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In support of Cindy Sheehan's vigil outside President Bush's ranch in Texas.

A woman replies to cries of "thank you," "God bless you," and other cheers of encouragement from the crowd as she is arrested.

On July 29th, Veterans for Peace-111 and the Whatcom Peace and Justice Center brought anti-war activist Cindy Sheehan to Bellingham. I attended her talk, and sat down for a private interview with her a few days later.

 

I wrote the following article on the talk and our interview. It appeared in abridged form in the August 12th, 2009 issue of Bellingham's 'Cascadia Weekly.'

 

Read the full article below or check out Cascadia's version here:

 

www.cascadiaweekly.com/cw?/content/articles/cindy_sheehan...

 

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Cindy Sheehan Wages A War on War

By Alexander Kelly

 

Cindy Sheehan knows the sufferings of a mother.

 

For more than two centuries, millions of mothers have watched their children leave home to serve in the United States military. Like Casey, Sheehan’s son, they were recruited, trained and shipped in the thousands near and abroad to serve some known or obscured U.S. interest.

 

In our culture, we expect the mothers of these soldiers to feel proud of their children’s service and show unwavering support for the fulfillment of their duty. While a large number of them do, pride is hardly alone among the emotions dominating their hearts. Fear, anxiety and helplessness also grip them. For Cindy Sheehan, it was enough to keep her up at night.

 

Cindy is the mother of Spc. Casey Sheehan, an American soldier who served in the Iraq War. On April 4th, 2004, Cindy’s worst nightmare came true. While watching television that evening, CNN reported that Casey and seven others had been killed during an effort to rescue American troops. Casey’s death led his mother on a mission to understand what motives brought us to the war in Iraq, what is keeping us there, and a realization of the deep meaning of her son’s service and sacrifice. She became a warrior against war and an advocate for a peaceful U.S. foreign policy.

 

Five years and three months later, American forces still occupy Iraq, and Cindy Sheehan still hasn’t given up. Late last month, Veterans for Peace Chapter 111 and the Whatcom Peace and Justice Center’s Executive Director, Marie Marchand, brought Sheehan to Bellingham. On a hot July day, 200 people came to hear her speak at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church.

 

The evening marked the final stop of a four-month tour. Last April, Cindy set off to promote the message of her latest book, Myth America: 10 Greatest Myths of the Robber Class and the Case for Revolution. The result of four years of tireless activism, Myth America represents Cindy’s effort to identify and plainly convey ten established premises that allow American imperialism to persist unchallenged. Our culture’s blind acceptance of these myths killed her son, Sheehan says, and if we fail to expose and do away with them, untold more American youths will be lost to an early and unnecessary death.

 

Prior to the loss of her son, Sheehan was not an anti-war activist. After Casey was killed, she began speaking out against the war, but didn’t become the focus of national media attention until she sought to confront George Bush himself. Sheehan recalls the exact moment.

 

Unable to sleep, she was sitting at her computer at three in the morning on August 3rd, 2005. While sharing her grief via email to a list of 300 supporters, the voice of the man who killed her son came over the radio. “I want to tell you his exact words,” Sheehan told the Bellingham audience. “’The families of the fallen can rest assured their loved ones died for a noble cause.’”

 

Bush’s statement came three months after the Downing Street Memo was leaked to the British media. Practically ignored by mainstream American press, the document contained the details of a discussion between senior officials of the British government. Included was a statement made by Richard Dearlove, then the head of Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service. Dearlove related Bush’s intent to justify an American invasion of Iraq on the basis of unconfirmed intelligence regarding possession of nuclear weapons and ties to terrorist groups. Foreign Secretary Jack Straw confirmed the president had already decided to take military action, but making a legal case for the invasion was difficult.

 

With full knowledge of the memo, Bush’s comment devastated Sheehan. “Not only were they [Casey and the others] tragically killed, but George Bush came on and said they died for a noble cause,” she typed to her readers.

 

When the press failed to inquire exactly what the soldiers died for, Cindy decided it was her turn to ask questions. “The press didn’t ask him what was the noble cause,” she continued typing. “What’s wrong with me? I have a voice.” Three days and 1800 miles later, Sheehan found herself setting up camp along with six others in Crawford, TX, three miles away from George Bush’s vacation ranch.

 

Sheehan’s modest protest exploded into the most publicized anti-war demonstration the country had seen since the beginning of the Iraq war. Cindy admits she didn’t expect Camp Casey to become so significant. The protest drew international media attention, attracting 15,000 Americans during its 26 days, and for a brief moment, succeeded in uniting America’s anti-war movement.

 

Though Bush brought his vacation in Crawford to an early end without answering her questions, Cindy knows why her son was sacrificed in Iraq. In an interview with Veterans for Peace, she asked, “Was it freedom and democracy? Bullshit! He died for oil. He died to make your friends richer. He died to expand American imperialism in the Middle East.”

 

Sheehan was pleased with the national discussion Camp Casey stirred up, but it did not bring peace in Iraq. It also failed to move in the direction Sheehan began to hope for. Cindy intended to rally the country to bring an end to the Iraq war. Instead, she felt the movement was taken advantage of by political opportunists.

 

“Unfortunately, I believe that the energy of the movement, the Camp Casey and the anti-war movement, was co-opted and misused by democrats and organizations that support democrats,” she declared.

 

Before Camp Casey, Sheehan worked with Progressive Democrats of America. Over time, she began to sense they were using the anti-war movement for their own benefit. After Casey’s death, when John Kerry ran for president in 2004, Sheehan held her nose while she gave him her vote, knowing well enough that he was not an anti-war candidate.

 

Her faith in the Democratic Party suffered another blow when Kerry conceded to the suspicious voting outcome in Ohio. She recalls the hopeless situation of the Green and Libertarian candidates demanding a recount themselves. “They had no hope of coming out on top, but they thought that with a democracy, every vote should count,” she explains.

 

Eventually, Sheehan began speaking out against Democrats who did not support a platform focused on ending the Iraq war.

 

After countless beatings from the left in the media and on liberal blogs, in 2007, Cindy left the Democratic Party. When the results of the 2008 Presidential election were in, Cindy was surprised at the flood of congratulatory emails and phone calls she received. The show of support made her feel misunderstood.

 

Cindy lamented, “I never did this to get democrats elected. I did it to end the occupations and now those haven’t ended, and the fact that they’re getting worse is very frustrating to me. Many people have fallen back to sleep thinking that a regime change means anything different is going to happen.”

 

The realization that a Democratic candidate does not equal an anti-war candidate occurred slowly in Sheehan over the last few years. In her newest book she argues against the conventional lines that divide our society. The divisions between race, religion, geography and two-party politics, are illusions, Sheehan writes. They serve the elite by having the convenient effect of distracting us from the only division that really matters.

 

“The only relevant division in this country is the class division. All other divisions are artificial and imposed upon us by the robber class to divide and conquer,” Cindy says. “We in the robbed class have way more in common with each other than we do that separates us.”

 

“It’s not about the person in charge,” Sheehan says. “It’s not about Republicans, its not about Democrats, it’s not about George Bush, it’s not about Barack Obama. It’s the system that we battle against. So if we change regimes, it doesn’t mean that we stop.”

 

Wall Street, the corporate media, the current form of U.S. Government. Sheehan tells the audience that all of these are part of the robber class. They exist to make a profit, Sheehan says, no matter the cost to the rest of us. Whether they admit it or not, they would sooner send the rest of us to our deaths than give up an opportunity for profit. “After Casey was killed, I used to think that profit was a consequence of war,” Cindy confesses. “But now I know it’s a reason for war. It doesn’t really matter if Goldman Sachs candidate A wins or Goldman Sachs candidate B wins.”

 

Sheehan’s revolution is not a violent one. She wants to free us from the oppressive grip of the Robber Class. She asks people to focus on their local communities. “That’s where we have the greatest success,” she pleads. With half-closed fists, she invokes the old adage, ‘Think Globally. Act Locally.” Major positive change never occurs from the top down in this country, she says. “It only happens in a grass roots movement that pulls the Robber Class to us.”

 

Before the talk began, Cindy announced that the following day, she would return home to exercise and devote herself to her children and grandchildren. She will also continue to produce her radio show, Cindy Sheehan’s Soapbox, and focus her efforts on a new set of myths, tentatively titled Myth America 2. Apparently, Cindy Sheehan does not surrender.

 

-------

 

Epilogue

  

The talk began shortly after 7 P.M. I arrived at 6:15 with my friend Chris Crow, who photographed the event. For thirty minutes, we canvassed the church, guessing at the light and looking for the best angles for photographs of the talk. At around 6:30, Katelyn showed up, followed by three good activist friends of mine.

 

A few minutes before Cindy was introduced, I fiddled in my chair, joining a discussion of nonsense and commenting on the crowd of ‘usual suspects’ that regularly gathers for ‘peace’ events. After a few moments, Cindy appeared.

 

She is a blonde woman, of slightly taller-than-average height and is smiling as she enters the room. The crowd applauds and smiles back. She walks not with airs of importance or distinction, but as a simple woman ready to tell the story about the death of her son; the moment that changed her life.

 

As she speaks, she doesn’t bother with note cards, and she is unafraid to embark on the occasional meandering tangent. Though she has done this numerous times, there is something authentic, seemingly unrehearsed about this. She has acquired more than her share of anecdotes over her last four years of dealing with media, politicians and groups like ours.

 

As the talk comes to a close, the audience rises for applause. At that moment, there is a sense of adoration among the crowd. It was as if we were all waiting for her to finish talking in order to shower her with our support. Seated in the front row, I risk a glance behind me, and for a moment, even in the July heat, I feel a brief chill. Quickly, I count the number of people in the crowd under the age of 30.

 

Ten or so, it seems.

 

In a community of 75,000, known nationwide for its progressive politics, literally a handful of young adults came to hear a peace activist speak. As I recall Casey Sheehan’s final age, just weeks away from 25, I become terrified by what I see. Or what I do not see.

 

In a culture where powerful forces, in all media, work to seduce our sons and daughters into believing it is honorable to fight and die for whatever reasons our leaders allege, how can we hope to reach the audience who needs it most? If my generation is not available to hear the message, how may we hope to save our country from the devastating consequences of the decisions made by its unscrupulous leaders?

 

I cannot help but wonder – did Casey Sheehan ever hear someone with his mother’s conviction speak?

 

I did.

 

###

candles for peace...

"I want to tell you about my son" he said

Carlos Arredondo handed me the letter his son wrote him from the naval ship as he left for Iraq. He asked that I read it and told me I could keep the copy. There were a few other people there at the time and they were given their letter copies as well. Carlos had a lot to say and I felt like he really did not know where to start. He began with the story of finding out Alexander had been killed.

 

It was August 25th 2004 and his mother was at his house baking him a cake because it was his birthday. He said he had been watching TV nonstop to see how the war was progressing and was extremely happy because George W. Bush had recently come on the news and said “Mission Accomplished”. After hearing this news of the US victory he was very happy because he believed his son would be home very soon. Mom was in the kitchen baking the cake as a Marine van pulled up to the house. Carlos said his first thoughts were happiness, that this was a surprise birthday reunion with his son since the war was over. Three Marines came to the door and gave Carlos news that his son had just been killed.

 

Carlos then ran to his shed grabbing a container of gasoline and a propane tank. He then went to the Marine van, smashed out the window, climbed inside and proceeded to set the van and himself on fire. When the van exploded he was thrown from the vehicle. The Three Marines then extinguished the fire consuming him.

 

As Carlos told us this story he lifted his pants and shirt exposing scars from his severe burns. At this point we were all in tears or holding back as hard as we could. Most of us were parents and could put our self in his place. Carlos asked us to please read his sons letter, but this was way too difficult for me in that moment. I put the letter in my camera bag and promised him I would read it.

 

After listening to Carlos for that part of the story I had to get up and go for a walk. His story was so emotionally painful I was unable to stay and listen more without completely breaking down. My thoughts at that time were what I would do if I lost any of my children. What would I do if a man sent my son off to die for what I believed was not only an unjust war but purely for self profit? I was so sad and so angry I could hardly hold it inside. I walked for about 2 hours before coming back to Camp Casey to finish talking with Carlos.

 

While sitting in the grass listening too much of the same story again some people would come up and in their own special way tell Carlos that he was a disgrace to his son and to the US. Their jabs would come more as questions without care for retort. Carlos would remain at all times very calm and would answer any question that was asked of him. This is when he said what I believe effected me the most. He said some people need to get answers from the President, some need to rally and protest, some need to support this war because that is how they deal with their pain. He says he just needs to tell his son’s story and share the letter he received from him before finding out he was killed. “We are all in pain” he said “And I do not fault anyone for the way they deal with their pain”.

 

The Letter

 

Mom Dad

 

Today is Sunday January 19, 2003. I’ve been out at sea for three day now and I’m starting to feel better. The first two days I was completely sick from seasickness and some virus. So far everyday I come outside of the ship and write letters, whale watch (which isn’t that great cause I haven’t seen any but there are plenty of dolphins that swim along side the ship), watch the horizon and sunset etc…

This seems so unreal to me. I’ve never seen water this BLUE before, I’ve never looked 360 degrees around me and seen nothing but water, clouds, the sun, and a fleet of battle ships surrounding me.

Tomorrow is one of my many, many training days on the ship to prepare me for my mission. I will also be training a short time in Kuwait. This is hard for me to comprehend. It seems like my whole life changed in an instant. Yesterday I was in a classroom learning trigonometry and history. I graduated, went to boot camp, went to school, graduated as a grunt, I was sent across the country to train, now I’m being sent across the world to fight. Today I am in a classroom learning about TACTICAL URBAN COMBAT and NUCLEAR, BIOLOGICAL, and CHEMICAL WARFARE, In the middle of the Pacific Ocean, on my way to experience 1st hand what I am learning about.

I am not afraid of dying. I am more afraid of what will happen to all the ones that I love if something happens to me. Soon enough I will be in the desert, outside the city of Baghdad in full combat gear, ready to carry out my mission, wondering how this all happened so fast, wishing I was back home going to school, dating Sheila, taking care of my family.

Although I think this way now I am almost certain that if I didn’t walk this path of a proud warrior, a Marine. Just because I wonder “what if” doesn’t mean I’m not proud, it doesn’t mean I feel like I made the wrong decision, it doesn’t mean I have any regrets. I’m still proud to be fighting for my country, I feel like, if I’m not helping one way, I should still do all that I can to help (OPERATION ENDURING FREEDOM).

I am on the time hack now. I need to send this letter in the next hour for it to get to you by Tuesday or Wednesday. I love you both very much and I wish I could keep writing but I got to go. Love you.

What: March on the Pentagon Anti-War Rally and Vietnam Vet / Iraq Vet Pro-War Counter Rally

When: Saturday March 17th 2007 (4 Year Anniversary of Iraq War)

Where: Washington DC, United States of America

by Danny Hammontree

  

You can also view at deviantART

August 31, 2005

After riding the bus with Cindy from Camp Casey, I went to the Crawford Peace House for lunch.

 

The place was packed with people as the protest was winding down.

 

One of the attendees was able to give me a ride to the Waco Airport so I could head home.

(Outside the White House in Washington, D.C.) With the sun setting, the effects of candle light became apparent. Among the participants in the frame of this shot, a priest (left), pregnant mom-to-be (if not already), children, and other participants.

Cindy always had the time to speak to people.

Cindy Sheehan inside the big tent at Camp Casey. Behind her you can see the painted banner honoring her son and the camp's namesake, Casey Sheehan. To the left of the banner is an oversized, painted wooden casket with the names of the Americans who have died in Iraq inscribed on the side.

This impressive, hand-painted banner and tribute to Cindy Sheehan's son Casey hangs inside the tent at Camp Casey. Cindy saw it for the first time just the day before.

 

Cindy's tattoo honoring Casey, courtesy of Cowdenherrick.

Soon after I had photographed the children playing with their parents signs I walked up on this fellow carrying the very familiar sign “Who Would Jesus Bomb?” However this was the first time I had seen anyone dress up like clergy to slam this power phrase home. The whole time I photographed him he kept his eyes sternly fixated in the direction of The White House. This gentleman actually looks like he could be a man of the cloth. If he is I think that would be pretty wonderful.

 

When: September 24th 2005

Where: Washington DC

What: The United for Peace and Justice Anti-War protest & march.

When: September 25th 2005

Where: Washington DC - Camp Casey

What: The United for Peace and Justice Anti-War protest & march

Cheryl Norris, who evacuated from Houston to Washington D.C. in the face of Hurricane Rita, was arrested outside the White House protesting the Iraq War. [Props to rev_bri for the caption info.]

When I arrived at the main stage area of the protest in DC I ran into a guy I have photographed with in Ft. Lauderdale at the Organization of American States protest. He brought me over to the media booth and hooked me up with some media and stage passes. I then went to the media stage but realized I was missing some of the crowed shots I was really looking for, more specifically shots of children holding signs or just playing amongst all the fever of this very large protest. I wondered the crowed for a bit when I ran into these children playing with their parents signs. I shot about 20 photographs of them and again the first one I shot is my favorite of the bunch.

 

When: September 24th 2005

Where: Washington DC

What: The United for Peace and Justice Anti-War protest & march.

Fausto Fernós, and his mom Patricia go to Crawford, Texas to participate and cover the Peace Movement at Camp Casey, right in front of President George W Bush Jr's ranch home.

 

Photos by Fausto Fernos.

 

Listen to the podcasts and watch the videos at: www.feastoffools.net

 

Click here to subscribe for free on iTunes.

 

Dogman started off this series so I find it only fitting that Dogman takes us out. I hope that you all liked the series. It was very difficult narrowing down what photos would be posted from the over 1000 shot while I was in DC. I’m not sure what I will be doing next, more then likely it will be a few smaller series. I have a bunch of ideas running through my head and I get new ideas all the time. I truly love photojournalism and see myself sticking with it. I do wish photojournalism was a category of photography more people were interested in viewing or taking part in, but I am very happy with the quality of comments and responses to do get from the people that are interested in my photography. Thank you.

 

When: September 25th 2005

Where: Washington DC - Camp Casey

What: The United for Peace and Justice Anti-War protest & march

I met Dogman at Camp Casey in Washington DC. As soon as I saw him I knew I had to get a good photograph of him. I think in total I took about 60 shots of him throughout the 3 days I was in DC. When I photograph people I really try not being noticed because I want to get people as candid as possible. I wish I could post every photo I took of Dogman but you know… Maybe 1 or 2 ;)

 

When: September 24th 2005

Where: Washington DC

What: The United for Peace and Justice Anti-War protest & march.

What: March on the Pentagon Anti-War Rally and Vietnam Vet / Iraq Vet Pro-War Counter Rally

When: Saturday March 17th 2007 (4 Year Anniversary of Iraq War)

Where: Washington DC, United States of America

by Danny Hammontree

  

You can also view at deviantART

Peace March, Hollywood California October 28th, 2006

August 28, 2005

During the late afternoon, actor Martin Sheen addressed the crowd. He gave an inspiring speech.

  

August 28, 2005

During the late afternoon, actor Martin Sheen addressed the crowd. He gave an inspiring speech.

 

Cindy is standing with Mr. Sheen on the stage. Standing on the left is Tim Goodrich. He was a founding member of Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW).

August 27, 2005

Camp Casey field of crosses.

 

Casey Sheehan's cross. He was killed in Iraq on April 4, 2004. He had only been in Iraq two weeks. He was 24 years old.

What: March on the Pentagon Anti-War Rally and Vietnam Vet / Iraq Vet Pro-War Counter Rally

When: Saturday March 17th 2007 (4 Year Anniversary of Iraq War)

Where: Washington DC, United States of America

by Danny Hammontree

  

You can also view at deviantART

August 31, 2005

This is the Veterans for Peace (VFP) bus Cindy would leave Camp Casey in later in the morning.

 

Beside the bus, are the crosses that were reverently collected from the field of crosses.

 

Camp Casey was closing down today as Cindy left.

August 27, 2005

Camp Casey field of crosses.

 

Sherwood Baker's cross. He was killed in Iraq on April 26, 2004. He was 30 years old.

 

His mother, Celeste Zappala, is one of the sweetest people I have ever met. Celeste is a member of Military Families Speak Out (MFSO).

Arrest at Hart Office Building

This is being updated as we learn more, so any interested viewer should look below, & perhaps return. Also, one of Flickr's best photographers, Eqqman, has an excellent ongoing discussion about the issue of a possible attack against Iran at his site, here: www.flickr.com/photos/eqqman/126227421/

 

Another of Flickr's great photographers, k1mk1m, is appalled by oppression in his country, Britain, & I urge interested viewers to visit with him, here: www.flickr.com/photos/k1m/128110260/

 

And see the picture & read the apt quotation by Fromm, also at k1mk1m's site: www.flickr.com/photos/k1m/132106154/in/photostream/

 

Thank you for stopping by,

 

Robin

---------------------------------

 

THE IRAN PLANS

by SEYMOUR M. HERSH

 

Excerpt from article in The New Yorker, THE IRAN PLANS

by SEYMOUR M. HERSH:

 

"The attention given to the nuclear option [in attacking Iran] has created serious misgivings inside the offices of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he added, and some officers have talked about resigning. Late this winter, the Joint Chiefs of Staff sought to remove the nuclear option from the evolving war plans for Iran—without success, the former intelligence official said. “The White House said, ‘Why are you challenging this? The option came from you.’ ”

 

"The Pentagon adviser on the war on terror confirmed that some in the Administration were looking seriously at this option, which he linked to a resurgence of interest in tactical nuclear weapons among Pentagon civilians and in policy circles. He called it “a juggernaut that has to be stopped.” He also confirmed that some senior officers and officials were considering resigning over the issue. “There are very strong sentiments within the military against brandishing nuclear weapons against other countries,” the adviser told me. “This goes to high levels.” The matter may soon reach a decisive point, he said, because the Joint Chiefs had agreed to give President Bush a formal recommendation stating that they are strongly opposed to considering the nuclear option for Iran. “The internal debate on this has hardened in recent weeks,” the adviser said. “And, if senior Pentagon officers express their opposition to the use of offensive nuclear weapons, then it will never happen.

 

"The adviser added, however, that the idea of using tactical nuclear weapons in such situations has gained support from the Defense Science Board, an advisory panel whose members are selected by Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld. “They’re telling the Pentagon that we can build the B61 with more blast and less radiation,” he said."

 

Full text of article: www.newyorker.com/fact/content/articles/060417fa_fact

   

What: March on the Pentagon Anti-War Rally and Vietnam Vet / Iraq Vet Pro-War Counter Rally

When: Saturday March 17th 2007 (4 Year Anniversary of Iraq War)

Where: Washington DC, United States of America

by Danny Hammontree

  

You can also view at deviantART

Cornel West and Rev. Sekou await their arrest as they refuse to budge in front of the North side of the White House. They were among a couple hundred people who committed non-violent direct action at the White House, and several hundred who marched there mid-day.

In this photo Satan is the puppet master and Dick Cheney and George W. Bush are his marionettes. I am not sure if they were going through the whole route of the march or just performing in front of the White House where I saw them. The Dick Cheney character looked so much like Dick it was scary. The George W. Bush character wore a gold crown with the numbers 666 across the front. In one hand George was carrying a globe of the earth and a large pretzel. In his other hand he drank from a quart of motor oil. I will be posting some photos of them when I post the large gallery of color photos, so be on the look out for those. For now you have Satan!

 

When: September 24th 2005

Where: Washington DC

What: The United for Peace and Justice Anti-War protest & march

Left to Right-Front to Back

{ row1 }-Professor Steven Jones,Woody Harrelson,Naomi Wolf,Christine Ebersole,Ed Begley,Willie Nelson,Phil Donahue,Lou Dobbs,Keith Olberman,Michael Moore,{ row2 }-Alex Jones,Luke Rudowski,Ed Asner,Martin Sheen,Charlie Sheen,Rosie O'Donnell,Harry Belafonte,Peter Coyote,Amy Goodman,Noam Chomsky,Jeff Rense,{ row3 }-Robert F.Kennedy Jr,Jesse Ventura,Ron Paul,Cynthia McKinney,Dennis Kucinich,Cindy Sheehan,Gen.Wesley Clark,Gore Vidal,Bill Moyers.

What: March on the Pentagon Anti-War Rally and Vietnam Vet / Iraq Vet Pro-War Counter Rally

When: Saturday March 17th 2007 (4 Year Anniversary of Iraq War)

Where: Washington DC, United States of America

by Danny Hammontree

  

You can also view at deviantART

Cindy was in NYC today, and gave a speech in Union Square, explaining why she is running for Congress against Nancy Pelosi.

Video Here

August 27, 2005

My first views of Camp Casey. The field of crosses and the tent.

 

When Cindy sat in that ditch on that hot, Texas August day in 2005, the world took notice. The world was touched by this grieving mother's search for answers to her son's death.

 

Camp Casey, named in honor of Cindy's son, sprang up near that ditch. For four weeks, thousands made a pilgrimage to Camp Casey to show their support for Cindy.

 

When Cindy sat in that ditch, she was a member of Military Families Speak Out (MFSO), an organization of military families against the Iraq (and later the Afghanistan) war.

 

As a board member of MFSO, I was sent to Camp Casey to represent the organization during the vigil's last five days.

Washington DC, Lafayette Park and Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the The White House, Saturday afternoon March 21, 2015. Answer Coalition, Code Pink, Black United Front and other peace and justice groups gather for a rally and march to protest ongoing US post 911 'war on terror' military actions worldwide.

ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA RALLY at Lafayette Park, NW, Washington DC on Saturday morning, 16 March 2019 by Elvert Barnes Photography

 

CINDY SHEEHAN

www.facebook.com/cindyleesheehan

 

Follow Saturday, 16 March 2019 ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA NATIONAL MARCH ON WASHINGTON at www.facebook.com/events/242059076711261/

 

Elvert Barnes Saturday, 16 March 2019 ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA / Washington DC docu-project at elvertbarnes.com/16March2019

ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA RALLY at Lafayette Park, NW, Washington DC on Saturday morning, 16 March 2019 by Elvert Barnes Photography

 

CINDY SHEEHAN

www.facebook.com/cindyleesheehan

 

Follow Saturday, 16 March 2019 ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA NATIONAL MARCH ON WASHINGTON at www.facebook.com/events/242059076711261/

 

Elvert Barnes Saturday, 16 March 2019 ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA / Washington DC docu-project at elvertbarnes.com/16March2019

ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA RALLY at Lafayette Park, NW, Washington DC on Saturday morning, 16 March 2019 by Elvert Barnes Photography

 

CINDY SHEEHAN

www.facebook.com/cindyleesheehan

 

Follow Saturday, 16 March 2019 ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA NATIONAL MARCH ON WASHINGTON at www.facebook.com/events/242059076711261/

 

Elvert Barnes Saturday, 16 March 2019 ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA / Washington DC docu-project at elvertbarnes.com/16March2019

ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA RALLY at Lafayette Park, NW, Washington DC on Saturday morning, 16 March 2019 by Elvert Barnes Photography

 

CINDY SHEEHAN

www.facebook.com/cindyleesheehan

 

Follow Saturday, 16 March 2019 ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA NATIONAL MARCH ON WASHINGTON at www.facebook.com/events/242059076711261/

 

Elvert Barnes Saturday, 16 March 2019 ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA / Washington DC docu-project at elvertbarnes.com/16March2019

Washington DC, Lafayette Park and Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the The White House, Saturday afternoon March 21, 2015. Around 250 activists associated with Answer Coalition, Code Pink, Veterans For Peace, Black United Front and other peace and justice groups gather for a rally and meandering march ending on Capitol Hill to protest ongoing US post 911 'war on terror' military actions worldwide. The DC and Capitol police generally maintained respectful distance from the protesters. There were no arrests I am aware of. In this photograph a Walmart manager and security guard nervously eye the passing marchers. A 'Black Lives Matter' March this past fall 'bum rushed' the store and occupied it for about 15 minutes or so.

 

This shot belongs to a collection of my photographs of buildings and other notable places in the nation's capital. Feel free to use them unaltered with attribution for non-commercial purposes.

Oh my! The defamers have their claws out. A set of photos from Upfish

 

Robert Lederman wrote the following letter to the New York Times. I don't know if they published it. He asks the question "What can one person do?" This is what I can do: make a graphic (above) and publish Lerman's letter.

 

What can one person do?

 

Most people I've spoken with in recent years feel they have no power, no

ability to affect the dreadful course of events unfolding around them,

especially world or national events. Cindy Sheehan shows what one person can

do.

 

Whether you agree with her position on Bush and Iraq or not, there can be no

doubting the magnitude of the effect that has followed her actions. By

standing along a dusty road in Texas with a sign she has done more to

successfully challenge the neo-con New World Order than the entire worldwide

anti-war movement and the entire Democratic Party combined. If more people

dared to individually stand up for what they believe in this way the police

state would wither on the vine.

 

During a war normal life is suspended. We are in a war, but it's not the

fake war on terror we see on Fox and CNN.

 

The real war is being made all over the Earth against average everyday

people like Cindy Sheehan. Right now most of the casualties are overseas but

the real focus is still right here in the US. Unless the American people can

be subjugated, intimidated, disinformed and made willing to give up their

rights those making this war will ultimately lose it.

 

The real war is a war against free speech, against the bill of rights,

against freedom, against conscience and against human decency. It's a war

against life, against nature and against the Earth itself. As Americans we

are uniquely both the perpetrators and the victims of this war -

perpetrators because this is all being done in our names and victims because

it is our freedom that is the ultimate target.

 

Deny the corporate police state what it wants and you will deny it power. To

defeat such an enemy, we must use the weapons that are most effective, the

weapons they most fear.

 

What are these weapons? Certainly not bombs or bullets or suicide attacks.

They are the manufacturers, distributors and perpetrators of most of the

violence we see in the world today. Using the techniques of advertising,

propaganda and human psychology, they manipulate young Americans to go to

war as readily as they brainwash young Muslims to become suicide bombers.

 

What they fear most are not weapons of mass destruction but sincere words.

Cardboard signs. Acts of conscience. A refusal to go along with the

propaganda of fear. A determination to not let them get away with it.

 

It all comes down to one person at a time non-violently standing up for what

they believe in. Anyone can refuse to be intimidated into silence or passive

acceptance. Sometimes, defending your country means fighting against it.

 

Like the power within a single atom, we all have this power right now freely

at our disposal.

 

Freedom is the gift given to all Americans. Use it or lose it.

Robert Lederman

201 896-1686

What: March on the Pentagon Anti-War Rally and Vietnam Vet / Iraq Vet Pro-War Counter Rally

When: Saturday March 17th 2007 (4 Year Anniversary of Iraq War)

Where: Washington DC, United States of America

by Danny Hammontree

  

You can also view at deviantART

Washington DC, Lafayette Park and Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the The White House, Saturday afternoon March 21, 2015. Around 250 activists associated with Answer Coalition, Code Pink, Veterans For Peace, Black United Front and other peace and justice groups gather for a rally and meandering march ending on Capitol Hill to protest ongoing US post 911 'war on terror' military actions worldwide. Many of the marchers carried mock coffins and left some at the doors of notorious military contractors and AIPAC. The DC and Capitol police generally maintained respectful distance from the protesters. There were no arrests I am aware of.

ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA RALLY at Lafayette Park, NW, Washington DC on Saturday morning, 16 March 2019 by Elvert Barnes Photography

 

CINDY SHEEHAN

www.facebook.com/cindyleesheehan

 

Follow Saturday, 16 March 2019 ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA NATIONAL MARCH ON WASHINGTON at www.facebook.com/events/242059076711261/

 

Elvert Barnes Saturday, 16 March 2019 ANSWER Coalition U. S. HANDS OFF VENEZUELA / Washington DC docu-project at elvertbarnes.com/16March2019

August 28, 2005 - Sunday

In the morning was an interfaith service.

 

The Reverend Al Sharpton gave the sermon. He called Cindy "the conscience of the nation".

 

He reminded the gathering that it was 42 years ago that day (August 28, 1963) that Martin Luther King gave his "I Have a Dream" speech.

 

He ended his sermon with the inspiration that things are not solved by great men, they are solved by ordinary people stepping forward and having the courage to question and speak out.

 

After the service, the crowd was given 4,000 donated roses to place on the crosses. The people were silent as they walked among the crosses placing their roses.

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