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The Sulamani Temple is a Buddhist temple located in the village of Minnanthu (southwest of Bagan) in Burma. The temple is one of the most-frequently visited in Bagan.

 

It was built in 1183 by King Narapatisithu, and is similar to the Thatbyinnyu Temple in design. The Sulamani Temple also shows influence from the Dhammayangyi Temple, and was the model for the Htilominlo Temple. Sulamani Temple was restored after the 1975 earthquake, and utilises brick and stone, with frescoes in the interior of the temple.It was rebuilt in 1994.

Bagan's temple scenery. Dhammayangyi Temple from Shwesandaw Pagoda.

 

Bagan is an ancient city located in the Mandalay Region of Burma / Myanmar. From the 9th to 13th centuries, the city was the capital of the Kingdom of Pagan, the first kingdom to unify the regions that would later constitute modern Myanmar. During the kingdom's height between the 11th and 13th centuries, over 10,000 Buddhist temples, pagodas and monasteries were constructed in the Bagan plains alone, of which the remains of over 2200 temples and pagodas still survive to the present day.

(from Wikipedia)

 

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The great Dhammayangyi temple

Myanmar, Bagán

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Burmese woman with child at Dhammayangyi temple in Bagan. Dhammayangyi temple was built in 1167.

The Sulamani Temple ) is a Buddhist temple located in the village of Minnanthu (southwest of Bagan) in Burma. The temple is one of the most-frequently visited in Bagan.

It was built in 1183 by King Narapatisithu, and is similar to the Thatbyinnyu Temple in design. The Sulamani Temple also shows influence from the Dhammayangyi Temple, and was the model for the Htilominlo Temple. Sulamani Temple was restored after the 1975 earthquake, and utilises brick and stone, with frescoes in the interior of the temple

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Dhammayangyi Temple is a Buddhist temple located in Bagan, Myanmar. Largest of all the temples in Bagan, the Dhammayan as it is popularly known was built during the reign of King Narathu :167 (1167-1170). Narathu, who came to the throne by assassinating his father Alaungsithu and his elder brother, presumably built this largest temple to atone for his sins.

The Dhammayangyi is the widest temple in Bagan, and is built in a plan similar to that of Ananda Temple. Burmese chronicles state that while the construction of the temple was in the process, the king was assassinated by some Indians and thus the temple was not completed. Sinhalese sources however indicate that the king was killed by Sinhalese invaders.

A temple that never been restored

Myanmar, Bagán

Hi my friends, I'm back from traveling :)

 

We arrived Bagan with the nightbus from Yangon. We slept not very well, so we liked to go directly to the hotel.

But the taxidriver said "For a little more money, i drive you to the Pagoda for looking the sunrise..."

As we stood there, the fatigue was blown away (:

Many thanks to the taxidriver who drove us to this magical place!!

The Dhammayangyi Temple is the widest temple in Bagan. Burmese chronicles state that while the construction of the temple was in the process, the king was assassinated and thus the temple was not completed.

Dhammayangyi temple seen from Shwesandaw pagoda at sunrise. Bagan, Myanmar

Dhammayangyi Temple is the most massive structure in Bagan which has a similar architectural plan to Ananda Temple. It was built by King Narathu (1167-70), who was also known as Kalagya Min, the 'king killed by Indians'. The temple is located about a kilometer to the southeast of the city walls directing Minnanthu.

 

After murdering his own king father, Narathu ascended the throne of Bagan and due to that, he built this temple. It is said that Narathu oversaw the construction himself and that masons were excecuted if a needle could be pushed between bricks they had laid. But he never completed the construction because he was assassinated before the completion. It was said that he was displeased by the Hindu rituals and one of them who made those rituals was the Indian princess who was the daughter of Pateikkaya. So he executed her for such reasons. The princess's father wanted revenge for his innocent daughter and sent 8 officers in the disguise of Brahmans and assassinated Narathu in this very temple.

Sunset view of the massive Dhammayangyi temple from Shwesandaw Pagoda Bagan Myanmar

Dhammayangyi Temple is a Buddhist temple located in Bagan, Myanmar. Largest of all the temples in Bagan, the Dhammayan as it is popularly known was built during the reign of King Narathu (1167-1170). Narathu, who came to the throne by assassinating his father Alaungsithu and his elder brother, presumably built this largest temple to atone for his sins.

 

The Dhammayangyi is the widest temple in Bagan, and is built in a plan similar to that of Ananda Temple. Burmese chronicles state that while the construction of the temple was in the process, the king was assassinated by some Indians and thus the temple was not completed. Sinhalese sources however indicate that the king was killed by Sinhalese invaders.

 

The temple's interior is bricked up for unknown reasons, thus only the four porches and the outer corridors are accessible.

The 6 days we spent temple-hopping in Bagan opened my eyes and mind. It was probably the most enlightening trip I've ever taken.

 

This was a pano consisting of 6 vertical frames, taken from the popular Shwesandaw Pagoda.

 

From Wikipedia: Bagan (formerly Pagan) is an ancient city located in the Mandalay Region of Burma (Myanmar). From the 9th to 13th centuries, the city was the capital of the Kingdom of Pagan, the first kingdom to unify the regions that would later constitute modern Myanmar. During the kingdom's height between the 11th and 13th centuries, over 10,000 Buddhist temples, pagodas and monasteries were constructed in the Bagan plains alone, of which the remains of over 2200 temples and pagodas still survive to the present day.

Sunrise at Bagan with the silhouettes of Dhammayangyi and Sulamani Temples and hot air balloons flying over the archaeological zone

Dhammayangyi temple, also famously known as cursed temple captured from Myauk Guni temple

© all rights reserved by B℮n

 

Towering above the other monuments of Bagan, the magnificence in white which is the Thatbyinnyu. Its name means omniscience in Burmese language, describing the status that Buddha attained as he entered enlightenment - knowing thoroughly and seeing widely.

Built by King Alaungsithu from 1113 to 1163, the Thatbyinnyu is a transitional temple, standing between two styles. It is one of the earliest double-storeyed temples, but the arrangement is different from that of later double-storeyed temples, much as if it were still an experiment in the new form. Temple is among the best among Myanmar architecture, with surprisingly straight corners and windows that welcome light perfectly. The temple consists of two storeys, four corridors, and seven terraces. The terraces of the Thatbyinnyu provide a good panoramic view of Bagan- of the green and brown landscape, the innumerable monuments, the broad Ayeyarwaddy river, and the distant hills to the east and west. To the southwest of the Thatbyinnyu, in a monastery compound, are two tall stone pillars with foliations in an inverted V pattern. They were the supports for a huge bronze bell.

 

A coachman drives horse-drawn carriage away from the Thatbyinnyu Temple. The temple is 61 metres tall, the tallest in Bagan - Myanmar. Thatbyinnyu is situated at the south-east corner of the city wall. On the top of this highest temple in Bagan, among sunset, you can enjoy the magnificent and panoramic view of thousands temples dotting the antique region. During our visit to Bagan, we rented a bicycle and were allowed to drive along any Buddhist temple.

 

Het mysterieuze en bijzondere Bagan in Myanmar is eigenlijk niet te vergelijken met een andere plek op onze mooie wereld. Verspreid over een uitgestrekt landschap vind je in Bagan duizenden boeddhistische tempels. Waarbij de ene tempel van buiten of binnen nog mooier, groter of unieker is dan de ander. Tijdens ons bezoek aan Bagan huurden we fietsen. We fietsen langs alle bijzondere boeddhistische tempels in Bagan. Langs de tempels fietsen is natuurlijk erg leuk om te doen. Thatbyinnyu Pahto is de hoogste tempel van Bagan. Je vindt ‘m vlak naast Ananda Pahto. Hij werd in de 12de eeuw gebouwd in opdracht van koning Alaungsithu. Alaungsithu is de vader van… Narathu. Jawel, die snoodaard die zijn eigen broer en vader vermoordde om de macht te nemen en dan maar Dhammayangyi liet bouwen om zijn zonden af te kopen. De That Byin Nyu tempel is grijs zwart van kleur. Een koetsier rijdt paard en wagen terug van de Thatbyinnyu Tempel. Deze tempel is vooral mooi om ’s avonds te bekijken vanaf één van de omliggende tempels omdat de tempel dan gekleurd wordt door het zonlicht.

Sunrise over Dhammayangyi temple at Bagan, Burma.

Of the thousands of temples in Bagan, Myanmar the Dhammayangyi Temple stands out. It is one of the biggest temples and one of the easiest to spot situated with croplands surrounding it connected only with dirt roads.

...inside Dhammayangyi temple, Bagan, Myanmar...

The Sulamani Temple is a Buddhist temple located in the village of Minnanthu (southwest of Bagan) in Burma. The temple is one of the most-frequently visited in Bagan.

 

It was built in 1183 by King Narapatisithu, and is similar to the Thatbyinnyu Temple in design. The Sulamani Temple also shows influence from the Dhammayangyi Temple, and was the model for the Htilominlo Temple. Sulamani Temple was restored after the 1975 earthquake, and utilises brick and stone, with frescoes in the interior of the temple.

Sunset over the Irrawady River from Bu Paya Pagoda and long exposures in Dhammayangyi Pagoda.

Nikon F3 | Nikon Series E 28mm f2.8 | Kodak Ektar 100

 

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The rainbow came and went in the matter of minutes.

Balloon over Dhammayangyi Temple.

 

Dhammayangyi is the largest temple in Bagan. Unlike other temples that look tall and elegant, Dhammayangyi appears stout with its pyramid shape and dome-like top. The temple is shrouded in mystery as its entire innermost passage was intentionally filled with brick rubbles centuries ago. As I step into the temple, a pungent stench of bats' urine assaults my nasal senses. The high ceiling and poor natural lighting in the temple make it a favourite sanctuary for the bats during the day. At every temple, I always turn left and visit the four Buddha images in a clockwise direction. Despite the stench and the squeals from the bats, I want to do the same at Dhammayangyi. I am about halfway through as I turn the second corner. The passageway in front of me looks long and dark. The squeaky sounds from the bats originate from the high niche halfway down the corridor and are particularly loud. I proceed tentatively. I am alone and it feels really spooky. The eerie squeals get louder the closer I am to the central niche. Then my courage flees and I run back to the corner. I try to calm down and make another attempt. I abort it again and finally exit the temple. Fresh air and sunlight never feel so good.

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