postpaid WN. SCHLAnEK BEFORE 1^ SON, AFTER 422 Main Street. Sprlnsfleld, Mass. Mention The Review when you write. SPLIT CARNATIONS Easily mended with Pillsbiiry's Carnatioa Staple "Beat device on the market" Jooeph Traudt "Oonld not get along without them." 8. W. Pike.

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_47_2

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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100 The Florists' Review JAMDA.RT 18, 1021 VIOLETS In lots of 5 dozen bunches or more, $1.00 per dozen. ROSES RUSSELL and OPHELIA predominating, at right prices. Also a large cut of FREESIAS, NARCISSI, Paper Whites, We also carry a fine line of Jonquils, Daffodils, etc., etc. DG*1<*r\ HACI^irnTC Scotch Heather, extra fine for shipping. KILllil/ D/\dlVCj 1 O Plumosus, Adiantum, Woodwardia Ferns. beautifully decorated in the soft pastel shades. This line Helichrysum (dried), 60c per large bunch. is paramount to any other. Order a sample shipment. J. A. AXELL, whoutau commmiuion Fiori,t. 463 Bush St., Sail Francisco, Cal.

 

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ZINNIA ASPARAGUS AsparaKTUsSprenverl—(Absolutely 1921 crop, now in the picking). Plump teed, iruaranteeu to grow. Hand picked. 100 seeds, 91.00. Asparagus Lonicifoliu)). Wehave completely tested this and find that commercially it is roing; to be a winner. Shoots very sturdy, from 2 to 3 feet in heiqpht. Wonderful for fresco decoration and charming in bouquets. 50 seeds, $1.00. R. G. FRASER & SON, ^"MS^g'^gg^eA"*^ Pasadena, California ASTERS Fraser's DahlU-Flowered Zinnia Has all the Dahlia coloringrs, including shades unknown to Zinnias heretofore. The exact size of the famous show dahlia, blossoms being from 6 to 8 inches in diameter. Trade packet, $1.00 ASTERS—(American Beauty). This Is one Aster that can be grown both in early spring and in late fall. It is, therefore, the peer of Asters for the florist. Offered in old rose, September pink, purple, lavender and mixed. Trade packet, SOc. ASTERS—(Fraser's California Crevo). Veryfloffy and borne on unusually strong stem. You have alwayr had visions of such an aster. We are offering it in ros«^ pink, white, blue, lavender and mixed. Trade packet, 50c. has had a remarkably busy one. A mag- nificent plant of Erica melanthera, some six feet high and well proportioned, caused considerable attention to be given his window last week. It was grown by G. Prechtl at his Montebello nursery. C. J. Groen reports an excellent sea- son 's business. He cleaned up well on everything, both at Christmas and New Year's. Douglas iFraser, of R. G. Fraser & Son, of Pasadena, Cal., has been unable to attend to business, owing to a severe cold, but Mr. Fraser, Sr., says he is much better and hopes to get into har- ness again this week. H. R. R. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. The Market. Spring flowers are coining into the market. The unusually lieavy rainfall and the absence of severe frosts have combined to bring in quantities of Chinese lilies, Paper White narcissi and a few early outdoor daffodils. Violets are good and are now ]ilcntiful. Free- sias are coming in well from tlie grow- ers. There arc plenty of carnations and 8ome lilies of the valley. Short-stemmed roses are not plentiful, though some of the growers report that they have good stocks of tlieiii. Long-steniniod rosee are more abundant, but the price pre- vents them from moving as rapidly as the short-stemmed roses. There is much Scotch heather in the market and it is in demand for baskets and other deco- rative purposes. A few mums are to be found, but they are no longer a factor in the market. Orchids are fairly plen- tiful and the cheaper varieties of spring flowers, such as marigolds, are coming in well. Almond blossoms, the first of the fruit tree sprays, are just coming in. Various Notes. Members of the Retail Florists' As- sociation of San Francisco, which means practically the entire retail trade, in- augurated the Sunday closing move- ment January 9. F. C. Jaeger & Son,, determined to start the New Year with the new departure, closed all day Sun- day, January 2, and they are enthus- Spencer Sweet Peas RoseSy Violets, Narcissi, Freesias Stocks and CaUas California Floral Company WhoUaalm DeeJmn in Cat Flowra 217 Winston St. LOS ANGELES, CAL. THE BEST IN THE WEST Rooted Carnation Cuttings PENINSULA NURSERY SAN MATEO, CAL. I'di' Viirict'i'H and rrlci'R. sec iid in Ki'Vlcw, .7nn. 6. California Dahlias and Cannas DAHLIA SEED THE LATEST AND BEST G. S. ARCHER, 400 North Marengo Are., Alhunbra Los Angeles, Cal. iastic over the success of the plan. Everything was practically cleaned out on Saturday evening, they state, and all members of the force felt recuper- ated and ready to begin their work with zeal Monday morning. Now that the holidays are over, the Eetail Florists' Association is resuming its meetings, and it is expected that per- manent organization will be effected. Current Price List CUT FLOWERS EFFECTIVE JANUARY 9, 1921. Subject to change without notice. ROSES Short Medium Long Special Hoosier Tleaatr .10.12 $0.20 $0.:» $0.45 rolnnibla 12 .20 .,10 .45 Ophelia 12 .20 .30 .40 Dr. Smith 12 .20 .;«» .40 Slinwyer 10 .18 .if, .:W Wasatch lo .18 .2."i .35 Ked Shawynr 10 .18 .25 .35 Wliite Shawyer... .10 .18 .25 .35 White Killarney. .10 .18 .J.'i .35 CARNATIONS nest $0.10 Shorts aiul Splits (16 STKVIA $0.75per bunch SFRENC.KRI and PLUMOSIj'S. .75|>er bunch HARDY FKUNS . .25 per bunch No charge for packing. Uoxes at cost. HyiernoralCo.TITiin FARMINGTON, U 1 illl However, everything has been running along so smoothly with neither a consti- tution nor by-laws, that the adoption of

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_30_1

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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40 The Weekly Florists' Review. Mat 16. 1912. ROSES -- CARNATIONS -- PEONIES We have an excellent supply on all these and can fill your order, large or small. Send us a trial order now. Every- thing in seasonable stock shipped daily. Our growers are sending the l^st to be had. We want to please. Let ^our orders come. Out-of-town accounts solicited. Local dealers should call on us. MEMORIAL DAY PRICE LIST AMKRICAN BEAUTIES. Per Doc. Speclalg f4.00 86-inch ., 8.00 SO-Inch 8.80 24-lnch «.00 20-inrh 1.50 15-Inch 1.25 12-lnch 1.00 Short stem per 100 $4.00 to $6.00 Per 100 RICHMOND, select and fancy «6.00 to fS.OO Medium 4.00 Good short 8.00 KII/LARNEY. select and fancy «6.00 to fS.OO Medium 4.00 Good Short 8.00 WHITE KTLLARNEY, select and fancy $6.00 to $8.00 Medium 4.00 Good Short 8.00 PEONIES. Extra special. Special Good CARNATIONS, fancy White and Red. " fb-sts $4.00 to $ common splits ORCHIDS. Cattleyas. per dos $6.00 to S CALLAS 12.50 to TULIPS 2.00 to SPANISH IRIS 4.00 to \ALLET 8.00 to MIGNONETTE, large spikes SWEET PEAS 15 to ADIANTUM CROWEANUM 60 to SMILAX per do«.. 2.60 to SntENGERI. PLUMOSUS SPRAYS 8.00 to PLUMOSUS STRINGS each FERNS per 1000 2.50 to GALAX per 1000 Per 100 $8.00 6.00 4.00 S.00 8.00 2.00 ; 7.50 15.00 8.00 6.00 4.00 4.00 1.25 1.00 8.00 4.00 .60 8.00 1.25 El 1% r^ ID Ck Im L I MI \M LL L ^ Boom 221 Telephone Bandolpkes'l \^ HICOQO HentioD The Review wben you write PEONIES FOR DECORATION DAY, 4c, 6c and 8c Alao a heavy crop of Rosea, all colors, fine Batavia Greenhouse Co. Greenhouses: BeteTla, m. L. D. Phone $00$ Randolph Stores 30 E. Randolph St., CHICAGO Mention The Review when you write. gave clear title May 7. The site is a fine farm beside the Burlington at Greggs Station, two miles west of Hins- dale. Five large houses will be put up at once and eventually the entire range will be removed there. The plan is to build a thoroughly modern plant and one capable of indefinite expansion. Mr. Washburn has stated that $100,000 will be required to remove the range, but that the saving in cartage alone, by being beside the railroad, will pay interest on that sum. Various Notes. Koman J. Kaziminski was one of those who successfully passed the re- cent civil service examination and since May 3 has been on duty as florist at Garfield park. Wietor Bros, have planted a house of Sunburst rose and are well pleased with the stock and the way it is starting off. George A. Kuhl, who has been in the Presbyterian hospital for several weeks, returned to his home at Pekin, 111., May 9. ^ ^ Jack Byers returned May 12 from Hot Springs, Ark., feeling much better for his vacation and the baths. Kennicott Bros. Co. reports the ar- rival of the first peonies from Villa Kidge, May 10, several days later than last year. The crop is going into stor- |3VERY now and then a well- ■9 pleased reader speaks the word which is the means of brinsfing a new advertiser to yicpmr

 

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Such friendly assistance is thoroughly appreciated. Give us the name of anyone from whom you are buying, not an adver- tiser. 'We especially wish to interest those selling articles of florist's use not at present advertised. FLORISTS* PUBLISHING CO. 530-60 Caxton Bldg. Chicago age for the big special demand for Me- morial day. The Chicago Carnation Co. reports cutting the first King and Augusta gladioli May 9. E. P. Winterson Co. reports the re- ceipt last week of consignments of Easter lilies from both Pittsburgh and Cincinnati, which shows how the mar- kets are there. Ed. Armstrong, formerly with A. Lange, has taken the place with Ken- nicott Bros. Co. made vacant when Mike Fink went with the Chicago Flower Growers' Association. Peter Keinberg is pushing his replant- ing operations and is said to be farther alon^ than ever at this date, although the size of the two wagon loads of stock that come in every day wouldn 't look it. 0. Johnson says the rain was just what was needed to insure a good crop of peonies at Batavia; the ground was getting dry. Chas. E. Shaffer and Wm. L Shaffer, double violet growers, formerly of Bhinebeck, N. Y., have resigned their positions as growers for the Des Plaines Violet Co., Des Plaines, HI. Poehlmann Bros. Co. has a full force busy putting up southern peonies for cold storage. H. Van Gelder, manager for Percy Jones, reports that A. T. Hey, of May- wood, returned from his father's fu- neral at Springfield Sunday, May 12, to find that his house had burned. John F. Kidwell, of the Chicago Flower Growers' Association, says that the Mothers' day trade was fully up to

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_35_1

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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90 The Florists' Review Januauv 14, lOlu. GREENHOUSE MATERIAL and HOTBED SASH TT will^be to your interest to get our SKETCHES ''' and ESTIMATES for your new houses. Our construction 'is STRONG, LASTING and EFFI- CIENT; at the same time it is INEXPENSIVE. A. DIETSCH CO. (fSi) 2640 Sheffield Ave. CHICAGO I - 1 ^____ Mention The Review vrben yon write. ' KNOXVILLE, TENN. The Market. The--weather is cold and bright, and stock of all kinds is fine. Carnations, which were splitting pretty badly last week, are now almost perfect, and the supply exceeds the demand. Eoses are better than at any time this season, Killarneys predominating. Narcissi are fine, and the market is still overstocked. Valley, orchids and hyacinths are good and plentiful. There is also a good supply of plants, which are selling well. Business has been a little off, as there has been nothing going on to amount to anything, and funeral work has only been normal. Various Notes. E. G. Hill, of the E. G. Hill Co., Richmond, Ind., and Arthur Zirkman, representing the M. Bice Co., Philadel- phia, called on the trade last week, and Gunnar Teilmann, Jr., of Johnson City, Tenn., spent two days in Knoxville. C. li. Baum is cutting some fine carna- tions, roses and orchids. He has in stock a large number of fine primrose plants in pots, which are moving fast. Addison J. McNutt has done a great deal of funeral work during the last week. Mrs. Rosa Hall Ryno also has been rather busy with funeral work. A. H. Dailey sold a large number of pot plants last week. He is beginning to cut baby primroses. The new year started with a rush at C. W. Crouch's, but things have quieted down the last few days. Flow- ers have been rather scarce since the Christmas rush, but from now on he will have a heavy cut of carnations, roses and sweet peas; orchids also are blooming better, and the demand is great. Several decorations for dances have been put up of late; one especially, of southern wild smilax, was much ad- mired. R. E. M. GLAZING STAPLES FOR HOTHOUSE WORK E. H. Tilchener A Co. BINGHAMTON, N. T. TESTIMONIAL Wkver, Iowa, December 28,1914. The Foley Oreenhouse Mfg. Co., Chicago, 111. , ^ , QeDtlemen: We have just been painting the greenhouse material and hotbed sash we received from you, and we wish to write you a short letter in regard to the Quality of this material. , ^ ^ We knew, of course, when we first saw the goods you sent us that we had something extra line in quality, but when we came to paint it and examine it closely we were more than pleased. In fact, the hotbed sash and greenhouse material was absolutely free from knots, worm holes and sap, and if they vieie defective in any way we have not found it yet. We have bought several hundred hotbed saih locally and have always got what we con- sidered first-class sash, but your sash are ahead of them every way. not only in Quality of material but especially in construction and workmanship, and, best of all, we saved forty cents on every sash. . , ..^ ^ If you wish to refer anyone to us. or to print this letter, you are at perfect liberty to do so. Yours very truly, Edgar Bkebe & Sons. The above are responsible gardeners and farmers, and it is with pleasure that we print this verbatim copy of their letter, the original of which we have in our ofBce. The purchase from us was made only after due consideration of the esti- mates of other manufacturers covering the same material. Their order con- sisted of several hundred hotbed sash, material for three greenhouses and a carload of pecky cypress bench material. Their verdict is the same as that of many other well satisfied customers who use our material. Send us your inquiries and be happy, as they are. The Foley Greenhouse Mfg. Company Telephone-Lawndale 8180 3260 West 31st Street, CHICAGO Mention The Review when yon write.

 

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The best equipment and labor-saving devices, combined with strict economy, enable us to quote the lowest prices for the best materials. Order whatever you need, either for repairs or new houses. We will quote you the prices, WE PAYING THE FREIGHT, or NET PRICES, and you to pay the freight. Ickes-Braun Mill Co. BREENHOUSE MATERIAL - HOTBED SASH 2330 Wabansia Avenue» Near western and North Aves., CHICAGO Mention Th» Review when yon write. E. A. LIPPMAN Manufacturer of GREENHOUSE SHADING lam also making it up in dry form especially for commercial use. Write for particulars. Mention commercial or private. 6 Hlgrh St., MORRISTOWN, N. J. MvBthMi n« B«Tlew wb*B too writ*. 277fo MORE BLOSSOMS on plants raised In 4-lncb SQUARE paper pota (64 cubic inches of soil and roots) than on plants raised In 4-lnch clay pots (31 cubic inches ot soil and roots). See our page advt. on page 87. F. W. ROCHELLE & SONS. Chester. V. J.

  

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I did some weird stuff today. I'll explain in a while. Actually I do some weird stuff nearly every day, but later for the tiny story...

Below the row of asterisks is a very tiny true story about this photo.

 

**************************************************************************

Roughly 25 or more years ago I saw, probably at a Flea Market In Eugene, Oregon USA, a cute little shadowbox. What attracted me to it at first was how different it was from most. The wood frame and little shelf parts were made from wooden yardsticks. Even though I was spanked pretty hard with wooden yardsticks when I was a little girl, I still always thought they were kind of cool in other circumstances. If a furntirue store or paint shop were giving away sample ones, I would be right there with my hand out.

 

The frame on the sides of this, which I'll probably have to show in another picture, was made not from just any old yardstick, but ones from the Eugene Planing Mill, a very old company in Eugene's history. There were different types of food like wagon wheel macaroni and corn and things on the little shelves. I was thinking that it would be a cute decoration for a kitchen. At this point, even though I thought it was creative, and made from parts from a company that I believe had gone out of business by then, I still wasn't positive that I wanted to buy it. Then I noticed what I had not seen before. In the dried corn kernels was a little mouse. While I don't like real mice in my home, I thought this little wooden one with his leather ears was adorable. It was so clever and enchanting that someone had the idea to place the little mouse in the corn. That cinched it for me. I had to have this little shadow box. It hung in my kitchen for years. Then I moved many, many times, and it got moved with me, but not always hung up. The food got kind of old and faded and *buggy* looking and the glass got filthy and the wood was getting a bit warped and dried out. I kept saving it and packing it with tissue or bubble wrap for years and years. I continued to think that some day I would take it apart, get some fresh kinds of food, and clean it all up and actually enjoy having it hang in my home once more. It was one of those things that just never seemed to happen. Yesterday, I made up my mind that I would go to a grocery store that sold bulk staple type foods and buy tiny amounts of four things, and place the mouse (which I had carefully saved for about a quarter of a century or more) as if it were eating some of the food. I couldn't find the kind of corn I wanted, but I got wagon wheel macaroni, and split peas, a bowtie macaroni and gold fish snacks. Black-eyed Peas kind of appealed to me, but the colors would be kind of all drab and beige. I wanted some of the food to have some color. I glued the mouse in and tried to arrange the food so it didn't just look dumped in without any style. I cleaned the glass and carefully placed it back in. Today, I hung it up all fresh and cute looking, and I am so proud of myself. I love it when I finally decide to do something and actually do it.

~~~~~ THE END

 

There will be a similar story to this one on the two quilt pictures right after this shadowbox one. I need to go type it up.

 

(DSCN0135Shadowboxwithyardsticksmouse&foodinit)

Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw41amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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t§2 The American Florist, Aug. 14 GREATER NEW YORK FLORIST ASSOCIATION, Inc. D. Y. MELUS, Pres. HUGO JAHN, Vice-Pres. ROBUT G. WIISON, Treas. Wholesale Commission Florists And DEALERS IN FLOMSTS' SUPPLIES. 162 Livingston Street. TELEPHONE CONNECTIONS: 36 42 Main 3643 Main 6028 Main WILLIAM A. PHILLIPS, Sec'y GEO. W. CRAWBUCK, M^. Brooklyn Borough, New York, August lO, 1909. A GREETING TO THE TRADE: Entering upon our second year of business, we too, expect to live to celebrate our TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY. The business of the past year has greatly exceeded our expectations. We have added a number of representative growers to our list of shippers, and for the coming season we will be better than ever prepared to supply the demands of the retail trade. We are confident that we can continue to please both growers and retailers. ^J01M0E> Manhattan Flower Market Ship us some stock. We need a large supply of all kinds of flowers, Roscs, Carnations, Sweet Peas, Narclssus, Summer stock, etc., for our new store. Reliability and responsibility first-class. Good prices and prompt returns. Good opportunity. WHOLESALE FLORISTS 46 W. 28th St., NEW YORK Telephone: 1016 Madison Sa.

 

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New York. There is practical- ly no change in the condition of the cut flower market over that of a week ago; at least it may be stated for a certainty that there is no im- provement. Funeral worlc is about all that the retail stores are doing, and even that has fallen off this month. This recalls the remark of a humorist to a retailer who was complaining of sum- mer dullness : "You -can't expect all the people to die in the summertime just to please the florists." Orchids are considerably off crop at the pres- ent time, but on account of the light demand no inconvenience is experi- enced. Some new crop roses are com- ing in; as a matter of course, very short, but many of them are taken for funeral work. Ijilium aui-atum and L. rubrum are now in fair supply and of good quality. They are attractive fea- tures for display purposes, but have to take their chances among the rest of the surplus. The same applies to tritomas, which are in good supply. There is nothing to be added to our notes of last week concerning gladioli and asters. NOTES. The following are among those who will go to the convention from this city : F. Traendly, John Toung, Eugene Dailledouze. P. O'Mara. W. J. Stew- art, A. L. Miller. J. McHutchison, W. A. 'Manda, Joe Manda, I. L. Powell and family, Phil Kessler, A. H. Lang- jahr, B. Ezechel, F. R. Pierson, Robt. Berry, C. B. Weathered, E. M. Or- donez, John Phillips. D. T. Mellis, Robt. Wilson. Chas. Weber, J. Roehrs, Jr., A. Cowee, John E. Lager, J. H. Pepper and J. A. Shaw. Reports received by the transporta- tion committee of the Florists' Club indicate that between 40 and .50 will go to Cincinnati on the New York train. It is requested by the commit- tee that all who take advantage of the superb accommodations on this train will not buy tickets at the ticket of- fices, as they can to better advantage secure their tickets after boarding the train. Henry Hession. the well known car- nation grower of Flatbush, Brooklyn, has his houses all planted and the stock is looking fine. He says that, notwithstanding the dry and hot weather of June, his crop was never in better condition than this year, and inspection verifies his statement. His loss in the fi-eld was so trifling that he has 10,000 Enchantress left over and for sale. Chas. T>. J. Noeike, a well-known re- tailer of Seventh avenue and One Hun- dred and Thirty-flrst street, has been appointed a member of the school board for the Twenty-first district of this city. In view of discrimination in different parts of the country recently put in force against florists we con- gratulate Mr. Noeike on his appoint- ment to this ofiice and feel sure that he will make good. Mrs. W. C. Krick of 1164 Greene avenue, Brooklyn, who, since the death of her husband, has successfully man- aged the florists' letter business, left August .5 for a trip to California. She will visit her son. who is a resident of that state and returning will include other western points of interest in her tour. John A. Scollay of Brooklyn, noted for his boilers, has closed up contracts during the past two weeks disposing of about 70 boilers. John M. Hunter & Son of Englewood. N. J., are installing Scollay boilers with 8,000 feet of 4-inch pipe capacity in their five houses, each of which is 20x180 feet. Abraham Jacobs, "The Orchid Flo- rist," of 108 Columbus avenue, was recently found painting the interior of his store with his own hands. When asked why he did not hire a painter, he said that he was working for the benefit of the wholesalers. The Johnston Heating Co. has been very busy this summer, having con- tracts with several of the oldest firms in this vicinity. Though this firm is composed of voung men. it has an established reputation for doing good work. Chas. H Totty left on August 4 for a few weeks vacation in the cooler re- gions of this state. It is a one best bet that he will be seen at Cincinnati, as he long ago acquired the convention- habit. Geo. Cotsonas is a man who habit- ually wears a smile, but now he laughs out loud. Reason, a son, born August 2. Mother and child are doing well. Alfred Bunyard has resigned his po- sition as manager of the Rosary Flower Store. He has many warm friends who are greatly interested in his future welfare. W. J. Anackser, buyer for Chas. A. Dards. will sojourn at Ocean Grove and Asbury Park, N. J., for two weeks. A. J. Guttman has just returned from an extended sojourn in the Maine woods. Albany, H. Y. "Crepe chasers" was the subject of an animated meeting held by the Flor- ists' 'Club at the establishment of Fred A. Danker on the evening of Aug- ust 5. President Frederick Goldring was requested to read a copy of the advertisement recently inserted in the Boston newspapers by Thomas F. Gal- vin of that city. Mr. Galvin's notice applied in all essential particulars to this city and a general discussion fol- lowed . The members also had for discus^ sion the subject of decorations and the low price charged by some of the florists for this kind of work. In fact it was brought out that there are many functions of all kinds for which local dealers are asked to supply palms and other decorative, plants as a favor. The local retailers are very much, dissatisfied with this practice. The subject was placed in the hands of a committee composed of F. A. Danker. A. Whittle and W. C. King, who will endeavor to establish a uni- form scale of prices for decorations and eliminate all work on a gratis ba- sis. The club will hereafter hold a ques- tion box. at which matters of techni- cal interest will be discussed. At the next meeting President Goldring will be asked to read a paper on "The Splitting of Carnations." Chas. San- ders, an enthusiastic member, pre- sented some specimens of Boston fern, among them a new heavy foliaged variety that originated with him. The fronds of the new plant showed it to be suitable for decorations. On acount of the flower show com- ing on in November it was decided to hold the clambake earlier this year than usual. It will be held at Henkes Bros.' grove. Newtonville, August 15. A large and enthusiastic attendance is expected. It is planned to open the bake about .T o'clock instead of at .5 as in other years. The club accepted the invitation of W. W. Hannell, Wa- tervliet, to attend his twelfth wedding anniversary on August 21. R. D.

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_22_1

Year: (s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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14 The Weekly Florists^ Review^ July 0, 1808. THE FLORISTS' REVIEW 6. L. GRANT, Editor and Manager. PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY The FLORISTS' publishing Co. 030-56O Caxton BuUcling:, 884 Dearborn Street, Chicago. Telephone, Harrison 6429. aseiSTBRBD CABLS ADDRESS, FLORVIBW, CHICAGO New York Office: Borougrh Park Brooklyn, N. Y. J. Austin Shaw, Manager. Subscription $1.00 a year. To Canada, $2.00. To Europe. $2.50. Subscriptions accepted only from those in tbe trade. Advertising rates quoted upon request. Only strictly trade advertising accepted. Advertisements must reach us by Wednesday morning to hisure iufiertion in the issue of the following day, and earlier will be better. Entered as second class matter December 3, 1897, at the post-office at Chicago, 111., under the act of March 3, 1879. This paper is a member of tbe Ctiicago Trade Press Association. INDEX TO ASYERTISEBS, PAGE 66. CONTENTS. Roses—Diseased Rose Plants 3 — Pruning Hybrid Perp«tuals 3 — Roses In Sandy Soil 3 — House of KlUarney (Ulus.) 3 — Twelve Best Garden Roses 3 American Rose Society 4 The Retail Florist (Ulus.) 4 — Spray of Pink Sweet Peas (Ulus.) 4 — The Standing Crescent (Ulus.J 4 — The Ball Decoration (Ulus.) 4 — An Klaborate Decoration 4 Perennials for Retailers 5 Cultivation of Gladioli 6 Seasonable Suggestions 8 — Hardy Roses 8 — Attacks of Apbls 8 — San Jose Scale 8 — Lorraine Begonias 8 — Dahlias 8 — Antirrhinums 0 — Clematis Panlculata 0 Lilies Damaged by Storm 0 Good Business (lllus.) 9 Society of American Florists » The Peony Is Popular 10 — Recording and Labeling 10 — Peony Queen Victoria (lllus.) 11 — Peony Mme. Furtado (lllus.) ii Ferns from Runners 11 Sowing Smllax Seed 11 Kentlas from Seed 11 Obituary—James Cole, Sr. (portrait) 12 New York 12 New York Club's Outing UHus.) 13 American Carnation Society 14 Rates to Niagara Falls 14 To Destroy Aster Beetles 14 Green Mold on Flower Pots 14 Chicago 15 South Bend, Ind 17 Pittsburg 17 Philadelphia 18 Clnclnautl 20 Seed Trade News 24 — Crops In California 24 — Southern Seed Crops 24 — Watson S. Woodruff 25 — On the East Coast 25 — The Business Year 25 — "Price Guaranteed" 26 — Seed Farms of Essex 26 — Dutch Bulb Trade 28 — Bermuda Onioa Seed 30 — Catalogues Received 32 — Imports .'{2 St. Louis 32 Vegetable Forcing JJS — Mushrooms at Kennett (lllus.) 33 — The Sweet Potato 33 Boston 34 New Bedford, Mass 35 Washington 35 Pacific Coast 40 — Retail Trade In Plants 40 — San Francisco 40 — Portland, Ore 41 Steamer Sailings 42 Nursery News 44 — Late Flowering Lilacs 44 — Moving Rhododendrons 45 Toledo 46 Tnrrytown, N. Y 46 Milwaukee 48 Columbia, Mo. 48 Lltchflcld. Conn 50 Greenhouse Heating 68 — Size of Flow Pipe 68 — Burners for Natural Gas 68 — Natural Gas 60 — Piping and Valves 69 New Orleans 69 Detroit 60 Columbus, O 62 Buffalo 6t Worcester, Mass 64 t\lff^

 

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Is printe<I Wednesday eveniajf and mailed early Thursday morning. It is earnestly requested that all adver- tisers and correspondents mail their ''copy'^ to reach us by Monday or Tuesday at latest^ instead of Wed- nesday morning;, as many have done in the past. SOCIETY OF AJKEBICAN FLOBISTS. Incorporated by Act of Congress March 4, '01 Officers for 1908: President, F. H. Traendly, New York; vice-president, George W. McClure, Buffalo; secretary, Willis N. Rudd, Morgan Park. 111.; treasurer, H. B. Beatty, Pittsburg. Annual convention, Niagara Falls, Auffust 18 to 21, 1908. First National Flower Show, Chicago. Novem- ber 9 to 15. 1908; W. F. Kasting, Buffalo, chairman. Otto G. Koenig, secretary of the St. Louis Horticultural Society, has issued the preliminary list of premiums for that organization's fall exhibition. The Review has received a four-page anonymous letter commenting in caustic language on the practices of certain New York commission houses that are alleged to fill retail orders as well as those of the trade. The correspondent concludes: "It is an old sore, but I don't suppose you would dare publish this." The cor- respondent signed only an initial; if he will attach his full name to the com- munication it will be published for what it is worth. John Craig, of Cornell Universit). whose physician sentenced him to rest and recuperation from a threatened breakdown, wrote the Review from Frei- burg, Germany, June 21: "For the last two months I have been knocking about Italy with an eye on schools of horticul- ture and agriculture. The kingdom of Italy supports five colleges of agriculture of university grade. Kach has labora- tories and trial grounds. Some of the latter are extensive and excellent in de- tail. I shall spend a month or more in Germany and then go to Belgium and France. I hope to visit a large number of seed houses and nurserymen." The commercial agencies and other sources of business information say that general trade activity is steadily on the increase, but advertising men who come in touch with a variety of lines assert that personal experience does not con- firm these optimistic reports. The con- sensus of such opinion is that there has lately been a relapse rather than an in- crease in general business activity and that the florists, especially those outside the big cities, are to be congratulated that their business has been so good as it has been in the last six months; the flower business has surely been affected as little as any line, and not nearly so much as some. The presidential cam- paign will be a factor in postponing a re- vival of activity, but a greater one will be the fact that the farmers as a body are now able to hold their crops and need not rush them to market as soon as ready. with the result of putting most of the money at once into circulation. The volume of business in this country al- ways will be large, so long as crops are good and the country's wealth is not im- paired, but no boom in business is to be expected this fall. AMERICAN CARNATION SOCIETY. Bassett & Washburn, Hinsdale, 111., register carnation Orland P. Bassett; parentage Crane and Prosperity; color deep red; size of flower three and one- half to three and three-quarters inches; calyx long and never splits; stems strong and stiff and long; very strong grower, every shoot producing a flower. Albert M. Here, Sec'y. RATES TO NIAGARA FALLS. It is stated by a railroad man that at the last meeting of the Central Passen- ger Association at Chicago last week the matter of a special rate for the Society of American Florists' convention at Ni- agara Falls was reconsidered and it was decided to grant a rate of fare and a half for the round trip, but only on condition that 1,000 be present. The fare of 2 cents a mile in each direction, which is now the regular rate in most states, is practically the same as the fare and a third formerly granted on the cer- tificate plan. If the Central Passenger Association rate of a fare and a half can be obtained by virtue of large attend- ance it will be the cheapest transporta- tion any considerable part of the Society of American Florists' members ever have enjoyed. The secretary doubtless will shortly make an announcement covering transportation from all sections. TO DESTROY ASTERJEEETLES. What is the best method of destroying the bugs on asters? L. V. Aster beetles may be poisoned with Paris gteen, one teaspoonful to one gal- lon of water. Apply with a sprayer or sprinkling can. Albert F. Amling. GREEN MOLD IN FLOWER POTS. What is the cause of the green mold on the top of the soil of potted plants! We use good top soil and well rotted sod, and do not know how to account for the mold. G. G. Y. Constant sogginess at the roots, caused by an oversupply of water, is the most fertile method of producing green mold. If you will allow your plants to dry out fairly well between waterings, you will have less of it. A good deal also de- pends on the compost you are using. If there is a good proportion of sand used, there will be less moldiness. No matter, however, how you water and what your soil is, you are likely to have some trouble of this sort, and it is necessary to scratch over the surface of the soil in the pots at intervals and re- move the slimy formation, or the plants will do poorly. With hard-wooded plants, where the soil is packed liard in the pots and where plenty of sand is used, there is always less moldiness than with soft- wooded subjects, like primulas, cycla- mens, geraniums, begonias, etc., which re- quire potting less firmly. If your com- post is porous and you water carefully, the trouble can be considerably reduced. C. W.

  

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Title: Autumn catalogue of bulbs and plants

Identifier: autumncatalogueo1904jame

Year: 1904 (1900s)

Authors: James Vick's Sons (Rochester, N. Y. ); Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Seeds Catalogs; Flowers Catalogs; Bulbs (Plants) Catalogs

Publisher: Rochester, N. Y. : Vick & Hill Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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James Vick's Sons, Seedsmen, Rochester, New York THE BEST DOUBLE AND SINGLE GERANIUMS FOR HOUSE CULTURE Price of all Geraniums each, 15 cents: three for 40 cents; per dozen, $1.50; except as noted. SINGLE VARIETIES Albert Carre. Brilliant crimson-scarlet. Chaucier. Cerise; a beautiful, clear, bright shade. Gen. Galliene. Intenee crimson. Meteore. Scarlet, white eye. M. P. Morlan. Bright rosy salmon, center white. Queen of the Whites Impro\ed. Pure white. DOUBLE VARIETIES Centaure. A fine double pink. Countess de Harcourt. Pure snow-white. Effective. Hriglu scarlet. Madame Jaulin. Delicate pink, bordered white. S. A. Nutt. Brilliant deep blood-red, with maroon shading. Toronto. Bright salmon. SWEET - SCENTED Dr. Livingston. Leaves finely- divided, very fragrant. Rose. The most desirable of the scented varieties. IVY - LEAF Thick, glossy, Ivy-shaped leaves; plants drooping in habit. Jeanne d'Arc. White, suffused with lavender. Souvenir de Charles Turner. Deep pink, feath- ered maroon in upper petals. BRONZE Leaves show the most beautiful shades of yellow or brownish red, the foliage being as handsome as flowers. Black Douglas. Klowers salmon ; foliage golden yellow, red zone. Magician. Leaf green and yellow, chocolate zone ; flow- ers double, scarlet. GREVILLEA ROBUST A, The Silk Oak A beautiful plant for decorative purposes; quick of growth and of easy culture. The leaves are a light bronze color, the tips being covered with a soft down resembling raw silk. For the house it is unsurpassed, as it needs little attention. Each, 20 cents ; two for 30 cents. OTAHEITE ORANGE A dwarf orange, which grows, blooms, and fniits freely in pots, when only a foot or two high. Fruit about one- half the size of ordinary oranges. The blossoms are pro- duced in great abundance, delicate and beautiful in color, and of a delicious perfume. Strong plants, each 20 cents ; extra strong plants, each 35 cents. OXALIS Handsome plant for pot culture, always in bloom, and not requiring any special care. Ortgiesii, or Golden Star. About twelve inches high ; branches freely : dark olive green foliage, under side purple. Flowers in clusters, star-shaped, bright golden yellow, always in bloom. Each 15 cts.; two for 25 cts. PRIMULA Obconica Grandiflora Perpetual-blooming, bearing large trusses of flowers on long stems well above the foliage; color pale lilac, shading to white. Each 15 cents. CHINESE PRIMROSE Few house-plants afford better satisfaction. Requires a cool north window. Care should be taken that no water falls on the buds, as it causes them to rot. In summer they can be turned out into a shady border. Single White, or Single Pink. Each 20 cents.

 

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LARGE-FRUITED LEMON PONDEROSA Nothing that has ever been brought to our notice in the plant line has caused half the commotion that this wonder- ful Lemon has. It is a true everbearing variety. On a plant six feet high no less than eighty-nine of these pon- derous lemons were growing at one time. It was a beauti- ful sight. The tree was blooming, and at the same time had fruit in all stages of development, from the size of a pea Up to the ripe fruit. Fruit weighing over four pounds has been taken from this tree. The lemons have very thin rind for such large fruit. It is the juiciest of all lemons, makes delicious lemonade, and for culinary pur- poses cannot be excelled. Ponderosa Lemon is sure to become popular when it is known. It fruits when quite small, and makes a lovely house plant. Everybody can grow their own lemons. Thrifty young plants, each 25 cents ; two for 40 cents. PALMS Palms will do well at a window where there is little or no direct sunshine. A regular, but not excessive, supply of water and a fair light are all the plants demand during the cool season. The soil should be a substantial fibery loam. A daily syringing of the leaves is an advantage, but in winter once a week is sufficient. If kept in a living- room with dry furnace heat, da.ly syringing or spraying the leaves is advisable. We here offer plants of the hand- somest and most reliable species. First size, eighteen to twenty inches high. Second size, twelve inches high. Third size, strong plants from 3-inch pots. Sent by Mail or Express at these Prices. Kentia Belmoreana. Graceful arching leaves, with long, terete, shining, yellowish-brown petioles; divi- sions of the leaves twenty to thirty in number, strap- shaped, and deep green in color. This Palm will stand a great deal of ill usage and maintain a good appearance. First size $1.25; second size 85 cents ; third size 35 cents. Kentia Forsteriana. The beautiful "Thatch Palm." Similar to K. Belmoreana, but the petioles are a darker green and the leaf divisions broader. A hand- some Palm for table decoration. First size $1.25; second size 85 cents; third size 25 cents. Latania Borbonica. Fan-shaped leaves, split into divisions at the apex. A strong, vigorous plant, and makes a fine appearance in the window or in contrast with other plants. First size $1.25 ; second size 50 cents ; third size 25 cents.

  

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Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw34amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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igo6. The American Florist. 293

 

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TULIP PICOTEE AT HIGHLAND PARK, ROCHESTER, N. Y. cut in the fall and stacked with layers of cow manure between, about one load of manure to four of sod. Little or no arti- ficial manure will be needed for the first two pottings, but for the shift into 6-inch pots and final, enough should be added to give the plants a strong healthy growth. The soil for final potting should be pre- pared a few days before it will be need- ed, thoroughly mixed and put in a heap. Potting.—The first important thing before potting is to crock the pots prop- erly so as to give the plants good drain- age. Place one large crock hollow side down and a few smaller ones on top; cover with rough soil, then fine, and ram firml}'. Place the plant in center of pot and put soil round the side for the small pots with a thin stick, but for the larger ones use a rammer. Light soils will require plenty of ramming, but heavy clay soils very little. General Cultural Remarks.—Tlie house most suitable is a span roof run- ning north and south, with ventilation top and bottom. The houses should be thrown open at every opportunity. The right temperature should be from 45° to 55°, or when in flower they should be kept about 50° at night. Watering.—This is the most import- ant point in growing chrysanthemums, and unless thoroughly done, no success can be obtained. It is best to go over them several times a day. A good way to tell if a plant is dry is to tap with the knuckles, and if it sounds hollow it is safe to water. On windy days they may be inclined to flag, and look dry, but a spray overhead will soon put them right. They should be syringed two or three times a day on bright days, syr- inging well underneath the foliage to keep down red spiders. Syringe early enough so that they will dry up before night; stop syringing as soon as buds show color, Black and green fly must be kept in check either by fumigating or with tobacco dust. It is best to choose wet nights for fumigating, and then do it as late as possible so the house has a chance to cool down. It is better to give them several light doings than one hea-vy one. Syringing with XL All is fine for killing black fly, also mildew. After the final potting they will need staking, tying and disbudding. Every- thing should be done as soon as it needs it, or else the plant will be robbed of its nourishment. The early morning is the best time to get the side shoots out. Feeding.—As soon as the pots are full of root, feeding should commence. Top dressing with Clays or Ithemic, water- ing with Bonora cow manure soot water. Feeding should be stopped as soon as the bud shows. After taking the bud, and it is about the size of a pea, start feed- ing again gently at first. Stop feeding as soon as bud shows color. Taking the Bud.—Every variety, to bring it to perfection, must have its bud taken at the right time; some are best on an early, and some a late bud. If a bud is showing a few days too early it is best to leave a few shoots on so as to hold it back, and reduce then gradually when the proper time comes. Damping.—When the blooms are opening if the weather is very warm they will be liable to have a light shade of whitening; putting on the glass will help to stop it. Cutting the Blooms.—For exhibitiori the flowers should be cut at least 24 hours before packing. The best time td cut is in the morning before the sun strikes them. Split the stems and put them in water in a cool room. New Varieties.—This year we have a grand lot of new varieties to work on, with the lovely Beatrice May, Miss F. F. Thompson, Morton F. Plant, Mrs. John E. Dunne, Mrs. Henry Partridge, E. J. Brooks, and several others, which were shown in fine shape at Philadel- phia. Bridgeport^ Conn.—Jas. Horan & Son supplied the handsome decorations at the recent Henshaw dance. The deco- rations attracted much favorable com- ment from those in attendance. San Angelo, Tex.—J. J. Nussbaumer has his place in excellent condition, car- nations and lilies looking especially fine. His stock of bedding plants, including geraniums and begonias, is in fine con- dition, and for this section of the counr- try it is quite extensive.

  

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Title: Catalogue of plants, bulbs and seeds

Identifier: CAT31282511

Year: 1897 (1890s)

Authors: John A. Doyle Co; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Nursery stock Ohio Catalogs; Flowers Seeds Catalogs

Publisher: Springfield, Ohio : John A. Doyle Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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The John A. Doyle Co., Florists, Springfield, Ohio. SKSsr SWAINSONIA ELEGANS. The prettiest plant of any in our collection. This is the prettiest all round plant for house cultnre we know of. It is of such easy culture that everybody succeeds with it. It is a rapid grower,and in a short time makes a handsome,compact hush, as it naturally grows into a shapely plant. The foliage is deep green,small, like shown in cut. It bears its panicles six inches long, of pure white, pea-shaped (lowers in the greatest profusion,and of the sweet- est fragrance. Indeed, it is as swert in perfume as Sweet I'eas. We have been cultivating it for the past two years, and it is seldom out of flower either Winter or Summer. Be sure and try it, as it will certainly please you. Price, 15c each; two for 25c. RALMS. The following is a select list of rare and hand- some varieties that can be recommended for apart- ment s, conservatories, decorations or vase plants •during Summer. They are all grand plants,and of the easiest culture. We can furnish extra large Palms that are fine specimens at from $3.00 to $5.00 each. Large plants must be sent by express. Latania Barhonica.—Leaves large, fan-shaped, of a very cheerful green color. Plant of hardy constitution, and adapted to all decorative purposes, within or without doors. Appreciated by all the plant-loving community. The cut shows a healthy plant of about five years old. "Price, nice yonng plants, 16 cents each; handsome larger plants, 40 cents each; extra size, $1.50 each. Filifera Palm.—{Washington Fill/'era.) It has elegant dark green, fan-shaped leaves, from which hang thread-like filaments. The plant is a compact grower, well adapted to pot culture. Price, small plants, 15c each; larger size, 25c each. Kentia Balmoreana.—The Kentias are among the best of the Palm species for general cultivation, being almost impregnable against diseases. This variety is one of the best of its class, graceful hab- it, bright green foliage gracefully disposed. As a decorative plant for the window, dinner table, or the conservatory, it scarcely has an equal. Price, 50 cents each; large plants, eighteen inches high, $1.50 each. Kentia Fosteriana.—This is one of the finest not plants imaginable, and the easiest to grow of any of the Palm family. Being almost hardy, it is not injured by slight changes in temperature, and its stifl", glossy leaves enable it to stand the dry, hot air of the living room without injury. The leaves are a deep, glossy-green, fan-shaped, split deeply into segments. This, without excep- tion, is the most hardy of its class. It is very graceful for table decoration. Scarcely has its equal. Price, 50 ^cents each; large plants, eighteen inches high, $1.50 each.

 

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SWAINSONIA ELEGANS. OTAHEITE ORANGE THE CHAMPION POT PLANT, rs< The more we see of this unique Orange the better we like it. It is one of the real good things that we feel safs in recommend- ing. We know it will please all. It is a dwarf reproduction of

  

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Title: Autumn catalogue of bulbs and plants

Identifier: autumncatalogueo1905jame

Year: 1905 (1900s)

Authors: James Vick's Sons (Rochester, N. Y. ); Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Seeds Catalogs; Flowers Catalogs; Fruit Catalogs; Bulbs (Plants) Catalogs

Publisher: Rochester, N. Y. : Vick & Hill Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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James Vick's Sons, Seedsmen, Rochester, New York 21 THE BEST DOUBLE AND SINGLE GERANIUMS FOR HOUSE CULTURE Price of all Geraniums each, 15 cents; three for 40 cents; per dozen, $1.50; except as noted. SINGLE VARIETIES Albert Carre, Brilliant crimson-scarlet. Chaucier. Cerise; a beautiful, clear, bright shade. Gen. Galliene. Intense crimson. Meteore. Scarlet, white eye. M. P. Morlan. Bright rosy salmon, center white. Queen of the Whites Improved. Pure white. DOUBLE VARIETIES Centaure. A fine double pink. Countess de Harcourt. Pure snow-white. Effective. Bright scarlet. Madame Jaulin. Delicate pink, bordered white. S. A. Nutt. Brilliant deep blood-red, with maroon shading. Toronto. Bright salmon. SWEET - SCENTED Dr. Livingston. Leaves finely divided, very fragrant. Rose. The most desirable of the scented varieties. IVY-LEAF Thick, glossy, Ivy-shaped leaves; plants drooping in habit. Jeanne d'Arc. White, suffused with lavender. Souvenir de Charles Turner. Deep pink, feath- ered maroon in upper petals. GREVTLLEA ROBUST A, The Silt Oak A beautiful plant for decorative purposes; quick of growth and of easy culture. The leaves are a light bronze color, the tips being covered with a soft down resembling raw silk. For the house it is unsurpassed, as it needs little attention. Each, 20 cents ; two for 30 cents. PALMS Palms will do well at a wijk'ow where there is little or no direct sunshine. A regular, but not excessive, supply of water and a fair light are all the plants demand during the cool season. The soil should be a substantial fibery loam. A daily syringing of the leaves is an advanlrge, but in winter once a week is sufficient. If kept in a living- room with dry furnace heat, da.ly syringing or spraying the leaves is advisable. We here offer plants of the hand- somest and most reliable species. First size, eighteen to twenty inches high. Second size, twelve inches high. Third size, strong plants from 3-inch pots. Sent by Mail or Express at these Prices. Kentia Belmoreana. Graceful arching leaves, with long, terete, shining, yellowish-brown petioles; divi- sions of the leaves twenty to thirty in number, strap- shaped, and deep green in color. This Palm will stand a great de.il of ill usage and maintain a good appearance. First size $1.2$; second size 85 cents ; third size 35 cents. Kentia Forsteriana. The beautiful "Thatch Palm." Similar to K. Belmoreana, bet the petioles are a darker green and the leaf divisions broader. A hand- some Palm for table decoration. First size $1.25; second size 85 cents; third size 25 cents. Latania Borbonica. Fan-shaped leaves, split into divisions at the apex. A strong, vigorous plant, and makes a fine appearance in the window or in contrast with other plants. First size $1.25; second size 50 cents; third size 25 cents.

 

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LARGE-FRUITED LEMON PONDEROSA Nothing that has ever been brought to our notice in the plant line has caused half the commotion that this wonder- ful Lemon has. It is a true everbearing variety. On a plant six feet high no less than eighty-nine of these pon- derous lemons were growing at one time. It was a beauti- ful sight. The tree was blooming, and at the same time had fruit in all stages of development, from the size of a pea up to the ripe fruit. Fruit weighing over four pounds has been taken from this tree. The lemons have very thin rind for such large fruit. It is the juiciest of all lemons, makes delicious lemonade, and for culinary pur- poses cannot be excelled. Ponderosa Lemon is sure to become popular when it is known. It fruits when quite small, and makes a lovely house plant. Everybody can grow their own lemons. Thrifty young plants, each 25 Cents; two for 40 cents. OTAHEITE ORANGE A dwarf orange, which grows, blooms, and fruits freely in pots, when only a foot or two high. Fruit about one- half the size of ordinary oranges. The blossoms are pro- duced in great abundance, delicate and beautiful in color, and of a delicious perfume. Strong plants, each 20 cents ; extra strong plants, each 35 cents. PRIMULA Obconica Grandiflora Perpetual-blooming, bearing large trusses of flowers on long stems well above the foliage; color pale lilac, shading to white. Each 15 cents. CHINESE PRIMROSE Few house-plants afford better satisfaction. Requires a cool north window. Care should be taken that no water falls on the buds, as it causes them to rot. In summer they can be turned out into a shady border. Single White, or Single Pink. Each 20 cents. I HE PLANTS WE OFFER ARE i STRONG, HEALTHY, AND FREE FROM INSECTS AND SCALE

  

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Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw53amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

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28G The American Florist. Ffih. 26,

 

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REED BASKETS For four, five and six inch pots. Stained in all the desired colors. Green, Brown, etc. 2 DOZEN FOR $6.00 The same assortment mentioned above in the Two-Tone and Bronze finishes, $8.50. ORDER TODAY. ^^To reach our store take a Chicago Avenue. Division Street. Mil- waukee Avenue or Armitage Avenue car at State and Randolph Streets and get oti at Huron Street. Cars stop right in front of our store. RAEDLEIN BASKET CO. 713 Milwaukee Ave., Phone, Monroe 4977. CHICAGO, ILL. Lancaster County Florists' Club. One of two things is certain—either 3:30 is a more popular hour than 1 o'clock, or W. B. Girvin has a magnetic attraction to draw a crowd, for our visiting trips this winter have not been overcrowded numerically, but this time we had a full 2a and they were all well repaid. Carnations are of course the prin- cipal feature at this, as at all Lan- caster county rang-es, and his Match- less proved that this variety is a prof- itable one, for although the main crop was just off, enough flowers were com- ing into bloom to cover expenses imtil the second large crop would follow, which will be about Mothers' day. Talk about your gold mines or "Bethle- hem steel"; they are not "one, two, three" alongside of this proposition. The place as a whole is what might be termed, between crops. Beacon, while not quite as good as last season, has produced its quota and will soon be ready for pulling out to make room for young stock. Mrs. C. "W. Ward is producing some very fine flowers, but along with them about five per cent of splits and poorly colored blooms. Mrs. Akehurst is highly thought of and will be planted very extensively next season; in fact, nearly to the ex- clusion of all other pinks. Gloriosa is in good shape, as is Pink Delight, but successors that will produce more cuttings are being sought. The cut of carnations from this place during January was 32,000. Chrysanthemum cuttings and carnation cuttings are a feature here and aie in the sand by the tens of thousands; in fact, pot stock runs into large figures, and in talking of plumosus Mr. Girvin glibly rolls over his tongue, the numbers 25,000 to 50.000—hundreds are a for- gotten quantity here. Returning, Dennis Connor and the writer stopped at the station and met the essayist of the evening, M. C. "Wright, and the writer was the only member of the club to take dinner with him, although a number of the members were hailed and asked to join us. Right here is where this club falls down with a dull sickening thud. It is a cold-blooded proposition to ask a man to give his time and money to come and favor us with such papers as we have been receiving from ovu- out-of-town essayists, allow them to be met at the station by one lone member of the club, accompanied to dinner by the same lone member, and often after the lecture, a beggarly two accompany the lecturer back to his hotel or to the railroad station. Reci- procity is the order of the day, and when we stop to think of the time such men as Messrs. Wright, Pennock, Vincent and others give to us. is it absolutely essential that we make the first car out of town after the meet- ing? There is one place where we do not fall down, however, and that is in proportion to membership, the club holds the record for the United States in turning out to hear our different speakers. Mr. Wright certainly had a large and appreciative audience, and the vote of thanks at the end was a real one from the heart. The slides accompanying the paper were highly appreciated and added much to the body of the paper. On the exhibition table we had a very handsome bunch of sweet peas from E. P. Hostetter, of Manheim; Purity freesias from John R. Shreiner, and Rudolph Nagle proved to us, by his vase of mignonette, that he knew the business well enough to make his first attempt a complete success. Among the visitors were T. J. Nolan, of The King Construction Co., Dennis Connor and M. C. Wright, of The Lord & Burnham Co.; Mr. Kenny, of the Cumberland Floral Co., Harrisburg, Pa., and E. S. Rutt, of Elizabethtown, Pa. In addition to the routine business of the club a proposition was pre- sented by H. Horter Fricke for The Philadelphia Press in relation to a special issue for flower show week, and in which the club has taken a five-inch double column space for gen- eral publicity purposes, and in which will appear a full list of our member- ship. It was also moved that we buy 100 tickets for the use of our club members, and arrangements are on foot for a "Lancaster day" with special train and special rates. The programme committee, through its chairman, H. K. Rohrer, has in store for us at the next meeting. March 10. an illustrated lecture by Richard Vincent, Jr., on the bulb in- dustry in Holland and we are going to have our wives and sweethearts at this meeting. Our new president. Mr. Schroyer, seems determined to give the girls a chance at our bachelor florists this leap ■ year, and has ap- pointed a committee to arrange for a ladies' night the Thursday following Easter to take the place of our April meeting, which would fall three days before Easter, an inopportune time for most of us. Albert M. Hf.ur. CARNATION DYE Much the best dye on the market for St. Patrick's day, A packet will color from 75 to 100 carna- tions. 1 pkt., 25c; 3 pkts., 60c; 12 pkts., $2.00, postpaid on re- ceipt of price. Chas. W. McKellar 22 E. Randolph St., CHICAGO St. Louis. TRADE INCLINED TO BE QUIET. During the past week business was rather quiet with the exception of roses which are still very scarce and consequently high priced. There is a good demand for short roses. Carna- tions sell at $1.50 to $3 per hundred, according to quality, but the market on them cleans up readily each day. NOTES. Among the notable events of the week was a decoration by the Mul- lanphy Florists at the formal open- ing of the Mill Creek Sewer which cost $3,500,000. There were 192 guests banqueted, among those present be- ing the city officials and several bank- ers. The walls were white washed and decorated with smilax. Palms were also used. The tables were ar- ranged on either side of the semi-cyl- indrical arch about 250 feet long, and were decorated with jonquils and red carnations. Julius Schaffer of the Mullanphy Florists, took the contract for the decoration at the Washington Uni- versity gymnasium. A shipment of wild smilax from the south has been received for the occasion. Conrad Bergstermann, proprietor of a flower shop at 3117 South Grand avenue, was found dead in his home. February 20, the cause probably due to heart trouble. He was 59 years old. The floral department of Scruggs- Vandervoort-Barney Dry Goods Co. has been quite busy the past week with funeral work. Foster, the Florist, will remove from North Sixth street to Eighth and Olive streets in the near future.

  

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Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_35_2

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

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1B08 Pacific Ave. Member Florists* Telecrraph DeUrery PHIUPS BROS., 938 Broad SL NEWARK, N. J. Aitistk Floral Work and Long Stai Beauties Our Specialty NONTCLAIR, N. J. MASSMANN, Leadlns Florist All Orders PrompUr Attended to L. P. Phone No. 438 N EW JERSEY emUD SCEDtr-rATERSON ul riUSAK Member Florists' Telecraph Delivery Associatioe W. and W. FLOWER STORE 09 8. Mala St., WASHINQTON, PA. Wboleaale and Retail FloriBts. LANCASTER, PA. B. F. BARR & CO., Leading Florists "THE ROSERY" LANCASTKirS QUALITY rLOWKR SHOP Lou Helen Dundore Moore LAWCASTWI. PA. LLAlUL, lUlKiST, 194 Washington Ave. Member Florists' Telegraph Delivery. Orders for Northeastern Pennsylvania filled promptly. TTsaiil discount. Both phones No. /i454. SCHULTHEIS, FLORIST Write. Phone or Wire .SCRANTON PA. eiS Unden Street. 0*#IUWIVn, IH. mc fONBY J. Ve LAYER ERIE, PA WRITE, PHONE or WIRE ■STASUSHBD IMS

 

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ERie. PAm AU orders carefully and promptly filled. directors were James L. Miller and W. J. Patterson. Aids were E. H. Borow- ski, Martin Wax, John R. Ness, Henry Penn and Arthur Clarke. Varioiis Notes. The Horticultural Club held a meet- iug and dinner at the Parker House March 12, with the majority of the members present and these guests: H. H. Bartsch, president of the Gardeners' and Florists' Club; E. Doubleday, of the firm of Doubleday, Page & Co., New York; Louis C. Elson, of the New Eng- land Conservatory of Music; Leonard Barron, New York; Chief Justice Aiken, of the Superior court, and W. R. Nicholson. President Farquhar intro- duced Patrick Welch, who gave an ad- dress on the recent S. A. F. meeting in Chicago. Some of the newest Spencer sweet peas, from William Sim, deco- rated the tables. Geo. W. Marshall, of Medfield, has rented from Woodman Bros., of Danvers, four centrally located greenhouses in that town. Hitchings & Co. built the principal greenhouses and store and they are quite up to date. Mr. Mar- shall will occupy them at once and will grow a general line of stock for retail trade. Danvers is a flourishing town of 10,000 population. John Barr, of South Natick, is de- lighted with Carnation Matchless. He grew 3,000 plants and says he has not had twenty-five split flowers this sea- son. He will give Champion another trial to prove it further. He will plant Alice in quantity next season, with smaller lots of Good Cheer and Pink Sensation. Hoffman had the decorations, which were unusually extensive, for the spring openings of two of Boston's largest dry goods stores, Jordan, Marsh Co., and Filene's. At the latter store he used great numbers of well grown cinerarias arranged in large concrete urns, seven or more plants of solid colors in each, which looked particu- larly well. Prunus triloba and other deciduous shrubs, also rambler roses and bulbous subjects, were used in

  

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