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Cyrus Tomb at Night,Pasargad,Fars Province,Iran

:copyright: Vafa Nematzadeh.All rights reserved.Thank you very much for your visits,faves and comments here.

 

Cyrus: The Great Emperor of Persia (580-529 BC)

Achaemenid Empire (550–330 BC)

 

Cyrus I am ..

the lord of the world,the lord of human's widest lands,

the leader of wisdom,cheerfulness,purity and devoutness,

the unique grandchild of light,the tutti of melody,

the master of kingdom..

I am Cyrus.

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One of the five shrines in the building underlies the devoutness to their belief and way of life. The fruits have been "fossilized" since 1948.

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life. - Confucius

 

Macro Monday project – 01/20/14

"Clothing”

Nara townscape, Japan 奈良散歩 Dec. 2012

Shigisan-Chogosonshiji temple, Kuhatsu-Gohodo shrine 信貴山朝護孫子寺 空鉢護法堂

The believers keep their own pots here to make the shrine clean and proffer water to God. They have to climb to the shrine on a mountain carrying water in the pots.

Carl Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 2/50 ZE

 

Ι.Μ. Προφήτη Ηλία στο Νεόκαστρο Ημαθίας, μετόχι Ι.Μ. Οσίου Γρηγορίου Αγίου Όρους.

Monastery Prophet Elias Monastery in Neokastro Imathias, dependency Monastery of Ossiou Grigoriou of Agion Oros.

Καταφυγιο Φλαμπουρι Παρνηθα,shelter Flabouri Parnitha

 

αφιερωμενη στο αγαπημενο μου φιλαρακι Χρηστο Καραγεωργο....

 

Μια λέξη

 

σε μια στιγμή

 

σινιάλο η φωνή

 

θα σου κρατώ

 

το χέρι σφιχτά

 

ο πόνος να μη στρέψει

 

τα πυρά

 

πίκρα να μη στέργει

 

στα στάχυα της φωλιάς.

 

La basilique-cathédrale Notre-Dame-de-la-Treille (Lille, Nord, France) est de style néogothique. Sa construction a débuté en 1854 pour s'achever en... 1999 seulement (par manque d'argent) par une façade très moderne. La Sainte Chapelle abrite une copie de la statue miraculeuse de Notre-Dame de la Treille, l'original ayant été volé en 1969.

 

-----

The basilica-cathedral Notre-Dame-de-la-Treille (Lille, France) is of neo-Gothic style. Its construction began in 1854 to end in ... 1999 only (lack of money) with a very modern facade. The Holy Chapel shelters a copy of the supernatural statue of Notre-Dame de la Treille: the original has been stolen in 1969.

St. George church, Athens, Greece

(further pictures you can see by clicking on the link at the end of page!)

Breitenseer parish church of St. Lawrence

Text: Stefan Malfer

In the north transept of the Breitenseer parish church a window with historicist stained glass is the 'Turks year' 1683 dedicated. The upper half of the window shows Marco d' Aviano blessing the army commanders before the decisive battle at Kahlenberg. In his left hand he holds his famous wooden cross. In the lower part of the window Emperor Leopold I prays to "Our Lady of Victory" for his residence city of Vienna, which is pictured in the background.

The Breitenseer parish church was built in 1896-1898, the Marco d' Aviano window was delivered in 1900, so only eighteen years after Onno Klopp's book about the great ,Turkish War', twelve years after Klopp's edition of the correspondence between Emperor Leopold I and Marco d'Aviano and eleven years after the initiation of the process of beatification. Maybe the window is the first visual representation of the subject in a building.

For the construction of the Breitenseer parish church

The not yet in Vienna incorporated small village of Breitensee in the west of Vienna above Penzing at the northern slope of the river Wien belonged to the parish Penzing and had only a small chapel. The expansion of the City of Vienna, the settlement of business enterprises, the construction of tenements and schools made ​​a larger church to an urgent necessity. 1886 founded the in Breitensee acting Benefiziat Ferdinand Ordelt a Church Building Association. Ten years later, in 1896, construction started in 1898 the neo-Gothic church was consecrated. It was financed by contributions from the population, the architect Ludwig Zatzka family who lived in Breitensee, the City of Vienna (the location was incorporated in 1892) and the Lower Austrian religious fund. 1899, the parish Breitensee was established.

Kaiser Jubilee Church

In 1893 the church building association decided that the church to the 50th jubilee of Emperor Franz Joseph I. should be completed and a Kaiser Jubilee Church should be. This idea in the Church is reflected in several places, most prominently in the great Breitenseer stained glass cycle on the "Pietas Austriaca" and on the cross devoutness of the House of Habsburg.

The Breitenseer glass painting cycle "Pietas Austriaca"

The by Ferdinand Ordelt conceived cycle represents in eight large glass windows on around 140 m2 "how the sublime Emperors from the House of Habsburg have honored the cross (Rudolf I), with the same sought comfort and help (Ferdinand II), fought for the same (Charles V) and themselves and their empire have placed under the protection of the Mother of God (Leopold I)". The underlying idea behind this simple but concentrated formulation is nothing less than a probably unique collection and representation of the Cross devotion of the Habsburg dynasty in the context of "pietas Austriaca". Ordelt was a pious, patriotic and educated priest and teacher of religious education. Prior to his activity in Breitensee he was tutor to the sons of Count Hardegg. He chose from the by the so-called Habsburg patriotism of the 19th Century (eg in textbooks and in the patriotic literature, even for the youth) intensively imparted stories of the "pietas Austriaca" all narratives on the topic veneration of the cross and put them in relation to salvation history, thereby expressing the fact that the secular rule of the House Habsburg, inclusively the his Jubilee celebrating Emperor Franz Joseph I, was based on the piety of the house and was nothing else but rule in the name of Christ.

Defense of Christianity against external enemies

Within this framework the ,Turks remembrance' twice is addressed, namely, in the representation of the crusading enterprise of Emperor Charles V against Tunis in 1535 and in the representation of the blessing of the Christian army commanders by Marco d' Aviano in 1683.

This remembrance results from the stations of the cycle: Stations of the Cross, Finding of the cross (Helena), Christian Empire (Emperor Constantine, King Rudolf I, King Stephen of Hungary), defense against internal enemies (Archduke Ferdinand III against the Protestants, Peter Canisius), defense against external enemies ( Emperor Charles V against Tunis in 1535, Marco d' Aviano and Emperor Leopold I. 1683), Last Judgment.

The crusade -like enterprise of Emperor Charles V against Chaireddin Barbarossa and the conquest of Tunis with the liberation of Christian slaves in 1535 is shown in the left window of the north transept, the events of 1683 in the right window of this transept.

www.tuerkengedaechtnis.oeaw.ac.at/ort/breitenseer-pfarrki...

(further pictures you can see by clicking on the link at the end of page!)

Breitenseer parish church of St. Lawrence

Text: Stefan Malfer

In the north transept of the Breitenseer parish church a window with historicist stained glass is the 'Turks year' 1683 dedicated. The upper half of the window shows Marco d' Aviano blessing the army commanders before the decisive battle at Kahlenberg. In his left hand he holds his famous wooden cross. In the lower part of the window Emperor Leopold I prays to "Our Lady of Victory" for his residence city of Vienna, which is pictured in the background.

The Breitenseer parish church was built in 1896-1898, the Marco d' Aviano window was delivered in 1900, so only eighteen years after Onno Klopp's book about the great ,Turkish War', twelve years after Klopp's edition of the correspondence between Emperor Leopold I and Marco d'Aviano and eleven years after the initiation of the process of beatification. Maybe the window is the first visual representation of the subject in a building.

For the construction of the Breitenseer parish church

The not yet in Vienna incorporated small village of Breitensee in the west of Vienna above Penzing at the northern slope of the river Wien belonged to the parish Penzing and had only a small chapel. The expansion of the City of Vienna, the settlement of business enterprises, the construction of tenements and schools made ​​a larger church to an urgent necessity. 1886 founded the in Breitensee acting Benefiziat Ferdinand Ordelt a Church Building Association. Ten years later, in 1896, construction started in 1898 the neo-Gothic church was consecrated. It was financed by contributions from the population, the architect Ludwig Zatzka family who lived in Breitensee, the City of Vienna (the location was incorporated in 1892) and the Lower Austrian religious fund. 1899, the parish Breitensee was established.

Kaiser Jubilee Church

In 1893 the church building association decided that the church to the 50th jubilee of Emperor Franz Joseph I. should be completed and a Kaiser Jubilee Church should be. This idea in the Church is reflected in several places, most prominently in the great Breitenseer stained glass cycle on the "Pietas Austriaca" and on the cross devoutness of the House of Habsburg.

The Breitenseer glass painting cycle "Pietas Austriaca"

The by Ferdinand Ordelt conceived cycle represents in eight large glass windows on around 140 m2 "how the sublime Emperors from the House of Habsburg have honored the cross (Rudolf I), with the same sought comfort and help (Ferdinand II), fought for the same (Charles V) and themselves and their empire have placed under the protection of the Mother of God (Leopold I)". The underlying idea behind this simple but concentrated formulation is nothing less than a probably unique collection and representation of the Cross devotion of the Habsburg dynasty in the context of "pietas Austriaca". Ordelt was a pious, patriotic and educated priest and teacher of religious education. Prior to his activity in Breitensee he was tutor to the sons of Count Hardegg. He chose from the by the so-called Habsburg patriotism of the 19th Century (eg in textbooks and in the patriotic literature, even for the youth) intensively imparted stories of the "pietas Austriaca" all narratives on the topic veneration of the cross and put them in relation to salvation history, thereby expressing the fact that the secular rule of the House Habsburg, inclusively the his Jubilee celebrating Emperor Franz Joseph I, was based on the piety of the house and was nothing else but rule in the name of Christ.

Defense of Christianity against external enemies

Within this framework the ,Turks remembrance' twice is addressed, namely, in the representation of the crusading enterprise of Emperor Charles V against Tunis in 1535 and in the representation of the blessing of the Christian army commanders by Marco d' Aviano in 1683.

This remembrance results from the stations of the cycle: Stations of the Cross, Finding of the cross (Helena), Christian Empire (Emperor Constantine, King Rudolf I, King Stephen of Hungary), defense against internal enemies (Archduke Ferdinand III against the Protestants, Peter Canisius), defense against external enemies ( Emperor Charles V against Tunis in 1535, Marco d' Aviano and Emperor Leopold I. 1683), Last Judgment.

The crusade -like enterprise of Emperor Charles V against Chaireddin Barbarossa and the conquest of Tunis with the liberation of Christian slaves in 1535 is shown in the left window of the north transept, the events of 1683 in the right window of this transept.

www.tuerkengedaechtnis.oeaw.ac.at/ort/breitenseer-pfarrki...

Basilique Notre Dame de Fourvière, Lyon.

(further pictures you can see by clicking on the link at the end of page!)

Breitenseer parish church of St. Lawrence

Text: Stefan Malfer

In the north transept of the Breitenseer parish church a window with historicist stained glass is the 'Turks year' 1683 dedicated. The upper half of the window shows Marco d' Aviano blessing the army commanders before the decisive battle at Kahlenberg. In his left hand he holds his famous wooden cross. In the lower part of the window Emperor Leopold I prays to "Our Lady of Victory" for his residence city of Vienna, which is pictured in the background.

The Breitenseer parish church was built in 1896-1898, the Marco d' Aviano window was delivered in 1900, so only eighteen years after Onno Klopp's book about the great ,Turkish War', twelve years after Klopp's edition of the correspondence between Emperor Leopold I and Marco d'Aviano and eleven years after the initiation of the process of beatification. Maybe the window is the first visual representation of the subject in a building.

For the construction of the Breitenseer parish church

The not yet in Vienna incorporated small village of Breitensee in the west of Vienna above Penzing at the northern slope of the river Wien belonged to the parish Penzing and had only a small chapel. The expansion of the City of Vienna, the settlement of business enterprises, the construction of tenements and schools made ​​a larger church to an urgent necessity. 1886 founded the in Breitensee acting Benefiziat Ferdinand Ordelt a Church Building Association. Ten years later, in 1896, construction started in 1898 the neo-Gothic church was consecrated. It was financed by contributions from the population, the architect Ludwig Zatzka family who lived in Breitensee, the City of Vienna (the location was incorporated in 1892) and the Lower Austrian religious fund. 1899, the parish Breitensee was established.

Kaiser Jubilee Church

In 1893 the church building association decided that the church to the 50th jubilee of Emperor Franz Joseph I. should be completed and a Kaiser Jubilee Church should be. This idea in the Church is reflected in several places, most prominently in the great Breitenseer stained glass cycle on the "Pietas Austriaca" and on the cross devoutness of the House of Habsburg.

The Breitenseer glass painting cycle "Pietas Austriaca"

The by Ferdinand Ordelt conceived cycle represents in eight large glass windows on around 140 m2 "how the sublime Emperors from the House of Habsburg have honored the cross (Rudolf I), with the same sought comfort and help (Ferdinand II), fought for the same (Charles V) and themselves and their empire have placed under the protection of the Mother of God (Leopold I)". The underlying idea behind this simple but concentrated formulation is nothing less than a probably unique collection and representation of the Cross devotion of the Habsburg dynasty in the context of "pietas Austriaca". Ordelt was a pious, patriotic and educated priest and teacher of religious education. Prior to his activity in Breitensee he was tutor to the sons of Count Hardegg. He chose from the by the so-called Habsburg patriotism of the 19th Century (eg in textbooks and in the patriotic literature, even for the youth) intensively imparted stories of the "pietas Austriaca" all narratives on the topic veneration of the cross and put them in relation to salvation history, thereby expressing the fact that the secular rule of the House Habsburg, inclusively the his Jubilee celebrating Emperor Franz Joseph I, was based on the piety of the house and was nothing else but rule in the name of Christ.

Defense of Christianity against external enemies

Within this framework the ,Turks remembrance' twice is addressed, namely, in the representation of the crusading enterprise of Emperor Charles V against Tunis in 1535 and in the representation of the blessing of the Christian army commanders by Marco d' Aviano in 1683.

This remembrance results from the stations of the cycle: Stations of the Cross, Finding of the cross (Helena), Christian Empire (Emperor Constantine, King Rudolf I, King Stephen of Hungary), defense against internal enemies (Archduke Ferdinand III against the Protestants, Peter Canisius), defense against external enemies ( Emperor Charles V against Tunis in 1535, Marco d' Aviano and Emperor Leopold I. 1683), Last Judgment.

The crusade -like enterprise of Emperor Charles V against Chaireddin Barbarossa and the conquest of Tunis with the liberation of Christian slaves in 1535 is shown in the left window of the north transept, the events of 1683 in the right window of this transept.

www.tuerkengedaechtnis.oeaw.ac.at/ort/breitenseer-pfarrki...

The traditional Maya ballgame known as pitz was considered a natural part of Maya political, spiritual, and social interaction. Performed using a nice rubberized softball varying in dimensions starting from a competitive softball on to a soccer ball, participants would need to make an effort to hop the actual ball without having to use their hands via pure stone hoops connected to the sides of the actual ball court. The entire ball court on it's own became a center point for Maya urban centers and therefore represented the particular city's prosperity not to mention power. The actual playing area ended up being in the form of an I with higher platforms on each side of the court making it possible for many more fans. Mobile or portable pure stone court markers referred to as hacha ordinarily depicting animals or skulls happen to be located all around stadium. Wall art showing captives, soldiers, Creation beliefs, and even transfers of political power from one leader to a new one had been painted all around the ball court. The very ballgame afforded nearby cities and towns a substitute for battle with regard to deciding disagreements.

 

Ballplayers donned protective gear through the entire match in order to prevent bodily harm mainly because of the tough rubberized ball that typically weighed as much as 20 lbs. To shield ribs along with the entire upper body competitors might wear a yoke of natural leather as well as wood about their waists. Pure stone hachas appeared to be occasionally connected to the front side on the yoke following the competition designed for ceremonial practices. Additionally, they donned extra padding all around knees and also arms, and enormous stylized animal headdresses which may have symbolized whatever they regarded as their own animal counterparts or way. Handstones termed manopla were definitely used to strike the ball by using additional power, and could happen to be utilized to launch the ball in play.

 

The main spiritual tale most linked to the ballgame belongs to the Maize Gods and the Hero Twins from the Quich Maya book of creation, the Popol Vuh. For the story goes, the Maize Gods had been serious ballplayers who had been mortally wounded and laid to rest on the court by the Lords of Xibalba (the Underworld) for disturbing all of them with the noises from the competition. The head of one of the Maize gods appeared to be strung from a tree within the Underworld, and as a daughter of the Lord of the Underworld passes, it spit straight into her hands, astonishingly impregnating her. The daughter bore twin sons, the Hero Twins, who avenge their own father and uncle's deaths by means of resurrecting them within the ballcourt. The Hero Twins go on to endure the ordeals associated with Hell given to them by means of the death gods, whilst the born-again Maize Gods remain upon the main ballcourt meant for humans to be able to honor. The Maya for that reason thought that it absolutely was important to participate in the competition intended for their own survival. The ballgame offered the opportunity to display devoutness towards the gods simply by sacrificing captured kings along with high lords, or even the losing competitors of the competition.

 

Popol Vuh

 

A great deal of Maya customs centered all around the written text of the Popol Vuh, or Book of Counsel. The written text recollects the creation of humans by means of the Heart of Sky and also the Sovereign Plumed Serpent inside a number of efforts, utilizing materials including clay, wood, and lastly maize. The most crucial gods involved Itzmna, lord of life; Ali Kin, the sun god; Ah Puch, god of death; Chac, god of water and rain; Yumkax, the corn god; and Ixchel, goddess of the moon, pregnancy, and of abundance. The Maya thought there had been as many as 13 heavens over earth and 9 underworlds below it. A god reigned over each one of these skies and lower worlds. The Maya recognized all these numerous gods described inside the Popol Vuh with sacrificial rituals through which food, pottery, animals, and in many cases humans were offered. www.omec-arkofthecovenantmystery.com/article/the-mayan-ba...

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© SANJEEV SYAL

All my images are All Rights Reserved. They should not be reproduced in any way, and unauthorized use is strictly prohibited. To buy any of the images please contact me on sanjeev_syal@yahoo.com

(further pictures you can see by clicking on the link at the end of page!)

Breitenseer parish church of St. Lawrence

Text: Stefan Malfer

In the north transept of the Breitenseer parish church a window with historicist stained glass is the 'Turks year' 1683 dedicated. The upper half of the window shows Marco d' Aviano blessing the army commanders before the decisive battle at Kahlenberg. In his left hand he holds his famous wooden cross. In the lower part of the window Emperor Leopold I prays to "Our Lady of Victory" for his residence city of Vienna, which is pictured in the background.

The Breitenseer parish church was built in 1896-1898, the Marco d' Aviano window was delivered in 1900, so only eighteen years after Onno Klopp's book about the great ,Turkish War', twelve years after Klopp's edition of the correspondence between Emperor Leopold I and Marco d'Aviano and eleven years after the initiation of the process of beatification. Maybe the window is the first visual representation of the subject in a building.

For the construction of the Breitenseer parish church

The not yet in Vienna incorporated small village of Breitensee in the west of Vienna above Penzing at the northern slope of the river Wien belonged to the parish Penzing and had only a small chapel. The expansion of the City of Vienna, the settlement of business enterprises, the construction of tenements and schools made ​​a larger church to an urgent necessity. 1886 founded the in Breitensee acting Benefiziat Ferdinand Ordelt a Church Building Association. Ten years later, in 1896, construction started in 1898 the neo-Gothic church was consecrated. It was financed by contributions from the population, the architect Ludwig Zatzka family who lived in Breitensee, the City of Vienna (the location was incorporated in 1892) and the Lower Austrian religious fund. 1899, the parish Breitensee was established.

Kaiser Jubilee Church

In 1893 the church building association decided that the church to the 50th jubilee of Emperor Franz Joseph I. should be completed and a Kaiser Jubilee Church should be. This idea in the Church is reflected in several places, most prominently in the great Breitenseer stained glass cycle on the "Pietas Austriaca" and on the cross devoutness of the House of Habsburg.

The Breitenseer glass painting cycle "Pietas Austriaca"

The by Ferdinand Ordelt conceived cycle represents in eight large glass windows on around 140 m2 "how the sublime Emperors from the House of Habsburg have honored the cross (Rudolf I), with the same sought comfort and help (Ferdinand II), fought for the same (Charles V) and themselves and their empire have placed under the protection of the Mother of God (Leopold I)". The underlying idea behind this simple but concentrated formulation is nothing less than a probably unique collection and representation of the Cross devotion of the Habsburg dynasty in the context of "pietas Austriaca". Ordelt was a pious, patriotic and educated priest and teacher of religious education. Prior to his activity in Breitensee he was tutor to the sons of Count Hardegg. He chose from the by the so-called Habsburg patriotism of the 19th Century (eg in textbooks and in the patriotic literature, even for the youth) intensively imparted stories of the "pietas Austriaca" all narratives on the topic veneration of the cross and put them in relation to salvation history, thereby expressing the fact that the secular rule of the House Habsburg, inclusively the his Jubilee celebrating Emperor Franz Joseph I, was based on the piety of the house and was nothing else but rule in the name of Christ.

Defense of Christianity against external enemies

Within this framework the ,Turks remembrance' twice is addressed, namely, in the representation of the crusading enterprise of Emperor Charles V against Tunis in 1535 and in the representation of the blessing of the Christian army commanders by Marco d' Aviano in 1683.

This remembrance results from the stations of the cycle: Stations of the Cross, Finding of the cross (Helena), Christian Empire (Emperor Constantine, King Rudolf I, King Stephen of Hungary), defense against internal enemies (Archduke Ferdinand III against the Protestants, Peter Canisius), defense against external enemies ( Emperor Charles V against Tunis in 1535, Marco d' Aviano and Emperor Leopold I. 1683), Last Judgment.

The crusade -like enterprise of Emperor Charles V against Chaireddin Barbarossa and the conquest of Tunis with the liberation of Christian slaves in 1535 is shown in the left window of the north transept, the events of 1683 in the right window of this transept.

www.tuerkengedaechtnis.oeaw.ac.at/ort/breitenseer-pfarrki...

The days being nearly fulfilled when the Blessed Virgin must, according to the Law, present and redeem her firstborn in the Temple, 143143 The laws about ‘Purification’ and offerings after childbirth are in Lev. 12.4-8, and the ‘sanctification’ of the first-born is directed in Exod. 13.2 and Num. 3.13. (SB) all was prepared for the Holy Family’s journey first to the Temple and then to their home in Nazareth. On the evening of Sunday, December 30 th, the shepherds had been given everything left behind by Anna’s servants. The Cave of the Nativity, the side-cave, and Maraha’s grave were all completely swept out and emptied. Joseph left them all quite clean. In the night of Sunday, December 30 th, to Monday, December 31 st, I saw Joseph and Mary with the Child visiting the Cave of the Nativity once more and taking leave of that holy place. They spread out the kings’ carpet on Jesus’ birthplace, laid the Child on it and prayed, and finally laid it on the place where He had been circumcised, kneeling down in prayer there, too. At dawn on Monday, December 31 st, I saw the Blessed Virgin mount the donkey, which the old shepherds had brought to the cave all equipped for the journey. Joseph held the Child while she settled herself comfortably; then he laid Him in her lap. She sat sideways on the saddle with her feet on a rather high support, facing backwards. She held the Child on her lap wrapped in her big veil and looked down on Him with an expression of great happiness. There were only a few rugs and small bundles on the donkey. Mary sat between them. The shepherds accompanied them part of their way before taking a moving farewell of them. They did not take the way by which they had come, but went between the Cave of the Nativity and the grave of Maraha, round the east side of Bethlehem. Nobody noticed them.

[January 30 th:] This morning I saw them going very slowly on the short journey from Bethlehem to Jerusalem: they must have made many halts. At midday I saw them resting on benches round a fountain with a roof over it. I saw some women coming to the Blessed Virgin and bringing her jugs with balsam and small loaves of bread. The Blessed Virgin’s sacrifice for the Temple hung in a basket at the side of the donkey. This basket had three compartments, two of which were lined with something. These contained fruit. The third was of open wickerwork and a couple of doves could be seen in it. Towards evening I saw them enter a small house beside a large inn about a quarter of an hour from Jerusalem. This was kept by an old childless couple who welcomed them with particular affection. I now know why I mistook Anna’s companions yesterday for the people from an inn in Jerusalem: I had seen them stopping here with these good old people on their way to Bethlehem, when they had no doubt arranged about a lodging for the Blessed Virgin. The old couple were Essenes and related to Joanna Chuza. The husband was a gardener by trade, trimmed hedges, and was employed in work on the road.

[February 1 st:] I saw the Holy Family with these old innkeepers near Jerusalem during the whole of today. The Blessed Virgin was generally alone in her room with the Child, who lay on a rug on a low ledge projecting from the wall. She was praying all the time, and seemed to be preparing herself for the coming ceremony. It was revealed to me at the same time how one should prepare oneself for receiving Holy Communion.

I saw the appearance of a number of holy angels in her room, worshipping the Infant Jesus. I do not know whether the Blessed Virgin also saw these angels, but I think so, because I saw her rapt in contemplation. The good people of the inn did everything possible to please the Blessed Virgin: they must have been aware of the holiness of the Infant Jesus.

About seven o’clock in the evening I had a vision of the aged Simeon. He was a thin, very old man with a short beard. He was an ordinary priest, was married, and had three grown-up sons, the youngest of whom might have been about twenty. I saw Simeon, who lived close to the Temple, going through a narrow dark passage in the Temple walls into a small vaulted cell, built in the thickness of the wall. I saw nothing in this room but an opening through which one could look down into the Temple. I saw the aged Simeon kneeling here rapt in prayer. Then the appearance of an angel stood before him and warned him to take heed of the little child who should be first presented early next morning, for this was the Messiah for whom he had so long yearned. After he had seen Him, he would soon die. I saw this so plainly; the room was illuminated, and the holy old man was radiant with joy. Then I saw him going to his house and telling his wife with great joy what had been announced to him. After his wife had gone to bed, I saw Simeon betake himself to prayer again.

I never saw devout Israelites and their priests praying with such exaggerated gestures as the Jews today. I did, however, see them scourging themselves. I saw the prophetess Anna praying in her cell and having a vision about the Presentation of the Infant Jesus in the Temple.

[February 2 nd:] This morning, while it was still dark, I saw the Holy Family, accompanied by the people of the inn, leaving the inn and going to Jerusalem to the Temple with the baskets of offerings and with the donkey laden for the journey. They went into a walled courtyard in the Temple. While Joseph and the innkeeper stabled the donkey in a shed, the Blessed Virgin and her Child were kindly received by an aged woman and led into the Temple by a covered passage. A light was carried, for it was still dark. No sooner had they entered this passage than the aged priest Simeon came, full of expectation, towards the Blessed Virgin. After addressing a few friendly words to her, he took the Child Jesus in his arms, pressed Him to his heart, and then hurried back to the Temple by another way. Yesterday’s message from the angel had so filled him with longing to see the Child of the Promise, for whom he had sighed so long, that he had come out here to the place where the women arrived. He was dressed in long garments such as the priests wear when not officiating. I often saw him in the Temple, and always as an aged priest of no elevated rank. His great devoutness, simplicity, and enlightenment alone distinguished him.

The Blessed Virgin was led by her guide to the outer courts of the Temple where the ceremony took place, and she was here received by Noemi, her former teacher, and Anna, who both lived on this side of the Temple. Simeon, who now once more came out of the Temple to meet the Blessed Virgin, led her, with her Child in her arms, to the customary place for the redemption of the firstborn. Anna, to whom Joseph gave the basket with the offerings, followed her with Noemi. The doves were in the lower part of the basket; above them was a compartment with fruit. Joseph went by another door into the place set apart for men.

It must have been known in the Temple that several women were coming for the presentation ceremony, for everything was arranged. The room where the ceremony took place was as big as the parish church here in Dülmen. Many lamps were burning on its walls, forming pyramids of light. The little flames are at the end of a bent tube projecting from a golden disc which shines almost as brightly as the flame. Hanging from this disc by a woven cord is a little extinguisher which is used to put out the light without making any smell and removed again when the lamps are lit.

An oblong chest had been brought out by several priests and set before a kind of altar with what looked like horns at each corner. The doors of this chest were opened to form a stand on which a large tray was laid. This was covered first with a red cloth, and then with a transparent white one, which hung down to the ground on each side. Burning lamps with several branches were placed at the four corners of this table, in the middle of which was an oblong cradle flanked by two oval bowls containing two baskets. All these things had been brought out of drawers in the chest, with priests’ vestments, which were laid on the other permanent altar. The table which had been set up for the offering was surrounded by a railing. On each side of this room were seats, raised one above the other, in which were priests saying prayers.

Simeon now approached the Blessed Virgin, in whose arms the Infant Jesus lay wrapped in a sky-blue covering, and led her through the railing to the table, where she laid the Child in the cradle. From this moment I saw an indescribable light filling the Temple. I saw that God Himself was in it, and above the Child I saw the heavens opening to disclose the Throne of the Holy Trinity. Simeon then led the Blessed Virgin back to the women’s place. Mary wore a pale sky-blue dress, with a white veil, and was completely enveloped in a long yellow cloak. Simeon then went to the permanent altar on which the vestments had been laid out, and he and three other priests vested each other for the ceremony. They had a kind of little shield on their arms, and on their heads were caps divided like miters. One went behind and the other in front of the table of offering, while two others stood at the narrow ends of it praying over the Child. Anna now came up to Mary and handed her the basket of offerings, which contained fruit and doves in two separate compartments, one above the other. She led her to the railing in front of the table, and there both remained standing. Simeon, who was standing before the table, opened the railing, led Mary up to the table, and placed her offering on it. Fruit was placed in one of the oval dishes and coins in the other: the doves remained in the basket. 144144 In 1823, when recounting Jesus’ stay in Hebron during the third year of His ministry, some ten days after the death of the Baptist, Catherine Emmerich said that she saw Our Lord teaching, on Friday the 29th day of the month of Thebet (i.e. Jan. 17th), from the Sabbath reading taken from Exodus, Chapter 10 to Chapter 13.17. He taught about the Egyptian plague of darkness and about the redemption of the first-born. In connection with the latter she recounted once more the whole ceremony of the Presentation of Christ in the Temple, including the following, omitted from the description given in the text:‘The Blessed Virgin did not present Our Lord in the Temple until the forty-third day after His birth. Because of the feast, she waited for three days with the good people of the inn outside the Bethlehem gate of Jerusalem. Besides the customary offering of doves, she presented to the Temple five triangular pieces of gold from the kings’ gifts, as well as several pieces of beautiful stuff for embroidery. Before leaving Bethlehem, Joseph sold to his cousin the young she-ass which he had given him in pledge on Nov. 30th. I have always thought that the she-ass, on which Jesus rode into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, was a descendant of hers.’ (CB) Simeon remained standing with Mary before the table of offering, and the priest who stood behind it lifted the Infant Jesus from the cradle and held Him up towards the different sides of the Temple, making a long prayer the while. He then gave the Child to Simeon, who laid Him once more in Mary’s arms and prayed over her and the Child from a scroll hanging on a stand beside him. Simeon then led the Blessed Virgin back to where Anna was waiting for her in front of the railing, after which Anna took her back to the railed-off women’s enclosure. Here some twenty women were waiting to present their firstborn. Joseph and the other men were standing farther back in the place for men.

The priests at the permanent altar now began a service with incense and prayers. The priests in the seats took part in this service, making gestures, but not such violent ones as the Jews of today. At the close of this ceremony, Simeon came up to where Mary was standing, took the Infant Jesus from her into his arms, speaking long and loudly over Him in raptures of joy and thanking God that He had fulfilled His Promise. He ended with his Nunc Dimittis [ Luke 2.29-32]. After the Presentation Joseph came up, and he and Mary listened with great reverence to Simeon’s inspired words to the Blessed Virgin [ Luke 2.34]. When Simeon had finished speaking, the prophetess Anna was also filled with inspiration, and spoke long and loudly about the Infant Jesus, hailing His Mother as blessed. I saw that those who were present were greatly moved by all this, and the priests, too, seemed to hear something of what was happening; but no sort of disturbance was caused thereby. It seemed as if this loud inspired praying was nothing unusual, as if it often happened, and as if it must all be so. At the same time I saw that the hearts of all the bystanders were much moved, and all showed great reverence to the Child and His Mother. Mary was like a heavenly rose in radiance.

The Holy Family had, in appearance, made the most humble offering; but Joseph gave Anna and the aged Simeon many of the triangular yellow pieces in secret, to be used specially for poor girls who were being brought up in the Temple and could not afford the expense.

I saw the Blessed Virgin and her Child being accompanied by Anna and Noemi back to the outer court, whence they had fetched her, and there they took leave of each other. Joseph was there already with the two people from the inn; he had brought the donkey which carried Mary and the Child, and they started at once on their journey from the Temple through Jerusalem to Nazareth. I did not see the presentation of the other firstborn children that day, but I feel that they were all given a special grace, and that many of them were among the massacred Innocents.

The Presentation must have ended about nine o’clock this morning, for it was at this time that I saw the departure of the Holy Family. That day they traveled as far as Bethoron, where they spent the night at the house which had been the last stopping-place of the Blessed Virgin when she was brought to the Temple thirteen years before. The owner of this house seemed to me to be a schoolteacher. Servants sent by Anna were waiting here for them. They went to Nazareth by a much more direct road than on their way to Bethlehem, when they had avoided all towns and had only stopped at lonely houses. Joseph had left in pledge with his relations the young she ass which had shown him the way on their journey to Bethlehem, for he still intended to return to Bethlehem and build a house in the Shepherds’ Valley. He had spoken to the shepherds about it, and told them that he was taking Mary to her mother only for a time until she should have recovered from the discomfort of her lodging. With this plan in his mind, he had left a good many things with the shepherds. Joseph had a strange kind of money with him; I think he must have been given it by the three kings. Inside his robe he had a kind of pouch, in which he carried a quantity of little thin shining yellow leaves rolled up in each other. Their corners were rounded and something was scratched on them. Judas’ pieces of silver were thicker and tongue-shaped; the whole pieces were rounded at both ends and the half pieces at one end only.

1. A VIEW OF THE THREE HOLY KINGS ON THEIR JOURNEY HOME.

 

At this time I saw all three kings together again beyond a river. They had a day of rest and kept a feast. At this place there was one big house with several smaller ones. The direction taken by the kings on their way home lies between the road they followed on their journey to Bethlehem and that by which Jesus came out of Egypt in the third year of His ministry. At first they traveled very quickly, but after this resting-place their pace was much slower than when they came. I always saw a shining youth going before them and sometimes talking with them. They left Ur on the right.

2. SIMEON’S DEATH.

 

[February 3 rd:] Simeon had a wife and three sons, of whom the eldest was about forty and the youngest twenty years old. All three served in the Temple, and were later secret friends of Jesus and His followers. All became disciples of Our Lord, but at different times: before His death or after His ascension. At the Last Supper one of them prepared the Paschal Lamb for Jesus and the Apostles; but these were perhaps grandsons, not sons, of Simeon; I am not sure. Simeon’s sons did much to help the friends of Our Lord at the time of the first persecutions after the Ascension. Simeon was related to Seraphia, who was later given the name Veronica, and also, through her father, to Zechariah.

I saw that Simeon fell ill yesterday immediately on returning home after his prophecy at the Presentation of Jesus, but he spoke very joyfully with his wife and sons. Tonight I saw that today was to be the day of his death. Of the many things I saw I can only remember this much. Simeon, from the couch where he lay, spoke earnestly to his wife and children, telling them of the salvation that was come to Israel and of everything that the angel had announced to him. His joy was touching to behold. Then I saw him die peacefully and heard the quiet lamentation of his family. Many other old priests and Jews were praying round his bed. Then I saw them carry his body into another room. They placed it on a board pierced with holes, and washed it with sponges, holding a cloth over it so that its nakedness could not be seen. The water ran through the board into a copper basin placed beneath it. Then they covered the body with big green leaves, surrounded it with bunches of sweet herbs, and wrapped it in a great cloth in which it was tied up with long bandages like a child in swaddling bands. The body lay so straight and rigid that I thought the bands must have been tied right round the board.

In the evening Simeon was buried. His body was carried to the grave by six men bearing torches. It lay on a board more or less the shape of a body, but surrounded by an edge higher in the middle of its four sides and lower at the corners. The wrapped-up corpse lay on this board without any other covering. The bearers and those who followed them walked quicker than is usual at our burials. The grave was on a hill not very far from the Temple. The door of the sepulcher was set slanting against a little hill. It was walled inside with a strange kind of masonry like that which I saw St. Benedict working at in his first monastery. 145145 In a vision of the life of St. Benedict which Catherine Emmerich had on Feb. 10th, 1820, she saw amongst other things that as a boy he was shown by his teacher how to use colored stones to make all kinds of ornaments and arabesques in the sand of the garden in the manner of the old pavements. Later she saw him, when a hermit, decorating the roof of his cell or cave with a reproduction in rough mosaic of a vision of the Last Judgment. Still later she saw St. Benedict’s followers imitating and extending this form of decoration. After contemplating in its smallest details the whole history and development of his Order from its foundation, she said: ‘Because in the Benedictines the inner spirit became less active and alive than its outer shell, I saw their churches and monasteries becoming too much ornamented and decorated. I thought to myself, that comes from the picture Benedict made in his cell; it has shot up like a weed, and when once this superstructure collapses, it will strike many of them at the same time.’ (CB) The walls, like those in the Blessed Virgin’s cell in the Temple, were decorated with stars and other patterns in colored stones. The little cave in the middle of which they laid the corpse was just large enough to allow them to pass round the body. There were some other funeral customs such as laying various things beside the dead man—coins, little stones, and I think also food, but I am not sure.

3. THE ARRIVAL OF THE HOLY FAMILY AT ST. ANNE’S HOUSE.

 

In the evening I saw the Holy Family arrive at Anna’s house, which is about half an hour’s distance from Nazareth in the direction of the valley of Zabulon. There was a little family’ festival like the one when Mary left home for the Temple. A lamp was burning above the table. Joachim was dead, and I saw Anna’s second husband as master of the house. Anna’s eldest daughter, Mary Heli, was there on a visit. The donkey was unloaded, for Mary meant to stay here for some time. All were full of joy over the Infant Jesus, but it was a tranquil inner joy; I never saw any of these people giving way to very violent emotions. Some aged priests were there, and all present partook of a light meal. The women ate separately from the men, as is always the custom at meals.

I saw the Holy Family still in Anna’s house a few days later. There are several women there, Mary Heli, Anna’s eldest daughter, with her child Mary Cleophas, a woman from Elizabeth’s home, and the maidservant who was with Mary in Bethlehem. This maidservant did not wish to marry again after the death of her husband, who had not been a good man, and came to Elizabeth at Juttah, where the Blessed Virgin made her acquaintance when she visited Elizabeth before John’s birth. From here this widow came to Anna. Today I saw Joseph in Anna’s house packing many things on donkeys and going in front of the donkeys (of which there were two or three) towards Nazareth, accompanied by the maid.

I cannot remember the details of all that I saw today in Anna’s house, but I must have had a very vivid impression of it all, for while I was there I was in an intense activity of prayer, which is now hardly comprehensible to me. Before I came to Anna’s house I had been in spirit with a young married couple who supported their old mother; they are both mortally ill, and if they do not recover, the mother will perish. I know this poor family, but have had no news of them for a long time. In desperate cases like this I always invoke St. Anne, and when I was in her house today in my vision, I saw, in spite of the season of the year, and though the leaves had all fallen, many pears, plums, and other fruit hanging on the trees in her garden. When I went away I was allowed to pick these, and I took the pears to the young couple who were ill and so cured them. After that I was made to give some to many other poor people, known and unknown to me, who were restored to health by them. No doubt these fruits signified graces obtained through the intercession of St. Anne. I fear that these fruits mean much pain and suffering for me, which always comes after visions in which I pick fruit in the gardens of the saints—this has always to be paid for. Perhaps these souls are under the protection of St. Anne, and are thus entitled to fruit from the garden; or perhaps it happened because, as I have always recognized, she is a patroness in desperate cases.

4. THE WEATHER IN PALESTINE.

 

[When asked what sort of weather she saw in Palestine at this time of the year, she answered:] I always forget to mention that, because it seems to me all so natural that I always think everyone knows about it. I often see rain and mist, and sometimes a little snow, but this melts at once. I often see leafless trees with fruit still hanging on them. I see several crops in the year, and I see them beginning to harvest in our spring. Now that it is winter I see people going along the roads wrapped up, with their cloaks over their heads.

[February 6 th:] This afternoon I saw the Blessed Virgin going from Anna’s house to Joseph’s house in Nazareth. She was accompanied by her mother, who carried the Infant Jesus. It is a very pleasant walk of half an hour among hills and gardens. Anna sends provisions from her own house to Joseph and Mary in Nazareth. How beautiful is the life of the Holy Family! Mary is at once the mother and the humblest handmaid of the Holy Child and at the same time she is Joseph’s servant. Joseph is her faithful friend and humblest servant. When the Blessed Virgin rocks the Infant Jesus to and fro in her arms, how marvelous to see the all-merciful God, who made the world, allowing Himself out of His great love to be treated like a helpless little child! How dreadful in comparison the coldness and self-will of deceitful and hard-hearted men!

Casa Mila

 

Casa Milà, better known as La Pedrera, is a building designed by the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí and built during the years 1905–1910, being considered officially completed in 1912. It is located at 92, Passeig de Gràcia in the Eixample district of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

It was a controversial design at the time for the bold forms of the undulating stone facade and wrought iron decoration of the balconies and windows, designed largely by Josep Maria Jujol, who also created some of the plaster ceilings.

Architecturally it is considered an innovative work for its steel structure and curtain walls – the façade is self-supporting. Other innovative elements were the construction of underground car parking and separate lifts and stairs for the owners and their servants.

In 1984, it was declared World Heritage by UNESCO. The building is made open to the public by the CatalunyaCaixa Foundation, which manages the various exhibitions and activities and visits to the interior and roof.

It was built for the married couple, Roser Segimon and Pere Milà. Roser Segimon was the wealthy widow of Josep Guardiola, an Indiano, a term applied locally to the Catalans returning from the American colonies with tremendous wealth. Her second husband, Pere Milà, was a developer who was criticized for his flamboyant lifestyle and ridiculed by the contemporary residents of Barcelona, when they joked about his love of money and opulence, wondering if he was not rather more interested in "the widow’s guardiola" (piggy bank), than in "Guardiola’s widow".

Gaudi, a Catholic and a devotee of the Virgin Mary, planned for the Casa Milà to be a spiritual symbol. Overt religious elements include an excerpt from the Rosary prayer on the cornice and planned statues of Mary, specifically Our Lady of the Rosary, and two archangels, St. Michael and St. Gabriel. The design by Gaudi was not followed in some aspects. The local government objected to some aspects of the project, fined the owners for many infractions of building codes, ordered the demolition of aspects exceeding the height standard for the city. The Encyclopedia of Twentieth Century Architecture states that the statuary was indeed Mary the mother of Jesus, also noting Gaudi's devoutness, and notes that the owner decided not to include it after Semana Trágica, an outbreak of anticlericalism in the city. After the decision was made to exclude the statuary of Mary and the archangels, Gaudi contemplated abandoning the project but was persuaded not to by a priest.

(From WIKIPEDIA: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casa_Mil%C3%A0)

Painted Easter eggs in The Eggs Museum - Moldoviţa - Bucovina. And the artist is her.

 

Easter Traditions in Bucovina - Little is known today about the real origin of the ancestral custom of skilfully dyed eggs encountered today throughout Bucovina, as part of the specific interest in the ritual of welcoming the Holy Feast of Resurrection and then, the Lord’s Ascension. The themes dealt with, the way the patterns are represented and the colours used differ from village to village, sometimes even from one household to another, and so are the patterns and the colours of the decorations on men’s shirts or women’s blouses which respect the lines of deeply rooted traditions. Black is the major colour of Easter eggs in Ciocanesti, red is in Vatra Moldovitei and reddish-brown with tiny patterns are specific for the region between Brodina and Izvoarele Sucevei . The patterns in Fundu Moldovei are green and blue and in Gemenea, on the valley of The Suha River eggs are inscribed with the nib instead of the classical instrument of dying eggs called ‘chisita’. And on the Dorna Valley eggs are painted. Red and black with white and yellow grooving with simple geometrical shapes (circle, spiral and rhombus), vegetal motifs (cherry, oak leaf, acorn, fir tree twig and wheat ear), motifs taken from the animal world (the serpent, the frog, the bee and the rooster), household tools (the rake, the plough) minutely cover the egg in the spirit of an ancestral game played with cosmic seriosity. The sun and the moon, the star and the cross, the priest’s belt and the lost path are added to all mentioned above using the symbols of joy and wonder, of amazement and devoutness, of reconciliation and faith, dedication of everyday life to the miracle of Jesus Christ’s Resurrection and of the Ascent. © Terra Design

 

Traditii de Paste, in Bucovina - Ouale mestesugit "inchistrite", pe care le intâlnim si astazi in toata Bucovina, in preocuparile specifice asteptarii Sfintei Sarbatori a Invierii, apoi a Sarbatorii Inaltarii Domnului, vin, ca obicei, din vremuri stravechi, nimeni nu le mai stie originea exacta. Temele abordate, procedeele de reprezentare a modelelor si culorile utilizate difera de la sat la sat, de multe ori chiar de la vatra la vatra , asa cum difera motivele si culorile din ornamentele aplicate pe camesile barbatilor ori pe iile femeilor, respectând, insa, liniile unei traditii cu adânci radacini. La Ciocanesti, fondul oualor de Paste este negru, la Vatra Moldovitei este rosu, mai sus de Brodina, pâna la Izvoarele Sucevei, fondul este maro-rosiatic iar modelul de pe oua este maruntit; la Fundu Moldovei apare verdele si albastrul in desenul motivelor, la Gemenea, pe valea Suhai, ouale nu se inchistresc cu chisita, ci se scriu, cu "penita", iar pe Valea Dornelor se picteaza. Forme geometrice simple (cercul, spirala, rombul), motive vegetale (ciresica, frunza de stejar, ghinda, creanga de brad, spicul), motive din lumea animalelor (sarpele, broasca, albina, cocosul), unelte din gospodarie (grebla, fierul plugului), in rosu si negru, vrâstate cu alb si cu galben acopera cu meticulozitate oul, intr-o joaca ancestrala si cu o seriozitate cosmica. La acestea s-au adaugat soarele si luna, steaua, crucea, brâul popii, calea ratacita, intr-o simbolistica a bucuriei, uimirii, smereniei, impacarii, credintei, inchinarii vietii de fiecare zi miracolului Invierii Domnului Iisus Hristos si a Inaltarii Lui la Tatal Ceresc. © Terra Design

China. Fujian province. Xiamen.

 

Nanputuo Temple is a famous Buddhist temple in the coastal area of South-east China,located on Xiamen Island at the foot of the Wulaofeng-Five Old Men-chain of hills,close to the sed and next to Xiamen University.The backdrop of beautiful hills with their mysterious grottoes and their cover of green trees,and the deep blue sea with its sparkling waves in the azure of the sky,provides a delightful environment. Nanputuo Temple was founded in the Tang dynasty. It embodies the long history and culture of South-east China,and is famous as a "Temple of a thousand years". A pair of couplets on the pillars of the Mahavira Hall read:

 

Built during the Tang dynasty during the Kaiyuan reign period,

 

With its back to Wulao Peak,its face towards Mount Taiwu.

 

The temple was founded by the monk Qinghao who lived during the Tang(AD68-907)and 5 Dynasties periods(AD907-960). At that time, it was known as the Sizhou Temple, but later, in the Song Dynasty(AD960-1279), it was extended by the monk Wencui and renamed the Wujin Rock, meaning "Boundless Rock". In the year 1341, during the Yuan Dynasty(AD1271-1368), the temple was destroyed and was only rebuilt in 1368, the first year of Ming Emperor Hongwu's reign. At that time, the monk Jueguan changed its name to Puzhao,"Illuminating the Universe", Temple and the Puzhao Courtyard, and the resident monks numbered in the hundreds. The temple was renovated during the reign of Ming Emperor Yongle(1403-1423), but was destroyed once again in 1628 in the fighting that eventually brought the Ming Dynasty to an end.

 

In 1684, the 23rd year of the reign of Qing Dynasty Emperor Kangxi, General Shi Liang, the Duke of Jinghai, withdrew his army from Taiwan to Xiamen. He had a dream in which he saw four characters,bui ri pu zhao, meaning "The brilliant sun illuminates the world". He was astonished to learn the next day that there was in Xiamen a Puzhao Temple with an elderly Buddhist master called Huiri. Shi Liang discussed the Buddhist Dharma with Huiri, and such was his delight that, seeing that the temple was old and shabby, he resolved to restore it. The name of the temple was changed once again from Puzhao Temple to Nanputuo Temple because the Avatamsaka Sutra (Flower Adornment Sutra) says that Guanyin lives on Mount Potala. During the reign of the Qing Emperor Yongzheng(1723 to 1735), the temple came under the rule of the monk Jingfeng, a latter-day disciple of Xingmi, a follower of the Genxin (Eternal Truth) School at Nanshan Temple in Zhangzhou, and himself a follower of the Heyun School of the Linji Sect at Nanshan. Jingfeng did much construction work on the temple. The Heyun School was founded during the Ming Dynasty on the teachings of the Dhyana Sect by the monk Linji in the Nanshan Temple in Zhangzhou. His folluwers subsequently spread into Xiamen, Quanzhou, Taiwan, Singapore and the Philippines. Nanputuo is one of the centres of the Linji Sect Heyun School in modern times.

 

In 1833, the 13th reign year of the Emperor Daoguang, Xingji a third generation disciple of Jingfeng, collected alms to extend the temple once again, in particular the Mahakaruna or Grand Compassion Hall and the surrounding cloisters, together with the Bell and Drum Towers. In 1895, the 21st year of the reign of the Emperor Guangxu, Xicang succeeded Fori, a follower of the Nanshan Heyun School, as abbot. He continued with the expansion of the temple, building seven halls, and held two mandala-preaching events-to spread Buddhist teachings. In 1921,Zhuanfeng, another follower of the Heyun School, became the abbot, and in 1924, replacde the old "in-house" system of appointing abbots to an open system named the "ten directions Sangha gathering" system.

 

Master Huiquan was appointed abbot through the "ten directions Sangha gathering" system, the first to be appointed by the new system. After taking up office, with the support of Master Zhuanfeng, Master Huiquan established the Minnan Buddhist College, of which he was the first Dean. In 1927, with the full support of Master Huiquan, Master Taixu was appointed Abbot of Nanputuo Temple and Dean of the Minnan Buddhist College. During his period in office, Master Taixu was active in reforming the standard of the monkhood and propagated set of "Outlines for the Monkhood in Modern China", implementing "Trust in the Three Treasures-Buddha, the Dharma and the Sangha-to create the monkhood; study the Six Perfections to achieve complete monkhood". Master Taixu also reformed the teaching system and the syllabus of the Minnan Buddhist College, established a graduats school with different specialisms available for graduate students to choose. He himself also taught the monks, requiring them to maintain high standards both academically and spiritually. He lectured on subjects including:"The training of monks should be based on regulations and practices"; "The aims and purpose of Buddhism";"Outline of Buddhism for novice monks". Under the title of "The crisis in the current training of monks and the future of Buddhism", he also energetically opposed the acdemic style of the old schoar-officials in the training of monks. He also encouraged novices to realise their duty to promote the welfare of Buddhism, and to develop the habits of diligence, endurance, simplicity and poverty and devote themselves to the promulgation of Buddhism. As a result of Master Taixu’s teaching, personal discipline and consolidation of the rules, the spirit of the Minnan Buddhist College was renewed, and the College became one of the best Buddhist colleges in China, and renowned the world over. A number of Buddhist master of high repute for their ability and integrity graduated from the College, including Master Yinshun and Master Zhumo. In 1938, the 64-year-old Master Huiquan was unanimously re-invited to become Abbot of Nanputuo Temple again.

 

In 1957, Master Miaozhan became the eighth abbot of Nanputuo Temple,a pusition he held for 39 years until his death in 1995. During his tenure, Master Miaozhan exterded the temple, re-opened the Minnan Buddhist College and establish the Nanputuo Temple Charity Foundation, all of which laid a solid foundation for the future development of Nanputuo Temple. In 1997, in accordance wite the electoral system, the Temple invited Master Shenghui to be the 9th, 10th and 11th abbot. During his term of office, Shenghui set a good example for his fellow monks by his diligence in practising Buddhist teachings, inluding the Buddhist observances, about karma, teaching arousal of mind towards enlightenment and teaching the ethics, and by practising the precepts of combining learning wite practice and building up the temple community. As a resule, Nanputuo Temple became a centre of Buddhist practice for all followers of Buddhism, a cradle nurturing Buddhist talents, and at the same time a window of communication between Chinese Buddhism and world Buddhism. In October 2005, Master Zewu became the 12th abbot. The new abbot is committed to cultivating the humanist spirit of Master Taixu:"Only by worshipping Buddha can you become a complete man; completing yourself as a man is completing the Buddha; that is a true description of reality." He comtinuously looks to open up new avenues, promote patriotism and devoutness, create prosperity fot the temple and stability for the monastic community, practice Buddhism, and benefit the people as a whole.

 

Under the careful management of its many abbots, the buildings of Nanputuo Temple have been renovated many times and its courtyards enlarged; the Temple has held many activities for both committed Buddhists and interested members of the public, and has become an inspiration to all the other temples in the south-east of China.

www.nanputuo.com/npten/html/201112/2315260573499.html

Wikipaedia :

 

St. Canute's Cathedral (Danish: Odense Domkirke or Sct. Knuds Kirke), also known as Odense Cathedral, is named after the Danish king Canute the Saint (Danish: Knud den Hellige), otherwise Canute IV. It is a fine example of Brick Gothic architecture. The church's most visited section is the crypt where the remains of Canute and his brother Benedict are on display.

 

* 1 History

* 2 The Second St. Canute's Cathedral

* 3 External links

* 4 References

 

History

 

St. Canute's Church in one form or another has stood on Nuns' Hill in Odense (Danish: Nonnebakken) for over 900 years.

 

Odense was established as the seat of the Bishop of Odense (Othinia) before 988 under the supervision of the Archbishop of Schleswig. The diocese included the southern Baltic islands of Denmark. The earliest bishops' names have not been recorded. Odense passed to the jurisdiction of Roskilde in 1072 for a short period of time before falling to the Archdiocese of Lund.

 

The earliest known church on the present location was a travertine church which was reported under construction by Aelnoth of Canterbury, a Benedictine monk at the nearby St. Alban's Priory in 1095. The foundations of the travertine church can still be seen in the crypt of the present building. The church was built in Romanesque style with semi-circular arches supporting a flat timber ceiling. The travertine church was built specifically to house the earthly remains of King Canute, who was murdered in the church of St. Alban's Priory in 1086.

 

Canute IV of Denmark, the son of King Sven Estridsen, was born about 1040 and ruled Denmark from 1080-1086. In 1075 he accompanied the Danish fleet on the last great Viking raid of that age. It is suggested that he stole relics of Saint Alban from Ely, which he deposited in St. Alban's Priory which he had founded in Odense.

 

Canute reigned at a difficult time in Danish history. The country was a patchwork of powerful autonomous feudal landowners. The idea of a united Danish nation was not on anyone's agenda at the time, except for that of King Canute himself. After the death of his older brother, the national assembly (Ting) met on Zealand to proclaim Canute king of Denmark. Once the assembly had shouted their approval, Canute stood up and spoke to those assembled, both peasant and nobles: "You called my brother Harald the Whet-stone, but you will learn that I will be hard as granite!" (kampesten). Soon after, he ordered the people of Halland to supply him with horses and wagons to transport himself and his household throughout the kingdom. The assembly met to discuss the king's request. The people decided that the request was not lawful according to the ancient customs and laws they all knew. Canute was enraged by what he heard. "It is your right to hold fast to your rights and laws and bear only the burdens the law allows, but you must also accept that I am free to do with mine what I will, and I forbid you to let your swine graze in Halland's Great Forest which belongs to me!" After hasty consultations the Hallanders supplied the required equipment. Canute did the same in Scania (southern Sweden). At the assembly he required men and supplies to build the new cathedral at Lund. When the assembly baulked, Canute swore he would forbid them to fish in the Øresund. Likewise they too acceded to the king's request.

 

Canute was a devout Christian and believed that a strong central church in Denmark would give him more power. He was instrumental in improving the nation-wide system of bishops by using his own local officials (fogeder) to collect tithes, a new tax, which were used to build the churches, hospitals and monasteries which were just beginning to be introduced into Denmark. Many people were Christian in name, but the old ways were only half-forgotten, and suspicions about foreigners ran high. Peasants were pressed hard to put food on the table and the forced tithes infuriated peasants, merchants, and nobles alike.

 

Canute brought about the wrath of some of his chiefs when he hanged Jarl Egil Ragnarsen, his hand-picked governor of Bornholm, and most of his household for piracy. Many nobles took to the seas on occasion looking for a quick way to bolster income. The execution of a high-ranking chief caused more than one chief to reconsider his support for such a troublesome monarch.

 

Canute's headaches came to a head in 1085-86, when he decided to invade England and try to take the throne from William I who was old and by some reports failing. As a close relative of Canute the Great, Canute's claim was easily as valid as that of William of Normandy's. With the co-operation of Robert I, Count of Flanders, his father-in-law, Canute ordered an armada of 1,000 Danish ships and 60 Norwegian ships to assemble at Struer in the Limfjord, northern Jutland, in the summer of 1085. As had been the tradition since the first Viking raid on England, local chiefs gathered ships, supplies, sailors, and warriors for a share of the profits, loot, slaves, and treasure taken during the raid. Canute in the meantime travelled from assembly to assembly in southern Jutland ordering his people to pay tithes, a tenth of all their produce for the church. At the same time he tried to institute a poll tax (nefgjald) to raise money from the peasants. The tithes and new tax were not well received, and when his brother, Olaf, protested, Canute had him arrested and exiled to Flanders in chains, believing that Olaf was responsible for the growing unrest. It took so long to pacify the south that Canute was unable to come north for weeks. In the meantime, the Danes at Struer were hungry, bored, and very unhappy with the king. Finally they agreed that they would sail home. They told themselves that the weather would turn bad before they could complete a successful raid, and that such a late start would spell disaster. The order to assemble had not been made at an assembly, and was therefore unlawful in the popular view. To the Norwegians they said, "You can stay here in this place of starvation, if you will. We are going home."

 

When Canute arrived at Struer and found the fleet disbanded, he was furious. He thanked the Norwegians for their patience and sent them home. "Now we (Danes) will play," he said ominously. Canute blamed the wives of several leading chiefs from Jutland of causing bad weather and ordered his officers to collect such heavy fines from their families that it would have bankrupted all of them. Then he proceeded from assembly to assembly to outlaw any man, sailor, peasant or noble who left Struer until they paid a heavy fine, more than the annual income of any but the wealthiest nobles. Within days the peasants in Vendsyssel, the most northern part of Jutland, rebelled. Royal property was burned, and royal officials were tortured and murdered.

 

The Jute chiefs decided to cast their lot in with the peasants for once, and the rebellion spread rapidly. Canute and his household and other loyal followers fled from Jutland with the intention of returning to Zealand, where Canute had more support. He was convinced instead however to sail over to Funen and then on to the royal farm (gård) at Odense by his trusted adviser, Asbjørn Blak, who also persuaded the king that he could be reconciled with the great landowners and peasants.

 

Canute and his brothers, Benedict and Erik, and their housecarls went to the king's farm outside Odense. When the peasants and their leaders realized the king was at Odense, they raced to the king's farm, but Canute and Benedict fled into the little timber church of St. Alban's Priory near the river for sanctuary. The rebels refused to recognize sanctuary. "Come out to us, you devil. Too long you have used the edge of your sword to hurt your own people. Now you will feel the edge of our weapons!" Prince Benedict and several others defended the doors. The mob hurled stones and arrows through the windows shouting, "This is for stealing my cow! This is for taking my horses!" Since they couldn't get through the heavy outer doors, the mob tried to set fire to the church, but a light rain kept the fire from taking hold. They began tearing at the timber walls to get access. Prince Benedict shouted, "It would be better that you go home to thresh your grain than stand here and exchange blows with the king's men!" The remaining defenders retreated to the choir door which separated the altar area from the nave of the church. The floors ran with blood. "There he is!" shouted Blak, but before the traitor could move against the king, he was slain by Prince Benedict. The mob hacked Prince Benedict to death. Canute had received communion and tradition says he offered no resistance when he was killed at the main altar. Forensic evidence suggests he was speared from the front and had his skull smashed, perhaps by a stone thrown through an opening that had been torn through the wall of the choir. Prince Erik, later King Erik Ejegod, managed to talk his way out of the king's farm and fled to Zealand and then with his wife and child to Skania. The seventeen housecarls loyal to Canute were massacred within the confines of the church on 10 July 1086.

 

The Benedictine monks buried Canute and Prince Benedict in front of the main altar of the priory church. The story of Canute's death at the altar and his well-known devoutness quickly caught the popular imagination. When his queen, Adela of Flanders, came to move her husband's body to Flanders, a bright light shone around St. Alban's church. The queen left her husband where he was, and the faithful streamed to the church which housed the remains of their saintly king. Almost immediately there were reports of miraculous healings at the site of his burial. Blind, deaf, and lame were healed. Seven years of famine following Canute's death were another sure sign that Canute was worthy of veneration. His brother and successor, Olaf I, was given the nickname Hunger because he was unable to do anything about the famine that ravaged Denmark for years after Canute's death.

 

The unique circumstances of Canute's death was seized upon by the Roman Catholic church as an example of saintliness for the newly converted peoples of Scandinavia. Canute was canonized in 1101 by Pope Pascal II. Some confusion exists among writers about the location of the new St. Canute's church thinking it rose on the site of the assassination, but St Alban's and St Canute's churches were not in the same location. The new cathedral, constructed in imported tufa stone, was constructed a little farther from the river, and was well underway before Canute became a saint. Aelnoth of Canterbury, an English monk, reported the building of St Canute's in 1095 and described the miracles reported at the site of Canute's grave. When the first church of St. Canute was completed, a three day fast was proclaimed for the entire kingdom and the remains of Canute and Benedict were moved to the cathedral. It was believed that if the king was truly a saint that the shroud should be set on fire and the body would not be harmed. The shroud of Saint Canute was set alight, but the fire indeed left no mark upon the body of the king.

[edit] The Second St. Canute's Cathedral

 

During the civil war between Eric IV and his brother, Abel, Odense and the cathedral were burned down in 1247. The present church was constructed in several phases to replace the aging and inadequate stone church in about 1300 by Bishop Gisico (1287-1300). The new cathedral was built in Gothic style with its typical pointed arches and high vaulted ceilings. The building material of choice for the time was over-sized red brick which was cheaper and easier to work with than the porous stone available. Portions of the stone cathedral were taken down and the new building expanded around the old.

 

In all it took approximately two hundred years to complete the cathedral, which was finally dedicated on 30 April 1499. The church was built in cruciform shape without a tower. The ancient crypt was expanded in such a way that pilgrims could visit the reliquary of Saint Canute beneath the raised choir without interfering with the canons' hourly services above. The canons also claimed they had relics of Saint Alban which Canute supposedly stole on his 1075 attack on Ely, England.

 

King Hans of Denmark (d. 1513) was buried in the cathedral in 1513. His wife, Christina of Saxony, who lived the latter part of her life in a nunnery in Odense, commissioned the famous German sculptor Claus Berg to create a magnificent burial chapel in the church of the Franciscan friary in Odense, where both she and her husband were laid to rest after her death in 1521. The son of Hans and Christina, King Christian II, with his wife Isabella of Austria, was also interred in the royal family chapel. In 1807 the former Franciscan church was demolished, and Claus Berg's magnificent late Gothic altarpiece and the bodies of the four royals were transferred to St. Canute's Cathedral. The altarpiece is truly one of Denmark's national treasures. It was carved between 1515 and 1525. Each of the three sections is intricately carved and gilded. It survived the iconoclastic fervour of the Reformation perhaps because of its connection with the royal burials.

 

The single tower was completed in 1586 over the west entrance in the same style as the rest of the cathedral. Five bells hang in the tower, the oldest from 1300 cast by Adam..., one cast in 1597 by Jens Hansen, a bell cast in 1677, and one from 1767 cast by ... Leitze. The most recent bell was cast by MP Allerup in 1880.

 

In 1633 Valkendorf's Chapel was added, by all accounts a fine example of Renaissance artistry. Unfortunately it was dismantled in the great restoration of 1868.

 

Thomas Kingo was made the Lutheran Bishop of Odense in 1634. He was Denmark's most famous psalmist and produced a new hymnbook to which he personally contributed 85 hymns.

 

1752 Amdie Worm's spectacular organ was installed. The facade of the organ remains, but the organ has been expanded and improved to become the cherished voice of Odense Cathedral.

 

During restoration work in the 1870s, the crypt which had been closed since the Reformation was refurbished and opened as a chapel, and Saint Canute once more went on display.

Saint Silvan was a Christian martyr and a saint who lived in the fourth century. Not much is known about this Saint other than he was martyred between 300 A.D - 350 A.D. and his apparently incorrupt body is still on display 17 centuries after his death. It appears that Silvan was very young when he was martyred, showing his devoutness to Christianity from a young age. In his tomb, an embroidered cross on the front of his garment indicating that he may have been a priest or some other cleric possibly indicating that he was a fairly high ranking in his time.

 

The incorrupt body of Saint Silvan is located in the Church of Saint Blaise in Dubrovnik, Croatia. A number of Silvans have been canonized as saints, and it is unclear which Saint Silvan is entombed at the Church of Saint Blaise. Most sources claim the Saint Silvan at Dubrovnik was martyred in the 4th century — a gruesome wound on his neck suggests the manner of his martyrdom — which may indicate he was Saint Silvanus, Bishop of Emesa, Phoenicia, martyred c. 311. Other Saint Silvans died in various ways (e.g., thrown off a cliff or of natural causes) or at an age suggesting they cannot be the Saint Silvan at Dubrovnik. Still others are believed to be buried elsewhere. His body is purported to be totally incorrupt and lies in the Church of St. Blaise at Dubrovnik, Croatia.[1] On his neck the body has a big scar, which is believed to have caused his martyrdom.

~Wikipedia

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"Pietà (after Delacroix)" (second version) (Saint-Rémy, September, 1889) [F630]

By Vincent van Gogh, from Zundert, Netherlands (1853 - 1890)

- oil on canvas; 73 x 60.5 cm -

Place of creation: Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, Provence, France

© Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam

(Vincent van Gogh Stichting)

www.vangoghmuseum.nl/

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Letter from Vincent to Theo. Saint-Rémy, September 10, 1889

"...My dear brother, you know that I came to the south and threw myself into work for a thousand reasons.

To want to see another light, to believe that looking at nature under a brighter sky can give us a more accurate idea of the Japanese way of feeling and drawing. Wanting, finally, to see this stronger sun, because one feels that without knowing it one couldn’t understand the paintings of Delacroix from the point of view of execution, technique, and because one feels that the colours of the prism are veiled in mist in the north.

...Will you then understand that while finding my illness horrible I feel that all the same I’ve entered into attachments that are a little too strong here – attachments which could mean that later on the desire to work here will take hold of me again – while all the same it may well be that I’ll return to the north relatively soon.

...Yes, for I don’t hide from you the fact that in the same way that I’m taking my food avidly at present, I have a terrible desire that comes to me to see my friends again and to see the northern countryside again.

Work is going very well, I’m finding things that I’ve sought in vain for years, and feeling that I always think of those words of Delacroix that you know, that he found painting when he had neither breath nor teeth left.

Ah well, I myself with the mental illness I have, I think of so many other artists suffering mentally, and I tell myself that this doesn’t prevent one from practising the role of painter as if nothing had gone wrong.

...Thus this time during my illness a misfortune happened to me – that lithograph of Delacroix, the Pietà, [the lithograph by Nanteuil-Leboeuf after Delacroix’s Pietà] with other sheets had fallen into some oil and paint and got spoiled.

I was sad about it – then in the meantime I occupied myself painting it, and you’ll see it one day, on a no. 5 or 6 canvas I’ve made a copy of it which I think has feelings [this copy is Pietà (after Delacroix) (F 757 / JH 1776 [2831]). It measures 42 x 34 cm and is therefore a no. 6 canvas (the other version, F 630 / JH 1775 [2830], is a no. 20 canvas (73 x 60.5 cm), so it cannot be the one referred to here)"]

vangoghletters.org/vg/letters/let801/letter.html

  

Letter from Vincent to Willemien van Gogh. Saint-Rémy, September 19, 1889

"...The Delacroix is a Pietà, i.e. a dead Christ with the Mater Dolorosa. The exhausted corpse lies bent forward on its left side at the entrance to a cave, its hands outstretched, and the woman stands behind. It’s an evening after the storm, and this desolate, blue-clad figure stands out – its flowing clothes blown about by the wind – against a sky in which violet clouds fringed with gold are floating. In a great gesture of despair she too is stretching out her empty arms, and one can see her hands, a working woman’s good, solid hands. With its flowing clothes this figure is almost as wide in extent as it’s tall. And as the dead man’s face is in shadow, the woman’s pale head stands out brightly against a cloud – an opposition which makes these two heads appear to be a dark flower with a pale flower, arranged expressly to bring them out better."

vangoghletters.org/vg/letters/let804/letter.html

Letter from Vincent to Theo. Auvers-sur-Oise, June 3, 1890

"...Gachet also told me that if I wanted to give him great pleasure he would like me to redo for him the copy of Delacroix’s Pietà, which he gazed at for a long time."

vangoghletters.org/vg/letters/let877/letter.html

  

"This Pietà – the Virgin Mary mourning over the dead Christ – is based on a lithograph by Nanteuil after a painting by Eugène Delacroix. Van Gogh painted it in 1889, during his confinement at the hospital in Saint-Rémy. It is more a variation on the original than a true copy: the painter adopted both the subject and composition, but executed it in his own color and style.

  

As he wrote to Theo, the pretext for the painting was an accident which had occurred during his illness: “The Delacroix lithograph La Pietà, as well as several others, fell into my oils and paints and was damaged. This upset me terribly, and I am now busy making a painting of it, as you will see.” The stained lithograph has also survived.

  

Religion

Religious works such as Pietà are an exception in Van Gogh’s oeuvre. On the other hand, it is probably no accident that the painter chose to work on this particular subject.

  

The hospital at Saint-Rémy was housed in an old monastery. Although the devoutness of the nuns sometimes annoyed him, he did find a certain solace in religion: “I am not indifferent, and pious thoughts often console me in my suffering.”

  

It seems quite likely that Van Gogh may, in some sense, have identified with Christ – who had also suffered and been misunderstood. Some scholars have noted the resemblance between the painter and the red-bearded Christ in the Pietà and, above all to Lazarus in the copy after Rembrandt. Whether this was intended, however, is not known."

www.vangoghmuseum.nl/

I had a vision of the creation of Mary’s most holy soul and of its being united to her most pure body. In the glory by which the Most Holy Trinity is usually represented in my visions I saw a movement like a great shining mountain, and yet also like a human figure; and I saw something rise out of the midst of this figure towards its mouth and go forth from it like a shining brightness. Then I saw this brightness standing separate before the Face of God, turning and shaping itself— or rather being shaped, for I saw that while this brightness took human form, yet it was by the Will of God that it received a form so unspeakably beautiful. I saw, too, that God showed the beauty of this soul to the angels, and that they had unspeakable joy in its beauty. I am unable to describe in words all that I saw and understood.

When seventeen weeks and five days after the conception of the Blessed Virgin had gone by (that is to say, five days before Anna’s pregnancy was half accomplished), I saw the Blessed Virgin’s holy mother lying asleep in her bed in her house near Nazareth. Then there came a shining light above her, and a ray from this light fell upon the middle of her side, and the light passed into her in the shape of a little shining human figure. In the same instant I saw the Blessed Virgin’s holy mother raise herself on her couch surrounded by light. She was in ecstasy, and had a vision of her womb opening like a tabernacle to enclose a shining little virgin from whom man’s whole salvation was to spring. I saw that this was the instant in which for the first time the child moved within her. Anna then rose from her couch, dressed herself, and announced her joy to the holy Joachim. They both thanked God, and I saw them praying under the tree in the garden where the angel had comforted Anna. It was made known to me that the Blessed Virgin’s soul was united to her body five days earlier than with other children, and that her birth was twelve days earlier.

 

Several days before the Blessed Virgin’s birth Anna had told Joachim that the time was approaching for her to be delivered. She sent messengers to Sephoris, where her younger sister Maraha lived; to the widow Enue (sister of Elizabeth) in the valley of Zabulon; and to her niece Mary Salome at Bethsaida, asking these three women to come to her. I saw them on their journeys. The widow Enue had a serving lad with her; the other two women were accompanied by their husbands who, however, went back on approaching Nazareth. I saw that on the day before Anna was delivered Joachim sent his many menservants out to the herds, and among Anna’s new maidservants he kept in the house only those who were needed. He, too, went out into his nearest pasture. I saw that Anna’s firstborn daughter, Mary Heli, looked after the house. She was then about nineteen years old and was married to Cleophas, one of Joachim’s chief shepherds, by whom she had a little daughter, Mary Cleophas, now about four years old. After praying, Joachim chose out his finest lambs, kids, and cattle, sending shepherds to take them to the Temple as a thank-offering. He did not return home until nightfall.

I saw the three cousins arriving at Anna’s house in the evening. They went to her in her room behind the hearth and embraced her. After Anna had told them that the time was near for her to be delivered, they stood up and sang a hymn together: ‘Praise the Lord God; He has shown mercy to His people, and has redeemed Israel, and has fulfilled the promise which He gave to Adam in Paradise that the seed of the woman should crush the head of the serpent,’ and so on. I can no longer recite it all by heart. Anna prayed as though in ecstasy. She introduced into the hymn all the prophetic symbols of Mary. She said: ‘The seed given by God to Abraham has ripened in me.’ She spoke of the promise to Sarah of Isaac’s birth and said: ‘The blossoming of Aaron’s rod is perfected in me.’ At that moment I saw her as though suffused with light; I saw the room full of radiance, and Jacob’s ladder appearing above it. The women were overcome with astonishment and joy, and I think that they also saw the vision. When the prayer of welcome was over, the travelers were refreshed with a slight meal of bread and fruit, and water mixed with balsam. They ate and drank standing up, and then lay down till midnight to rest from their journey. Anna did not go to bed, but prayed, and at midnight woke the other women to pray with her. They followed her to her praying-place behind a curtain.

Anna opened the doors of a little cupboard in the wall which contained a casket with holy objects. On each side were lights—perhaps lamps, but I am not sure. They had to be pushed up in their holders, and then little bits of shavings put underneath to prevent them from sinking down. After this the lights were lit. There was a cushioned stool at the foot of this sort of little altar. The casket contained some of Sarah’s hair (Anna had a great veneration for her), some of Joseph’s bones (brought by Moses from Egypt), and something belonging to Tobias, I think a relic of his clothing; also the little shining, white, pear-shaped goblet from which Abraham had drunk when blessed by the angel. (This had been given to Joachim from the Ark of the Covenant when he was blessed in the Temple. I now know that this blessing took the form of wine and bread and was a strengthening and sacramental food.)

Anna knelt before the little cupboard with one of the women on each side and the third behind her. She recited another hymn; I think it mentioned the burning bush of Moses. Then I saw the room filled with supernatural light which became more intense as it wove itself round Anna. The women sank to the ground as though stunned. The light round Anna took the exact form of the burning bush of Moses on Horeb, and I could no longer see her. The whole flame streamed inwards; and then I suddenly saw that Anna received the shining child Mary in her hands, wrapped her in her mantle, pressed her to her heart, and laid her naked on the stool in front of the holy relics, still continuing her prayer. Then I heard the child cry, and saw that Anna brought out wrappings from under the great veil which enveloped her. She wrapped the child first in gray and then in red swaddling bands up to her arms; her breast, arms, and head were bare. The appearance of the burning bush around Anna had now vanished.

The women stood up and received the newborn child in their arms with great astonishment. They shed tears of joy. They all joined in a hymn of praise, and Anna lifted her child up on high as though making an offering. I saw at that moment the room full of light, and beheld several angels singing Gloria and Alleluia. I heard all their words. They announced that on the twentieth day the child was to be called Mary.

Anna now went into her bedroom and lay down on her couch. The women in the meantime unwrapped the child, bathed it, and wrapped it up again, and then laid it beside its mother. There was a little woven wicker basket which could be fastened beside the bed or against the wall or at the foot of the bed, whichever was wanted, so that the child could always have its place near its mother and yet separate.

The women now called Joachim, the father. He came to Anna’s couch and knelt down weeping, his tears falling on the child; then he lifted it up in his arms and uttered his song of praise, like Zechariah at John’s birth. He spoke in this hymn of the holy seed, implanted by God in Abraham, which had continued amongst God’s people by means of the covenant ratified by circumcision, but had now reached its highest blossoming in this child and was, in the flesh, completed. I also heard how this song of praise declared that now was fulfilled the word of the prophet: ‘There shall come forth a rod out of the root of Jesse.’ He said, too, in great humility and devoutness, that he would now gladly die.

It was only then that I noticed that Mary Heli, Anna’s elder daughter, did not have sight of the child until later. Although she had become the mother of Mary Cleophas several years before, she was not present at the Blessed Virgin’s birth—perhaps because, according to Jewish rules, it was not considered seemly for a daughter to be with her mother at such a time.

Next morning I saw the serving men and maids and many people from nearby gathered round the house. They were allowed to enter in groups, and the child was shown by the women to them all. Many were greatly moved, and some led better lives thereafter. The neighbors had come because they had seen in the night a glowing light above the house, and because the birth of Anna’s child after long unfruitfulness was looked upon as a great favor from heaven.

Workshop fotoGrapHia CLUB / Fundu Moldovei / March, 25th / The Feast of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

 

Easter Traditions in Bucovina - Little is known today about the real origin of the ancestral custom of skilfully dyed eggs encountered today throughout Bucovina, as part of the specific interest in the ritual of welcoming the Holy Feast of Resurrection and then, the Lord’s Ascension. The themes dealt with, the way the patterns are represented and the colours used differ from village to village, sometimes even from one household to another, and so are the patterns and the colours of the decorations on men’s shirts or women’s blouses which respect the lines of deeply rooted traditions. Black is the major colour of Easter eggs in Ciocanesti, red is in Vatra Moldovitei and reddish-brown with tiny patterns are specific for the region between Brodina and Izvoarele Sucevei . The patterns in Fundu Moldovei are green and blue and in Gemenea, on the valley of The Suha River eggs are inscribed with the nib instead of the classical instrument of dying eggs called ‘chisita’. And on the Dorna Valley eggs are painted. Red and black with white and yellow grooving with simple geometrical shapes (circle, spiral and rhombus), vegetal motifs (cherry, oak leaf, acorn, fir tree twig and wheat ear), motifs taken from the animal world (the serpent, the frog, the bee and the rooster), household tools (the rake, the plough) minutely cover the egg in the spirit of an ancestral game played with cosmic seriosity. The sun and the moon, the star and the cross, the priest’s belt and the lost path are added to all mentioned above using the symbols of joy and wonder, of amazement and devoutness, of reconciliation and faith, dedication of everyday life to the miracle of Jesus Christ’s Resurrection and of the Ascent. © Terra Design

 

Traditii de Paste, in Bucovina - Ouale mestesugit "inchistrite", pe care le intâlnim si astazi in toata Bucovina, in preocuparile specifice asteptarii Sfintei Sarbatori a Invierii, apoi a Sarbatorii Inaltarii Domnului, vin, ca obicei, din vremuri stravechi, nimeni nu le mai stie originea exacta. Temele abordate, procedeele de reprezentare a modelelor si culorile utilizate difera de la sat la sat, de multe ori chiar de la vatra la vatra , asa cum difera motivele si culorile din ornamentele aplicate pe camesile barbatilor ori pe iile femeilor, respectând, insa, liniile unei traditii cu adânci radacini. La Ciocanesti, fondul oualor de Paste este negru, la Vatra Moldovitei este rosu, mai sus de Brodina, pâna la Izvoarele Sucevei, fondul este maro-rosiatic iar modelul de pe oua este maruntit; la Fundu Moldovei apare verdele si albastrul in desenul motivelor, la Gemenea, pe valea Suhai, ouale nu se inchistresc cu chisita, ci se scriu, cu "penita", iar pe Valea Dornelor se picteaza. Forme geometrice simple (cercul, spirala, rombul), motive vegetale (ciresica, frunza de stejar, ghinda, creanga de brad, spicul), motive din lumea animalelor (sarpele, broasca, albina, cocosul), unelte din gospodarie (grebla, fierul plugului), in rosu si negru, vrâstate cu alb si cu galben acopera cu meticulozitate oul, intr-o joaca ancestrala si cu o seriozitate cosmica. La acestea s-au adaugat soarele si luna, steaua, crucea, brâul popii, calea ratacita, intr-o simbolistica a bucuriei, uimirii, smereniei, impacarii, credintei, inchinarii vietii de fiecare zi miracolului Invierii Domnului Iisus Hristos si a Inaltarii Lui la Tatal Ceresc. © Terra Design

The devotion to the miraculous Nuestro Padre Jesús Nazareno has attracted huge following among the populace. Its popularity, which initially spread to the northern and southern provinces of Luzon, spread over time throughout the country.

A beloved spot here in this hall where many lie down on the ground for a short pray but he had a more intense need of devotion, sitting down, a humble talk with God.

 

On the edge of light in a very dark part of the Meenakshi Temple, I call it the Butterball hall as next to this place people throw ghee butter balls to the statues of Gods.

There was a very weak light of a lamp to enlighten this scene anticipated with a high ISO.

 

A strong presence of believe and proud devoutness as an aspect of the daily life here, people are not ashamed to express it openly and natural, how many still dare to do in these times ?

 

2006-01-26 16:46

Canon EOS 5D ,Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L USM

ISO-3200 F/2,8 1/13sec 32mm

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St. Canute's Cathedral (Danish: Odense Domkirke or Sct. Knuds Kirke), also known as Odense Cathedral, is named after the Danish king Canute the Saint (Danish: Knud den Hellige), otherwise Canute IV. It is a fine example of Brick Gothic architecture. The church's most visited section is the crypt where the remains of Canute and his brother Benedict are on display

 

* 1 History

* 2 The Second St. Canute's Cathedral

* 3 External links

* 4 References

 

History

 

St. Canute's Church in one form or another has stood on Nuns' Hill in Odense (Danish: Nonnebakken) for over 900 years.

 

Odense was established as the seat of the Bishop of Odense (Othinia) before 988 under the supervision of the Archbishop of Schleswig. The diocese included the southern Baltic islands of Denmark. The earliest bishops' names have not been recorded. Odense passed to the jurisdiction of Roskilde in 1072 for a short period of time before falling to the Archdiocese of Lund.

 

The earliest known church on the present location was a travertine church which was reported under construction by Aelnoth of Canterbury, a Benedictine monk at the nearby St. Alban's Priory in 1095. The foundations of the travertine church can still be seen in the crypt of the present building. The church was built in Romanesque style with semi-circular arches supporting a flat timber ceiling. The travertine church was built specifically to house the earthly remains of King Canute, who was murdered in the church of St. Alban's Priory in 1086.

 

Canute IV of Denmark, the son of King Sven Estridsen, was born about 1040 and ruled Denmark from 1080-1086. In 1075 he accompanied the Danish fleet on the last great Viking raid of that age. It is suggested that he stole relics of Saint Alban from Ely, which he deposited in St. Alban's Priory which he had founded in Odense.

 

Canute reigned at a difficult time in Danish history. The country was a patchwork of powerful autonomous feudal landowners. The idea of a united Danish nation was not on anyone's agenda at the time, except for that of King Canute himself. After the death of his older brother, the national assembly (Ting) met on Zealand to proclaim Canute king of Denmark. Once the assembly had shouted their approval, Canute stood up and spoke to those assembled, both peasant and nobles: "You called my brother Harald the Whet-stone, but you will learn that I will be hard as granite!" (kampesten). Soon after, he ordered the people of Halland to supply him with horses and wagons to transport himself and his household throughout the kingdom. The assembly met to discuss the king's request. The people decided that the request was not lawful according to the ancient customs and laws they all knew. Canute was enraged by what he heard. "It is your right to hold fast to your rights and laws and bear only the burdens the law allows, but you must also accept that I am free to do with mine what I will, and I forbid you to let your swine graze in Halland's Great Forest which belongs to me!" After hasty consultations the Hallanders supplied the required equipment. Canute did the same in Scania (southern Sweden). At the assembly he required men and supplies to build the new cathedral at Lund. When the assembly baulked, Canute swore he would forbid them to fish in the Øresund. Likewise they too acceded to the king's request.

 

Canute was a devout Christian and believed that a strong central church in Denmark would give him more power. He was instrumental in improving the nation-wide system of bishops by using his own local officials (fogeder) to collect tithes, a new tax, which were used to build the churches, hospitals and monasteries which were just beginning to be introduced into Denmark. Many people were Christian in name, but the old ways were only half-forgotten, and suspicions about foreigners ran high. Peasants were pressed hard to put food on the table and the forced tithes infuriated peasants, merchants, and nobles alike.

 

Canute brought about the wrath of some of his chiefs when he hanged Jarl Egil Ragnarsen, his hand-picked governor of Bornholm, and most of his household for piracy. Many nobles took to the seas on occasion looking for a quick way to bolster income. The execution of a high-ranking chief caused more than one chief to reconsider his support for such a troublesome monarch.

 

Canute's headaches came to a head in 1085-86, when he decided to invade England and try to take the throne from William I who was old and by some reports failing. As a close relative of Canute the Great, Canute's claim was easily as valid as that of William of Normandy's. With the co-operation of Robert I, Count of Flanders, his father-in-law, Canute ordered an armada of 1,000 Danish ships and 60 Norwegian ships to assemble at Struer in the Limfjord, northern Jutland, in the summer of 1085. As had been the tradition since the first Viking raid on England, local chiefs gathered ships, supplies, sailors, and warriors for a share of the profits, loot, slaves, and treasure taken during the raid. Canute in the meantime travelled from assembly to assembly in southern Jutland ordering his people to pay tithes, a tenth of all their produce for the church. At the same time he tried to institute a poll tax (nefgjald) to raise money from the peasants. The tithes and new tax were not well received, and when his brother, Olaf, protested, Canute had him arrested and exiled to Flanders in chains, believing that Olaf was responsible for the growing unrest. It took so long to pacify the south that Canute was unable to come north for weeks. In the meantime, the Danes at Struer were hungry, bored, and very unhappy with the king. Finally they agreed that they would sail home. They told themselves that the weather would turn bad before they could complete a successful raid, and that such a late start would spell disaster. The order to assemble had not been made at an assembly, and was therefore unlawful in the popular view. To the Norwegians they said, "You can stay here in this place of starvation, if you will. We are going home."

 

When Canute arrived at Struer and found the fleet disbanded, he was furious. He thanked the Norwegians for their patience and sent them home. "Now we (Danes) will play," he said ominously. Canute blamed the wives of several leading chiefs from Jutland of causing bad weather and ordered his officers to collect such heavy fines from their families that it would have bankrupted all of them. Then he proceeded from assembly to assembly to outlaw any man, sailor, peasant or noble who left Struer until they paid a heavy fine, more than the annual income of any but the wealthiest nobles. Within days the peasants in Vendsyssel, the most northern part of Jutland, rebelled. Royal property was burned, and royal officials were tortured and murdered.

 

The Jute chiefs decided to cast their lot in with the peasants for once, and the rebellion spread rapidly. Canute and his household and other loyal followers fled from Jutland with the intention of returning to Zealand, where Canute had more support. He was convinced instead however to sail over to Funen and then on to the royal farm (gård) at Odense by his trusted adviser, Asbjørn Blak, who also persuaded the king that he could be reconciled with the great landowners and peasants.

 

Canute and his brothers, Benedict and Erik, and their housecarls went to the king's farm outside Odense. When the peasants and their leaders realized the king was at Odense, they raced to the king's farm, but Canute and Benedict fled into the little timber church of St. Alban's Priory near the river for sanctuary. The rebels refused to recognize sanctuary. "Come out to us, you devil. Too long you have used the edge of your sword to hurt your own people. Now you will feel the edge of our weapons!" Prince Benedict and several others defended the doors. The mob hurled stones and arrows through the windows shouting, "This is for stealing my cow! This is for taking my horses!" Since they couldn't get through the heavy outer doors, the mob tried to set fire to the church, but a light rain kept the fire from taking hold. They began tearing at the timber walls to get access. Prince Benedict shouted, "It would be better that you go home to thresh your grain than stand here and exchange blows with the king's men!" The remaining defenders retreated to the choir door which separated the altar area from the nave of the church. The floors ran with blood. "There he is!" shouted Blak, but before the traitor could move against the king, he was slain by Prince Benedict. The mob hacked Prince Benedict to death. Canute had received communion and tradition says he offered no resistance when he was killed at the main altar. Forensic evidence suggests he was speared from the front and had his skull smashed, perhaps by a stone thrown through an opening that had been torn through the wall of the choir. Prince Erik, later King Erik Ejegod, managed to talk his way out of the king's farm and fled to Zealand and then with his wife and child to Skania. The seventeen housecarls loyal to Canute were massacred within the confines of the church on 10 July 1086.

 

The Benedictine monks buried Canute and Prince Benedict in front of the main altar of the priory church. The story of Canute's death at the altar and his well-known devoutness quickly caught the popular imagination. When his queen, Adela of Flanders, came to move her husband's body to Flanders, a bright light shone around St. Alban's church. The queen left her husband where he was, and the faithful streamed to the church which housed the remains of their saintly king. Almost immediately there were reports of miraculous healings at the site of his burial. Blind, deaf, and lame were healed. Seven years of famine following Canute's death were another sure sign that Canute was worthy of veneration. His brother and successor, Olaf I, was given the nickname Hunger because he was unable to do anything about the famine that ravaged Denmark for years after Canute's death.

 

The unique circumstances of Canute's death was seized upon by the Roman Catholic church as an example of saintliness for the newly converted peoples of Scandinavia. Canute was canonized in 1101 by Pope Pascal II. Some confusion exists among writers about the location of the new St. Canute's church thinking it rose on the site of the assassination, but St Alban's and St Canute's churches were not in the same location. The new cathedral, constructed in imported tufa stone, was constructed a little farther from the river, and was well underway before Canute became a saint. Aelnoth of Canterbury, an English monk, reported the building of St Canute's in 1095 and described the miracles reported at the site of Canute's grave. When the first church of St. Canute was completed, a three day fast was proclaimed for the entire kingdom and the remains of Canute and Benedict were moved to the cathedral. It was believed that if the king was truly a saint that the shroud should be set on fire and the body would not be harmed. The shroud of Saint Canute was set alight, but the fire indeed left no mark upon the body of the king.

[edit] The Second St. Canute's Cathedral

 

During the civil war between Eric IV and his brother, Abel, Odense and the cathedral were burned down in 1247. The present church was constructed in several phases to replace the aging and inadequate stone church in about 1300 by Bishop Gisico (1287-1300). The new cathedral was built in Gothic style with its typical pointed arches and high vaulted ceilings. The building material of choice for the time was over-sized red brick which was cheaper and easier to work with than the porous stone available. Portions of the stone cathedral were taken down and the new building expanded around the old.

 

In all it took approximately two hundred years to complete the cathedral, which was finally dedicated on 30 April 1499. The church was built in cruciform shape without a tower. The ancient crypt was expanded in such a way that pilgrims could visit the reliquary of Saint Canute beneath the raised choir without interfering with the canons' hourly services above. The canons also claimed they had relics of Saint Alban which Canute supposedly stole on his 1075 attack on Ely, England.

 

King Hans of Denmark (d. 1513) was buried in the cathedral in 1513. His wife, Christina of Saxony, who lived the latter part of her life in a nunnery in Odense, commissioned the famous German sculptor Claus Berg to create a magnificent burial chapel in the church of the Franciscan friary in Odense, where both she and her husband were laid to rest after her death in 1521. The son of Hans and Christina, King Christian II, with his wife Isabella of Austria, was also interred in the royal family chapel. In 1807 the former Franciscan church was demolished, and Claus Berg's magnificent late Gothic altarpiece and the bodies of the four royals were transferred to St. Canute's Cathedral. The altarpiece is truly one of Denmark's national treasures. It was carved between 1515 and 1525. Each of the three sections is intricately carved and gilded. It survived the iconoclastic fervour of the Reformation perhaps because of its connection with the royal burials.

 

The single tower was completed in 1586 over the west entrance in the same style as the rest of the cathedral. Five bells hang in the tower, the oldest from 1300 cast by Adam..., one cast in 1597 by Jens Hansen, a bell cast in 1677, and one from 1767 cast by ... Leitze. The most recent bell was cast by MP Allerup in 1880.

 

In 1633 Valkendorf's Chapel was added, by all accounts a fine example of Renaissance artistry. Unfortunately it was dismantled in the great restoration of 1868.

 

Thomas Kingo was made the Lutheran Bishop of Odense in 1634. He was Denmark's most famous psalmist and produced a new hymnbook to which he personally contributed 85 hymns.

 

1752 Amdie Worm's spectacular organ was installed. The facade of the organ remains, but the organ has been expanded and improved to become the cherished voice of Odense Cathedral.

 

During restoration work in the 1870s, the crypt which had been closed since the Reformation was refurbished and opened as a chapel, and Saint Canute once more went on display.

Just a few steps, then a few more

even fewer took me to the fore

of the outraged sky peering over

a parison sun offering a seductive future;

this respite, this roborant of nature

alluding to colours, light, feelings that wonder

no song, no sound, no spite so profound

only a will to gather a devoutness unbound

below the Ash, in deified, dancing foliage

we, commingling to receive our message

 

by anglia24

10h25: 19/08/2007

© 2007anglia24

 

[Photo taken Friday, 17/08/2007]

傍晚的大昭寺外还有很多虔诚的人们在这里磕头跪拜。

Designs and works of the great Antoni Gaudi. Designs of chimneys at the top of the building.

 

Casa Milà, better known as La Pedrera (Catalan for 'The Quarry'), is a building designed by the Catalan architect Antoni Gaudí and built during the years 1905–1910, being considered officially completed in 1912. It is located at 92, Passeig de Gràcia (passeig is Catalan for promenade) in the Eixample district of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

 

It was built for the married couple, Rosario Segimon and Pere Milà. Rosario Segimon was the wealthy widow of José Guardiola, an Indiano, a term applied locally to the Catalans returning from the American colonies with tremendous wealth. Her second husband, Pere Milà, was a developer who was criticized for his flamboyant lifestyle and ridiculed by the contemporary residents of Barcelona, when they joked about his love of money and opulence, wondering if he was not rather more interested in "the widow’s guardiola" (piggy bank), than in "Guardiola’s widow".

 

Gaudi, a Catholic and a devotee of the Virgin Mary, planned for the Casa Milà to be a spiritual symbol. Overt religious elements include an excerpt from the Rosary prayer on the cornice and planned statues of Mary, specifically Our Lady of the Rosary, and two archangels, St. Michael and St. Gabriel. The design by Gaudi was not followed in some aspects. The local government objected to some aspects of the project, fined the owners for many infractions of building codes, ordered the demolition of aspects exceeding the height standard for the city. The Encyclopedia of Twentieth Century Architecture states that the statuary was indeed Mary the mother of Jesus, also noting Gaudi's devoutness, and notes that the owner decided not to include it after Semana Trágica, an outbreak of anticlericalism in the city. After the decision was made to exclude the statuary of Mary and the archangels, Gaudi contemplated abandoning the project but was persuaded not to by a priest.

 

Casa Milà was in poor condition in the early 1980s. It had been painted a dreary brown and many of its interior color schemes had been abandoned or allowed to deteriorate, but it has since been restored and many of the original colors revived.

 

* Summary from Wikipedia

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