new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged dorkbotsocal

Playstation flip screen. Mr. Jalopy encourages use of boomboxes as a platform.

Unfortunately, the guy at Norton wouldn't sell me one of these: he said he technically didn't own it. I didn't quite understand.

 

I thought it would make a great doorbell switch.

From www.nwmangum.com/Kodak/Rochester.html#Elgeet :

 

The Elgeet Optical Company was founded by three young men who had been boyhood friends: Mortimer A. London, then a lens inspector at Kodak, with David L. Goldstein and Peter Terbuska of Ilex. (The firm's name is an acronym of L, G. and T). In 1946 they began by leasing some machine tools to make lens-polishing machinery, and with this they set up shop in an Atlantic Avenue loft, where they did all their own lens manufacture, packaging, and selling.

 

By 1952 the firm had grown sufficiently to enable them to purchase a former clothing plant at 838 Smith Street. At that time Goldstein was president, Terbuska was secretary, and London treasurer. The company prospered and with nearly 300 employees they manufactured thousands of lenses for small movie cameras and many other applications.

 

London left in 1960, and in 1962 the firm acquired ownership of the ancient establishment of Steinheil in Munich, but they soon sold this, I believe to Lear Siegler. In 1964 there were difficulties at stock-holder's meetings, and the firm was reorganized with Alfred Watson as president. Two years later the assets of the company were acquired by MATI (Management and Technology Inc.), who acquired Turner Bellows at the same time. MATI survived only until 1969, when they disappeared. Goldstein purchased the remaining assets of the former Gundlach Manufacturing Company in Fairport and reorganized it under the name "Dynamic Optics Incorporated," but this also ceased operations in 1972.

  

I recently got one of these for $30 from Norton Sales. Here's the blurb (and photos) from www.hp.com/hpinfo/abouthp/histnfacts/museum/imagingprinti...:

 

Oscilloscope cameras produced permanent records of oscilloscope displays for use in engineering reports or in other situations where pictures of waveforms, or traces, were needed. These cameras could photograph single traces on the oscilloscope that were too short-lived for the eye to see.

 

The HP 196B included an ultraviolet light that caused the phosphor to gently glow, generating a gray background to the finished photo or "oscillogram." The gray background sharply contrasted the white trace, or waveform, with the black graticule lines (the measurement lines on the oscilloscope), making the oscillogram easier to interpret. This camera had a Polaroid Land Camera back that produced finished photos in 10 seconds. It was priced at $445.

Project: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDZtIirXXtQ

Event: www.dorkbot.org/dorkbotsocal

 

This was a special holiday edition of Dorkbot SoCal, held at perhaps the most ambitious light display in Southern California. We met at the driveway of Ric Turner at 7pm on Tuesday December 28th 2010, and he demo'd and explained his latest Christmas Light video game project, Snowball Blaster.

 

Ric Turner is a former Disney Imagineer who created special effects for theme park attractions and shows such as Space Mountain, The Haunted Mansion, and the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage.

Hydraulic lift built to lift the rear of a live axle rear wheel drive car.

Art director, creative director, and multimedia designer, Hector cut his teeth and honed his interactive skills in the burgeoning field of digital and interactive advertising. Among other awards and achievements, Hector has won a Cyber Lion from the 2006 Cannes Lions and a 2009 People's Voice Webby Award. In addition to a keen sense of aesthetics, he specializes at coming up with highly creative core ideas and defining the practical solutions to bring them to reality; he’s applied these skills in everything from social media campaigns to viral video production to product design. Holding a degree in Industrial Design from the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), and an avid breakdancer since the age of 13, Hector is endowed with a dramatically flexible face and takes pleasure in ruining other people’s photos with it.

 

Video: www.ustream.tv/recorded/7129079

Project: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDZtIirXXtQ

Event: www.dorkbot.org/dorkbotsocal

 

This was a special holiday edition of Dorkbot SoCal, held at perhaps the most ambitious light display in Southern California. We met at the driveway of Ric Turner at 7pm on Tuesday December 28th 2010, and he demo'd and explained his latest Christmas Light video game project, Snowball Blaster.

 

Ric Turner is a former Disney Imagineer who created special effects for theme park attractions and shows such as Space Mountain, The Haunted Mansion, and the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage.

My background is in industry and science, a part of my life from a very young age. I grew up in a cold-hearted rural suburb, my father a self-taught electronic technician in the Route 128 high-tech beltway around Boston Massachusetts (the birthplace of early computer, radar and cold-war technologies), a radio amateur and technologist of great talent. I spent my childhood making things and taking things apart (mainly the latter); when I was twelve years old I (quite naively) made a functional copy of Edward Keinholz's Friendly Grey Computer – Star Gauge Model 54, in my own mode, after seeing it in long-defunct Science and Technology magazine.

 

Currently I make functional and complex instrumentation that reveals the beauty hidden within scientific apparatus of the 1930's through 1950's, a time of unsurpassed social and scientific change. My work is about the aesthetics of scientific problem-solving and the obscure traditions of technical design. With my specific knowledge of the era and period materials and obsolete electronic components (backed up by modern embedded computer technology) I create physical embodiments of historic conversations on long-standing problems, and illuminate discarded modes of thought and beauty. My instruments are presented as “products” of “World Power Systems”, an ironic and non-existent entity of obscure origins and intent.

 

By design it's often impossible to distinguish my instruments from historic objects; I use actual materials, components and techniques from this period. Each instrument performs some historic function, genuine or revisionist; they invite human interaction but also work as “sculpture”, subtly or passively, usually silently, working by themselves. They are not simulations or “virtual” anything, but actual devices designed for longevity and reliability. My goal is to create a complexity of layers: rich and beautiful materials; forgotten paradigms of beauty and endurance and meaning; cold and functional components, hard-edged in their own time but oddly organic now; beautiful to look at but with deeply functional internal complexity.

 

I started my working career while in high school, at jobs as close to science as I could get, initially as an electronic technician, later as an undegreed engineer in electronics, digital and analog design, later still in computers and networking, providing a solid technical basis for my present work. My interest in the history of computing and symbolic machinery dates to the late 1970's, and my understanding of technologies a half-century old has helped me even with modern problems.

 

Born in Boston Massachusetts in 1955, I moved to San Francisco in 1983, to Los Angeles in 1996, to Tucson Arizona in 1998, then back to Los Angeles in 2001 where I now live with my partner of 10 years, Josh Stehlik, on a converted commercial “compound” in the Silverlake area with two hairless dogs.

 

Project: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDZtIirXXtQ

Event: www.dorkbot.org/dorkbotsocal

 

This was a special holiday edition of Dorkbot SoCal, held at perhaps the most ambitious light display in Southern California. We met at the driveway of Ric Turner at 7pm on Tuesday December 28th 2010, and he demo'd and explained his latest Christmas Light video game project, Snowball Blaster.

 

Ric Turner is a former Disney Imagineer who created special effects for theme park attractions and shows such as Space Mountain, The Haunted Mansion, and the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage.

Project: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDZtIirXXtQ

Event: www.dorkbot.org/dorkbotsocal

 

This was a special holiday edition of Dorkbot SoCal, held at perhaps the most ambitious light display in Southern California. We met at the driveway of Ric Turner at 7pm on Tuesday December 28th 2010, and he demo'd and explained his latest Christmas Light video game project, Snowball Blaster.

 

Ric Turner is a former Disney Imagineer who created special effects for theme park attractions and shows such as Space Mountain, The Haunted Mansion, and the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage.

Project: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDZtIirXXtQ

Event: www.dorkbot.org/dorkbotsocal

 

This was a special holiday edition of Dorkbot SoCal, held at perhaps the most ambitious light display in Southern California. We met at the driveway of Ric Turner at 7pm on Tuesday December 28th 2010, and he demo'd and explained his latest Christmas Light video game project, Snowball Blaster.

 

Ric Turner is a former Disney Imagineer who created special effects for theme park attractions and shows such as Space Mountain, The Haunted Mansion, and the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage.

Project: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDZtIirXXtQ

Event: www.dorkbot.org/dorkbotsocal

 

This was a special holiday edition of Dorkbot SoCal, held at perhaps the most ambitious light display in Southern California. We met at the driveway of Ric Turner at 7pm on Tuesday December 28th 2010, and he demo'd and explained his latest Christmas Light video game project, Snowball Blaster.

 

Ric Turner is a former Disney Imagineer who created special effects for theme park attractions and shows such as Space Mountain, The Haunted Mansion, and the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage.

Project: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDZtIirXXtQ

Event: www.dorkbot.org/dorkbotsocal

 

This was a special holiday edition of Dorkbot SoCal, held at perhaps the most ambitious light display in Southern California. We met at the driveway of Ric Turner at 7pm on Tuesday December 28th 2010, and he demo'd and explained his latest Christmas Light video game project, Snowball Blaster.

 

Ric Turner is a former Disney Imagineer who created special effects for theme park attractions and shows such as Space Mountain, The Haunted Mansion, and the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage.

Project: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDZtIirXXtQ

Event: www.dorkbot.org/dorkbotsocal

 

This was a special holiday edition of Dorkbot SoCal, held at perhaps the most ambitious light display in Southern California. We met at the driveway of Ric Turner at 7pm on Tuesday December 28th 2010, and he demo'd and explained his latest Christmas Light video game project, Snowball Blaster.

 

Ric Turner is a former Disney Imagineer who created special effects for theme park attractions and shows such as Space Mountain, The Haunted Mansion, and the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage.

Name all the things you recogonize in this picture? Can you find the bike?

I recently got one of these for $30 from Norton Sales. Here's the blurb (and photos) from www.hp.com/hpinfo/abouthp/histnfacts/museum/imagingprinti...:

 

Oscilloscope cameras produced permanent records of oscilloscope displays for use in engineering reports or in other situations where pictures of waveforms, or traces, were needed. These cameras could photograph single traces on the oscilloscope that were too short-lived for the eye to see.

 

The HP 196B included an ultraviolet light that caused the phosphor to gently glow, generating a gray background to the finished photo or "oscillogram." The gray background sharply contrasted the white trace, or waveform, with the black graticule lines (the measurement lines on the oscilloscope), making the oscillogram easier to interpret. This camera had a Polaroid Land Camera back that produced finished photos in 10 seconds. It was priced at $445.

Project: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDZtIirXXtQ

Event: www.dorkbot.org/dorkbotsocal

 

This was a special holiday edition of Dorkbot SoCal, held at perhaps the most ambitious light display in Southern California. We met at the driveway of Ric Turner at 7pm on Tuesday December 28th 2010, and he demo'd and explained his latest Christmas Light video game project, Snowball Blaster.

 

Ric Turner is a former Disney Imagineer who created special effects for theme park attractions and shows such as Space Mountain, The Haunted Mansion, and the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage.

Project: www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDZtIirXXtQ

Event: www.dorkbot.org/dorkbotsocal

 

This was a special holiday edition of Dorkbot SoCal, held at perhaps the most ambitious light display in Southern California. We met at the driveway of Ric Turner at 7pm on Tuesday December 28th 2010, and he demo'd and explained his latest Christmas Light video game project, Snowball Blaster.

 

Ric Turner is a former Disney Imagineer who created special effects for theme park attractions and shows such as Space Mountain, The Haunted Mansion, and the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage.

I recently got one of these for $30 from Norton Sales. Here's the blurb (and photos) from www.hp.com/hpinfo/abouthp/histnfacts/museum/imagingprinti...:

 

Oscilloscope cameras produced permanent records of oscilloscope displays for use in engineering reports or in other situations where pictures of waveforms, or traces, were needed. These cameras could photograph single traces on the oscilloscope that were too short-lived for the eye to see.

 

The HP 196B included an ultraviolet light that caused the phosphor to gently glow, generating a gray background to the finished photo or "oscillogram." The gray background sharply contrasted the white trace, or waveform, with the black graticule lines (the measurement lines on the oscilloscope), making the oscillogram easier to interpret. This camera had a Polaroid Land Camera back that produced finished photos in 10 seconds. It was priced at $445.

I recently got one of these for $30 from Norton Sales. Here's the blurb (and photos) from www.hp.com/hpinfo/abouthp/histnfacts/museum/imagingprinti...:

 

Oscilloscope cameras produced permanent records of oscilloscope displays for use in engineering reports or in other situations where pictures of waveforms, or traces, were needed. These cameras could photograph single traces on the oscilloscope that were too short-lived for the eye to see.

 

The HP 196B included an ultraviolet light that caused the phosphor to gently glow, generating a gray background to the finished photo or "oscillogram." The gray background sharply contrasted the white trace, or waveform, with the black graticule lines (the measurement lines on the oscilloscope), making the oscillogram easier to interpret. This camera had a Polaroid Land Camera back that produced finished photos in 10 seconds. It was priced at $445.

This is the Eagle layout for the Xport Direct interface / power supply PCB

I recently got one of these for $30 from Norton Sales. Here's the blurb (and photos) from www.hp.com/hpinfo/abouthp/histnfacts/museum/imagingprinti...:

 

Oscilloscope cameras produced permanent records of oscilloscope displays for use in engineering reports or in other situations where pictures of waveforms, or traces, were needed. These cameras could photograph single traces on the oscilloscope that were too short-lived for the eye to see.

 

The HP 196B included an ultraviolet light that caused the phosphor to gently glow, generating a gray background to the finished photo or "oscillogram." The gray background sharply contrasted the white trace, or waveform, with the black graticule lines (the measurement lines on the oscilloscope), making the oscillogram easier to interpret. This camera had a Polaroid Land Camera back that produced finished photos in 10 seconds. It was priced at $445.

I recently got one of these for $30 from Norton Sales. Here's the blurb (and photos) from www.hp.com/hpinfo/abouthp/histnfacts/museum/imagingprinti...:

 

Oscilloscope cameras produced permanent records of oscilloscope displays for use in engineering reports or in other situations where pictures of waveforms, or traces, were needed. These cameras could photograph single traces on the oscilloscope that were too short-lived for the eye to see.

 

The HP 196B included an ultraviolet light that caused the phosphor to gently glow, generating a gray background to the finished photo or "oscillogram." The gray background sharply contrasted the white trace, or waveform, with the black graticule lines (the measurement lines on the oscilloscope), making the oscillogram easier to interpret. This camera had a Polaroid Land Camera back that produced finished photos in 10 seconds. It was priced at $445.

Brian O'Connor

Arduino + Chumby = Fun!: The Chumby is an open-source, ambient Internet device running Linux while the Arduino is an open-source prototyping platform. Brian will show how to connect an Arduino to the Chumby and develop a simple application that monitors the environment.

Brian O'Connor

Arduino + Chumby = Fun!: The Chumby is an open-source, ambient Internet device running Linux while the Arduino is an open-source prototyping platform. Brian will show how to connect an Arduino to the Chumby and develop a simple application that monitors the environment.

Brian O'Connor

Arduino + Chumby = Fun!: The Chumby is an open-source, ambient Internet device running Linux while the Arduino is an open-source prototyping platform. Brian will show how to connect an Arduino to the Chumby and develop a simple application that monitors the environment.

Tom Jennings giving a demo of http://wps.com/projects/MP3-system/index.html - a computer music system for his 1970 AMC Hornet. This is an linux-based MP3 player operated by 2 knobs and 2 switches, with no visible computer controls.

I recently got one of these for $30 from Norton Sales. Here's the blurb (and photos) from www.hp.com/hpinfo/abouthp/histnfacts/museum/imagingprinti...:

 

Oscilloscope cameras produced permanent records of oscilloscope displays for use in engineering reports or in other situations where pictures of waveforms, or traces, were needed. These cameras could photograph single traces on the oscilloscope that were too short-lived for the eye to see.

 

The HP 196B included an ultraviolet light that caused the phosphor to gently glow, generating a gray background to the finished photo or "oscillogram." The gray background sharply contrasted the white trace, or waveform, with the black graticule lines (the measurement lines on the oscilloscope), making the oscillogram easier to interpret. This camera had a Polaroid Land Camera back that produced finished photos in 10 seconds. It was priced at $445.

Alex Braidwood - www.listeninginstruments.com/

Alex Braidwood will be demonstrating "Noisolation Headphones", an invention for mechanically transforming the relationship between a person and the noise in their environment. Alex Braidwood is a designer and design educator who maintains a practice centered around a process of play, experimentation and research through making. Alex's current work explores methods for transforming the relationship between people and the noise in their environment. Alex earned his BFA in Graphic Design from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit, MI and his MFA in Media Design from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, CA.

Alex Braidwood - www.listeninginstruments.com/

Alex Braidwood will be demonstrating "Noisolation Headphones", an invention for mechanically transforming the relationship between a person and the noise in their environment. Alex Braidwood is a designer and design educator who maintains a practice centered around a process of play, experimentation and research through making. Alex's current work explores methods for transforming the relationship between people and the noise in their environment. Alex earned his BFA in Graphic Design from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit, MI and his MFA in Media Design from the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, CA.

How many chainsaws do you see in this picture?

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 28 29