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The word "jackfruit" comes from Portuguese jaca, which in turn is derived from the Malayalam language term chakka (Malayalam chakka pazham)

 

Jackfruit nutrition facts

 

Jackfruit is absolutely one of a kind tropical fruit recognized for its unique shape, and size. The fruity flavor of its sweet arils (bulbs) can be appreciated from a distance. In common with other tropical fruits such as durian, banana, etc., it is also rich in energy, dietary fiber, minerals, and vitamins and free from saturated fats or cholesterol; fitting it into one of the healthy treats to relish!

 

Botanically, this popular Asian tropical fruit belongs to the family of Moraceae, of the genus: Artocarpus and is closely related to figs, mulberry, and breadfruit. Scientific name: Artocarpus heterophyllus.

 

Jackfruit is a huge tree that grows to as high as 30 meters, larger than mango, breadfruit, etc. It is believed to be indigenous to the Southwestern rain forests of India. Today, it widely cultivated in the tropical regions of the Indian subcontinent, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and Brazil for its fruit, seeds, and wood. The tree grows best in tropical humid and rainy climates but rarely survives cold and frosty conditions.

jackfruit tree bearing fruits jackfruit-tree

Jackfruit tree with a heavy yield. Huge jackfruit tree.

 

In a season, each tree bears as many as 250 large fruits, supposed to be the biggest tree-borne fruits in the world. The fruit varies widely in size, weigh from 3 to 30 kg, and has oblong or round shape, measuring 10 cm to 60 cm in length, 25 to 75 cm in diameter. While unripe fruits are green, they turn light brown and spread a strong sweet, fruity smell once ripe.

 

jackfruit jackfruit bulb

Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus). Golden-yellow color

edible aril (bulb).

(Photo courtesy: laughlin)

 

As in the durian fruit,As in the durian fruit, jackfruit's outer surface also is covered with blunt spikes which become soft as the fruit ripen.

 

Its interior consists of eye-catching orange-yellow color edible bulbs. Each bulb consists of sweet flesh (sheath) that encloses a smooth, oval, light-brown seed. There may be as many as 50 to 500 edible bulbs embedded in a single fruit interspersed in-between thin bands of fibers.

 

Jackfruit seed encased inside a thin, transparent outer cover. It largely composes of starch and protein. Each seed measures about 2 to 4 cm in length, and 1 to 3 cm in thickness.

 

Almost all the parts of the tree secrete white sticky latex-like milk (juice) upon infliction of injury.

 

Health benefits of jackfruit

 

100 g of edible jackfruit bulbs provide 95 calories. The fruit made of soft, easily digestible flesh (arils) made up of simple sugars like fructose and sucrose that when eaten replenishes energy and revitalizes the body instantly.

 

Jackfruit is rich in dietary fiber, which makes it a good bulk laxative. The fiber content helps protect the colon mucous membrane by binding to and eliminating cancer-causing chemicals from the colon.

 

The fresh fruit has small but significant amounts of vitamin-A, and flavonoid pigments such as carotene-ß, xanthin, lutein, and cryptoxanthin-ß. Together, these compounds play vital roles in antioxidant and vision functions. Vitamin-A also required for maintaining the integrity of mucosa and skin. Consumption of natural fruits rich in vitamin-A and carotenes has been found to protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.

 

Jackfruit is a good source of antioxidant vitamin-C, provides about 13.7 mg or 23% of RDA. Consumption of foods rich in vitamin-C helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful free radicals.

 

It is one of the rare fruits that is rich in a B-complex group of vitamins. It contains outstanding amounts of vitamin B-6 (pyridoxine), niacin, riboflavin, and folic acid.

 

Further, fresh fruit is a good source of potassium, magnesium, manganese, and iron. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure.

  

Jackfruit seeds

dried jackfruit seeds

 

Jackfruit seeds are indeed very rich in digestible starch, protein, and minerals. In general, the seeds are gathered from the ripe fruit during summer, sun-dried and stored for use during the rainy season in many parts of South-Indian states. Again, in these areas, jackfruit seeds can be employed in a variety of recipes where they are eaten either by roasting as a snack or added to stews (curries) in place of lentils.

 

Selection and storage

 

Jackfruit is a summer season fruit coinciding with other tropical favorites like mango, durian, and mangosteen.

 

In the stores, buy fruit that emits mild yet rich flavor and just yields to thumb pressure. Thorn-like projections become softer in the case of the ripe fruit. Once ripen, the fruit deteriorates rather quickly unless its processed arils (bulbs) stored in the refrigerator.

 

Preparation and serving method

 

Cut the fruit in a similar fashion like other large size fruits like breadfruit. White, gummy latex oozes from the cut ends even in ripe fruits but to a lesser extent than in green unripe one. This latex problem can be overcome by applying a little coconut oil on the hands while separating bulbs since protective gloves would not help.

 

Another great way of dealing with latex problem is mopping or rubbing the cut sections with a lemon slice or gently drowning in a bowl of acidulated water. Discard the thick rind that runs through the middle of the fruit, and the whole section is gently twisted few times to loosen individual arils (bulbs).

edible jackfruit bulbs

 

Each aril (bulb) is made of sweet, thick orange-yellow flesh; cut it open with a small knife or split the bulb with fingertips vertically. Inside each bulb, you find a thick light brown color seed; keep it aside and enjoy the delicious flesh (sheath).

 

Here are some serving tips:

 

Jackfruit bulbs have a unique flavor and sweet taste. Enjoy them without any additions to experience their rich taste.

 

Jackfruit slices hand-mixed with grated coconut, honey, banana slices is one of the wonderfully delicious dessert preparations commonly served on festive occasions in southern parts of India.

 

The fruit also used in jam, jelly and chutney preparations.

 

Fruit slices are a great addition to fruit salad.

 

Jackfruit seeds are a good source of protein and minerals; used like vegetables and pulses in curry (sabzi) preparation in several Asian countries.

 

Unripe green fruit employed like a vegetable in the preparation known as "kathal sabzi" in some North Indian states and "sayur nangka" in Indonesia.

info_ www.nutrition-and-you.com/jackfruit.html

... served with chapati and green chutney. Coconut yogurt on the side.

 

Red Bean Curry

 

2 cans of red kidney beans, drained and rinsed

1 28 ounce can of recipe ready tomatoes

1 large onion, small dice

1 large green pepper, diced

2 large cloves of garlic, peeled and minced

2 tbsp of a light tasting vegetable oil

1 bay leaf

3 cloves

3 cardamoms

1/2 tsp of cinnamon

2 tsp chili powder

1/2 tsp ground coriander

1 tsp cumin

2 tsp curry powder

1/2 tsp tumeric

3/4 tsp ground ginger

 

Heat the oil in a heavy pan. On medium heat saute the onions and green pepper until the mixture is soft. Add the garlic and the herbs and spices, stirring constantly for about a minute. Add the tomatoes and beans. Allow the mixture to simmer for 40 minutes. Add a 1/2 cup of vegetable broth if you find the sauce thickening too much.

 

Samosa Hash

 

2-3 tbsp of light tasting vegetable oil

2 large peeled potatoes, small dice

1 large carrot, peeled and shredded

1 medium onion, small dice

2 cloves of garlic, minced

1/2 cup each of peas and corn (frozen is fine

1 1/4 tbsp of lemon juice

1 1/2 tsp chili powder

1 1/2 tsp curry powder

1 tsp of red pepper powder to taste--you can use cayenne but use judiciously

1/2 tsp ground cumin

1/4 cup of vegetable broth

1/2 tsp salt

 

In a heavy pan with a lid, heat the oil on medium heat. Add the potatoes. Adjust heat to fry the potatoes until just about tender--about 15 minutes with regular flipping. Add the shredded carrot, onion and garlic and continue stirring and cooking until the potatoes are done. Stir in the spices, corn and peas and cook until fragrant--about a minute. Add the lemon juice. If the mixture seems dry just add a little vegetable broth. turn off the heat and cover the pan with the lid until ready to serve.

 

Don't use this image on websites, blogs, or other media without explicit permission :copyright: Colleen Watson-Turner

KODO MILLET UPMA RECIPE | VARAGU ARISI UPMA RECIPE

 

Recipe Link: asmallbite.com/kodo-millet-upma-recipe-varagu-arisi-upma-...

 

After all the festive celebrations and high calorie food intake, today I am sharing an easy kodo millet upma recipe. It is named as Varagu in Tamil, Arikelu in Telugu, Kodra in Hindi and Harka in Kannada. The health benefits of this millet is numerous and it was used in India 3000 years ago. It is very high in protein, fibre, it has low fat, so helps in weight loss and it is gluten free also. For busy mornings, this varagu arisi upma recipe can be prepared plain also without any veggies and a spoonful of sugar is enough to enjoy your breakfast. But it tastes too good with coconut chutney, tiffin sambar and onion chutney.

Jodhpur (/ˈdʒɒdpʊər/ About this sound Listen (help·info)) is the second largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan. After its population crossed a million, it has been declared as the second "Metropolitan City" of Rajasthan. It was formerly the seat of a princely state of the same name, the capital of the kingdom known as Marwar. Jodhpur is a popular tourist destination, featuring many palaces, forts and temples, set in the stark landscape of the Thar Desert.

 

The city is known as the "Sun City" for the bright, sunny weather it enjoys all the year round. It is also referred to as the "Blue City" due to the vivid blue-painted houses around the Mehrangarh Fort. The old city circles the fort and is bounded by a wall with several gates. However, the city has expanded greatly outside the wall over the past several decades. Jodhpur lies near the geographic centre of Rajasthan state, which makes it a convenient base for travel in a region much frequented by tourists.

 

Jodhpur topped Lonely Planet's list of most extraordinary places to stay in 2013. Tamil movie, I, which is the costliest Indian film to date, was also shot at Jodhpur.

 

HISTORY

According to Rajasthan district Gazetteers of Jodhpur and the Hindu epic Ramayana (composed up to the 4th century AD), Abhiras (Ahirs) were the original inhabitants of Jodhpur and later Aryans spread to this region.

 

Jodhpur was also part of the Gurjara–Pratihara Empire and until 1100 CE was ruled by a powerful Gurjar King. Jodhpur was founded in 1459 by Rao Jodha, a Rajput chief of the Rathore clan. Jodha succeeded in conquering the surrounding territory and thus founded a state which came to be known as Marwar. As Jodha hailed from the nearby town of Mandore, that town initially served as the capital of this state; however, Jodhpur soon took over that role, even during the lifetime of Jodha. The city was located on the strategic road linking Delhi to Gujarat. This enabled it to profit from a flourishing trade in opium, copper, silk, sandals, date palms and coffee.

 

In between 1540 to 1556, Afghans were in control of most of North India. Rajasthan born Hemu who started his career as a supplier of various types of merchandise to Sher Shah Suri empire, held various positions in capital Delhi as 'Incharge of Food Affairs', 'Minister of Internal Security', 'Prime Minister-cum-Chief of Army' with Islam Shah Suri and Adil Shah, who ruled north India from Punjab to Bengal at that point in time. Hemu, who took as the military commander of Afghan army in 1553, crushed the first rebellion, killing the Governor of Ajmer province Juneid Khan and appointed his own Governor in Rajasthan. Hem Chandra won several battles (22) throughout North India against Afghan rebels and twice against Akbar at Agra and Delhi, before his coronation at Purana Quila in Delhi on 7 October 1556 as a 'Vikramaditya' king. Hemu lost his life in the Second Battle of Panipat on 5 November 1556, and the area came under Mughal king Akbar.

 

Early in its history, the state became a fief under the Mughal Empire, owing fealty to them while enjoying some internal autonomy. During this period, the state furnished the Mughals with several notable generals such as Maharaja Jaswant Singh. Jodhpur and its people benefited from this exposure to the wider world: new styles of art and architecture made their appearance and opportunities opened up for local tradesmen to make their mark across northern India.

Aurangzeb briefly sequestrated the state (c.1679) on the pretext of a minority, but the rightful ruler Maharaja Ajit Singh was restored to the throne by Veer Durgadas Rathore after Aurangzeb died in 1707 and a great struggle of 30 years. The Mughal empire declined gradually after 1707, but the Jodhpur court was beset by intrigue; rather than benefiting from circumstances, Marwar descended into strife and invited the intervention of the Marathas, who soon supplanted the Mughals as overlords of the region. This did not make for stability or peace, however; 50 years of wars and treaties dissipated the wealth of the state, which sought and gratefully entered into subsidiary alliance with the British in 1818.

 

During the British Raj, the state of Jodhpur had the largest land area of any in Rajputana. Jodhpur prospered under the peace and stability that were a hallmark of this era. The land area of the state was 60,980 km2 its population in 1901 was 44,73,759. It enjoyed an estimated revenue of £35,29,000/. Its merchants, the Marwaris, flourished without let or limit and came to occupy a position of dominance in trade across India. In 1947, when India became independent, the state merged into the union of India and Jodhpur became the second city of Rajasthan.

 

At the time of partition, ruler of Jodhpur Hanwant Singh did not want to join India, but finally due to the effective persuasion of Sardar Vallab Patel, the then Home Minister at the centre, the princely state of Jodhpur was included in Indian Republic. Later after State Reorganisation Act, 1956 it was made part of the state of Rajasthan.

 

DEMOGRAPHICS

As per provisional reports of Census India, population of Jodhpur is 1,033,918 in 2011; of which male and female nearly constitute 52.62 percent and 47.38 percent respectively. Average literacy rate of Jodhpur city is 81.56 percent of which male and female literacy was 88.42 and 73.93 percent respectively. Total children under 6 years of age constitute nearly 12.24 percent of city population. Jodhpur city is governed by Municipal Corporation which comes under Jodhpur Urban Agglomeration. The Jodhpur Urban/Metropolitan area include Jodhpur, Kuri Bhagtasani, Mandore Industrial Area, Nandri, Pal Village and Sangariya. Its Urban/Metropolitan population is 1,137,815 of which 599,332 are males and 538,483 are females,On the date: 01/07/2015 the record of citypopulation.de website shows Jodhpur city is having Population of 1,300,000

 

CLIMATE

The climate of Jodhpur is generally hot and semi-arid, but with a rainy season from late June to September (Köppen BShw). Although the average rainfall is around 450 millimetres, it is extraordinarily variable. In the famine year of 1899, Jodhpur received only 24 millimetres, but in the flood year 1917 it received as much as 1,178 millimetres.

 

Temperatures are extreme throughout the period from March to October, except when monsoonal rain produces thick clouds to lower it slightly. In the months of April, May and June, high temperatures routinely exceed 40 degrees Celsius. During the monsoon season, average temperatures decrease slightly. However, the city's generally low humidity rises and this adds to the normal discomfort from the heat. Phalodi, near Jodhpur, is the driest place of the district as well as in the state.

 

ECONOMY

The Handicrafts industry has in recent years eclipsed all other industries in the city. By some estimates, the furniture export segment is a $200 million industry, directly or indirectly employing as many as 200,000 people. Other items manufactured include textiles, metal utensils, bicycles, ink and sporting goods. A flourishing cottage industry exists for the manufacture of such items as glass bangles, cutlery, carpets and marble products.

 

After handicrafts, tourism is the second largest industry of Jodhpur. Crops grown in the district include wheat and the famous Mathania red chillies. Gypsum and salt are mined. The city serves as an important marketplace for wool and agricultural products. The Indian Air Force, Indian Army, Indo Tibetan Border Police and Border Security Force maintain training centres in Jodhpur.

 

The administration of Jodhpur consists of a District Collector, followed by 4 Additional District Magistrates (I, II, Land Conversion and City ADM). Presently, the Collector and District Magistrate is Dr. Preetam B. Yashwant (IAS). The city is also under Police Commissioner system, with Mr. Ashok Rathore (IPS) as Police Commissioner of the city.

 

The upcoming 9 MMTPA Refinery and Petrochemical complex to be set up by Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) in Pachpadra, Barmer will transform the industrial scene of the city drastically. Pachpadra lies just 60 kilometres from the industrial area of Boranada in Jodhpur. Around 120 by-products that are produced by the refinery are going to provide opportunities for new industries to be set up in and around Jodhpur.

 

India's most ambitious industrial development project, the over USD 100 dollars Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Project is also going to impact industry in Jodhpur. Marwar Junction which is located about 100 kilometres from Jodhpur will be one of the nine freight loading points along the DMIC route. Jodhpur and Pali districts fall under the region that is going to be developed as a manufacturing hub for the DMIC.

 

STRATEDIC LOCATION

Jodhpur is the most important city of western Rajasthan and lies about 250 kilometres from the border with Pakistan. This location makes it an important base for the Indian army, Indian Air Force and Border Security Force (BSF). Jodhpur's air base is Asia's largest and one of the most critical and strategically located (Jodhpur Airport played the crucial role during Indo-Pakistan wars in 1965 &1971) airbases of the IAF deployed with fighter jets Sukhoi Su-30MKI and Advanced Light Helicopters Dhruv.

 

CULTURE

The city is famous for its food and its popularity can be judged from the fact that one can find sweet shops named 'Jodhpur Sweets' in many cities throughout India. Being at the onshore of Thar desert, life has been influenced with ways of the desert folks (gypsies can be found in many parts of the city).

 

TOURISM

Jodhpur's attractions include Mehrangarh Fort, Umaid Bhawan Palace, Jaswant Thada, Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower) and Flying Fox (Mehrangarh Fort). Tourists can make excursions to Mandore, Kaylana Lake and Garden, Balsamand Lake, Santoshi Mata Temple, Mahamandir, Siddhnath Mahadev, Achalnath Mahadev, Udai Mandir, Mandaleshwar Mahadev Temple (Mandalnath), Ratanada Ganesh Temple, Sardar Samand Lake and Palace, Masooria Hills, Rai Ka Bagh Palace, Veer Durgadas Smarak (monument, park and museum), Bhim Bhirak Cave.

 

The beautiful historic buildings and scenic landscapes of the city were featured in major films including The Dark Knight Rises directed by Christopher Nolan, and The Fall directed by Tarsem Singh, Hum Saath Saath Hain, Veer, and Shuddh Desi Romance. More recently, there have been many high-profile celebrations in the city including many celebrity weddings. This has given an impetus to a nascent lavish wedding industry and increased tourism.

 

CUISINE

A number of Indian delicacies have originated in Jodhpur. To name a few, the Makhaniya Lassi, Mawa Ki Kachori, Pyaaj Ki Kachori, Hot & Spicy Mirchi Bada (A preparation made with potato, onion, chilli and gramflour), Dal Bati Churma (dal is lentils; bati is baked wheat ball; and churma is powdered sweetened cereal), Lasan Ki Chutney (hot fiery garlic chutney), Mirchi Ka Kutaa (hot recipe of crushed green chilies), Gatte Ki Sabzi (A delicacy made up of gramflour balls, curd and spices), Ker Sangri Sabzi (also known as Pachkutaa - the five ingredients of Pachkutaa are sangri, ker, kumatiya, dried goonda and dried red chillies), Raab (pearl millet flour and yoghurt curry), Lapsi (a special kind of dessert made with cracked wheat, Jaggery, coconut and ghee), Aate Ka Halwa (wheat flour dessert), Kachara Mircha Sabzi (made with chilli and Kachara, a special type of vegetable grown in desert area) and Kadhi Pakoda (recipe made with gramflour, curd and chilli) with Baajre Ka Sogra (a thick flat and round bread of pearl millet). Jodhpur is known for its sweets ranging from traditional "Makhanbada", "Mawa Ki Kachori", "Malpua", "Ghevar", "Motichur Ke Laddu", "Besan barfi", "Thorr" and "Gulab Jamun" to Bengali "Rasgulla" and "Ras Malai" prepared by a traditional house "Jodhpur Sweets".

 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Jodhpur is fast becoming a major education hub for higher studies in India. Almost every major discipline has a dedicated institution in the city, with disciplines varying from Engineering, Medicine, Law, Design among others. With many renowned academicians, Jodhpur is also India's largest hub for preparation of the CA(Chartered Accountant) entrance examination held throughout India by ICAI (The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India).

 

TRANSPORTATION

The city has well established rail, road and air networks connecting it to other major cities of the country.

 

RAILWAYS

Jodhpur railway station is the divisional headquarters of the North Western Railways (NWR). It is well connected with railways to major Indian cities like Alwar, Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bangalore, Trivandrum, Pune, Kota, Kanpur, Bareilly, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad, Indore, Bhopal, Dhanbad, Guwahati, Nagpur, Lucknow, Gwalior, Jaipur etc. To decongest the main Jodhpur station (JU), the suburban station Bhagat ki Kothi (BGKT) is being developed as the second main station for passenger trains. At present 106 trains serves to both the stations. Some of the important trains originating from Jodhpur railway station are- Ranthambore Express (Jodhpur to Indore), Mandore Express (Jodhpur to Delhi), Suryanagri Express (Jodhpur to Mumbai), Marudhar Express (Jodhpur to Lucknow), Howrah Superfast (From Jodhpur to Howrah) etc.

 

For further train running information, timings, halts etc. visit the official website of Indian Railways

 

Luxury train service- For experiencing the true magnificence and royal opulence of Rajasthan, luxury trains Palace on Wheels and Royal Rajasthan on Wheels are run jointly by RTDC and Indian railways. Jodhpur is one of the destinations of both of the trains. Recently a plan to start metro train service in jodhpur was proposed to decongest the city traffic.however the proposal is still pending with state government for its approval.

 

AIR

Jodhpur Airport is one of the prominent airports of Rajasthan. The airport is due for being transformed into an international airport. The work on which is going to start very soon. At present, there are daily flights from Delhi Mumbai and banglore to the city operated by Air India and Jet Airways.

 

ROAD

Jodhpur is connected by road to all major cities in Rajasthan and neighbouring states like Delhi, Ahmedabad, Surat, Ujjain, Agra etc. Apart from deluxe and express bus services to cities within the state, Rajasthan Roadways provides Volvo & Mercedes Benz bus service to Delhi, Ahmedabad, Jaipur, Udaipur and Jaisalmer (click here for time table and reservations). Recently, Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS) is launched in the city with low floor and semi low floor buses plying on major routes. Jodhpur is connected to the National Highway network with three National Highways and to the Rajasthan State Highway network with ten state highways. National Highways passing through Jodhpur:

 

WIKIPEDIA

Jodhpur (/ˈdʒɒdpʊər/ About this sound Listen (help·info)) is the second largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan. After its population crossed a million, it has been declared as the second "Metropolitan City" of Rajasthan. It was formerly the seat of a princely state of the same name, the capital of the kingdom known as Marwar. Jodhpur is a popular tourist destination, featuring many palaces, forts and temples, set in the stark landscape of the Thar Desert.

 

The city is known as the "Sun City" for the bright, sunny weather it enjoys all the year round. It is also referred to as the "Blue City" due to the vivid blue-painted houses around the Mehrangarh Fort. The old city circles the fort and is bounded by a wall with several gates. However, the city has expanded greatly outside the wall over the past several decades. Jodhpur lies near the geographic centre of Rajasthan state, which makes it a convenient base for travel in a region much frequented by tourists.

 

Jodhpur topped Lonely Planet's list of most extraordinary places to stay in 2013. Tamil movie, I, which is the costliest Indian film to date, was also shot at Jodhpur.

 

HISTORY

According to Rajasthan district Gazetteers of Jodhpur and the Hindu epic Ramayana (composed up to the 4th century AD), Abhiras (Ahirs) were the original inhabitants of Jodhpur and later Aryans spread to this region.

 

Jodhpur was also part of the Gurjara–Pratihara Empire and until 1100 CE was ruled by a powerful Gurjar King. Jodhpur was founded in 1459 by Rao Jodha, a Rajput chief of the Rathore clan. Jodha succeeded in conquering the surrounding territory and thus founded a state which came to be known as Marwar. As Jodha hailed from the nearby town of Mandore, that town initially served as the capital of this state; however, Jodhpur soon took over that role, even during the lifetime of Jodha. The city was located on the strategic road linking Delhi to Gujarat. This enabled it to profit from a flourishing trade in opium, copper, silk, sandals, date palms and coffee.

 

In between 1540 to 1556, Afghans were in control of most of North India. Rajasthan born Hemu who started his career as a supplier of various types of merchandise to Sher Shah Suri empire, held various positions in capital Delhi as 'Incharge of Food Affairs', 'Minister of Internal Security', 'Prime Minister-cum-Chief of Army' with Islam Shah Suri and Adil Shah, who ruled north India from Punjab to Bengal at that point in time. Hemu, who took as the military commander of Afghan army in 1553, crushed the first rebellion, killing the Governor of Ajmer province Juneid Khan and appointed his own Governor in Rajasthan. Hem Chandra won several battles (22) throughout North India against Afghan rebels and twice against Akbar at Agra and Delhi, before his coronation at Purana Quila in Delhi on 7 October 1556 as a 'Vikramaditya' king. Hemu lost his life in the Second Battle of Panipat on 5 November 1556, and the area came under Mughal king Akbar.

 

Early in its history, the state became a fief under the Mughal Empire, owing fealty to them while enjoying some internal autonomy. During this period, the state furnished the Mughals with several notable generals such as Maharaja Jaswant Singh. Jodhpur and its people benefited from this exposure to the wider world: new styles of art and architecture made their appearance and opportunities opened up for local tradesmen to make their mark across northern India.

Aurangzeb briefly sequestrated the state (c.1679) on the pretext of a minority, but the rightful ruler Maharaja Ajit Singh was restored to the throne by Veer Durgadas Rathore after Aurangzeb died in 1707 and a great struggle of 30 years. The Mughal empire declined gradually after 1707, but the Jodhpur court was beset by intrigue; rather than benefiting from circumstances, Marwar descended into strife and invited the intervention of the Marathas, who soon supplanted the Mughals as overlords of the region. This did not make for stability or peace, however; 50 years of wars and treaties dissipated the wealth of the state, which sought and gratefully entered into subsidiary alliance with the British in 1818.

 

During the British Raj, the state of Jodhpur had the largest land area of any in Rajputana. Jodhpur prospered under the peace and stability that were a hallmark of this era. The land area of the state was 60,980 km2 its population in 1901 was 44,73,759. It enjoyed an estimated revenue of £35,29,000/. Its merchants, the Marwaris, flourished without let or limit and came to occupy a position of dominance in trade across India. In 1947, when India became independent, the state merged into the union of India and Jodhpur became the second city of Rajasthan.

 

At the time of partition, ruler of Jodhpur Hanwant Singh did not want to join India, but finally due to the effective persuasion of Sardar Vallab Patel, the then Home Minister at the centre, the princely state of Jodhpur was included in Indian Republic. Later after State Reorganisation Act, 1956 it was made part of the state of Rajasthan.

 

DEMOGRAPHICS

As per provisional reports of Census India, population of Jodhpur is 1,033,918 in 2011; of which male and female nearly constitute 52.62 percent and 47.38 percent respectively. Average literacy rate of Jodhpur city is 81.56 percent of which male and female literacy was 88.42 and 73.93 percent respectively. Total children under 6 years of age constitute nearly 12.24 percent of city population. Jodhpur city is governed by Municipal Corporation which comes under Jodhpur Urban Agglomeration. The Jodhpur Urban/Metropolitan area include Jodhpur, Kuri Bhagtasani, Mandore Industrial Area, Nandri, Pal Village and Sangariya. Its Urban/Metropolitan population is 1,137,815 of which 599,332 are males and 538,483 are females,On the date: 01/07/2015 the record of citypopulation.de website shows Jodhpur city is having Population of 1,300,000

 

CLIMATE

The climate of Jodhpur is generally hot and semi-arid, but with a rainy season from late June to September (Köppen BShw). Although the average rainfall is around 450 millimetres, it is extraordinarily variable. In the famine year of 1899, Jodhpur received only 24 millimetres, but in the flood year 1917 it received as much as 1,178 millimetres.

 

Temperatures are extreme throughout the period from March to October, except when monsoonal rain produces thick clouds to lower it slightly. In the months of April, May and June, high temperatures routinely exceed 40 degrees Celsius. During the monsoon season, average temperatures decrease slightly. However, the city's generally low humidity rises and this adds to the normal discomfort from the heat. Phalodi, near Jodhpur, is the driest place of the district as well as in the state.

 

ECONOMY

The Handicrafts industry has in recent years eclipsed all other industries in the city. By some estimates, the furniture export segment is a $200 million industry, directly or indirectly employing as many as 200,000 people. Other items manufactured include textiles, metal utensils, bicycles, ink and sporting goods. A flourishing cottage industry exists for the manufacture of such items as glass bangles, cutlery, carpets and marble products.

 

After handicrafts, tourism is the second largest industry of Jodhpur. Crops grown in the district include wheat and the famous Mathania red chillies. Gypsum and salt are mined. The city serves as an important marketplace for wool and agricultural products. The Indian Air Force, Indian Army, Indo Tibetan Border Police and Border Security Force maintain training centres in Jodhpur.

 

The administration of Jodhpur consists of a District Collector, followed by 4 Additional District Magistrates (I, II, Land Conversion and City ADM). Presently, the Collector and District Magistrate is Dr. Preetam B. Yashwant (IAS). The city is also under Police Commissioner system, with Mr. Ashok Rathore (IPS) as Police Commissioner of the city.

 

The upcoming 9 MMTPA Refinery and Petrochemical complex to be set up by Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) in Pachpadra, Barmer will transform the industrial scene of the city drastically. Pachpadra lies just 60 kilometres from the industrial area of Boranada in Jodhpur. Around 120 by-products that are produced by the refinery are going to provide opportunities for new industries to be set up in and around Jodhpur.

 

India's most ambitious industrial development project, the over USD 100 dollars Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Project is also going to impact industry in Jodhpur. Marwar Junction which is located about 100 kilometres from Jodhpur will be one of the nine freight loading points along the DMIC route. Jodhpur and Pali districts fall under the region that is going to be developed as a manufacturing hub for the DMIC.

 

STRATEDIC LOCATION

Jodhpur is the most important city of western Rajasthan and lies about 250 kilometres from the border with Pakistan. This location makes it an important base for the Indian army, Indian Air Force and Border Security Force (BSF). Jodhpur's air base is Asia's largest and one of the most critical and strategically located (Jodhpur Airport played the crucial role during Indo-Pakistan wars in 1965 &1971) airbases of the IAF deployed with fighter jets Sukhoi Su-30MKI and Advanced Light Helicopters Dhruv.

 

CULTURE

The city is famous for its food and its popularity can be judged from the fact that one can find sweet shops named 'Jodhpur Sweets' in many cities throughout India. Being at the onshore of Thar desert, life has been influenced with ways of the desert folks (gypsies can be found in many parts of the city).

 

TOURISM

Jodhpur's attractions include Mehrangarh Fort, Umaid Bhawan Palace, Jaswant Thada, Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower) and Flying Fox (Mehrangarh Fort). Tourists can make excursions to Mandore, Kaylana Lake and Garden, Balsamand Lake, Santoshi Mata Temple, Mahamandir, Siddhnath Mahadev, Achalnath Mahadev, Udai Mandir, Mandaleshwar Mahadev Temple (Mandalnath), Ratanada Ganesh Temple, Sardar Samand Lake and Palace, Masooria Hills, Rai Ka Bagh Palace, Veer Durgadas Smarak (monument, park and museum), Bhim Bhirak Cave.

 

The beautiful historic buildings and scenic landscapes of the city were featured in major films including The Dark Knight Rises directed by Christopher Nolan, and The Fall directed by Tarsem Singh, Hum Saath Saath Hain, Veer, and Shuddh Desi Romance. More recently, there have been many high-profile celebrations in the city including many celebrity weddings. This has given an impetus to a nascent lavish wedding industry and increased tourism.

 

CUISINE

A number of Indian delicacies have originated in Jodhpur. To name a few, the Makhaniya Lassi, Mawa Ki Kachori, Pyaaj Ki Kachori, Hot & Spicy Mirchi Bada (A preparation made with potato, onion, chilli and gramflour), Dal Bati Churma (dal is lentils; bati is baked wheat ball; and churma is powdered sweetened cereal), Lasan Ki Chutney (hot fiery garlic chutney), Mirchi Ka Kutaa (hot recipe of crushed green chilies), Gatte Ki Sabzi (A delicacy made up of gramflour balls, curd and spices), Ker Sangri Sabzi (also known as Pachkutaa - the five ingredients of Pachkutaa are sangri, ker, kumatiya, dried goonda and dried red chillies), Raab (pearl millet flour and yoghurt curry), Lapsi (a special kind of dessert made with cracked wheat, Jaggery, coconut and ghee), Aate Ka Halwa (wheat flour dessert), Kachara Mircha Sabzi (made with chilli and Kachara, a special type of vegetable grown in desert area) and Kadhi Pakoda (recipe made with gramflour, curd and chilli) with Baajre Ka Sogra (a thick flat and round bread of pearl millet). Jodhpur is known for its sweets ranging from traditional "Makhanbada", "Mawa Ki Kachori", "Malpua", "Ghevar", "Motichur Ke Laddu", "Besan barfi", "Thorr" and "Gulab Jamun" to Bengali "Rasgulla" and "Ras Malai" prepared by a traditional house "Jodhpur Sweets".

 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Jodhpur is fast becoming a major education hub for higher studies in India. Almost every major discipline has a dedicated institution in the city, with disciplines varying from Engineering, Medicine, Law, Design among others. With many renowned academicians, Jodhpur is also India's largest hub for preparation of the CA(Chartered Accountant) entrance examination held throughout India by ICAI (The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India).

 

TRANSPORTATION

The city has well established rail, road and air networks connecting it to other major cities of the country.

 

RAILWAYS

Jodhpur railway station is the divisional headquarters of the North Western Railways (NWR). It is well connected with railways to major Indian cities like Alwar, Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bangalore, Trivandrum, Pune, Kota, Kanpur, Bareilly, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad, Indore, Bhopal, Dhanbad, Guwahati, Nagpur, Lucknow, Gwalior, Jaipur etc. To decongest the main Jodhpur station (JU), the suburban station Bhagat ki Kothi (BGKT) is being developed as the second main station for passenger trains. At present 106 trains serves to both the stations. Some of the important trains originating from Jodhpur railway station are- Ranthambore Express (Jodhpur to Indore), Mandore Express (Jodhpur to Delhi), Suryanagri Express (Jodhpur to Mumbai), Marudhar Express (Jodhpur to Lucknow), Howrah Superfast (From Jodhpur to Howrah) etc.

 

For further train running information, timings, halts etc. visit the official website of Indian Railways

 

Luxury train service- For experiencing the true magnificence and royal opulence of Rajasthan, luxury trains Palace on Wheels and Royal Rajasthan on Wheels are run jointly by RTDC and Indian railways. Jodhpur is one of the destinations of both of the trains. Recently a plan to start metro train service in jodhpur was proposed to decongest the city traffic.however the proposal is still pending with state government for its approval.

 

AIR

Jodhpur Airport is one of the prominent airports of Rajasthan. The airport is due for being transformed into an international airport. The work on which is going to start very soon. At present, there are daily flights from Delhi Mumbai and banglore to the city operated by Air India and Jet Airways.

 

ROAD

Jodhpur is connected by road to all major cities in Rajasthan and neighbouring states like Delhi, Ahmedabad, Surat, Ujjain, Agra etc. Apart from deluxe and express bus services to cities within the state, Rajasthan Roadways provides Volvo & Mercedes Benz bus service to Delhi, Ahmedabad, Jaipur, Udaipur and Jaisalmer (click here for time table and reservations). Recently, Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS) is launched in the city with low floor and semi low floor buses plying on major routes. Jodhpur is connected to the National Highway network with three National Highways and to the Rajasthan State Highway network with ten state highways. National Highways passing through Jodhpur:

 

WIKIPEDIA

Approx: 10 min. Lunch

 

Salmon Gourmet Chutney ,Dressing,Salad

 

Method for Salmon Sauce Chutney and Salad Dressing :

 

In a mixing bowl add the following:

  

1 table spoon of Raw unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar (Bitter Tart}

 

1 table spoon of Lime or Lemon Juice (Sour)

 

Add ½ tea spoon of ground Mustard Powder (Hot)

 

1 table spoon of Raw unfiltered Honey (Sweet)

 

Tip: Stir and taste to see if it brings a Smile to Your Face ?

Remember that all people have different taste buds even in the slightest of degree.

Make adjustments to the desire of your taste using the 4 ingredients above until your Smile spreads from ear to ear. Great!

 

Optional: if you desire Salty then you can add a bit of Sea Salt or do what I do add a bit of SOLE ( A glass jar of water an already disolved pure christal rock of Himalayan Pink Sea Salt)

For the Thai people or persons liking it spicy and hot a little sprinkle of Chili Powder will bring out the effect your looking for.

 

Note Food for Thought:

 

To prove that all people have different taste buds ,just consider the following scenario.

If 100 people sat down to order a meal from the restaurant menu and the menu contained 100 choices. It would be extremely remote that all or even most people would order the same thing on the menu am I right?

 

Of course people have different dislikes and likes and cravings for a certain taste in foods that they eat. So it would be fare to say that the choices would be varied as much as the people ordering of the menu.

 

The whole structure and purpose of the way my Recipes are presented to you is to give you the opportunity to create your own recipes to your liking and taste. To give you lots of options to create and to explore exciting new possibilities of your own personal Gourmet Foods presentation. Remember when it comes to Gourmet Cuisine I do not believe the recipe should be written in Stone. The recipe in my view serves as a guide only to bring out the Gourmet in YOU.

 

I encourage you to be your Own Gourmet Health Guru Master Chef , to have fun and to share your Recipe ideas to every one around you.

 

Many 5 star Hotel chefs will taste prepare ,taste prepare to more or a lesser degree to make sure that the meal passes the taste test before it is served to the valued customer.

So it is a good practice to get into and after a while you will get used to it and it will become second nature to you.

 

Make your food choices Whole and Natural and taste test in your preparations when necessary and you will soon become your own Gourmet Food Expert at Heart with passion.

 

Chutney Herb Dressing preparation: Add one table spoon of each chopped fresh green herbs to the mixing bowl. Rosemary, Sage, and Mint

 

These herbs are very pungent and the flavors will blend together and uplift the senses when you start adding your Salmon Sauce to the Herbs and taste with your personal adjustments.

Put the rest of the herb dressing to the side.

 

Tossed Salad Ingredients:

 

Put a hand full of your favorite chopped greens into your mixing bowl.

Add some shaved Fresh Beet Root

Toss in a few cherrie tomatoes

 

Add loosely some soybean sprouts raw

 

For Temperate Zones Western : Add chopped apple with skins if (Organic) without skins if conventional ,put the other half aside.

Now toss your salad and add slowly your Temperate Zone Cold Pressed Olive Oil or your Salmon Salad Dressing toss again and taste.

Now to your satisfaction shave the other half Apple to the top of your Salad in layers.

  

For Tropical Zones Eastern : Cut 1 inch thick fresh Pineapple discard tough skins , and cut into small pieces and add to the salad and toss.

Add your Tropical Zone Cold Pressed Coconut Oil or Salmon Salad Dressing.

Sprinkle more Soy Bean sprouts on top.

 

Health Tip: Any left over Salmon Dressing can be stored in your refrigerator for further toppings to be used up in 2 days. You can sprinkle Bee Pollen and add your favorite nuts and milled seed over your salad for added superior Nutrition as well.

 

You will find below all the information you need for Steaming your Salmon Fish Fillet.

“Enjoy”

        

Step by step pictures showing how to make onion+tomato chutney. 2 minutes chutney that nobody'll believe you made them in a hurry!

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/08/quick-and-easy-spicy-chutne...

Jodhpur (/ˈdʒɒdpʊər/ About this sound Listen (help·info)) is the second largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan. After its population crossed a million, it has been declared as the second "Metropolitan City" of Rajasthan. It was formerly the seat of a princely state of the same name, the capital of the kingdom known as Marwar. Jodhpur is a popular tourist destination, featuring many palaces, forts and temples, set in the stark landscape of the Thar Desert.

 

The city is known as the "Sun City" for the bright, sunny weather it enjoys all the year round. It is also referred to as the "Blue City" due to the vivid blue-painted houses around the Mehrangarh Fort. The old city circles the fort and is bounded by a wall with several gates. However, the city has expanded greatly outside the wall over the past several decades. Jodhpur lies near the geographic centre of Rajasthan state, which makes it a convenient base for travel in a region much frequented by tourists.

 

Jodhpur topped Lonely Planet's list of most extraordinary places to stay in 2013. Tamil movie, I, which is the costliest Indian film to date, was also shot at Jodhpur.

 

HISTORY

According to Rajasthan district Gazetteers of Jodhpur and the Hindu epic Ramayana (composed up to the 4th century AD), Abhiras (Ahirs) were the original inhabitants of Jodhpur and later Aryans spread to this region.

 

Jodhpur was also part of the Gurjara–Pratihara Empire and until 1100 CE was ruled by a powerful Gurjar King. Jodhpur was founded in 1459 by Rao Jodha, a Rajput chief of the Rathore clan. Jodha succeeded in conquering the surrounding territory and thus founded a state which came to be known as Marwar. As Jodha hailed from the nearby town of Mandore, that town initially served as the capital of this state; however, Jodhpur soon took over that role, even during the lifetime of Jodha. The city was located on the strategic road linking Delhi to Gujarat. This enabled it to profit from a flourishing trade in opium, copper, silk, sandals, date palms and coffee.

 

In between 1540 to 1556, Afghans were in control of most of North India. Rajasthan born Hemu who started his career as a supplier of various types of merchandise to Sher Shah Suri empire, held various positions in capital Delhi as 'Incharge of Food Affairs', 'Minister of Internal Security', 'Prime Minister-cum-Chief of Army' with Islam Shah Suri and Adil Shah, who ruled north India from Punjab to Bengal at that point in time. Hemu, who took as the military commander of Afghan army in 1553, crushed the first rebellion, killing the Governor of Ajmer province Juneid Khan and appointed his own Governor in Rajasthan. Hem Chandra won several battles (22) throughout North India against Afghan rebels and twice against Akbar at Agra and Delhi, before his coronation at Purana Quila in Delhi on 7 October 1556 as a 'Vikramaditya' king. Hemu lost his life in the Second Battle of Panipat on 5 November 1556, and the area came under Mughal king Akbar.

 

Early in its history, the state became a fief under the Mughal Empire, owing fealty to them while enjoying some internal autonomy. During this period, the state furnished the Mughals with several notable generals such as Maharaja Jaswant Singh. Jodhpur and its people benefited from this exposure to the wider world: new styles of art and architecture made their appearance and opportunities opened up for local tradesmen to make their mark across northern India.

Aurangzeb briefly sequestrated the state (c.1679) on the pretext of a minority, but the rightful ruler Maharaja Ajit Singh was restored to the throne by Veer Durgadas Rathore after Aurangzeb died in 1707 and a great struggle of 30 years. The Mughal empire declined gradually after 1707, but the Jodhpur court was beset by intrigue; rather than benefiting from circumstances, Marwar descended into strife and invited the intervention of the Marathas, who soon supplanted the Mughals as overlords of the region. This did not make for stability or peace, however; 50 years of wars and treaties dissipated the wealth of the state, which sought and gratefully entered into subsidiary alliance with the British in 1818.

 

During the British Raj, the state of Jodhpur had the largest land area of any in Rajputana. Jodhpur prospered under the peace and stability that were a hallmark of this era. The land area of the state was 60,980 km2 its population in 1901 was 44,73,759. It enjoyed an estimated revenue of £35,29,000/. Its merchants, the Marwaris, flourished without let or limit and came to occupy a position of dominance in trade across India. In 1947, when India became independent, the state merged into the union of India and Jodhpur became the second city of Rajasthan.

 

At the time of partition, ruler of Jodhpur Hanwant Singh did not want to join India, but finally due to the effective persuasion of Sardar Vallab Patel, the then Home Minister at the centre, the princely state of Jodhpur was included in Indian Republic. Later after State Reorganisation Act, 1956 it was made part of the state of Rajasthan.

 

DEMOGRAPHICS

As per provisional reports of Census India, population of Jodhpur is 1,033,918 in 2011; of which male and female nearly constitute 52.62 percent and 47.38 percent respectively. Average literacy rate of Jodhpur city is 81.56 percent of which male and female literacy was 88.42 and 73.93 percent respectively. Total children under 6 years of age constitute nearly 12.24 percent of city population. Jodhpur city is governed by Municipal Corporation which comes under Jodhpur Urban Agglomeration. The Jodhpur Urban/Metropolitan area include Jodhpur, Kuri Bhagtasani, Mandore Industrial Area, Nandri, Pal Village and Sangariya. Its Urban/Metropolitan population is 1,137,815 of which 599,332 are males and 538,483 are females,On the date: 01/07/2015 the record of citypopulation.de website shows Jodhpur city is having Population of 1,300,000

 

CLIMATE

The climate of Jodhpur is generally hot and semi-arid, but with a rainy season from late June to September (Köppen BShw). Although the average rainfall is around 450 millimetres, it is extraordinarily variable. In the famine year of 1899, Jodhpur received only 24 millimetres, but in the flood year 1917 it received as much as 1,178 millimetres.

 

Temperatures are extreme throughout the period from March to October, except when monsoonal rain produces thick clouds to lower it slightly. In the months of April, May and June, high temperatures routinely exceed 40 degrees Celsius. During the monsoon season, average temperatures decrease slightly. However, the city's generally low humidity rises and this adds to the normal discomfort from the heat. Phalodi, near Jodhpur, is the driest place of the district as well as in the state.

 

ECONOMY

The Handicrafts industry has in recent years eclipsed all other industries in the city. By some estimates, the furniture export segment is a $200 million industry, directly or indirectly employing as many as 200,000 people. Other items manufactured include textiles, metal utensils, bicycles, ink and sporting goods. A flourishing cottage industry exists for the manufacture of such items as glass bangles, cutlery, carpets and marble products.

 

After handicrafts, tourism is the second largest industry of Jodhpur. Crops grown in the district include wheat and the famous Mathania red chillies. Gypsum and salt are mined. The city serves as an important marketplace for wool and agricultural products. The Indian Air Force, Indian Army, Indo Tibetan Border Police and Border Security Force maintain training centres in Jodhpur.

 

The administration of Jodhpur consists of a District Collector, followed by 4 Additional District Magistrates (I, II, Land Conversion and City ADM). Presently, the Collector and District Magistrate is Dr. Preetam B. Yashwant (IAS). The city is also under Police Commissioner system, with Mr. Ashok Rathore (IPS) as Police Commissioner of the city.

 

The upcoming 9 MMTPA Refinery and Petrochemical complex to be set up by Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) in Pachpadra, Barmer will transform the industrial scene of the city drastically. Pachpadra lies just 60 kilometres from the industrial area of Boranada in Jodhpur. Around 120 by-products that are produced by the refinery are going to provide opportunities for new industries to be set up in and around Jodhpur.

 

India's most ambitious industrial development project, the over USD 100 dollars Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Project is also going to impact industry in Jodhpur. Marwar Junction which is located about 100 kilometres from Jodhpur will be one of the nine freight loading points along the DMIC route. Jodhpur and Pali districts fall under the region that is going to be developed as a manufacturing hub for the DMIC.

 

STRATEDIC LOCATION

Jodhpur is the most important city of western Rajasthan and lies about 250 kilometres from the border with Pakistan. This location makes it an important base for the Indian army, Indian Air Force and Border Security Force (BSF). Jodhpur's air base is Asia's largest and one of the most critical and strategically located (Jodhpur Airport played the crucial role during Indo-Pakistan wars in 1965 &1971) airbases of the IAF deployed with fighter jets Sukhoi Su-30MKI and Advanced Light Helicopters Dhruv.

 

CULTURE

The city is famous for its food and its popularity can be judged from the fact that one can find sweet shops named 'Jodhpur Sweets' in many cities throughout India. Being at the onshore of Thar desert, life has been influenced with ways of the desert folks (gypsies can be found in many parts of the city).

 

TOURISM

Jodhpur's attractions include Mehrangarh Fort, Umaid Bhawan Palace, Jaswant Thada, Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower) and Flying Fox (Mehrangarh Fort). Tourists can make excursions to Mandore, Kaylana Lake and Garden, Balsamand Lake, Santoshi Mata Temple, Mahamandir, Siddhnath Mahadev, Achalnath Mahadev, Udai Mandir, Mandaleshwar Mahadev Temple (Mandalnath), Ratanada Ganesh Temple, Sardar Samand Lake and Palace, Masooria Hills, Rai Ka Bagh Palace, Veer Durgadas Smarak (monument, park and museum), Bhim Bhirak Cave.

 

The beautiful historic buildings and scenic landscapes of the city were featured in major films including The Dark Knight Rises directed by Christopher Nolan, and The Fall directed by Tarsem Singh, Hum Saath Saath Hain, Veer, and Shuddh Desi Romance. More recently, there have been many high-profile celebrations in the city including many celebrity weddings. This has given an impetus to a nascent lavish wedding industry and increased tourism.

 

CUISINE

A number of Indian delicacies have originated in Jodhpur. To name a few, the Makhaniya Lassi, Mawa Ki Kachori, Pyaaj Ki Kachori, Hot & Spicy Mirchi Bada (A preparation made with potato, onion, chilli and gramflour), Dal Bati Churma (dal is lentils; bati is baked wheat ball; and churma is powdered sweetened cereal), Lasan Ki Chutney (hot fiery garlic chutney), Mirchi Ka Kutaa (hot recipe of crushed green chilies), Gatte Ki Sabzi (A delicacy made up of gramflour balls, curd and spices), Ker Sangri Sabzi (also known as Pachkutaa - the five ingredients of Pachkutaa are sangri, ker, kumatiya, dried goonda and dried red chillies), Raab (pearl millet flour and yoghurt curry), Lapsi (a special kind of dessert made with cracked wheat, Jaggery, coconut and ghee), Aate Ka Halwa (wheat flour dessert), Kachara Mircha Sabzi (made with chilli and Kachara, a special type of vegetable grown in desert area) and Kadhi Pakoda (recipe made with gramflour, curd and chilli) with Baajre Ka Sogra (a thick flat and round bread of pearl millet). Jodhpur is known for its sweets ranging from traditional "Makhanbada", "Mawa Ki Kachori", "Malpua", "Ghevar", "Motichur Ke Laddu", "Besan barfi", "Thorr" and "Gulab Jamun" to Bengali "Rasgulla" and "Ras Malai" prepared by a traditional house "Jodhpur Sweets".

 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Jodhpur is fast becoming a major education hub for higher studies in India. Almost every major discipline has a dedicated institution in the city, with disciplines varying from Engineering, Medicine, Law, Design among others. With many renowned academicians, Jodhpur is also India's largest hub for preparation of the CA(Chartered Accountant) entrance examination held throughout India by ICAI (The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India).

 

TRANSPORTATION

The city has well established rail, road and air networks connecting it to other major cities of the country.

 

RAILWAYS

Jodhpur railway station is the divisional headquarters of the North Western Railways (NWR). It is well connected with railways to major Indian cities like Alwar, Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bangalore, Trivandrum, Pune, Kota, Kanpur, Bareilly, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad, Indore, Bhopal, Dhanbad, Guwahati, Nagpur, Lucknow, Gwalior, Jaipur etc. To decongest the main Jodhpur station (JU), the suburban station Bhagat ki Kothi (BGKT) is being developed as the second main station for passenger trains. At present 106 trains serves to both the stations. Some of the important trains originating from Jodhpur railway station are- Ranthambore Express (Jodhpur to Indore), Mandore Express (Jodhpur to Delhi), Suryanagri Express (Jodhpur to Mumbai), Marudhar Express (Jodhpur to Lucknow), Howrah Superfast (From Jodhpur to Howrah) etc.

 

For further train running information, timings, halts etc. visit the official website of Indian Railways

 

Luxury train service- For experiencing the true magnificence and royal opulence of Rajasthan, luxury trains Palace on Wheels and Royal Rajasthan on Wheels are run jointly by RTDC and Indian railways. Jodhpur is one of the destinations of both of the trains. Recently a plan to start metro train service in jodhpur was proposed to decongest the city traffic.however the proposal is still pending with state government for its approval.

 

AIR

Jodhpur Airport is one of the prominent airports of Rajasthan. The airport is due for being transformed into an international airport. The work on which is going to start very soon. At present, there are daily flights from Delhi Mumbai and banglore to the city operated by Air India and Jet Airways.

 

ROAD

Jodhpur is connected by road to all major cities in Rajasthan and neighbouring states like Delhi, Ahmedabad, Surat, Ujjain, Agra etc. Apart from deluxe and express bus services to cities within the state, Rajasthan Roadways provides Volvo & Mercedes Benz bus service to Delhi, Ahmedabad, Jaipur, Udaipur and Jaisalmer (click here for time table and reservations). Recently, Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS) is launched in the city with low floor and semi low floor buses plying on major routes. Jodhpur is connected to the National Highway network with three National Highways and to the Rajasthan State Highway network with ten state highways. National Highways passing through Jodhpur:

 

WIKIPEDIA

Step by step pictures showing how to make onion+tomato chutney. 2 minutes chutney that nobody'll believe you made them in a hurry!

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/08/quick-and-easy-spicy-chutne...

Step by step pictures showing how to make onion+tomato chutney. 2 minutes chutney that nobody'll believe you made them in a hurry!

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/08/quick-and-easy-spicy-chutne...

Step by step pictures showing how to make onion+tomato chutney. 2 minutes chutney that nobody'll believe you made them in a hurry!

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/08/quick-and-easy-spicy-chutne...

Step by step pictures guding you to make the easiest chutneys - Roasted Gram / Dalia/ Pottukadalai Chutney.

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/10/pottukadalai-chutney-recipe...

Step by step pictures guding you to make the easiest chutneys - Roasted Gram / Dalia/ Pottukadalai Chutney.

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/10/pottukadalai-chutney-recipe...

Step by step pictures guding you to make the easiest chutneys - Roasted Gram / Dalia/ Pottukadalai Chutney.

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/10/pottukadalai-chutney-recipe...

Step by step pictures guding you to make the easiest chutneys - Roasted Gram / Dalia/ Pottukadalai Chutney.

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/10/pottukadalai-chutney-recipe...

Step by step pictures showing how to make onion+tomato chutney. 2 minutes chutney that nobody'll believe you made them in a hurry!

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/08/quick-and-easy-spicy-chutne...

Step by step pictures guding you to make the easiest chutneys - Roasted Gram / Dalia/ Pottukadalai Chutney.

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/10/pottukadalai-chutney-recipe...

Step by step pictures guding you to make the easiest chutneys - Roasted Gram / Dalia/ Pottukadalai Chutney.

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/10/pottukadalai-chutney-recipe...

Step by step pictures guding you to make the easiest chutneys - Roasted Gram / Dalia/ Pottukadalai Chutney.

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/10/pottukadalai-chutney-recipe...

Step by step pictures showing how to make onion+tomato chutney. 2 minutes chutney that nobody'll believe you made them in a hurry!

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/08/quick-and-easy-spicy-chutne...

 

Salmon Gourmet & Raw

 

Ingredients:One Wild Red Salmon Fillet & Vegetables for Steaming & Blanching

 

One Hand size or smaller Wild Red Salmon Fillet (Not Farm Raised )

Fresh or Frozen and Thawed

 

On stand by ground Black Pepper and ground Chili Pepper

 

2 Garlic Gloves or more slivered

 

The following to your desire a layer of sliced Pumpkin or Squash pieces with skins on

 

A layer of diced Carrot and Tomato

 

A pinch of Dry Sea Weed of your choice

 

One half cup of Asparagus Spears

 

Ingredients: Sauce for Chutney & Salad Dressing

 

Raw Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar (Bitter Tart)

On stand by Lime or Lemon Juice (Sour)

On stand by ground Mustard Powder ( Hot) Optional Ground Chili Powder (Hot)

On stand By Raw Unfiltered Honey (Sweet)

Optional Stand by Sea Salt or Sole made from a dissolved Pink Himalayan Chrystal of Sea Salt dissolved in pure water.

 

Ingredients:Chutney Herbs

 

1 table spoon of chopped herbs of Rosemary,Sage,and Mint

 

Ingredients:Salad

 

One hand full of your favorite chopped leafy greens

A few cherrie tomatoes

A small hand full of raw bean sprouts

One purple Beet Root

  

For Temperate Zones Western : Add chopped apple with skins if (Organic) without skins if conventional ,put the other half aside.

Now toss your salad and add slowly your Temperate Zone Cold Pressed Olive Oil or your Salmon Salad Dressing toss again and taste.

Now to your satisfaction shave the other half Apple to the top of your Salad in layers.

  

For Tropical Zones Eastern : Cut 1 inch thick fresh Pineapple discard tough skins , and cut into small pieces and add to the salad and toss.

Add your Tropical Zone Cold Pressed Coconut Oil or Salmon Salad Dressing.

Sprinkle more Soy Bean sprouts on top.

 

Step by step pictures guding you to make the easiest chutneys - Roasted Gram / Dalia/ Pottukadalai Chutney.

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/10/pottukadalai-chutney-recipe...

Step by step pictures guding you to make the easiest chutneys - Roasted Gram / Dalia/ Pottukadalai Chutney.

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/10/pottukadalai-chutney-recipe...

Jodhpur (/ˈdʒɒdpʊər/ About this sound Listen (help·info)) is the second largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan. After its population crossed a million, it has been declared as the second "Metropolitan City" of Rajasthan. It was formerly the seat of a princely state of the same name, the capital of the kingdom known as Marwar. Jodhpur is a popular tourist destination, featuring many palaces, forts and temples, set in the stark landscape of the Thar Desert.

 

The city is known as the "Sun City" for the bright, sunny weather it enjoys all the year round. It is also referred to as the "Blue City" due to the vivid blue-painted houses around the Mehrangarh Fort. The old city circles the fort and is bounded by a wall with several gates. However, the city has expanded greatly outside the wall over the past several decades. Jodhpur lies near the geographic centre of Rajasthan state, which makes it a convenient base for travel in a region much frequented by tourists.

 

Jodhpur topped Lonely Planet's list of most extraordinary places to stay in 2013. Tamil movie, I, which is the costliest Indian film to date, was also shot at Jodhpur.

 

HISTORY

According to Rajasthan district Gazetteers of Jodhpur and the Hindu epic Ramayana (composed up to the 4th century AD), Abhiras (Ahirs) were the original inhabitants of Jodhpur and later Aryans spread to this region.

 

Jodhpur was also part of the Gurjara–Pratihara Empire and until 1100 CE was ruled by a powerful Gurjar King. Jodhpur was founded in 1459 by Rao Jodha, a Rajput chief of the Rathore clan. Jodha succeeded in conquering the surrounding territory and thus founded a state which came to be known as Marwar. As Jodha hailed from the nearby town of Mandore, that town initially served as the capital of this state; however, Jodhpur soon took over that role, even during the lifetime of Jodha. The city was located on the strategic road linking Delhi to Gujarat. This enabled it to profit from a flourishing trade in opium, copper, silk, sandals, date palms and coffee.

 

In between 1540 to 1556, Afghans were in control of most of North India. Rajasthan born Hemu who started his career as a supplier of various types of merchandise to Sher Shah Suri empire, held various positions in capital Delhi as 'Incharge of Food Affairs', 'Minister of Internal Security', 'Prime Minister-cum-Chief of Army' with Islam Shah Suri and Adil Shah, who ruled north India from Punjab to Bengal at that point in time. Hemu, who took as the military commander of Afghan army in 1553, crushed the first rebellion, killing the Governor of Ajmer province Juneid Khan and appointed his own Governor in Rajasthan. Hem Chandra won several battles (22) throughout North India against Afghan rebels and twice against Akbar at Agra and Delhi, before his coronation at Purana Quila in Delhi on 7 October 1556 as a 'Vikramaditya' king. Hemu lost his life in the Second Battle of Panipat on 5 November 1556, and the area came under Mughal king Akbar.

 

Early in its history, the state became a fief under the Mughal Empire, owing fealty to them while enjoying some internal autonomy. During this period, the state furnished the Mughals with several notable generals such as Maharaja Jaswant Singh. Jodhpur and its people benefited from this exposure to the wider world: new styles of art and architecture made their appearance and opportunities opened up for local tradesmen to make their mark across northern India.

Aurangzeb briefly sequestrated the state (c.1679) on the pretext of a minority, but the rightful ruler Maharaja Ajit Singh was restored to the throne by Veer Durgadas Rathore after Aurangzeb died in 1707 and a great struggle of 30 years. The Mughal empire declined gradually after 1707, but the Jodhpur court was beset by intrigue; rather than benefiting from circumstances, Marwar descended into strife and invited the intervention of the Marathas, who soon supplanted the Mughals as overlords of the region. This did not make for stability or peace, however; 50 years of wars and treaties dissipated the wealth of the state, which sought and gratefully entered into subsidiary alliance with the British in 1818.

 

During the British Raj, the state of Jodhpur had the largest land area of any in Rajputana. Jodhpur prospered under the peace and stability that were a hallmark of this era. The land area of the state was 60,980 km2 its population in 1901 was 44,73,759. It enjoyed an estimated revenue of £35,29,000/. Its merchants, the Marwaris, flourished without let or limit and came to occupy a position of dominance in trade across India. In 1947, when India became independent, the state merged into the union of India and Jodhpur became the second city of Rajasthan.

 

At the time of partition, ruler of Jodhpur Hanwant Singh did not want to join India, but finally due to the effective persuasion of Sardar Vallab Patel, the then Home Minister at the centre, the princely state of Jodhpur was included in Indian Republic. Later after State Reorganisation Act, 1956 it was made part of the state of Rajasthan.

 

DEMOGRAPHICS

As per provisional reports of Census India, population of Jodhpur is 1,033,918 in 2011; of which male and female nearly constitute 52.62 percent and 47.38 percent respectively. Average literacy rate of Jodhpur city is 81.56 percent of which male and female literacy was 88.42 and 73.93 percent respectively. Total children under 6 years of age constitute nearly 12.24 percent of city population. Jodhpur city is governed by Municipal Corporation which comes under Jodhpur Urban Agglomeration. The Jodhpur Urban/Metropolitan area include Jodhpur, Kuri Bhagtasani, Mandore Industrial Area, Nandri, Pal Village and Sangariya. Its Urban/Metropolitan population is 1,137,815 of which 599,332 are males and 538,483 are females,On the date: 01/07/2015 the record of citypopulation.de website shows Jodhpur city is having Population of 1,300,000

 

CLIMATE

The climate of Jodhpur is generally hot and semi-arid, but with a rainy season from late June to September (Köppen BShw). Although the average rainfall is around 450 millimetres, it is extraordinarily variable. In the famine year of 1899, Jodhpur received only 24 millimetres, but in the flood year 1917 it received as much as 1,178 millimetres.

 

Temperatures are extreme throughout the period from March to October, except when monsoonal rain produces thick clouds to lower it slightly. In the months of April, May and June, high temperatures routinely exceed 40 degrees Celsius. During the monsoon season, average temperatures decrease slightly. However, the city's generally low humidity rises and this adds to the normal discomfort from the heat. Phalodi, near Jodhpur, is the driest place of the district as well as in the state.

 

ECONOMY

The Handicrafts industry has in recent years eclipsed all other industries in the city. By some estimates, the furniture export segment is a $200 million industry, directly or indirectly employing as many as 200,000 people. Other items manufactured include textiles, metal utensils, bicycles, ink and sporting goods. A flourishing cottage industry exists for the manufacture of such items as glass bangles, cutlery, carpets and marble products.

 

After handicrafts, tourism is the second largest industry of Jodhpur. Crops grown in the district include wheat and the famous Mathania red chillies. Gypsum and salt are mined. The city serves as an important marketplace for wool and agricultural products. The Indian Air Force, Indian Army, Indo Tibetan Border Police and Border Security Force maintain training centres in Jodhpur.

 

The administration of Jodhpur consists of a District Collector, followed by 4 Additional District Magistrates (I, II, Land Conversion and City ADM). Presently, the Collector and District Magistrate is Dr. Preetam B. Yashwant (IAS). The city is also under Police Commissioner system, with Mr. Ashok Rathore (IPS) as Police Commissioner of the city.

 

The upcoming 9 MMTPA Refinery and Petrochemical complex to be set up by Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) in Pachpadra, Barmer will transform the industrial scene of the city drastically. Pachpadra lies just 60 kilometres from the industrial area of Boranada in Jodhpur. Around 120 by-products that are produced by the refinery are going to provide opportunities for new industries to be set up in and around Jodhpur.

 

India's most ambitious industrial development project, the over USD 100 dollars Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Project is also going to impact industry in Jodhpur. Marwar Junction which is located about 100 kilometres from Jodhpur will be one of the nine freight loading points along the DMIC route. Jodhpur and Pali districts fall under the region that is going to be developed as a manufacturing hub for the DMIC.

 

STRATEDIC LOCATION

Jodhpur is the most important city of western Rajasthan and lies about 250 kilometres from the border with Pakistan. This location makes it an important base for the Indian army, Indian Air Force and Border Security Force (BSF). Jodhpur's air base is Asia's largest and one of the most critical and strategically located (Jodhpur Airport played the crucial role during Indo-Pakistan wars in 1965 &1971) airbases of the IAF deployed with fighter jets Sukhoi Su-30MKI and Advanced Light Helicopters Dhruv.

 

CULTURE

The city is famous for its food and its popularity can be judged from the fact that one can find sweet shops named 'Jodhpur Sweets' in many cities throughout India. Being at the onshore of Thar desert, life has been influenced with ways of the desert folks (gypsies can be found in many parts of the city).

 

TOURISM

Jodhpur's attractions include Mehrangarh Fort, Umaid Bhawan Palace, Jaswant Thada, Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower) and Flying Fox (Mehrangarh Fort). Tourists can make excursions to Mandore, Kaylana Lake and Garden, Balsamand Lake, Santoshi Mata Temple, Mahamandir, Siddhnath Mahadev, Achalnath Mahadev, Udai Mandir, Mandaleshwar Mahadev Temple (Mandalnath), Ratanada Ganesh Temple, Sardar Samand Lake and Palace, Masooria Hills, Rai Ka Bagh Palace, Veer Durgadas Smarak (monument, park and museum), Bhim Bhirak Cave.

 

The beautiful historic buildings and scenic landscapes of the city were featured in major films including The Dark Knight Rises directed by Christopher Nolan, and The Fall directed by Tarsem Singh, Hum Saath Saath Hain, Veer, and Shuddh Desi Romance. More recently, there have been many high-profile celebrations in the city including many celebrity weddings. This has given an impetus to a nascent lavish wedding industry and increased tourism.

 

CUISINE

A number of Indian delicacies have originated in Jodhpur. To name a few, the Makhaniya Lassi, Mawa Ki Kachori, Pyaaj Ki Kachori, Hot & Spicy Mirchi Bada (A preparation made with potato, onion, chilli and gramflour), Dal Bati Churma (dal is lentils; bati is baked wheat ball; and churma is powdered sweetened cereal), Lasan Ki Chutney (hot fiery garlic chutney), Mirchi Ka Kutaa (hot recipe of crushed green chilies), Gatte Ki Sabzi (A delicacy made up of gramflour balls, curd and spices), Ker Sangri Sabzi (also known as Pachkutaa - the five ingredients of Pachkutaa are sangri, ker, kumatiya, dried goonda and dried red chillies), Raab (pearl millet flour and yoghurt curry), Lapsi (a special kind of dessert made with cracked wheat, Jaggery, coconut and ghee), Aate Ka Halwa (wheat flour dessert), Kachara Mircha Sabzi (made with chilli and Kachara, a special type of vegetable grown in desert area) and Kadhi Pakoda (recipe made with gramflour, curd and chilli) with Baajre Ka Sogra (a thick flat and round bread of pearl millet). Jodhpur is known for its sweets ranging from traditional "Makhanbada", "Mawa Ki Kachori", "Malpua", "Ghevar", "Motichur Ke Laddu", "Besan barfi", "Thorr" and "Gulab Jamun" to Bengali "Rasgulla" and "Ras Malai" prepared by a traditional house "Jodhpur Sweets".

 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Jodhpur is fast becoming a major education hub for higher studies in India. Almost every major discipline has a dedicated institution in the city, with disciplines varying from Engineering, Medicine, Law, Design among others. With many renowned academicians, Jodhpur is also India's largest hub for preparation of the CA(Chartered Accountant) entrance examination held throughout India by ICAI (The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India).

 

TRANSPORTATION

The city has well established rail, road and air networks connecting it to other major cities of the country.

 

RAILWAYS

Jodhpur railway station is the divisional headquarters of the North Western Railways (NWR). It is well connected with railways to major Indian cities like Alwar, Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bangalore, Trivandrum, Pune, Kota, Kanpur, Bareilly, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad, Indore, Bhopal, Dhanbad, Guwahati, Nagpur, Lucknow, Gwalior, Jaipur etc. To decongest the main Jodhpur station (JU), the suburban station Bhagat ki Kothi (BGKT) is being developed as the second main station for passenger trains. At present 106 trains serves to both the stations. Some of the important trains originating from Jodhpur railway station are- Ranthambore Express (Jodhpur to Indore), Mandore Express (Jodhpur to Delhi), Suryanagri Express (Jodhpur to Mumbai), Marudhar Express (Jodhpur to Lucknow), Howrah Superfast (From Jodhpur to Howrah) etc.

 

For further train running information, timings, halts etc. visit the official website of Indian Railways

 

Luxury train service- For experiencing the true magnificence and royal opulence of Rajasthan, luxury trains Palace on Wheels and Royal Rajasthan on Wheels are run jointly by RTDC and Indian railways. Jodhpur is one of the destinations of both of the trains. Recently a plan to start metro train service in jodhpur was proposed to decongest the city traffic.however the proposal is still pending with state government for its approval.

 

AIR

Jodhpur Airport is one of the prominent airports of Rajasthan. The airport is due for being transformed into an international airport. The work on which is going to start very soon. At present, there are daily flights from Delhi Mumbai and banglore to the city operated by Air India and Jet Airways.

 

ROAD

Jodhpur is connected by road to all major cities in Rajasthan and neighbouring states like Delhi, Ahmedabad, Surat, Ujjain, Agra etc. Apart from deluxe and express bus services to cities within the state, Rajasthan Roadways provides Volvo & Mercedes Benz bus service to Delhi, Ahmedabad, Jaipur, Udaipur and Jaisalmer (click here for time table and reservations). Recently, Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS) is launched in the city with low floor and semi low floor buses plying on major routes. Jodhpur is connected to the National Highway network with three National Highways and to the Rajasthan State Highway network with ten state highways. National Highways passing through Jodhpur:

 

WIKIPEDIA

Step by step pictures guding you to make the easiest chutneys - Roasted Gram / Dalia/ Pottukadalai Chutney.

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/10/pottukadalai-chutney-recipe...

Jodhpur (/ˈdʒɒdpʊər/ About this sound Listen (help·info)) is the second largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan. After its population crossed a million, it has been declared as the second "Metropolitan City" of Rajasthan. It was formerly the seat of a princely state of the same name, the capital of the kingdom known as Marwar. Jodhpur is a popular tourist destination, featuring many palaces, forts and temples, set in the stark landscape of the Thar Desert.

 

The city is known as the "Sun City" for the bright, sunny weather it enjoys all the year round. It is also referred to as the "Blue City" due to the vivid blue-painted houses around the Mehrangarh Fort. The old city circles the fort and is bounded by a wall with several gates. However, the city has expanded greatly outside the wall over the past several decades. Jodhpur lies near the geographic centre of Rajasthan state, which makes it a convenient base for travel in a region much frequented by tourists.

 

Jodhpur topped Lonely Planet's list of most extraordinary places to stay in 2013. Tamil movie, I, which is the costliest Indian film to date, was also shot at Jodhpur.

 

HISTORY

According to Rajasthan district Gazetteers of Jodhpur and the Hindu epic Ramayana (composed up to the 4th century AD), Abhiras (Ahirs) were the original inhabitants of Jodhpur and later Aryans spread to this region.

 

Jodhpur was also part of the Gurjara–Pratihara Empire and until 1100 CE was ruled by a powerful Gurjar King. Jodhpur was founded in 1459 by Rao Jodha, a Rajput chief of the Rathore clan. Jodha succeeded in conquering the surrounding territory and thus founded a state which came to be known as Marwar. As Jodha hailed from the nearby town of Mandore, that town initially served as the capital of this state; however, Jodhpur soon took over that role, even during the lifetime of Jodha. The city was located on the strategic road linking Delhi to Gujarat. This enabled it to profit from a flourishing trade in opium, copper, silk, sandals, date palms and coffee.

 

In between 1540 to 1556, Afghans were in control of most of North India. Rajasthan born Hemu who started his career as a supplier of various types of merchandise to Sher Shah Suri empire, held various positions in capital Delhi as 'Incharge of Food Affairs', 'Minister of Internal Security', 'Prime Minister-cum-Chief of Army' with Islam Shah Suri and Adil Shah, who ruled north India from Punjab to Bengal at that point in time. Hemu, who took as the military commander of Afghan army in 1553, crushed the first rebellion, killing the Governor of Ajmer province Juneid Khan and appointed his own Governor in Rajasthan. Hem Chandra won several battles (22) throughout North India against Afghan rebels and twice against Akbar at Agra and Delhi, before his coronation at Purana Quila in Delhi on 7 October 1556 as a 'Vikramaditya' king. Hemu lost his life in the Second Battle of Panipat on 5 November 1556, and the area came under Mughal king Akbar.

 

Early in its history, the state became a fief under the Mughal Empire, owing fealty to them while enjoying some internal autonomy. During this period, the state furnished the Mughals with several notable generals such as Maharaja Jaswant Singh. Jodhpur and its people benefited from this exposure to the wider world: new styles of art and architecture made their appearance and opportunities opened up for local tradesmen to make their mark across northern India.

Aurangzeb briefly sequestrated the state (c.1679) on the pretext of a minority, but the rightful ruler Maharaja Ajit Singh was restored to the throne by Veer Durgadas Rathore after Aurangzeb died in 1707 and a great struggle of 30 years. The Mughal empire declined gradually after 1707, but the Jodhpur court was beset by intrigue; rather than benefiting from circumstances, Marwar descended into strife and invited the intervention of the Marathas, who soon supplanted the Mughals as overlords of the region. This did not make for stability or peace, however; 50 years of wars and treaties dissipated the wealth of the state, which sought and gratefully entered into subsidiary alliance with the British in 1818.

 

During the British Raj, the state of Jodhpur had the largest land area of any in Rajputana. Jodhpur prospered under the peace and stability that were a hallmark of this era. The land area of the state was 60,980 km2 its population in 1901 was 44,73,759. It enjoyed an estimated revenue of £35,29,000/. Its merchants, the Marwaris, flourished without let or limit and came to occupy a position of dominance in trade across India. In 1947, when India became independent, the state merged into the union of India and Jodhpur became the second city of Rajasthan.

 

At the time of partition, ruler of Jodhpur Hanwant Singh did not want to join India, but finally due to the effective persuasion of Sardar Vallab Patel, the then Home Minister at the centre, the princely state of Jodhpur was included in Indian Republic. Later after State Reorganisation Act, 1956 it was made part of the state of Rajasthan.

 

DEMOGRAPHICS

As per provisional reports of Census India, population of Jodhpur is 1,033,918 in 2011; of which male and female nearly constitute 52.62 percent and 47.38 percent respectively. Average literacy rate of Jodhpur city is 81.56 percent of which male and female literacy was 88.42 and 73.93 percent respectively. Total children under 6 years of age constitute nearly 12.24 percent of city population. Jodhpur city is governed by Municipal Corporation which comes under Jodhpur Urban Agglomeration. The Jodhpur Urban/Metropolitan area include Jodhpur, Kuri Bhagtasani, Mandore Industrial Area, Nandri, Pal Village and Sangariya. Its Urban/Metropolitan population is 1,137,815 of which 599,332 are males and 538,483 are females,On the date: 01/07/2015 the record of citypopulation.de website shows Jodhpur city is having Population of 1,300,000

 

CLIMATE

The climate of Jodhpur is generally hot and semi-arid, but with a rainy season from late June to September (Köppen BShw). Although the average rainfall is around 450 millimetres, it is extraordinarily variable. In the famine year of 1899, Jodhpur received only 24 millimetres, but in the flood year 1917 it received as much as 1,178 millimetres.

 

Temperatures are extreme throughout the period from March to October, except when monsoonal rain produces thick clouds to lower it slightly. In the months of April, May and June, high temperatures routinely exceed 40 degrees Celsius. During the monsoon season, average temperatures decrease slightly. However, the city's generally low humidity rises and this adds to the normal discomfort from the heat. Phalodi, near Jodhpur, is the driest place of the district as well as in the state.

 

ECONOMY

The Handicrafts industry has in recent years eclipsed all other industries in the city. By some estimates, the furniture export segment is a $200 million industry, directly or indirectly employing as many as 200,000 people. Other items manufactured include textiles, metal utensils, bicycles, ink and sporting goods. A flourishing cottage industry exists for the manufacture of such items as glass bangles, cutlery, carpets and marble products.

 

After handicrafts, tourism is the second largest industry of Jodhpur. Crops grown in the district include wheat and the famous Mathania red chillies. Gypsum and salt are mined. The city serves as an important marketplace for wool and agricultural products. The Indian Air Force, Indian Army, Indo Tibetan Border Police and Border Security Force maintain training centres in Jodhpur.

 

The administration of Jodhpur consists of a District Collector, followed by 4 Additional District Magistrates (I, II, Land Conversion and City ADM). Presently, the Collector and District Magistrate is Dr. Preetam B. Yashwant (IAS). The city is also under Police Commissioner system, with Mr. Ashok Rathore (IPS) as Police Commissioner of the city.

 

The upcoming 9 MMTPA Refinery and Petrochemical complex to be set up by Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) in Pachpadra, Barmer will transform the industrial scene of the city drastically. Pachpadra lies just 60 kilometres from the industrial area of Boranada in Jodhpur. Around 120 by-products that are produced by the refinery are going to provide opportunities for new industries to be set up in and around Jodhpur.

 

India's most ambitious industrial development project, the over USD 100 dollars Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Project is also going to impact industry in Jodhpur. Marwar Junction which is located about 100 kilometres from Jodhpur will be one of the nine freight loading points along the DMIC route. Jodhpur and Pali districts fall under the region that is going to be developed as a manufacturing hub for the DMIC.

 

STRATEDIC LOCATION

Jodhpur is the most important city of western Rajasthan and lies about 250 kilometres from the border with Pakistan. This location makes it an important base for the Indian army, Indian Air Force and Border Security Force (BSF). Jodhpur's air base is Asia's largest and one of the most critical and strategically located (Jodhpur Airport played the crucial role during Indo-Pakistan wars in 1965 &1971) airbases of the IAF deployed with fighter jets Sukhoi Su-30MKI and Advanced Light Helicopters Dhruv.

 

CULTURE

The city is famous for its food and its popularity can be judged from the fact that one can find sweet shops named 'Jodhpur Sweets' in many cities throughout India. Being at the onshore of Thar desert, life has been influenced with ways of the desert folks (gypsies can be found in many parts of the city).

 

TOURISM

Jodhpur's attractions include Mehrangarh Fort, Umaid Bhawan Palace, Jaswant Thada, Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower) and Flying Fox (Mehrangarh Fort). Tourists can make excursions to Mandore, Kaylana Lake and Garden, Balsamand Lake, Santoshi Mata Temple, Mahamandir, Siddhnath Mahadev, Achalnath Mahadev, Udai Mandir, Mandaleshwar Mahadev Temple (Mandalnath), Ratanada Ganesh Temple, Sardar Samand Lake and Palace, Masooria Hills, Rai Ka Bagh Palace, Veer Durgadas Smarak (monument, park and museum), Bhim Bhirak Cave.

 

The beautiful historic buildings and scenic landscapes of the city were featured in major films including The Dark Knight Rises directed by Christopher Nolan, and The Fall directed by Tarsem Singh, Hum Saath Saath Hain, Veer, and Shuddh Desi Romance. More recently, there have been many high-profile celebrations in the city including many celebrity weddings. This has given an impetus to a nascent lavish wedding industry and increased tourism.

 

CUISINE

A number of Indian delicacies have originated in Jodhpur. To name a few, the Makhaniya Lassi, Mawa Ki Kachori, Pyaaj Ki Kachori, Hot & Spicy Mirchi Bada (A preparation made with potato, onion, chilli and gramflour), Dal Bati Churma (dal is lentils; bati is baked wheat ball; and churma is powdered sweetened cereal), Lasan Ki Chutney (hot fiery garlic chutney), Mirchi Ka Kutaa (hot recipe of crushed green chilies), Gatte Ki Sabzi (A delicacy made up of gramflour balls, curd and spices), Ker Sangri Sabzi (also known as Pachkutaa - the five ingredients of Pachkutaa are sangri, ker, kumatiya, dried goonda and dried red chillies), Raab (pearl millet flour and yoghurt curry), Lapsi (a special kind of dessert made with cracked wheat, Jaggery, coconut and ghee), Aate Ka Halwa (wheat flour dessert), Kachara Mircha Sabzi (made with chilli and Kachara, a special type of vegetable grown in desert area) and Kadhi Pakoda (recipe made with gramflour, curd and chilli) with Baajre Ka Sogra (a thick flat and round bread of pearl millet). Jodhpur is known for its sweets ranging from traditional "Makhanbada", "Mawa Ki Kachori", "Malpua", "Ghevar", "Motichur Ke Laddu", "Besan barfi", "Thorr" and "Gulab Jamun" to Bengali "Rasgulla" and "Ras Malai" prepared by a traditional house "Jodhpur Sweets".

 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Jodhpur is fast becoming a major education hub for higher studies in India. Almost every major discipline has a dedicated institution in the city, with disciplines varying from Engineering, Medicine, Law, Design among others. With many renowned academicians, Jodhpur is also India's largest hub for preparation of the CA(Chartered Accountant) entrance examination held throughout India by ICAI (The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India).

 

TRANSPORTATION

The city has well established rail, road and air networks connecting it to other major cities of the country.

 

RAILWAYS

Jodhpur railway station is the divisional headquarters of the North Western Railways (NWR). It is well connected with railways to major Indian cities like Alwar, Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bangalore, Trivandrum, Pune, Kota, Kanpur, Bareilly, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad, Indore, Bhopal, Dhanbad, Guwahati, Nagpur, Lucknow, Gwalior, Jaipur etc. To decongest the main Jodhpur station (JU), the suburban station Bhagat ki Kothi (BGKT) is being developed as the second main station for passenger trains. At present 106 trains serves to both the stations. Some of the important trains originating from Jodhpur railway station are- Ranthambore Express (Jodhpur to Indore), Mandore Express (Jodhpur to Delhi), Suryanagri Express (Jodhpur to Mumbai), Marudhar Express (Jodhpur to Lucknow), Howrah Superfast (From Jodhpur to Howrah) etc.

 

For further train running information, timings, halts etc. visit the official website of Indian Railways

 

Luxury train service- For experiencing the true magnificence and royal opulence of Rajasthan, luxury trains Palace on Wheels and Royal Rajasthan on Wheels are run jointly by RTDC and Indian railways. Jodhpur is one of the destinations of both of the trains. Recently a plan to start metro train service in jodhpur was proposed to decongest the city traffic.however the proposal is still pending with state government for its approval.

 

AIR

Jodhpur Airport is one of the prominent airports of Rajasthan. The airport is due for being transformed into an international airport. The work on which is going to start very soon. At present, there are daily flights from Delhi Mumbai and banglore to the city operated by Air India and Jet Airways.

 

ROAD

Jodhpur is connected by road to all major cities in Rajasthan and neighbouring states like Delhi, Ahmedabad, Surat, Ujjain, Agra etc. Apart from deluxe and express bus services to cities within the state, Rajasthan Roadways provides Volvo & Mercedes Benz bus service to Delhi, Ahmedabad, Jaipur, Udaipur and Jaisalmer (click here for time table and reservations). Recently, Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS) is launched in the city with low floor and semi low floor buses plying on major routes. Jodhpur is connected to the National Highway network with three National Highways and to the Rajasthan State Highway network with ten state highways. National Highways passing through Jodhpur:

 

WIKIPEDIA

 

Jodhpur (/ˈdʒɒdpʊər/ About this sound Listen (help·info)) is the second largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan. After its population crossed a million, it has been declared as the second "Metropolitan City" of Rajasthan. It was formerly the seat of a princely state of the same name, the capital of the kingdom known as Marwar. Jodhpur is a popular tourist destination, featuring many palaces, forts and temples, set in the stark landscape of the Thar Desert.

 

The city is known as the "Sun City" for the bright, sunny weather it enjoys all the year round. It is also referred to as the "Blue City" due to the vivid blue-painted houses around the Mehrangarh Fort. The old city circles the fort and is bounded by a wall with several gates. However, the city has expanded greatly outside the wall over the past several decades. Jodhpur lies near the geographic centre of Rajasthan state, which makes it a convenient base for travel in a region much frequented by tourists.

 

Jodhpur topped Lonely Planet's list of most extraordinary places to stay in 2013. Tamil movie, I, which is the costliest Indian film to date, was also shot at Jodhpur.

 

HISTORY

According to Rajasthan district Gazetteers of Jodhpur and the Hindu epic Ramayana (composed up to the 4th century AD), Abhiras (Ahirs) were the original inhabitants of Jodhpur and later Aryans spread to this region.

 

Jodhpur was also part of the Gurjara–Pratihara Empire and until 1100 CE was ruled by a powerful Gurjar King. Jodhpur was founded in 1459 by Rao Jodha, a Rajput chief of the Rathore clan. Jodha succeeded in conquering the surrounding territory and thus founded a state which came to be known as Marwar. As Jodha hailed from the nearby town of Mandore, that town initially served as the capital of this state; however, Jodhpur soon took over that role, even during the lifetime of Jodha. The city was located on the strategic road linking Delhi to Gujarat. This enabled it to profit from a flourishing trade in opium, copper, silk, sandals, date palms and coffee.

 

In between 1540 to 1556, Afghans were in control of most of North India. Rajasthan born Hemu who started his career as a supplier of various types of merchandise to Sher Shah Suri empire, held various positions in capital Delhi as 'Incharge of Food Affairs', 'Minister of Internal Security', 'Prime Minister-cum-Chief of Army' with Islam Shah Suri and Adil Shah, who ruled north India from Punjab to Bengal at that point in time. Hemu, who took as the military commander of Afghan army in 1553, crushed the first rebellion, killing the Governor of Ajmer province Juneid Khan and appointed his own Governor in Rajasthan. Hem Chandra won several battles (22) throughout North India against Afghan rebels and twice against Akbar at Agra and Delhi, before his coronation at Purana Quila in Delhi on 7 October 1556 as a 'Vikramaditya' king. Hemu lost his life in the Second Battle of Panipat on 5 November 1556, and the area came under Mughal king Akbar.

 

Early in its history, the state became a fief under the Mughal Empire, owing fealty to them while enjoying some internal autonomy. During this period, the state furnished the Mughals with several notable generals such as Maharaja Jaswant Singh. Jodhpur and its people benefited from this exposure to the wider world: new styles of art and architecture made their appearance and opportunities opened up for local tradesmen to make their mark across northern India.

Aurangzeb briefly sequestrated the state (c.1679) on the pretext of a minority, but the rightful ruler Maharaja Ajit Singh was restored to the throne by Veer Durgadas Rathore after Aurangzeb died in 1707 and a great struggle of 30 years. The Mughal empire declined gradually after 1707, but the Jodhpur court was beset by intrigue; rather than benefiting from circumstances, Marwar descended into strife and invited the intervention of the Marathas, who soon supplanted the Mughals as overlords of the region. This did not make for stability or peace, however; 50 years of wars and treaties dissipated the wealth of the state, which sought and gratefully entered into subsidiary alliance with the British in 1818.

 

During the British Raj, the state of Jodhpur had the largest land area of any in Rajputana. Jodhpur prospered under the peace and stability that were a hallmark of this era. The land area of the state was 60,980 km2 its population in 1901 was 44,73,759. It enjoyed an estimated revenue of £35,29,000/. Its merchants, the Marwaris, flourished without let or limit and came to occupy a position of dominance in trade across India. In 1947, when India became independent, the state merged into the union of India and Jodhpur became the second city of Rajasthan.

 

At the time of partition, ruler of Jodhpur Hanwant Singh did not want to join India, but finally due to the effective persuasion of Sardar Vallab Patel, the then Home Minister at the centre, the princely state of Jodhpur was included in Indian Republic. Later after State Reorganisation Act, 1956 it was made part of the state of Rajasthan.

 

DEMOGRAPHICS

As per provisional reports of Census India, population of Jodhpur is 1,033,918 in 2011; of which male and female nearly constitute 52.62 percent and 47.38 percent respectively. Average literacy rate of Jodhpur city is 81.56 percent of which male and female literacy was 88.42 and 73.93 percent respectively. Total children under 6 years of age constitute nearly 12.24 percent of city population. Jodhpur city is governed by Municipal Corporation which comes under Jodhpur Urban Agglomeration. The Jodhpur Urban/Metropolitan area include Jodhpur, Kuri Bhagtasani, Mandore Industrial Area, Nandri, Pal Village and Sangariya. Its Urban/Metropolitan population is 1,137,815 of which 599,332 are males and 538,483 are females,On the date: 01/07/2015 the record of citypopulation.de website shows Jodhpur city is having Population of 1,300,000

 

CLIMATE

The climate of Jodhpur is generally hot and semi-arid, but with a rainy season from late June to September (Köppen BShw). Although the average rainfall is around 450 millimetres, it is extraordinarily variable. In the famine year of 1899, Jodhpur received only 24 millimetres, but in the flood year 1917 it received as much as 1,178 millimetres.

 

Temperatures are extreme throughout the period from March to October, except when monsoonal rain produces thick clouds to lower it slightly. In the months of April, May and June, high temperatures routinely exceed 40 degrees Celsius. During the monsoon season, average temperatures decrease slightly. However, the city's generally low humidity rises and this adds to the normal discomfort from the heat. Phalodi, near Jodhpur, is the driest place of the district as well as in the state.

 

ECONOMY

The Handicrafts industry has in recent years eclipsed all other industries in the city. By some estimates, the furniture export segment is a $200 million industry, directly or indirectly employing as many as 200,000 people. Other items manufactured include textiles, metal utensils, bicycles, ink and sporting goods. A flourishing cottage industry exists for the manufacture of such items as glass bangles, cutlery, carpets and marble products.

 

After handicrafts, tourism is the second largest industry of Jodhpur. Crops grown in the district include wheat and the famous Mathania red chillies. Gypsum and salt are mined. The city serves as an important marketplace for wool and agricultural products. The Indian Air Force, Indian Army, Indo Tibetan Border Police and Border Security Force maintain training centres in Jodhpur.

 

The administration of Jodhpur consists of a District Collector, followed by 4 Additional District Magistrates (I, II, Land Conversion and City ADM). Presently, the Collector and District Magistrate is Dr. Preetam B. Yashwant (IAS). The city is also under Police Commissioner system, with Mr. Ashok Rathore (IPS) as Police Commissioner of the city.

 

The upcoming 9 MMTPA Refinery and Petrochemical complex to be set up by Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) in Pachpadra, Barmer will transform the industrial scene of the city drastically. Pachpadra lies just 60 kilometres from the industrial area of Boranada in Jodhpur. Around 120 by-products that are produced by the refinery are going to provide opportunities for new industries to be set up in and around Jodhpur.

 

India's most ambitious industrial development project, the over USD 100 dollars Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Project is also going to impact industry in Jodhpur. Marwar Junction which is located about 100 kilometres from Jodhpur will be one of the nine freight loading points along the DMIC route. Jodhpur and Pali districts fall under the region that is going to be developed as a manufacturing hub for the DMIC.

 

STRATEDIC LOCATION

Jodhpur is the most important city of western Rajasthan and lies about 250 kilometres from the border with Pakistan. This location makes it an important base for the Indian army, Indian Air Force and Border Security Force (BSF). Jodhpur's air base is Asia's largest and one of the most critical and strategically located (Jodhpur Airport played the crucial role during Indo-Pakistan wars in 1965 &1971) airbases of the IAF deployed with fighter jets Sukhoi Su-30MKI and Advanced Light Helicopters Dhruv.

 

CULTURE

The city is famous for its food and its popularity can be judged from the fact that one can find sweet shops named 'Jodhpur Sweets' in many cities throughout India. Being at the onshore of Thar desert, life has been influenced with ways of the desert folks (gypsies can be found in many parts of the city).

 

TOURISM

Jodhpur's attractions include Mehrangarh Fort, Umaid Bhawan Palace, Jaswant Thada, Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower) and Flying Fox (Mehrangarh Fort). Tourists can make excursions to Mandore, Kaylana Lake and Garden, Balsamand Lake, Santoshi Mata Temple, Mahamandir, Siddhnath Mahadev, Achalnath Mahadev, Udai Mandir, Mandaleshwar Mahadev Temple (Mandalnath), Ratanada Ganesh Temple, Sardar Samand Lake and Palace, Masooria Hills, Rai Ka Bagh Palace, Veer Durgadas Smarak (monument, park and museum), Bhim Bhirak Cave.

 

The beautiful historic buildings and scenic landscapes of the city were featured in major films including The Dark Knight Rises directed by Christopher Nolan, and The Fall directed by Tarsem Singh, Hum Saath Saath Hain, Veer, and Shuddh Desi Romance. More recently, there have been many high-profile celebrations in the city including many celebrity weddings. This has given an impetus to a nascent lavish wedding industry and increased tourism.

 

CUISINE

A number of Indian delicacies have originated in Jodhpur. To name a few, the Makhaniya Lassi, Mawa Ki Kachori, Pyaaj Ki Kachori, Hot & Spicy Mirchi Bada (A preparation made with potato, onion, chilli and gramflour), Dal Bati Churma (dal is lentils; bati is baked wheat ball; and churma is powdered sweetened cereal), Lasan Ki Chutney (hot fiery garlic chutney), Mirchi Ka Kutaa (hot recipe of crushed green chilies), Gatte Ki Sabzi (A delicacy made up of gramflour balls, curd and spices), Ker Sangri Sabzi (also known as Pachkutaa - the five ingredients of Pachkutaa are sangri, ker, kumatiya, dried goonda and dried red chillies), Raab (pearl millet flour and yoghurt curry), Lapsi (a special kind of dessert made with cracked wheat, Jaggery, coconut and ghee), Aate Ka Halwa (wheat flour dessert), Kachara Mircha Sabzi (made with chilli and Kachara, a special type of vegetable grown in desert area) and Kadhi Pakoda (recipe made with gramflour, curd and chilli) with Baajre Ka Sogra (a thick flat and round bread of pearl millet). Jodhpur is known for its sweets ranging from traditional "Makhanbada", "Mawa Ki Kachori", "Malpua", "Ghevar", "Motichur Ke Laddu", "Besan barfi", "Thorr" and "Gulab Jamun" to Bengali "Rasgulla" and "Ras Malai" prepared by a traditional house "Jodhpur Sweets".

 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Jodhpur is fast becoming a major education hub for higher studies in India. Almost every major discipline has a dedicated institution in the city, with disciplines varying from Engineering, Medicine, Law, Design among others. With many renowned academicians, Jodhpur is also India's largest hub for preparation of the CA(Chartered Accountant) entrance examination held throughout India by ICAI (The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India).

 

TRANSPORTATION

The city has well established rail, road and air networks connecting it to other major cities of the country.

 

RAILWAYS

Jodhpur railway station is the divisional headquarters of the North Western Railways (NWR). It is well connected with railways to major Indian cities like Alwar, Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bangalore, Trivandrum, Pune, Kota, Kanpur, Bareilly, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad, Indore, Bhopal, Dhanbad, Guwahati, Nagpur, Lucknow, Gwalior, Jaipur etc. To decongest the main Jodhpur station (JU), the suburban station Bhagat ki Kothi (BGKT) is being developed as the second main station for passenger trains. At present 106 trains serves to both the stations. Some of the important trains originating from Jodhpur railway station are- Ranthambore Express (Jodhpur to Indore), Mandore Express (Jodhpur to Delhi), Suryanagri Express (Jodhpur to Mumbai), Marudhar Express (Jodhpur to Lucknow), Howrah Superfast (From Jodhpur to Howrah) etc.

 

For further train running information, timings, halts etc. visit the official website of Indian Railways

 

Luxury train service- For experiencing the true magnificence and royal opulence of Rajasthan, luxury trains Palace on Wheels and Royal Rajasthan on Wheels are run jointly by RTDC and Indian railways. Jodhpur is one of the destinations of both of the trains. Recently a plan to start metro train service in jodhpur was proposed to decongest the city traffic.however the proposal is still pending with state government for its approval.

 

AIR

Jodhpur Airport is one of the prominent airports of Rajasthan. The airport is due for being transformed into an international airport. The work on which is going to start very soon. At present, there are daily flights from Delhi Mumbai and banglore to the city operated by Air India and Jet Airways.

 

ROAD

Jodhpur is connected by road to all major cities in Rajasthan and neighbouring states like Delhi, Ahmedabad, Surat, Ujjain, Agra etc. Apart from deluxe and express bus services to cities within the state, Rajasthan Roadways provides Volvo & Mercedes Benz bus service to Delhi, Ahmedabad, Jaipur, Udaipur and Jaisalmer (click here for time table and reservations). Recently, Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS) is launched in the city with low floor and semi low floor buses plying on major routes. Jodhpur is connected to the National Highway network with three National Highways and to the Rajasthan State Highway network with ten state highways. National Highways passing through Jodhpur:

 

WIKIPEDIA

96 of the world’s best chefs share their favorite food experiences

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CNN.com – Travel ift.tt/1Oh9IdM

 

On the eve of the 2016 World’s Best Restaurant awards, we asked chefs from the world’s current top 100 eateries to nominate an all-time favorite culinary experience that they’d recommend to traveling foodies.

 

We heard from 96 chefs at 93 restaurants and here’s what they proposed, in their words.

 

Breakfast at Krabi market in Thailand.

 

It opens very early in the morning and closes at lunchtime, so it’s best to reach the place at 7 a.m., a magic hour, with the remaining freshness of the night, the still atmosphere, and the rising sun that starts waking up your senses.

 

Exuberant local products, the smell of the fruits, the durian perfume, fantasy textures.

 

For a cook, it’s like arriving in paradise when reaching the food area of the market, with lots of people cooking and eating, the fragrance of fermented shrimp paste, the rich variety of curries, coconut and coriander, and then discovering a very interesting sweet kitchen — don’t miss the steamed pumpkins, filled with a curdled eggs, milk and sugar shake.

 

Full spoons of pleasure.

 

Whenever I travel, the first place I want to see is the local market.

 

This gives me a sense of how people relate to food and how important it is to them.

 

I love shopping in the covered

 

Albineli Market

 

in the center of Modena. It is a gathering place, bustling with great energy and even better products.

 

There are many stalls, from dairy products with the best Italian cheeses to

 

Manzini

 

, gastronomy with condiments, anchovies and spices, as well as fresh fruit, vegetables, meat, fish and cold cuts.

 

I encourage all our guests to stop by the turn of the century market just to soak up the busy atmosphere and see Italians doing what they do best — shop for their kitchens!

 

3. Rene Redzepi, Noma (Copenhagen, Denmark)

 

The greatest market I’ve ever been to is the Mercado de Abastos in Oaxaca, Mexico.

 

There’s a mind-blowing diversity of ingredients available.

 

You can spend hours trying to wrap your head around it.

 

There’s hundreds of food stalls serving seasonal drinks, tacos, and the crunchiest chicharrones (fried pork rind).

 

4. Virgilio Martinez Veliz, Central (Lima, Peru)

 

There is nothing like being up in the Andean mountains of Janac Chuquibamba in Lamay near Cusco, having freshly harvested native potatoes that are cooked under the ground with hot stones, and surrounding aromatics like muna (medicinal plant) and huacatay (black mint-like herb).

 

It’s an amazing experience to see the native Andean communities doing this type of cooking. Ask a local hotel chef in Cusco to recommend the best place to go and take a taxi to Lamay or ask a tour guide to take you.

 

There is this goat farm and restaurant in Provence called Ferme Auberge Le Castelas at Le Castelas, Sivergues, France, that is the most amazing place to visit. (84400 Sivergues;

 

+33 4 90 74 30 81)

 

The food is delicious, simply prepared, with dishes like roasted vegetables and local ham, roasted pork and potatoes, beautiful cheeses made on the property, and plenty of wine. Everything is served communally and the tables are all made of large rocks.

 

While you dine the goats from the farm roam the grounds following the food. The property provides you with stunning views overlooking the valley.

 

It’s a remarkable spot and one of the most memorable dining experiences I’ve ever had.

 

6. Andoni Luis Aduriz, Mugaritz (Renteria, Spain)

 

Gastronomic experiences are not bound to eating in fine dining restaurants. There are even times where they are not even related to eating or cooking. Just simply being close to iconic produce is enough to give me goose bumps.

 

A cold morning before dawn in the damp surroundings of

 

Tsukiji market

 

in Tokyo is one of my dearest memories.

 

The non-existent fish smell I had expected to find at the market and the collection of fish that resembled pricey rocks displayed like jewelery shocked me to the bone. I could only find comfort after eating a steaming bowl of ramen in one of the nearby shops.

 

Another experience I remember fondly is cooking mandioca flour at Belen de Para in Brazil. I didn’t do it at a restaurant, but at a family’s house surrounded by their warmth and teachings.

 

One of my favorite experiences would have to be at

 

Asador Etxebarri

 

in Spain.

 

The drive to this area alone is twice spectacular with an amazing outlook.

 

Chef Victor Arguinzoniz cooked a brilliant tasting menu, simple dishes sometimes only showcasing a single ingredient.

 

His cooking technique is amazing, preserving ancient cooking techniques using carefully selected firewood.

 

The grilled red prawn was perfectly cooked over embers and a desert of reduced milk ice cream made by reducing the milk slowly in the oven, then transferring it to the grill, where he cooked it in a pile of small embers.

 

The great thing is that you can easily go for lunch from most of Europe as it is located just 45 minutes by car from Bilbao.

 

8. Yoshihiro Narisawa, Narisawa (Tokyo)

 

My favorite place is Okinawa, the far southern islands of Japan.

 

My eternal interest is to create a cuisine that enables diners to live longer and more healthily.

 

Japan has the longest life expectancy in the world and the Okinawans the longest life expectancy in Japan.

 

Known for stunning beaches and coral reefs, the sub-tropical climate and rich history of Okinawa has created a unique culinary tradition

 

There are many great restaurants that serve traditional Okinawan food, but try

 

Cafe Garamanjyaku

 

.

 

You will be amazed by the flavor of the vegetables, herbs and pulses, probably like nothing you have ever experienced before — a meal that makes you feel you are being detoxicated while you’re eating; a meal that makes you feel healthy.

 

9. Alex Atala, D.O.M. (Sao Paulo, Brazil)

 

Definitely one of my favorite food experiences is

 

Mugaritz

 

. I’m a huge fan and friend of chef Andoni Aduriz.

 

The simplicity and elegance with which Andoni interprets ingredients fascinates me.

 

I take inspiration from this and use it in my work with the unusual Amazonian ingredients of my own culture.

 

10. Gaggan Anand, Gaggan (Bangkok, Thailand)

 

The street food on Kolkata in the Vardhan market area — the chats, kulfi, deep fried pakoras with chutney, milk shakes, sherbets, and puchkas — all this standing in the hustle and bustle of the busy streets and people pushing you.

 

Into that madness I like to dive, into this magic moment, and I have flashbacks of memories of what I ate and grew up with during the years I lived there. I literally crave it every time I am back in my homeland.

 

11. Mauro Colagreco, Mirazur (Menton, France)

 

During my honeymoon in Trancoso, in the state of Bahia in Brazil, I was walking on beautiful Coqueiros beach when I saw two guys bringing a bag from the sea.

 

I asked them what was inside and they showed me live rock lobster that they had just catch in the coral.

 

I asked them where I could eat that and they indicated to me a very simple restaurant with very good produce called

 

Barraca do Jonas

 

, just in front of the beach.

 

I ate there every day until I left Trancoso.

 

12. Alain Passard, L’Arpege (Paris)

 

A food experience that is worth going back to each year would be lunch at the Chinese restaurant in the garden of the Summer Palace in Beijing, China, at the

 

Aman

 

, as it takes you back in time.

 

The imperial food is delicate and surprising.

 

13. Victor Arguinzoniz, Asador Etxebarri (Bizkaia, Spain)

 

My most memorable food experience was dining at

 

Nihonryori RyuGin

 

in Tokyo on a trip to Japan.

 

I loved the discipline, extremely high quality of product, and incredible technique the chef uses.

 

14. Gaston Acurio and Diego Munoz, Astrid y Gaston (Lima, Peru)

 

Gaston Acurio: A few hours eating in Lima, the city of cebiches. We hit the streets at noon to visit the ceviche vendors.

 

One of them, Bam Bam, does black clam ceviche, conches negras ceviche.

 

After, we walk to Picanteria nearby, to experience northern Peru style ceviche. Around 12:30 p.m. we go to Chez Wong to enjoy pret-a-porter ceviche by Javier Wong.

 

At 1:30 p.m. we go for a very cheap but good ceviche at Ronald, a family neighbourhood-style cebicheria.

 

At 2:30 p.m. we finish in our La Mar Cebicheria, where you can have sea urchins, raw crayfish, and pejerrey ceviches with Peruvian cocktails.

 

Diego Munoz: I have a few favorite food experiences. First, I will travel to eat whatever my mom cooks since we live far apart.

 

Secondly, I would love to be able to eat again at El Bulli,

 

Dos Palillos

 

,

 

Noma

 

and

 

Mugaritz

 

. I also love to discover more huariques (small hidden restaurants) in Peru and around the world.

 

All of them have something in common that make them special at any level, and that is that their cooks have decided to make the best food that they can.”

 

15. Heinz Reitbauer, Steirereck (Vienna, Austria)

 

Something I look forward to every year is the Bio-Jungpflanzen Markt ran by the

 

Noah’s Ark

 

seed savers association in Schiltern, Lower Austria.

 

Hobby gardeners and small organic farmers from all over the country descend upon this small village with their rare plants, seeds and delicious homemade products, creating a real festival atmosphere.

 

It is always a joy and an inspiration to walk the stalls and see, taste, and be inspired by the passion and creativity on display.

 

16. Enrico Olivera, Pujol (Mexico City)

 

My favorite food experience is the Sunday market at Tlacolula, in Oaxaca.

 

The quality and diversity of the ingredients, the smells, colors and people are almost too beautiful to be true.

 

Walking through the butcher shops where you can buy some tasajo (thinly sliced beef) and cook it over some charcoal gives it a ceremonial charm.

 

17. Juan Mari Arzak, Arzak (Guipuzcoa, Spain)

 

I love the Anana salt roasted squid at Pedro Subijana’s restaurant

 

Akelarre

 

. The squid are served raw on a base of the salt and fresh seasonal tomato at the table, where they are covered by oven-heated salt.

 

That way they are cooked perfectly, right in front of the diner.

 

The flavor and texture are marvelous. It reminds me of the bottom of the sea. It’s pure iodine, aroma, multi-sensoriality, and integrity.

 

It is an experience that you can only have in a place that stands out for its magic, bio-sensoriality, and dependence on the light and the sea.

 

Pedro Subijana is one of the best chefs in the world and his restaurant is without doubt a unique spot overlooking the sea.

 

18. Eric Ripert, Le Bernardin (New York)

 

Every spring, I try and visit the market in the old town in Nice.

 

I love the smells, the colous and the taste of the produce — it is just so fresh and gorgeous and I really try to make an excuse to visit every year!

 

19. Eneko Atxa, Azurmendi (Bizkaia, Spain)

 

I was really impressed when I discovered the street food culture of Thailand, especially in Bangkok, but also on Phuket and north of the island where my restaurant Aziamendi is.

 

There, people eat everyday on the streets — at food stalls by the side of the road and simple family-owned restaurants.

 

It is a different way to enjoy food, its smells, its flavors and textures.

 

It makes me happy to see that there are societies where daily life revolves around food and people enjoy meals together each day, sitting outside around the same table with strangers.

 

20. Brett Graham, The Ledbury (London)

 

A special place for me was on holidays with my wife and we visited this great little place called

 

Restaurant Boccon di Vin

 

, which is in Montalcino in Tuscany.

 

The views are amazing of course, but the onion soup was superb, made by the father of the owner to the same recipe everyday.

 

22. David Thompson, Nahm (Bangkok)

 

One of my favorite street food restaurants does one of the best renditions of an oyster omelet I have ever had.

 

A crisp and rich base of eggs topped with an unctuous sauce of oysters and spring onions.

 

Sprinkle it with some white pepper and splash over the Sriracha chilli sauce and you’ll understand why the place has been going for 40 years.

 

They sell other dishes but I have never been able to forgo this pearl.

 

The name of this shop house is Nai Mong Hoi Nang Tort (539 Thanon Phlapplaachai, off Charoen Krung Road) but locals know it as “the oyster omelet house.”

 

For non-locals, look for the two mirrors on the wall and the dark smoky pan sticking out onto the street.

 

23. Vladimir Mukhin, White Rabbit (Moscow, Russia)

 

Food, seasonal products, new combinations of flavors — every day they give me the most thrilling experiences of my life, the most recent trying bread with birch lub.

 

Lub is a soft piece of wood between the bark and trunk.

 

In Russia, since ancient times, birch and pine lub have been added to bread when wheat flour was expensive.

 

It was exciting to restore the recipe.

 

And it turned out that it is really a gastronomic product with an amazing aroma and unusual fine bitterness that comes after the crisp sweetness, and is immediately replaced by the light tenderness of a crumb.

 

For me, there is no such a thing as one favorite food experience.

 

There are moments, sublime encounters of the third type, conjunction of circumstances that build strong memories and cannot be duplicated.

 

Tthe veal cutlet of my mother; the surprising Turkish burger and orange juice from over-touristy Taksim Square, Istanbul; the essential perfection of naked food wrapped with smoke from

 

Bilbao at Etxebarri

 

; the unbelievable chefs’ communion of Alain Ducasse’s 25 years at the

 

Louis XV

 

.

 

Humble, surprising, eccentric, choking, down to earth and moon-like moments.

 

Yes, they are map-able, on the planet and in your head.

 

25. Magnus Nilsson, Faviken (Jarpen, Sweden)

 

I think it is always worth traveling to eat food prepared by people who are passionate about what they do, regardless of where they do it and what it is that they produce.

 

There are so many great food experiences out there, I would never single one out.

 

26. Grant Achatz, Alinea (Chicago)

 

Dining in Kyoto at

 

Kitch

 

.

 

The blend of service, technique, ambiance and food makes it like no other place in the world and makes it worth a trip to Japan.

 

27. Enrico Crippa, Piazza Duomo (Alba, Italy)

 

Everyday I take a sort of trip to my biodynamic garden, located on the way to Barolo village, not far from the restaurant.

 

All the produce I see there has been chosen by me and I decide when to pick something to give my diners the best taste possible.

 

I love the vegetables and I love to share this passion with my diners through my cuisine.

 

That is what makes my garden very special!

 

28. Luke Dale Roberts, The Test Kitchen (Cape Town, South Africa)

 

Being half Swiss, as a child I traveled most years to Switzerland with my family.

 

You cannot beat a really good fondue in an alpine restaurant after a hard day’s skiing.

 

The last fondue I had was at

 

Le Namaste

 

in Verbier whilst I was visiting my pop-up Pot Luck Club.

 

That combination of healthy exhaustion, the smell of melting cheese and the cozy atmosphere is unique.

 

29. Seiji Yamamoto, Nihonryori RyuGin (Tokyo, Japan)

 

The blow fish called “fugu” in Japanese — only the chefs who have a specific license are allowed to prepare this luxurious fish.

 

For me, there is only one restaurant in all of Japan that serves the best fugu.

 

It’s Maru Yasu (7-6 Koushien Ichibancho Nishinomiya City, Hyogo, Japan).

 

It might be a little bit far from Tokyo, but it’s definitely worth the visit.

 

30. Joachim Wissler, Restaurant Vendome (Cologne, Germany)

 

Especially when I travel, I always get inspired by the culture, by the people, and by the local food.

 

I am convinced that my curiosity to always try to discover something new plays an extraordinary role in my work.

 

As a result my dishes deal with different aspects of the produce or the philosophy, represented at the center of each plate.

 

This center also can be a culinary throwback to memories from my childhood, like a Sunday meatloaf or the smell of little mushrooms on the lawn at springtime.

 

31. Bjorn Frantzen, Restaurant Frantzen (Stockholm, Sweden)

 

Every year I travel to the west coast of Sweden to Smogen.

 

They have the best langoustines.

 

You cook them with dill and beer and it’s probably the best meal you will ever enjoy.

 

Served best with a cold beer.

 

32. Ben Shewry, Attica (Melbourne, Australia)

 

For me, it’s a road trip from San Diego to Santa Cruz on the west coast of the United States, stopping at the many taquerias that are a great feature of the Californian food scene.

 

The generosity and humility of these taco stands, small restaurants and food trucks, is a poignant reminder that sometimes the most delicious food can cost as little as $1.

 

33. Sven Elverfeld, Aqua (Wolfsburg, Germany)

 

I worked in the small fishing village Agios Nikolaos on the island of Crete in Greece in the early 90s and spent one of the best times of my life there so far.

 

When you take the track from this village to Lassithi Pleateau you find different small taverns, which are unknown to tourists.

 

Eating the supposedly simple Cretan salad with tomatoes, feta cheese, cucumber, green bell pepper, onions, a great olive oil, red wine vinegar, wild mountain oregano, sea salt and the typical dry bread Dakos, will always remain in my memory.

 

Simplicity can be awesome if you have the perfect products.

 

34. Massimiliano Alajmo, Le Calandre (Padua, Italy)

 

I have two favorite food experiences.

 

The first is lunch in

 

Faith Willinger’s kitchen

 

in Florence because she serves some of the most authentic Italian food made with the most high-quality and hard-to-come-by ingredients.

 

The second is eating the spaghetti con le patelle, a coastal mollusk, served at I

 

l San Pietro di Positano

 

.

 

35. Jorge Vallejo, Quintonil (Mexico City)

 

My best dining experience was in a small restaurant in the city of Copenhagen called

 

Noma

 

.

 

Since I also had the opportunity to be part of this restaurant for a small period as a cook, I experienced the entire philosophy and must say that the food is absolutely delicious, which at the end is what matters.

 

37. Mikel Alonso, Biko (Mexico City)

 

In Oaxaca, Mexico, during the first rains of the year different varieties of insects are collected: chapulines, chinicules, hormigas. One of the delicacies there that most astonished me is called Chicatana’s Mole, made with giant winged flying ants.

 

This exotic and delectable dish is served at the

 

Restaurant Pitiona

 

.

 

You must try it with rib eye and hand-made tortillas, along with a good mezcal from the region.

 

38. Richard Ekkebus, Amber (Hong Kong)

 

Hong Kong is no doubt one of the most amazing dining scenes in the world, where every food culture is represented at its very best.

 

One of my all time favorite experiences is eating at our favorite Cantonese restaurant,

 

The Chairman

 

.

 

The steamed flowery crab with aged Shao Xing wine and chicken oil, and their braised spareribs with preserved plums and black vinegar are amazing.

 

The restaurant is special because it does not do the traditional and predictable menus you see in most restaurants. It takes pride in bringing old family recipe recipes to life and in the ingredients used.

 

39. Mikel Ponce, Quique Dacosta (Alicante, Spain)

 

The best experiences I ever have lived have been in Spain — in Sevilla, small and homely but very good bars like

 

Casablanca

 

; pintxo bars in San Sebastian; and one very special market, Mercado Central in Valencia, a beautiful and interesting place to visit because of the products and especially the people.

 

If we talk about gastronomic experiences at restaurants, my favorites are

 

El Celler de Can Roca

 

and

 

Mugaritz

 

.

 

They are representatives of the avant garde cuisine of the Spanish movement.

 

I’m convinced that if you want to live a wonderful experience, you can live it in these places.

 

40. Chef Thomas Keller, Per Se (New York)

 

There’s so much I enjoy about visiting Australia, starting with the wonderfully generous people.

 

But the food is a huge draw. I’m enthralled by Neil Perry’s cooking and the warmth of his personality.

 

And I love Australian wines.

 

If I had to single out just one food experience down under, it would be the date tart at

 

Rockpool

 

, with its sublime texture and alluring color palate.

 

It’s the best tart I’ve eaten in my life.

 

41. Helena Rizzo, Mani (Sao Paulo, Brazil)

 

My favorite food experience was witnessing a small industry in Kyoto, Japan, where they make yuba (soy milk) in a wooden pool.

 

Wonderful!

 

42. Rodolfo Guzman, Borago (Santiago, Chile)

 

El Rancho de la Senora Maria is a very humble place to eat and very cheap.

 

You will find the Mapuche chickens running all over the place and the best empanadas and short ribs cooked on the earth oven.

 

The place is about 35 minutes from Santiago and has no address.

 

From Santiago go to Kilometer 41, General San Martin Highway, in the direction of Los Andes on the way to the border with Argentina and you will see a big sign.

 

(Tie) 42. Albert Adria, Tickets (Barcelona, Spain)

 

Restaurant Umi (Sanminami Building, 1st Floor, Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku; 03 3401 3368) in Tokyo. It’s special because of the perfection.

 

The perfection starts by knowing that it doesn’t exist, but this restaurant gets very close. The chef is a true character and his knowledge of what he does is almost offensive.

 

Another experience very important to me is the fact that I live right next to la Boqueria market (Las Ramblas, Barcelona) which allows me to keep track of the new features and changes at the market.”

 

44. Mitsuharu Tsumura, Maido (Lima, Peru)

 

My favorite food experience was in Arequipa, a beautiful city south of Lima in Peru, where talking about food is something very serious.

 

We had an amazing experience having typical preparations from the ladies who cook in picanteras, where you can try the traditional cuisine from Arequipa.

 

Every preparation is full of taste and top quality products, such as river prawns, pork trotters, cuy (guinea pig meat) and rocoto relleno (stuffed peppers).

 

Mindblowing.

 

45. Christian F. Puglisi, Relae (Copenhagen, Denmark)

 

On my first pizza research trip to Campania, Italy, I drove my way down to Paestum, south of Napoli, to

 

Tenuta Vannulo

 

.

 

They make the most incredible organic buffalo mozzarella you can imagine.

 

As you drive up to the farm, you are surrounded by fields speckled with buffaloes chilling in the ponds.

 

I could hear their mooing and booing in the background, as I tasted the freshest and tastiest cheese of my life.

 

That’s when I truly understood what mozzarella was about.

 

I was born in Taiwan and grew up in France, until six years ago when I decided to settle down in Singapore and start my own restaurant.

 

Taiwan, this beautiful island, holds my happiest childhood memory.

 

I was fascinated by the native nine tribes spread out all over Taiwan.

 

Some still today live in the mountains and farm, fish and hunt.

 

The tribes not only have their own language but also distinct cuisine.

 

I was lucky to travel to the deep mountain to visit the tribe in Hualian, north of Taiwan, to discover traditional native tribe cuisine, which is nearly extinct in this modern day.

 

We foraged for wild ferns, wild succulents, most of them without names, and had them with game and wild boar, cured and cooked on the hot slate, and homemade rice wine.

 

Ever since, I return to Taiwan once a year to discover the authentic Taiwanese tribal flavors, and most importantly, re-discover my roots.

 

47. Alain Ducasse, Alain Ducasse au Plaza Athenee (Paris)

 

I love visiting markets to feed my curiosity and my passion for produce, to meet local people, and eat delicious simple food.

 

I have visited many of them around the world gaining inspiration, from Tunisia to Tokyo to San Sebastian.

 

A favorite of mine is the Cour Saleya market in Nice, where the popular street food socca — a thin crepe made of chickpea flour, water and olive oil — is made and eaten warm on the spot.

 

48. Andreas Caminada, Schloss Schauenstein (Furstenau, Switzerland)

 

One of my most favorite dishes reminds me of my childhood.

 

When I was young we used to eat maluns (slow-fried, scrambled potatoes) on special occasions, which is traditionally served with apple puree and a piece of Alps cheese.

 

It is this cheese, made of milk provided by cows fed on altitudes as high as 1,800 meters, which triggers the taste of pure and untouched nature.

 

My favorite place from which I get this cheese for my restaurant is Stizun Da Latg Andeer (Veia Granda 7440, Andeer, Switzerland).

 

At

 

Aponiente

 

, where chef Angel Leon hangs a picture of himself near the kitchen, his hulking frame emerging from the body of a squid, merman-like.

 

He’s not lording over the fish, like so many photos adorning the walls of fish restaurants; he’s emerging from its core, at one with the squid.

 

It’s humble in the same way Angel’s cuisine is infused with humility.

 

The picture tells you he’s going to speak for the fish.

 

Which he does.

 

Angel breaks rules, not with wild juxtapositions or chemical manipulations, but by looking to the sea to define his cuisine.

 

A single clam is poached so lightly in its own juices that it appears to be raw. Tomaso, a fish that’s usually ground up into meal, is salted and thinly sliced, acquiring a delicate, custard-like consistency.

 

50. Thomas Keller, French Laundry (Yountville, California)

 

Whenever I’m in London attending the World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards, it’s become a ritual to have a late dinner with my colleagues at

 

St. John restaurant

 

.

 

Chef Fergus Henderson’s generous spirit is always present and the food is so good; he refines simplicity to the highest level.

 

Last year we broke tradition and dined at Bentley’s

 

Oyster Bar and Grill

 

where chef Richard Corrigan has exemplified what a true oyster bar should be.

 

The freshness of the local catch and texture of the batter for the fish and chips cannot be beat; they are some of the best I have ever tasted.

 

Along with the chips with tartar sauce, we ordered local oysters, mushy peas and toasted with a bottle of Sancerre.

 

51. Rasmus Kofoed, Geranium (Copenhagen, Denmark)

 

My favorite food experience in the world is a trip to San Sebastian in northern Spain.

 

If you love food, here are all your heart’s desires, from extreme creativity at

 

Mugaritz

 

, amazing flavors at the rural restaurant

 

Asador Etxebarri

 

, to late-night dining at the busy pinxtos-bars of the old town.

 

Have a walk through town, which is beautifully placed around a lagoon, up to the old fortress where you can take in the breathtaking views.

 

If you get hungry on your way, you can either snack on wild sea fennel growing on the old city wall or stop by the very simple, but excellent seafood restaurant at the harbor and order grilled octopus with lemon and parsley.

 

52. Tim Raue, Tim Raue (Berlin, Germany)

 

Since my cooking style is mostly Chinese, I travel to Hong Kong several times per year, to be in touch with Asian flavors and tastes.

 

Every time, I go first to Tim Ho Wan (Shop 8, 2-20 Kwong Wa Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon), an outstanding dim sum restaurant, which allows me to immerse in the textures and tastes of Cantonese food.

 

Afterwards, I go to the dry market to buy ingredients that I would never get in Germany.

 

53. Gert De Mangeleer, Hertog Jan (Bruges, Belgium)

 

During a research trip to Japan, I was overwhelmed by the sushi culture, the technique and the way how top level restaurants serve it at the counter.

 

The search for freshness, the quality of the products and the respect for them is the same way I work myself.

 

The Japanese food culture inspires me to bring peace and even more simplicity to my own way of cooking.

 

But the place where I enjoy this culture most is

 

Zuma

 

in London. I visit Zuma at least five times per year.

 

54. Peter Goossens, Hof Van Cleve (Kruishoutem, Belgium)

 

Every food experience is special to me.

 

I admire every professional chef and cook who is engaged with the craft.

 

Each chef has his or her own style, which I surely appreciate, even if it’s very different from mine.

 

My favorite food experiences are all at restaurants in Belgium and include

 

Bon-Bon

 

in Brussels,

 

Bistrot Du Nord

 

in Antwerp,

 

Souvenir

 

in Ypres, and

 

L’Air du Temps

 

in Liernu.

 

I had the most amazing time at the

 

Fremont Diner

 

, driving through Sonoma County and the redwood forests of Muir woods in the U.S.

 

We stopped for a bite to keep us going.

 

With a great outdoor space, great setting, and Napa up ahead it was a great meal.

 

Fried chicken and Ruebens washed down with a Coke, it was a great all American experience.

 

56. Joshua Skenes, Saison (San Francisco, California)

 

There are a few experiences that come to mind but in Tokyo, there are a couple of place that have a heightened understanding of ingredient quality, handling, restraint, respect and hospitality.

 

At first glance it’s easy to miss the depth and extraordinary work that go into this “simplistic” approach but “simple” is often the most complex and difficult.

 

Each is a special place.

 

For me, they’re like home: restaurants

 

Ishikawa

 

and Matsukawa (

 

Akasaka 1-11-6, Roppongi, Minato-Ko, Tokyo, Japan; +81 3 6277 7371

 

).

 

57. Bertrand Grebaut, Septime (Paris, France)

 

I think my favorite food experience is eating a little milk fed pork in Bangkok, which is poached, dried and then caramelized by turning above a big wood fire.

 

Then it is served in two courses like a roast Peking duck, the crispy skin first and the meat after.

 

The restaurant is super simple, on the side of the highway, so it’s just street food, but so tasty and so rough, it’s crazy.

 

Eating this kind of dish can create emotions as great as the best dish you could eat at one of the restaurants on this list.

 

58. Peter Gilmore, Quay (Sydney, Australia)

 

One of my favorite things to do whilst in London is visit

 

Borough Market

 

near London Bridge.

 

The sheer quality and variety of produce on offer is inspiring.

 

It’s hard to go past the grilled Comte cheese and pickles served on sourdough from one of the stalls in the market.

 

I have been many times to Singapore and to Newton Street Food Centre (500 Clemenceau Ave. North, Newton), an amazing food court.

 

One night I went with Sam Leong, one of the most influential chefs in the city and that night was one of the most unforgettable gastronomic experiences of my life.

 

Two hours of gastronomic pleasure — sweet, acidic, smoke, heat, bitter and spice flavours — from the famous BBQ satay, oyster omelette with Sriracha sauce, black pepper frog legs, chilli crab, beef kway teow, prawns with salted duck egg, chicken and rice, to crispy baby squid with chilli.

 

60. Mikael Jonsson, Hedone (London)

 

My favorite food experience is walking around the food markets of the French and Italian Riviera.

 

The diversity of produce is exceptional.

 

I try not to miss a visit to Longo Saverio, the fishmonger at the market in Ventimiglia, who will have super fresh gamberoni or red deepwater prawns, caught the night before, resting in buckets with seawater and ice.

 

The eyes of the prawns are like light bulbs. I just chew down a couple of prawns, raw with shells and heads.

 

The flavor explosion is to die for.

 

61. Martin Berasategui, Martin Berasategui (San Sebastian, Spain)

 

In all the places I visit in the world I have great experiences, but I find in the local markets a lot of tenacity, effort, fight.

 

These people tug at my heartstrings with their generosity.

 

It’s all about sharing with all of us who like cooking. You never see a long face.

 

They’re always happy, with a fantastic disposition, trying to make us feel great.

 

All the local markets that I visit evolve, improve and overcome obstacles.

 

They’ve always worked really hard to provide us with the best products. They know what they do and they do it right, and that makes me happy.

 

Chinese cuisine, especially Cantonese cuisine, is one of my favorite cuisines in the world, because it has a long history, precise cooking techniques, and the food is simply amazing.

 

One of my favorites, Celebrity Cuisine (3 Kau U Fong, Central; +852 3650 0000), is the best Cantonese restaurant in Hong Kong.

 

Chef Fu’s magic hands create wonders that you can never imagine.

 

Don’t leave without trying the Braised Beef Brisket with Turnip in Pot.

 

64. Esben Holmboe Bang, Maaemo (Oslo, Norway)

 

I’m fascinated by Norwegian nature.

 

We have such a unique climate in Norway that makes for some remarkable produce.

 

One of my most memorable food experiences was at Grondalen Farm some 50 kilometers from Oslo.

 

It’s an old farm that’s been in the same family since the 1600s and they raise organic dairy cattle that are allowed to roam and eat a great diversity of grasses, clover, flowers and herbs.

 

I vividly remember drinking the warm milk straight from the cow after I had milked it and immediately felt so close to nature.

 

It gave me a new perspective on cooking and taught me how important it is to always be honest to the ingredients.

 

65. David Scabin, Combal.Zero (Rivoli, Italy)

 

Foxy’s Bar

 

on Jost Van Dyke Island, British Virgin Islands.

 

Jost Van Dyke is a minuscule island with a big reputation. The only way to get there is by sea on a speedboat.

 

There I had the most amazing aromatic green fish curry with rice.

 

The whole experience is magical and the place breathtaking. Unforgettable experience!

 

66. Matt Orlando, Amass (Copenhagen, Denmark)

 

My favorite food experience was dinner at a country house in an Italian town called Dolceacqua with my wife and mother.

 

The house was overlooking these amazing olive orchards and everything we ate came either directly from the family farm or from the immediate area.

 

And the ravioli was the best I have ever eaten.

 

67. Daniel Humm, NoMad (New York)

 

Russ & Daughters

 

is one of the quintessential spots for me in New York and is a place that I always recommend.

 

It’s a special place, one with deep roots in both the culinary and cultural history of New York.

 

The smoked and cured fish is some of the best around, the service always friendly. Try a bagel with trout roe and horseradish cream cheese.

 

It’s a bit of a dark horse.

 

68. Josean Alija, Nerua (Bilbao, Spain)

 

The pintxos of Bilbao. Eating pintxos, going bar by bar, is an alternative way to taste a cuisine born from the total freedom and from the mastery of joining different, purely local ingredients.

 

Walking to different local bars to enjoy their specialties and, above all, sense of humor, relationships, stories, is a very enjoyable experience that has inspired Nerua to develop our menus and the Nerua experience itself.

 

69. Sean Gray, Momofuku Ko (New York)

 

Sitting at the chefs table at

 

Cabane a Sucre Au Pied De Cochon

 

in Canada, on chairs lined with wolf pelts, a multi-course family-style feast was prepared for eight of us.

 

In between courses, we were presented with an opportunity to get up and sit back on large leather sofas, watch ice hockey on a 60″ TV (also in the kitchen), and have shots of Canadian whiskey chased with the day’s maple sap boil, while the next course was prepared.

 

Courses included a 30-egg omelet souffle with two whole lobsters, as well as six young chickens, slow roasted in maple syrup, a traditional presentation of a whole smoked sturgeon and a whole smoked pork shoulder which came from a smoker set up on the front porch.

 

We later found ourselves smoking cigars presented to us from the kitchen on that same porch.

 

It was the best experience I’ll probably ever have.

 

70. Tetsuya Wakuda, Waku Ghin (Singapore)

 

Having been traveling to Singapore for the last 20 years, I am fond of the food culture, as Singaporeans really love to eat.

 

I would even call it one of the national sports.

 

This makes Singapore a very interesting and rich gastronomic hub.

 

Whenever I’m there, I hop into a cab and go around town to enjoy some great food.

 

A favorite is the Old Tiong Bahru Bak Kut The (58 Seng Poh Road) for herbal pork rib soup for breakfast, because it is a very authentic local dish that is well prepared by the owners.

 

The side dishes also complement the soup nicely.

 

I love the experience of being in a local coffee shop located in an old neighborhood in Singapore.

 

71. Jonnie and Therese Boer, De Librije (Zwolle, Netherlands)

 

One of our favorite places is

 

Yardbird

 

in Hong Kong.

 

This restaurant serves one of the best yakitoris we have ever had!

 

It is a fantastic place by the former chef of Zuma.

 

The vibe and atmosphere are amazing!

 

It is a typical restaurant that can only be found outside Europe.

 

72. Christopher Kostow, Restaurant at Meadowood (St. Helena, California)

 

Scootering around the island of Koh Samui, Thailand, stopping at various noodle stands along the way.

 

My wife determining where to stop based on smells as we drove by.

 

The island is beautiful in parts and when the warm rains hit, the stands provide sustenance and shelter.

 

73. Jonny Lake, The Fat Duck (Berkshire, UK)

 

A visit to a cabane a sucre or sugar shack in Quebec, Canada, in early spring is one of my favorite food experiences in the world.

 

Traditionally it is a celebration of the sap harvest from the maple trees, which is used to make maple syrup.

 

There’s an enormous meal comprised mainly of pork in various incarnations and traditional Quebecois recipes, accompanied by jugs of maple syrup, followed by drinking, music and line dancing.

 

74. Julien Royer, Jaan (Singapore)

 

My best food experience is the one I can get back home in Cantal in the countryside of Auvergne, France, at a very particular period at the end of spring and beginning of summer, when the family garden is at its peak.

 

The tomatoes, radishes, melon, eggplant, zucchinis, haricots verts and garlic are just so great and pure in taste.

 

This is absolutely fantastic.

 

Other than that I always enjoy discovering local markets wherever I am to “feel” the soul of food.

 

75. Daniel Patterson, Coi (San Francisco)

 

I grew up in a small town on the coast of Massachusetts and one of my earliest seafood memories is digging and eating steamed soft-shell clams, which everyone there calls steamers.

 

We would remove them from their shells, drag them through ocean water to rinse off the grit, and then dip them in melted butter.

 

I’ve lived in California for 25 years now, but every time I go home during the summer I find a restaurant near the coast, order a bucket of steamers, and eat them outside, where I can listen to the sound of the ocean.

 

Try

 

The Back Eddy

 

in Westport, Massachusetts.

 

77. Manish Mehrotra, India Accent (New Delhi, India)

 

One of my most memorable meals was the mushroom tasting menu at

 

Mathias Dahlgren

 

, Stockholm.

 

The textures, the presentation, the service, everything was par excellence.

 

I also had a great experience at

 

NoMad

 

, New York. Their roast chicken is to die for.

 

78. Michel Troisgros, La Maison Troisgros (Roanne, France)

 

I live in a small house five minutes from my work.

 

We have a garden of herbs, spices and tomatoes.

 

My greatest pleasure is to spend a little time there, to pick the produce, and appreciate the generosity and gesture of Marie-Pierre, my wife.

 

This is the best food experience because it has feeling.

 

79. Tae Hwan Ryu, Ryunique (Seoul, South Korea)

 

I love eating the produce of Jeju Island, a big island located in Southeast Korea.

 

Jeju produce, such as seafood like sea urchins, shellfish and fish like mackerel, along with fresh fruit like mangoes and mandarins, is so fresh and so different to anywhere else that it’s on a unique level.

 

80. Daniel Boulud, Daniel (New York)

 

I trained under

 

Michel Guerard

 

when I was in my early twenties.

 

He was one of my first chef-mentors and taught me an immense amount about cooking creatively, soulfully and elegantly.

 

Fifteen years later, after I had moved to New York City and opened my own restaurant, I went back to the remote village of Eugenie-les-Bains and dined as a paying guest for the first time.

 

That dinner was one of the most memorable I’ve had, because it was a journey to get to the restaurant, a journey through the meal itself, and symbolic of my life journey.

 

All the best food experiences are ones that have roots in something more than the food you’re eating in that moment.

 

81. David McMillan and Fred Morin, Joe Beef (Montreal, Canada)

 

Eating our way through French Montreal.

 

Firmly rooted in Montreal history, our markets and French culinary heritage provide all the fodder we need to cook our version of the food of Quebec and Montreal.

 

We practice the old foods of Quebec and all our memories stem from French Canada.

 

82. Alain Ducasse, Le Louis XV (Monte Carlo, Monaco)

 

At the

 

Rivea London

 

, young chef Damien Leroux gives his take on the socca and the iconic popular dish, the Nicoise salad.

 

Damien gently wraps the ingredients of the Nicoise salad into the warm crispy socca. It is one of his signature starters.

 

83. German Martitegui, Tegui (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

 

I have three favorite food experiences: Eating on the street in Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam, visiting the foodie city of San Francisco and enjoying the seasonal produce of summer in Buenos Aires.

 

84. Martin Benn, Sepia (Sydney, Australia)

 

One of my favorite food experiences has to be in Tokyo, Japan, at

 

Den

 

.

 

Chef Zaiyu Hasegawa’s menu is a whimsical take on tradition and so very delicious. The counter seats just eight guests and it’s fun to watch him work as he has a great sense of humor that translates to his cuisine.

 

86. Hajime Yoneda, Hajime (Osaka, Japan)

 

I spent my childhood and adolescence in the small, simple mountain town of Hirakata, where there were a lot of wild raspberries, akebia vine, Japanese knot-weed and other wild plants.

 

Their tastes and that formative experience made a profound impression on me.

 

87. Dan Hunter, Brae (Birregurra, Australia)

 

After working in the Basque Country many years ago and returning regularly ever since, it has become my favorite food destination.

 

There is such a great range of high quality eating options, from small local markets and provedores such as La Bretxa, Don Serapio and Solbes in San Sebastian with the best wild mushrooms, jamon, cheeses, fresh fruit and vegetables, to the high-end Michelin-star experience at iconic restaurants like

 

Mugaritz

 

,

 

Arzak

 

and

 

Azurmend

 

.

 

The traditional seaside village of Guetaria is great for a day trip for the classic fish restaurants such as

 

Elcano

 

.

 

Or head out to Etxebarri for super-local, produce-driven food.

 

Tolosa is fantastic for Carne ala Brasa at

 

Casa Julian

 

or

 

Casa Nicolas

 

.

 

The pintxo bars of Bilbao and San Sebastian are a highlight — every visit, I find new places to eat, such as the modern Atari Gastroteka (Calle Major 18) which we discovered on our last visit — but don’t make the classic mistake of eating pintxos every day. There’s so much more to discover!

 

I love eating street food when I travel, especially when I go to Asia.

 

In Singapore there are hawker centers with many small stalls inside. A well known one is Newton Circus, but I also visited smaller unknown ones.

 

One of my favorite dishes is yong yau foo, a sort of DIY Chinese dish where you choose different types of fishcakes and tofu, mushrooms and gourd that are cooked on the spot in a very fragrant broth.

 

(Tie) 88. Rainer Becker, Zuma (Dubai, UAE)

 

Lunch at

 

Nerua

 

in the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao by chef Josean Alija was a fascinating experience: the room was very simple and minimalist but the views of the external building by Frank Gehry and artwork were so incredible.

 

The juxtaposition of room with the exterior building became part of the dining experience.

 

Eating within that very simplistic environment, meant you focused everything on the flavours and textures of the dish, which had a great affect on the relationship you had with it.

 

It was only then you realized how the lines of the external building mirrored the curvature of the plates for example. It’s those details that inspire and excite.

 

Everything you choose as a chef has a great artistic element to it.

 

90. Ignacio Mattos, Estela (New York)

 

One of the best places I’ve been to is

 

Gjusta

 

in Venice Beach, California.

 

It’s an all-day operation from the people behind hot spot restaurant Gjellina. You walk into Gjusta and it’s this beautiful and kind of mind-blowing warehouse space.

 

The menu is overwhelming, with breakfast dishes, sandwiches, rotisserie plates, so many things. I like to go in the morning.

 

The porridge waffle is a standout. Once you grab your food, you can head to the outdoor space, sit on a bench or plastic crate, and enjoy your food in the LA sun.

 

91. Jose Avillez, Belcanto (Lisbon, Portugal)

 

Fish and shell fish from the Portuguese coast.

 

I’m sure it’s one of the world’s best.

 

The flavor is unique: delightful, fresh, delicate and deep at the same time.

 

Scientists believe that the Portuguese coastline offers a unique cradle at the world level, enabling highly appreciated fish species to reproduce.

 

Try the fresh fish and shellfish in Lisbon at Mercado da Ribeira (Ribeira’s Market) on Avenida 24 de Julho.

 

92. Fergus Henderson, St John (London)

 

There are many joys to be had in a world full of good things.

 

A sense of place and context is vital: perhaps an urchin fresh from the sea around the British Isles (just know a good fishmonger!) or a magical moment in a small sushi restaurant in Ginza at the hands of a master.

 

Perhaps a bowl of tripe and noodles at Lavender Food Square (

 

195 Lavender Street

 

) in Singapore or the ribs at

 

Martin’s BBQ

 

just outside Nashville, which I last washed down with more beer than I should have.

 

The company is as important as the context.

 

Many years ago on a glorious summer evening Thomas Keller treated Trevor (St John co-founder) and myself to dinner at The French Laundry that was memorable and marvellous, not only for the food, drink and conversation, but also for the length.

 

It is a magical moment when all these ingredients come together perfectly.

 

93. Yim Jung-sik, Jungsik (Seoul, South Korea)

 

My favorite food experience is eating the roasted chicken at

 

Golden Leaf

 

, the Cantonese restaurant at the Conrad Hotel, Hong Kong.

 

You cannot believe how crispy the skin is and how juicy tender the breast is.

 

96. Mehmet Gurs, Mikla (Istanbul, Turkey)

 

Simple hot smoked flounder right out of the smoker with a nice beer.

 

You can’t go wrong with that.

 

I’m always looking forward to it before going to the family summer house in Hitis on the Finnish Archipelago.

 

97. Sayan Isaksson, Esperanto (Stockholm, Sweden)

 

A nice place at the Golden Gai in Shinjuku, Tokyo, rather scabby and rough, but a nice area filled with small bars and izakayas.

 

We found this tiny bar which had a teppanyaki stove of some sort and the wall was literally dripping of brown fat caused by the cooking and we had a magical beef stew, funky okonomiyaki and cold beer.

 

98. Gebhard Schachermayer, Vila Joya (Albufeira, Portugal)

 

The experiences I never want to miss in my life are based on the two countries I love.

 

On my days off there is nothing better than going to the beach just in front of Vila Joya and enjoying great seafood like grilled fish and a chilled bottle of Vinho Verde.

 

On the other hand, I love traditional Austrian food and whenever I get the chance to visit Vienna, I go to the Naschmarkt (6 Naschmarkt, between Getreidemarkt and Chain Bridge), a great combination of a traditional food market and Austrian street food.

 

A Vienna sausage and fresh beer — it hardly can be better at least not for me.

 

99. Chan Yan Tak, Lung King Heen (Hong Kong)

 

I appreciate home cooking after a day of hustle and bustle in the kitchen and traditional steamed garoupa fish with soya sauce and Chinese steamed meat cake are my favorites.

 

There is nothing as simple and gratifying as a simple meal at home with family and friends. Man Sing Cafe (16 Wun Sha Street, Tai Han, Hong Kong) is a small local eatery that has been in service for half a century.

 

So juicy, it melts in the mouth, their signature steamed-pork patty tower with salty egg is a must-try.

 

100. David Kinch, Manresa (Los Gatos, California)

 

Most of my inspiration happens when stopping by

 

Love Apple Farms

 

, the farm and sustainability center, where Manresa has an exclusive relationship in growing a major portion of the vegetables we use at the restaurant.

 

Throughout seasonal changes, just taking a walk through the rows of growth — the colors, smells, and tastes; the anticipation of beds not quite ready, but just a little bit longer — serves as our menu muse through the course of the year.

 

Lara Dunston is a travel and food writer who has contributed to Australian Gourmet Traveller, Feast and Delicious magazines. She also blogs on slow, local and experiential travel at Grantourismotravels.com.

 

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Recipe Link: asmallbite.com/goli-baje-recipe-mangalore-bonda-recipe/

 

Goli baje recipe / Mangalore bajji recipe / Maida bonda or Mangalore bonda recipe by whatever name it is called, is a speciality snack from Udupi cuisine in Mangalore and South Canara region. It is a no fail recipe without any grinding process, the only main ingredient is to use sour curd and just ferment the batter for minimum 2 hours, then you get super pillowy soft, fluffy and spongy bajji. This is also a no onion, no garlic recipe, then why waiting? get ready with the batter and enjoy your weekend with this hot hot bajji with coconut chutney and a cup of filter coffee…

Wholesome and highly nutritious Raagi Rotti loaded with vegetables and served with Soppina Huli (Green leafy stew), Coconut Chutney and polished down with a glass of tender coconut water was our lunch today.

 

Raagi/Ragi/Finger Millet is one of the ancient crops originated in East Africa and came to India around 4000 years ago. Earliest records of its cultivation in India show that it was cultivated in the Hallur region of Karnataka in the later Iron Age. It remains one of the main ingredients of the staple diet in Karnataka which is the top producer & has 58% share in India's export of this crop. Although the grain’s protein content is comparable to that of rice, some ragi varieties have shown double that level. With its high nutrition value, rich mineral, antioxidant and fibre contents, it is still looked upon as a “poor person’s crop” or a “famine food” which is a shame as it has been scientifically proven to control diabetes, reduces bad cholesterol, prevents cardiovascular diseases, and has anti-cancer potential.

 

Traditionally, ragi is given to infants and young children as Ragi Malt as it is easier to digest. I grew up drinking it throughout my school years along with other food preparations like rotti (unleavened flatbread), dosa (leavened crepes), idli (steamed cakes) and ganji (conjee) all served with a steaming bowl of Sambar or Huli and assorted chutneys. In Karnataka, ragi is generally consumed in the form of ragi mudde (balls) which is the staple diet of many residents of South Karnataka, especially in the rural areas. Mudde is prepared by cooking the ragi flour with water to achieve a dough-like consistency. This is then rolled into 'balls' of desired size and consumed with huli or saaru. My first experience of eating Mudde was when I was studying masters in Bangalore where our hostel cook generously shared her lunch with me. The novice mudde eater that I was, I chewed the large piece of of mudde dunked in huli and ended up with a mouthful of sticky paste! After laughing for good 5 minutes, the lady showed me the proper way to eat it by taking a small biteable size of mudde, dipping it in the curry and swallowing it wholly without biting into the pieces! It is a skill that took me a long time to master!!!

 

Coming to today’s recipe (similar to this recipe - www.monsoonspice.com/2012/01/cabbage-akki-rotti-recipe-gl... ), I made Ragi Rotti by heating 2 tbsp of oil and adding mustard and cumin seeds, hing and curry leaves, then quickly fried very finely chopped onions and green chillies, followed by shredded cabbage and carrot. Added hot boiled water, chopped coriander leaves, salt, red chilli powder for some kick and mixed ragi flour. Turned off the heat and mixed everything to form dough. Once it was cool enough to handle, made lemon sized balls and patted down on a greased baking paper to make thin roti. Cooked on both sides, by drizzling some ghee/oil on the edges, until they turned brown and crisp. Served them hot with a hearty Soppina Huli and coconut chutney! It was a fabulous meal!

 

Copyright of monsoonspice.com

 

#monsoonspice #iphoneonly

A doughnut or donut (/ˈdoʊnət/ or /ˈdoʊnʌt/; see spelling differences) is a type of fried dough confectionery or dessert food. The doughnut is popular in many countries and prepared in various forms as a sweet snack that can be homemade or purchased in bakeries, supermarkets, food stalls, and franchised specialty outlets. Donuts are usually deep-fried from a flour dough, and typically either ring-shaped or without a hole, and often filled. Other types of batters can also be used, and various toppings and flavorings are used for different types, such as sugar, chocolate, or maple glazing. In addition to flour, doughnuts may also include such ingredients as water, leavening, eggs, milk, sugar, oil/shortening, natural flavors and/or artificial flavors.

 

The two most common types are the toroidal ring doughnut and the filled doughnut - which is injected with fruit preserves, cream, custard, or other sweet fillings. A small spherical piece of dough may be cooked as a doughnut hole. Other shapes include rings, balls, and flattened spheres, as well as ear shapes, twists and other forms. Doughnut varieties are also divided into cake and risen type doughnuts.

 

SHAPES

RINGS

Ring doughnuts are formed by joining the ends of a long, skinny piece of dough into a ring or by using a doughnut cutter, which simultaneously cuts the outside and inside shape, leaving a doughnut-shaped piece of dough and a doughnut hole from dough removed from the center. This smaller piece of dough can be cooked or added back to the batch to make more doughnuts. A disk-shaped doughnut can also be stretched and pinched into a torus until the center breaks to form a hole. Alternatively, a doughnut depositor can be used to place a circle of liquid dough (batter) directly into the fryer.

 

There are two types of ring doughnuts, those made from a yeast-based dough for raised doughnuts or made from a special type of cake batter. Yeast-raised doughnuts contain about 25% oil by weight, whereas cake doughnuts' oil content is around 20%, but they have extra fat included in the batter before frying. Cake doughnuts are fried for about 90 seconds at approximately 190 °C to 198 °C, turning once. Yeast-raised doughnuts absorb more oil because they take longer to fry, about 150 seconds, at 182 °C to 190 °C. Cake doughnuts typically weigh between 24 g and 28 g, whereas yeast-raised doughnuts average 38 g and are generally larger, and taller (due to rising) when finished.

 

TOPPING

After frying, ring doughnuts are often topped. Raised doughnuts are generally covered with a glaze (icing). Cake doughnuts can also be glazed, or powdered with confectioner's sugar, or covered with cinnamon and granulated sugar. They are also often topped with cake frosting (top-side only) and sometimes sprinkled with coconut, chopped peanuts, or sprinkles (also called jimmies).

 

HOLES

Doughnut holes are small, bite-sized doughnuts that were traditionally made from the dough taken from the center of ring doughnuts. Before long, doughnut sellers saw the opportunity to market "holes" as a novelty and many chains offer their own variety, some with their own brand names such as "Munchkins" from Dunkin' Donuts and "Timbits" from Tim Hortons.

 

Traditionally, doughnut holes are made by frying the dough removed from the center portion of the doughnut. Consequently, they are considerably smaller than a standard doughnut and tend to be spherical. Similar to standard doughnuts, doughnut holes may be topped with confections, such as glaze or powdered sugar.

 

Originally, most varieties of doughnut holes were derivatives of their ring doughnut (yeast-based dough or cake batter) counterparts. However, doughnut holes can also be made by dropping a small ball of dough into hot oil from a specially shaped nozzle or cutter. This production method has allowed doughnut sellers to produce bite-sized versions of non-ring doughnuts, such as filled doughnuts, fritters and Dutchies.

 

FILLED

The filled doughnut is a flattened sphere injected with fruit preserves, cream, custard, or other sweet fillings, and often dipped into powdered sugar or topped off with frosting. Common varieties include the Boston cream, coconut, key lime, and jelly.

 

OTHER SHAPES

Others include the fritter and the Dutchie, which are usually glazed. These have been available on Tim Hortons' doughnut menu since the chain's inception in 1964, and a 1991 Toronto Star report found out that these two were the chain's most popular type of fried dough in Canada.

 

There are many other specialized doughnut shapes such as old-fashioned, bars or Long Johns (a rectangular shape), or with the dough twisted around itself before cooking. In the northeast U.S., bars and twists are usually referred to as crullers. Another is the beignet, which is square-shaped, covered with powdered sugar.

 

HISTORY

POSSIBLE ORIGINS

Doughnuts have a disputed history. One theory suggests they were invented in North America by Dutch settlers,[6] and in the 19th century, doughnuts were sometimes referred to as one kind of oliekoek (a Dutch word literally meaning "oil cake"), a "sweetened cake fried in fat."

 

Hanson Gregory, an American, claimed to have invented the ring-shaped doughnut in 1847 aboard a lime-trading ship when he was only 16 years old. Gregory was dissatisfied with the greasiness of doughnuts twisted into various shapes and with the raw center of regular doughnuts. He claimed to have punched a hole in the center of dough with the ship's tin pepper box, and to have later taught the technique to his mother. Smithsonian Magazine states that his mother, Elizabeth Gregory, "made a wicked deep-fried dough that cleverly used her son's spice cargo of nutmeg and cinnamon, along with lemon rind," and "put hazelnuts or walnuts in the center, where the dough might not cook through", and called the food 'doughnuts'.

 

According to anthropologist Paul R. Mullins, the first cookbook mentioning doughnuts was an 1803 English volume which included doughnuts in an appendix of American recipes. By the mid-19th century, the doughnut looked and tasted like today’s doughnut, and was viewed as a thoroughly American food.

 

Another theory on their origin came to light in 2013, appearing to predate all previous claims, when a recipe for "dow nuts" was found in a book of recipes and domestic tips written in 1800 by the wife of Baron Thomas Dimsdale, the recipe being given to the dowager Baroness by an acquaintance who transcribed for her the cooking instructions of a local delicacy, the "Hertfordshire nut".

 

ETHYMOLOGY

"DOUGH NUT"

The earliest known recorded usage of the term dates to an 1808 short story describing a spread of "fire-cakes and dough-nuts." Washington Irving's reference to "doughnuts" in 1809 in his History of New York is more commonly cited as the first written recording of the term. Irving described "balls of sweetened dough, fried in hog's fat, and called doughnuts, or olykoeks." These "nuts" of fried dough might now be called doughnut holes. Doughnut is the more traditional spelling, and still dominates outside the US. At present, doughnut and the shortened form donut are both pervasive in American English.

 

"DONUT"

The first known printed use of donut was in Peck's Bad Boy and his Pa by George W. Peck, published in 1900, in which a character is quoted as saying, "Pa said he guessed he hadn't got much appetite, and he would just drink a cup of coffee and eat a donut." According to John T. Edge (Donuts, an American passion 2006) the alternative spelling “donut” was invented when the New York–based Display Doughnut Machine Corporation abbreviated the word to make it more pronounceable by the foreigners they hoped would buy their automated doughnut making equipment. The donut spelling also showed up in a Los Angeles Times article dated August 10, 1929 in which Bailey Millard jokingly complains about the decline of spelling, and that he "can't swallow the 'wel-dun donut' nor the ever so 'gud bred'." The interchangeability of the two spellings can be found in a series of "National Donut Week" articles in The New York Times that covered the 1939 World's Fair. In four articles beginning October 9, two mention the donut spelling. Dunkin' Donuts, which was so-named in 1950, following its 1948 founding under the name Open Kettle (Quincy, Massachusetts), is the oldest surviving company to use the donut variation; other chains, such as the defunct Mayflower Doughnut Corporation (1931), did not use that spelling. According to the Oxford Dictionary while "doughnut" is used internationally, the spelling "donut" is American. The spelling "donut" remained rare until the 1950s, and has since grown significantly in popularity; this growth in use has possibly been influenced by the spread of Dunkin' Donuts.

 

NATIONAL DOUGHNUT DAY

National Doughnut Day, also known as National Donut Day, celebrated in the United States of America, is on the first Friday of June each year, succeeding the Doughnut Day event created by The Salvation Army in 1938 to honor those of their members who served doughnuts to soldiers during World War I. About 250 Salvation Army volunteers went to France. Because of the difficulties of providing freshly baked goods from huts established in abandoned buildings near the front lines, the two Salvation Army volunteers (Ensign Margaret Sheldon and Adjutant Helen Purviance) came up with the idea of providing doughnuts. These are reported to have been an "instant hit", and "soon many soldiers were visiting The Salvation Army huts". Margaret Sheldon wrote of one busy day: "Today I made 22 pies, 300 doughnuts, 700 cups of coffee." Soon, the women who did this work became known by the servicemen as "Doughnut Dollies".

Regional variations

 

AFRICA

SOUTH AFRICA

In South Africa, an Afrikaans variation known as the koeksister is popular. Another variation, similar in name, is the Cape Malay koesister being soaked in a spiced syrup and coated in coconut. It has a texture similar to more traditional doughnuts as opposed to the Afrikaans variety.[26] A further variation is the vetkoek, which is also dough deep fried in oil. It is served with mince, syrup, honey or jam.

 

TUNISIA

In Tunisia, a pastry similar to doughnuts are yo-yos. They are very traditional and popular. They come in different versions both as balls and in shape of doughnuts. They are deep-fried and covered in a honey syrup or a kind of frosting. Sesame seeds are also used for flavor and decoration along with orange juice and vanilla.

 

MOROCCO

In Morocco, Sfenj is a similar pastry eaten sprinkled with sugar or soaked in honey.

 

ASIA

CHINA

A few sweet, doughnut-style pastries are regional in nature. Cantonese cuisine features an oval-shaped pastry called ngàuhleisōu (牛脷酥, lit. "ox-tongue pastry" due to its tongue-like shape).

 

A spherical food called saa1 jung (沙翁) which is also similar to cream puff, but denser in texture (doughnut-like texture) with sugar sprinkled on top, is normally available in Cantonese restaurants in the dim sum style. An oilier Beijing variant of this called 高力豆沙, gaoli dousha, is filled with red bean paste; originally, it was made with egg white instead of dough. Many Chinese cultures make a chewy doughnut known as shuangbaotai (雙包胎), which consists of two conjoined balls of dough.

 

Chinese restaurants in the US sometimes serve small fried pastries similar to doughnut holes, served with condensed milk as a sauce.

 

Chinese cuisine features long, deep-fried doughnut sticks that are often quite oily, hence their name in Mandarin, yóutiáo (油條, lit. oil strips.); in Cantonese, this doughnut-style pastry is called yàuhjagwái (油炸鬼, ghosts fried in oil). These pastries are not sweet and are often served with congee, a traditional rice porridge.

 

INDIA

In India, a savory, fried, ring-shaped snack called a vada is often referred to as the Indian doughnut. The vada is made from dal, lentil or potato flours rather than wheat flour. In North India, it is in the form of a bulging disc called dahi-vada, and is soaked in curd, sprinkled with spices and sliced vegetables, and topped with a sweet and sour chutney. In South India, a vada is eaten with sambar and a coconut chutney.

 

Sweet pastries similar to old-fashioned doughnuts called badushahi and jalebi are also popular. Balushahi, also called badushah, is made from flour, deep fried in clarified butter, and dipped in sugar syrup. Balushahi is ring-shaped, but the hole in the center does not go all the way through. Jalebi, which is typically pretzel-shaped, is made by deep frying batter in oil and soaking it in sugar syrup. A variant of jalebi, called imarti, is shaped with a small ring in the center around which a geometric pattern is arranged.

 

Along with these Indian variants, American variants of doughnuts are also available with American brands such as Krispy Kreme and Dunkin' Donuts setting up retail outlets in India, as well as local brands such as Mad Over Donuts and the Donut Baker.

 

INDONESIA

The Indonesian, donat kentang is a potato doughnut, a ring-shaped fritter made from flour and mashed potatoes, coated in powder sugar or icing sugar.

 

IRAN

The Persian zoolbia and bamiyeh are fritters of various shapes and sizes coated in a sugar syrup. Doughnuts are also made in the home in Iran, referred to as doughnuts, even in the singular.

  

ISRAEL

Jelly doughnuts, known as sufganiyah (סופגניה, pl. sufganiyot סופגניות) in Israel, have become a traditional Hanukkah food in the recent era, as they are cooked in oil, associated with the holiday account of the miracle of the oil. Traditional sufganiyot are filled with red jelly and topped with icing sugar. However, many other varieties exist, with some being filled with dulce de leche (particularly common after the South American aliyah early in the 21st century).

 

JAPAN

In Japan, an-doughnut (あんドーナッツ, "bean paste doughnut") is widely available at bakeries. An-doughnut is similar to Germany's Berliner, except it contains red azuki bean paste. Mister Donut is one of the most popular doughnut chains in Japan. Native to Okinawa is a spheroid pastry similar to doughnuts called sata andagi.

 

MALAYSIA

Kuih keria is a hole doughnut made from boiled sweet potato that is mashed. The sweet potato mash is shaped into rings and fried. The hot doughnut is then rolled in granulated sugar. The result is a doughnut with a sugar-crusted skin.

 

NEPAL

Sel roti is a Nepali homemade, ring-shaped, rice doughnut prepared during Tihar, the widely celebrated Hindu festival in Nepal. A semiliquid dough is usually prepared by adding milk, water, sugar, butter, cardamom, and mashed banana to rice flour, which is often left to ferment for up to 24 hours. A sel roti is traditionally fried in ghee.

 

PAKISTAN

Doughnuts are available at most bakeries across Pakistan. The Navaz Sharif variety, available mainly in the city of Karachi, is covered in chocolate and filled with cream, similar to a Boston cream. Doughnuts can readily be found at the many Dunkin' Donuts branches spread across Pakistan.

 

PHILIPPINES

Local varieties of doughnuts sold by peddlers and street vendors throughout the Philippines are usually made of plain well-kneaded dough, deep-fried in refined coconut oil and sprinkled with refined (not powdered or confectioner's) sugar. Doughnuts are a popular mid-day snack. A native variant from the Visayas islands known as shakoy or siyakoy (also known as lubid-lubid in the northern Philippines) uses a length of dough twisted into a distinctive rope-like shape before being fried. The preparation is almost exactly the same as doughnuts, though there are variants made from glutinous rice flour. The texture can range from soft and fluffy, to sticky and chewy, to hard and crunchy. They are sprinkled with white sugar, but can also be topped with sesame seeds or caramelized sugar.

 

TAIWAN

In Taiwan, shuāngbāotāi (雙胞胎, lit. twins) is two pieces of dough wrapped together before frying.

 

THAILAND

In Thailand, a popular breakfast food is Pa Thong Ko, also known as Thai Donuts, a version of the Chinese Yiu Ja Guoy/Youtiao. Often sold from food stalls in markets or by the side of the road, these doughnuts are small sometimes X-shaped and sold by the bag full. They are often eaten in the morning with hot Thai tea.

 

VIETNAM

Vietnamese varieties of doughnuts include bánh tiêu, bánh cam, and bánh rán. Bánh tiêu is a sesame-topped, deep-fried pastry that is hallow. It can be eaten alone or cut in half and served with bánh bò, a gelatinous cake, placed inside the pastry. Bánh cam is from Southern Vietnam and is a ball-shaped, deep-fried pastry coated entirely in sesame seeds and inside of which contains a mung bean paste filling. Bánh rán is from Northern Vietnam and is similar to bánh cam; however, the difference is that bánh rán is covered with a sugar glaze after being deep-fried and its mung bean paste filling includes a jasmine essence.

 

EUROPE

AUSTRIA

In Austria, doughnut equivalents are called Krapfen. They are especially popular during Carneval season (Fasching), and do not have the typical ring shape, but instead are solid and usually filled with apricot jam (traditional) or vanilla cream (Vanillekrapfen). A second variant, called Bauernkrapfen, probably more similar to doughnuts, are made of yeast dough, and have a thick outside ring, but are very thin in the middle.

 

BELGIUM

In Belgium, the smoutebollen in Dutch, or "croustillons" in French, are similar to the Dutch kind of oliebollen, but they usually do not contain any fruit, except for apple chunks sometimes. They are typical carnival and fair snacks and are coated with powdered sugar.

 

BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVIA - CROATIA -

MACEDONIA AND SERBIA

Doughnuts similar to the Berliner are prepared in the northern Balkans, particularly in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia and Serbia (pokladnice or krofne). They are also called krofna, krafna or krafne, a name derived from the Austrian Krapfen for this pastry. In Croatia, they are especially popular during Carneval season and do not have the typical ring shape, but instead are solid. Traditionally, they are filled with jam (apricot or plum). However, they can be filled with vanilla or chocolate cream. Another types of doughnuts are uštipci and fritule.

 

CZECH REPUBLIC

There are Czech Republic "American" style doughnuts, but before they were solid shape and filled with jelly (strawberry or peach). The shape is similar to doughnuts in Germany or Poland. They are called Kobliha (Koblihy in plural). They may be filed with nougat or with vanilla custard. There are now many fillings; cut in half or non-filled knots with sugar and cinnamon on top.

 

DENMARK

In Denmark, doughnuts exist in their "American" shape, and these can be obtained from various stores, e.g. McDonald's and most gas stations. The Berliner, however, is also available in bakeries.

 

FINLAND

in Finland, a sweet doughnut is called a munkki (the word also means monk) and are commonly eaten in cafés and cafeteria restaurants. They are sold cold and are sometimes filled with jam (U.S. jelly) or a vanilla sauce. A ring doughnut is also known as donitsi.A savory form of doughnut is the meat doughnut (in Finnish lihapiirakka, or literally meat pie). Being made of doughnut mixture and deep fried the end product is more akin to a savory doughnut than any pie known in the English speaking world.

 

FRANCE

The French beignet, literally "bump", is the French and New Orleans equivalent of a doughnut: A pastry made from made from deep-fried choux pastry.

 

GERMANY

In parts of Germany, the doughnut equivalents are called Berliner (sg. and pl.), but not in the capital city of Berlin itself and neighboring areas, where they are called Pfannkuchen (which is often found misleading by people in the rest of Germany, who use the word Pfannkuchen to describe a pancake, which is also the literal translation of it). In middle Germany, they are called Kreppel or Pfannkuchen. In southern Germany, they are also called Krapfen and are especially popular during Carnival season (Karneval/Fasching) in southern and middle Germany and on New Year's Eve in northern Germany. Berliner do not have the typical ring shape, but instead are solid and usually filled with jam, while a ring-shaped variant called Kameruner is common in Berlin and eastern Germany. Bismarcks and Berlin doughnuts are also found in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Switzerland and the U.S. Today, American style doughnuts are also available in Germany, but are less popular than their native counterparts.

 

GREECE

In Greece, there is a doughnut-like snack, called loukoumas (λουκουμάς), which is a doughnut with sugar and comes in two types (one is shaped like the number 8; the other is a torus). The first one is crispier, whereas the second one is larger and softer.

 

HUNGARY

Fánk is a sweet traditional Hungarian cake. The most commonly used ingredients are: flour, yeast, butter, egg yolk, a little bit of rum, a sniff of salt, milk and oil to deep fry with. After the pastry has risen for approximately 30 minutes the result is an extreme light doughnut-like pastry. Fánk is mostly served with powdered sugar and lekvar.

 

It is supposed that Fánk pastry is of the same origin as German Berliner, Dutch oliebol, and Polish pączki.

 

ICELAND

In Iceland kleinuhringur (pl. kleinuhringir and kleinuhringar) are a type of old Icelandic cuisine which resembles doughnuts. The Berliner and many other kinds of doughnuts can only be found on one day of the year and that is on a holiday called "Bolludagur" or in other words Doughnut Day.

 

ITALY

Italian doughnuts include ciambelle, krapfen, zippuli and zeppole from Calabria, maritozzi and bomboloni from Tuscany.

 

LITHUANIA

In Lithuania, a kind of doughnut called spurgos is widely known. Some spurgos are similar to Polish pączki, but some specific recipes, such as cottage cheese doughnuts (varškės spurgos), were invented independently.

 

NETHERLANDS

In the Netherlands, oliebollen, referred to in cookbooks as "Dutch doughnuts", are a type of fritter, with or without raisins or currants, and usually sprinkled with powdered sugar. Variations of the recipe contain slices of apple or other fruits. They are traditionally eaten as part of New Year celebrations.

 

NORWAY

In Norway, the traditional smultring is the prevailing type of doughnut traditionally sold in bakeries, shops, and stalls, however the American-style doughnuts are widely available in larger supermarkets, McDonald's restaurants, 7-elevens and bakeries. The Berliner is more common than the US doughnut, and sold in most supermarkets and bakeries alongside smultring doughnuts.

 

POLAND

In Poland and parts of the U.S. with a large Polish community, like Chicago and Detroit, the round, jam-filled doughnuts eaten especially - though not exclusively - during the Carnival are called pączki (pronounced [ˈpɔntʂkʲi]). Pączki have been known in Poland at least since the Middle Ages. Jędrzej Kitowicz has described that during the reign of the August III under influence of French cooks who came to Poland at that time, pączki dough fried in Poland has been improved, so that pączki became lighter, spongier, and more resilient.

 

PORTUGAL

See Malasada.

 

ROMANIA

The Romanian dessert gogoși are fried dough balls similar to filled doughnuts. They are stuffed with chocolate, jam, cheese and other combinations and may be dusted with icing sugar.

 

RUSSIA

In Russia and the CIS countries, ponchiki (Russian: пончики, plural form of пончик, ponchik) or pyshki (Russian: пышки, especially in St. Petersburg) are a very popular sweet doughnut, with many fast and simple recipes available in Russian cookbooks for making them at home as a breakfast or coffee pastry. In Ukraine and Belarus they are called pampushky (Ukrainian: пампушки).

 

SLOVENIA

In Slovenia, a jam-filled doughnut known as krofi, is very popular. It is the typical sweet during Carnival time, but is to be found in most bakeries during the whole year. The most famous krofi come from the village of Trojane in central Slovenia, and are originally filled with apricot jam filling.

 

SPAIN

In Spain, there are two different types of doughnuts. The first one, simply called "donuts" (in reference to the most famous commercial brand name for this type of food) or "berlinas" (a more traditional name), refer to the American-style doughnut, that is, a deep fried, sweet, soft, ring of flour dough.

 

The second type of doughnut is a traditional pastry called "rosquilla", made of fermented dough and which is fried or baked in an oven. They were purportedly introduced in Spain by the Romans.[citation needed] In Spain, there are several variants of them depending on the region where they are prepared and on the time of the year they are sold, as they are regarded in some parts as a pastry especially prepared only for Easter. Although overall they result in pastries of a tighter texture and less sugared than American doughnuts, they differ greatly in shape, size and taste from one region to another.

 

The 'churro' is a sweet pastry of deep-fried dough similar to a doughnut but shaped as a long, thin, ribbed cylinder rather than a ring or sphere. Churros are commonly served dusted in sugar as a snack or with a cup of hot chocolate.

 

SWITZERLAND

In Switzerland, there are Zigerkrapfen and Berliner.

 

UNITED KINGDOM

In some parts of Scotland, ring doughnuts are referred to as doughrings, with the 'doughnut' name being reserved exclusively for the nut-shaped variety. Glazed, twisted rope-shaped doughnuts are known as yum-yums. It is also possible to buy fudge doughnuts in certain regions of Scotland. Fillings include jam, custard, cream, sweet mincemeat, chocolate and apple. Common ring toppings are sprinkle-iced and chocolate.

 

In Northern Ireland, ring doughnuts are known as 'gravy rings', gravy being an archaic term for hot cooking oil.

 

NORTH AMERICA

CARIBBEAN REGION

A doughnut known as "kurma" originating in Eastern India but being sold as a delicacy in Trinidad and Tobago, is a small, sweet, and fried cubed or rectangular-shaped doughnut.

 

COSTA RICA

A traditional Puntarenas cream-filled doughnut is round and robust, managing to keep the cream inside liquified. They are popular in Costa Rica.

 

MEXICO

The Mexican donas are similar to doughnuts, including the name; the dona is a fried-dough pastry-based snack, commonly covered with powdered brown sugar and cinnamon, white sugar or chocolate.

 

UNITED STATES AND CANADA

Frosted, glazed, powdered, Boston cream, coconut, sour cream, cinnamon, chocolate, and jelly are some of the varieties eaten in the United States and Canada. Sweetening, filling, and fancy toppings are now so common that plain doughnuts are now commonly labeled and sold as "old fashioned".

 

There are also potato doughnuts (sometimes referred to as spudnuts). Doughnuts are ubiquitous in the United States and can be found in most grocery stores, as well as in specialty doughnut shops.

 

A popular doughnut in Hawaii is the malasada. Malasadas were brought to the Hawaiian Islands by early Portuguese settlers, and are a variation on Portugal's filhós. They are small eggy balls of yeast dough deep-fried and coated in sugar.

 

Immigrants have brought various doughnut varieties to the United States. To celebrate Fat Tuesday in eastern Pennsylvania, churches sell a potato starch doughnut called a Fastnacht (or Fasnacht). The treats are so popular there that Fat Tuesday is often called Fastnacht Day. The Polish doughnut, the pączki, is popular in U.S. cities with large Polish communities such as Chicago, Milwaukee, and Detroit.

 

In regions of the country where apples are widely grown, especially the Northeast and Midwest states, cider doughnuts are a harvest season specialty, especially at orchards open to tourists, where they can be served fresh. Cider doughnuts are a cake doughnut with apple cider in the batter. The use of cider affects both the texture and flavor, resulting in a denser, moister product. They are often coated with either granulated or powdered sugar or cinnamon sugar.

 

In Southern Louisiana, a popular variety of the doughnut is the beignet, a fried, square doughnut served traditionally with powdered sugar. Perhaps the most famous purveyor of beignets is New Orleans restaurant Cafe Du Monde.

 

In Quebec, homemade doughnuts called beignes de Noël are traditional Christmas desserts.

 

OCEANIA

AUSTRALIA

In Australia, the doughnut is a popular snack food. Jam doughnuts are particularly popular and a unique aspect of Australian culture, especially in Melbourne, Victoria and the Queen Victoria Market, where they are a tradition. Jam doughnuts are similar to a Berliner, but are served hot with red jam (raspberry or strawberry) injected into a bun that is deep-fried and then frosted in either sugar or cinnamon. Jam doughnuts are sometimes also bought frozen. In South Australia, they are known as Berliner or Kitchener and often served in cafes. A variant is the custard-filled doughnut.

 

Mobile vans that serve doughnuts, traditional or jam, are often seen at spectator events, carnivals and fetes and by the roadside near high-traffic areas like airports and the carparks of large shopping centers. Traditional cinnamon doughnuts are readily available in Australia from specialised retailers and convenience stores. Doughnuts are a popular choice for schools and other not-for-profit groups to cook and sell as a fundraiser.

 

NEW ZEALAND

In New Zealand, the doughnut is a popular food snack available in corner dairies. They are in the form of a long sweet bread roll with a deep cut down its long axis. In this cut is placed a long dollop of sweetened clotted cream and on top of this is a spot of strawberry jam. Doughnuts are of two varieties: fresh cream or mock cream.

 

The rounded variety is widely available as well.

 

SOUTH AMERICA

BRAZIL

In Brazil, bakeries, grocery stores and pastry shops sell ball-shaped doughnuts popularly known as "sonhos" (lit. dreams). The dessert was brought to Brazil by Portuguese colonizers that had contact with Dutch and German traders. They are the equivalent of nowadays "bolas de Berlim" (lit. balls of Berlin) in Portugal, but the traditional Portuguese yellow cream was substituted by local dairy and fruit products. They are made of a special type of bread filled with "goiabada" (guava jelly) or milk cream, and covered by white sugar.

 

CHILE

Berlin (plural Berlines) doughnut is popular in Chile because of the large German community. It may be filled with jam or with manjar, the Chilean version of dulce de leche.

 

PERU

Peruvian cuisine includes picarones which are doughnut-shaped fritters made with a squash and sweet potato base. These snacks are almost always served with a drizzle of sweet molasses-based sauce.

 

WIKIPEDIA

Jodhpur (/ˈdʒɒdpʊər/ About this sound Listen (help·info)) is the second largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan. After its population crossed a million, it has been declared as the second "Metropolitan City" of Rajasthan. It was formerly the seat of a princely state of the same name, the capital of the kingdom known as Marwar. Jodhpur is a popular tourist destination, featuring many palaces, forts and temples, set in the stark landscape of the Thar Desert.

 

The city is known as the "Sun City" for the bright, sunny weather it enjoys all the year round. It is also referred to as the "Blue City" due to the vivid blue-painted houses around the Mehrangarh Fort. The old city circles the fort and is bounded by a wall with several gates. However, the city has expanded greatly outside the wall over the past several decades. Jodhpur lies near the geographic centre of Rajasthan state, which makes it a convenient base for travel in a region much frequented by tourists.

 

Jodhpur topped Lonely Planet's list of most extraordinary places to stay in 2013. Tamil movie, I, which is the costliest Indian film to date, was also shot at Jodhpur.

 

HISTORY

According to Rajasthan district Gazetteers of Jodhpur and the Hindu epic Ramayana (composed up to the 4th century AD), Abhiras (Ahirs) were the original inhabitants of Jodhpur and later Aryans spread to this region.

 

Jodhpur was also part of the Gurjara–Pratihara Empire and until 1100 CE was ruled by a powerful Gurjar King. Jodhpur was founded in 1459 by Rao Jodha, a Rajput chief of the Rathore clan. Jodha succeeded in conquering the surrounding territory and thus founded a state which came to be known as Marwar. As Jodha hailed from the nearby town of Mandore, that town initially served as the capital of this state; however, Jodhpur soon took over that role, even during the lifetime of Jodha. The city was located on the strategic road linking Delhi to Gujarat. This enabled it to profit from a flourishing trade in opium, copper, silk, sandals, date palms and coffee.

 

In between 1540 to 1556, Afghans were in control of most of North India. Rajasthan born Hemu who started his career as a supplier of various types of merchandise to Sher Shah Suri empire, held various positions in capital Delhi as 'Incharge of Food Affairs', 'Minister of Internal Security', 'Prime Minister-cum-Chief of Army' with Islam Shah Suri and Adil Shah, who ruled north India from Punjab to Bengal at that point in time. Hemu, who took as the military commander of Afghan army in 1553, crushed the first rebellion, killing the Governor of Ajmer province Juneid Khan and appointed his own Governor in Rajasthan. Hem Chandra won several battles (22) throughout North India against Afghan rebels and twice against Akbar at Agra and Delhi, before his coronation at Purana Quila in Delhi on 7 October 1556 as a 'Vikramaditya' king. Hemu lost his life in the Second Battle of Panipat on 5 November 1556, and the area came under Mughal king Akbar.

 

Early in its history, the state became a fief under the Mughal Empire, owing fealty to them while enjoying some internal autonomy. During this period, the state furnished the Mughals with several notable generals such as Maharaja Jaswant Singh. Jodhpur and its people benefited from this exposure to the wider world: new styles of art and architecture made their appearance and opportunities opened up for local tradesmen to make their mark across northern India.

Aurangzeb briefly sequestrated the state (c.1679) on the pretext of a minority, but the rightful ruler Maharaja Ajit Singh was restored to the throne by Veer Durgadas Rathore after Aurangzeb died in 1707 and a great struggle of 30 years. The Mughal empire declined gradually after 1707, but the Jodhpur court was beset by intrigue; rather than benefiting from circumstances, Marwar descended into strife and invited the intervention of the Marathas, who soon supplanted the Mughals as overlords of the region. This did not make for stability or peace, however; 50 years of wars and treaties dissipated the wealth of the state, which sought and gratefully entered into subsidiary alliance with the British in 1818.

 

During the British Raj, the state of Jodhpur had the largest land area of any in Rajputana. Jodhpur prospered under the peace and stability that were a hallmark of this era. The land area of the state was 60,980 km2 its population in 1901 was 44,73,759. It enjoyed an estimated revenue of £35,29,000/. Its merchants, the Marwaris, flourished without let or limit and came to occupy a position of dominance in trade across India. In 1947, when India became independent, the state merged into the union of India and Jodhpur became the second city of Rajasthan.

 

At the time of partition, ruler of Jodhpur Hanwant Singh did not want to join India, but finally due to the effective persuasion of Sardar Vallab Patel, the then Home Minister at the centre, the princely state of Jodhpur was included in Indian Republic. Later after State Reorganisation Act, 1956 it was made part of the state of Rajasthan.

 

DEMOGRAPHICS

As per provisional reports of Census India, population of Jodhpur is 1,033,918 in 2011; of which male and female nearly constitute 52.62 percent and 47.38 percent respectively. Average literacy rate of Jodhpur city is 81.56 percent of which male and female literacy was 88.42 and 73.93 percent respectively. Total children under 6 years of age constitute nearly 12.24 percent of city population. Jodhpur city is governed by Municipal Corporation which comes under Jodhpur Urban Agglomeration. The Jodhpur Urban/Metropolitan area include Jodhpur, Kuri Bhagtasani, Mandore Industrial Area, Nandri, Pal Village and Sangariya. Its Urban/Metropolitan population is 1,137,815 of which 599,332 are males and 538,483 are females,On the date: 01/07/2015 the record of citypopulation.de website shows Jodhpur city is having Population of 1,300,000

 

CLIMATE

The climate of Jodhpur is generally hot and semi-arid, but with a rainy season from late June to September (Köppen BShw). Although the average rainfall is around 450 millimetres, it is extraordinarily variable. In the famine year of 1899, Jodhpur received only 24 millimetres, but in the flood year 1917 it received as much as 1,178 millimetres.

 

Temperatures are extreme throughout the period from March to October, except when monsoonal rain produces thick clouds to lower it slightly. In the months of April, May and June, high temperatures routinely exceed 40 degrees Celsius. During the monsoon season, average temperatures decrease slightly. However, the city's generally low humidity rises and this adds to the normal discomfort from the heat. Phalodi, near Jodhpur, is the driest place of the district as well as in the state.

 

ECONOMY

The Handicrafts industry has in recent years eclipsed all other industries in the city. By some estimates, the furniture export segment is a $200 million industry, directly or indirectly employing as many as 200,000 people. Other items manufactured include textiles, metal utensils, bicycles, ink and sporting goods. A flourishing cottage industry exists for the manufacture of such items as glass bangles, cutlery, carpets and marble products.

 

After handicrafts, tourism is the second largest industry of Jodhpur. Crops grown in the district include wheat and the famous Mathania red chillies. Gypsum and salt are mined. The city serves as an important marketplace for wool and agricultural products. The Indian Air Force, Indian Army, Indo Tibetan Border Police and Border Security Force maintain training centres in Jodhpur.

 

The administration of Jodhpur consists of a District Collector, followed by 4 Additional District Magistrates (I, II, Land Conversion and City ADM). Presently, the Collector and District Magistrate is Dr. Preetam B. Yashwant (IAS). The city is also under Police Commissioner system, with Mr. Ashok Rathore (IPS) as Police Commissioner of the city.

 

The upcoming 9 MMTPA Refinery and Petrochemical complex to be set up by Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) in Pachpadra, Barmer will transform the industrial scene of the city drastically. Pachpadra lies just 60 kilometres from the industrial area of Boranada in Jodhpur. Around 120 by-products that are produced by the refinery are going to provide opportunities for new industries to be set up in and around Jodhpur.

 

India's most ambitious industrial development project, the over USD 100 dollars Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Project is also going to impact industry in Jodhpur. Marwar Junction which is located about 100 kilometres from Jodhpur will be one of the nine freight loading points along the DMIC route. Jodhpur and Pali districts fall under the region that is going to be developed as a manufacturing hub for the DMIC.

 

STRATEDIC LOCATION

Jodhpur is the most important city of western Rajasthan and lies about 250 kilometres from the border with Pakistan. This location makes it an important base for the Indian army, Indian Air Force and Border Security Force (BSF). Jodhpur's air base is Asia's largest and one of the most critical and strategically located (Jodhpur Airport played the crucial role during Indo-Pakistan wars in 1965 &1971) airbases of the IAF deployed with fighter jets Sukhoi Su-30MKI and Advanced Light Helicopters Dhruv.

 

CULTURE

The city is famous for its food and its popularity can be judged from the fact that one can find sweet shops named 'Jodhpur Sweets' in many cities throughout India. Being at the onshore of Thar desert, life has been influenced with ways of the desert folks (gypsies can be found in many parts of the city).

 

TOURISM

Jodhpur's attractions include Mehrangarh Fort, Umaid Bhawan Palace, Jaswant Thada, Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower) and Flying Fox (Mehrangarh Fort). Tourists can make excursions to Mandore, Kaylana Lake and Garden, Balsamand Lake, Santoshi Mata Temple, Mahamandir, Siddhnath Mahadev, Achalnath Mahadev, Udai Mandir, Mandaleshwar Mahadev Temple (Mandalnath), Ratanada Ganesh Temple, Sardar Samand Lake and Palace, Masooria Hills, Rai Ka Bagh Palace, Veer Durgadas Smarak (monument, park and museum), Bhim Bhirak Cave.

 

The beautiful historic buildings and scenic landscapes of the city were featured in major films including The Dark Knight Rises directed by Christopher Nolan, and The Fall directed by Tarsem Singh, Hum Saath Saath Hain, Veer, and Shuddh Desi Romance. More recently, there have been many high-profile celebrations in the city including many celebrity weddings. This has given an impetus to a nascent lavish wedding industry and increased tourism.

 

CUISINE

A number of Indian delicacies have originated in Jodhpur. To name a few, the Makhaniya Lassi, Mawa Ki Kachori, Pyaaj Ki Kachori, Hot & Spicy Mirchi Bada (A preparation made with potato, onion, chilli and gramflour), Dal Bati Churma (dal is lentils; bati is baked wheat ball; and churma is powdered sweetened cereal), Lasan Ki Chutney (hot fiery garlic chutney), Mirchi Ka Kutaa (hot recipe of crushed green chilies), Gatte Ki Sabzi (A delicacy made up of gramflour balls, curd and spices), Ker Sangri Sabzi (also known as Pachkutaa - the five ingredients of Pachkutaa are sangri, ker, kumatiya, dried goonda and dried red chillies), Raab (pearl millet flour and yoghurt curry), Lapsi (a special kind of dessert made with cracked wheat, Jaggery, coconut and ghee), Aate Ka Halwa (wheat flour dessert), Kachara Mircha Sabzi (made with chilli and Kachara, a special type of vegetable grown in desert area) and Kadhi Pakoda (recipe made with gramflour, curd and chilli) with Baajre Ka Sogra (a thick flat and round bread of pearl millet). Jodhpur is known for its sweets ranging from traditional "Makhanbada", "Mawa Ki Kachori", "Malpua", "Ghevar", "Motichur Ke Laddu", "Besan barfi", "Thorr" and "Gulab Jamun" to Bengali "Rasgulla" and "Ras Malai" prepared by a traditional house "Jodhpur Sweets".

 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Jodhpur is fast becoming a major education hub for higher studies in India. Almost every major discipline has a dedicated institution in the city, with disciplines varying from Engineering, Medicine, Law, Design among others. With many renowned academicians, Jodhpur is also India's largest hub for preparation of the CA(Chartered Accountant) entrance examination held throughout India by ICAI (The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India).

 

TRANSPORTATION

The city has well established rail, road and air networks connecting it to other major cities of the country.

 

RAILWAYS

Jodhpur railway station is the divisional headquarters of the North Western Railways (NWR). It is well connected with railways to major Indian cities like Alwar, Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bangalore, Trivandrum, Pune, Kota, Kanpur, Bareilly, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad, Indore, Bhopal, Dhanbad, Guwahati, Nagpur, Lucknow, Gwalior, Jaipur etc. To decongest the main Jodhpur station (JU), the suburban station Bhagat ki Kothi (BGKT) is being developed as the second main station for passenger trains. At present 106 trains serves to both the stations. Some of the important trains originating from Jodhpur railway station are- Ranthambore Express (Jodhpur to Indore), Mandore Express (Jodhpur to Delhi), Suryanagri Express (Jodhpur to Mumbai), Marudhar Express (Jodhpur to Lucknow), Howrah Superfast (From Jodhpur to Howrah) etc.

 

For further train running information, timings, halts etc. visit the official website of Indian Railways

 

Luxury train service- For experiencing the true magnificence and royal opulence of Rajasthan, luxury trains Palace on Wheels and Royal Rajasthan on Wheels are run jointly by RTDC and Indian railways. Jodhpur is one of the destinations of both of the trains. Recently a plan to start metro train service in jodhpur was proposed to decongest the city traffic.however the proposal is still pending with state government for its approval.

 

AIR

Jodhpur Airport is one of the prominent airports of Rajasthan. The airport is due for being transformed into an international airport. The work on which is going to start very soon. At present, there are daily flights from Delhi Mumbai and banglore to the city operated by Air India and Jet Airways.

 

ROAD

Jodhpur is connected by road to all major cities in Rajasthan and neighbouring states like Delhi, Ahmedabad, Surat, Ujjain, Agra etc. Apart from deluxe and express bus services to cities within the state, Rajasthan Roadways provides Volvo & Mercedes Benz bus service to Delhi, Ahmedabad, Jaipur, Udaipur and Jaisalmer (click here for time table and reservations). Recently, Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS) is launched in the city with low floor and semi low floor buses plying on major routes. Jodhpur is connected to the National Highway network with three National Highways and to the Rajasthan State Highway network with ten state highways. National Highways passing through Jodhpur:

 

WIKIPEDIA

Jodhpur (/ˈdʒɒdpʊər/ About this sound Listen (help·info)) is the second largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan. After its population crossed a million, it has been declared as the second "Metropolitan City" of Rajasthan. It was formerly the seat of a princely state of the same name, the capital of the kingdom known as Marwar. Jodhpur is a popular tourist destination, featuring many palaces, forts and temples, set in the stark landscape of the Thar Desert.

 

The city is known as the "Sun City" for the bright, sunny weather it enjoys all the year round. It is also referred to as the "Blue City" due to the vivid blue-painted houses around the Mehrangarh Fort. The old city circles the fort and is bounded by a wall with several gates. However, the city has expanded greatly outside the wall over the past several decades. Jodhpur lies near the geographic centre of Rajasthan state, which makes it a convenient base for travel in a region much frequented by tourists.

 

Jodhpur topped Lonely Planet's list of most extraordinary places to stay in 2013. Tamil movie, I, which is the costliest Indian film to date, was also shot at Jodhpur.

 

HISTORY

According to Rajasthan district Gazetteers of Jodhpur and the Hindu epic Ramayana (composed up to the 4th century AD), Abhiras (Ahirs) were the original inhabitants of Jodhpur and later Aryans spread to this region.

 

Jodhpur was also part of the Gurjara–Pratihara Empire and until 1100 CE was ruled by a powerful Gurjar King. Jodhpur was founded in 1459 by Rao Jodha, a Rajput chief of the Rathore clan. Jodha succeeded in conquering the surrounding territory and thus founded a state which came to be known as Marwar. As Jodha hailed from the nearby town of Mandore, that town initially served as the capital of this state; however, Jodhpur soon took over that role, even during the lifetime of Jodha. The city was located on the strategic road linking Delhi to Gujarat. This enabled it to profit from a flourishing trade in opium, copper, silk, sandals, date palms and coffee.

 

In between 1540 to 1556, Afghans were in control of most of North India. Rajasthan born Hemu who started his career as a supplier of various types of merchandise to Sher Shah Suri empire, held various positions in capital Delhi as 'Incharge of Food Affairs', 'Minister of Internal Security', 'Prime Minister-cum-Chief of Army' with Islam Shah Suri and Adil Shah, who ruled north India from Punjab to Bengal at that point in time. Hemu, who took as the military commander of Afghan army in 1553, crushed the first rebellion, killing the Governor of Ajmer province Juneid Khan and appointed his own Governor in Rajasthan. Hem Chandra won several battles (22) throughout North India against Afghan rebels and twice against Akbar at Agra and Delhi, before his coronation at Purana Quila in Delhi on 7 October 1556 as a 'Vikramaditya' king. Hemu lost his life in the Second Battle of Panipat on 5 November 1556, and the area came under Mughal king Akbar.

 

Early in its history, the state became a fief under the Mughal Empire, owing fealty to them while enjoying some internal autonomy. During this period, the state furnished the Mughals with several notable generals such as Maharaja Jaswant Singh. Jodhpur and its people benefited from this exposure to the wider world: new styles of art and architecture made their appearance and opportunities opened up for local tradesmen to make their mark across northern India.

Aurangzeb briefly sequestrated the state (c.1679) on the pretext of a minority, but the rightful ruler Maharaja Ajit Singh was restored to the throne by Veer Durgadas Rathore after Aurangzeb died in 1707 and a great struggle of 30 years. The Mughal empire declined gradually after 1707, but the Jodhpur court was beset by intrigue; rather than benefiting from circumstances, Marwar descended into strife and invited the intervention of the Marathas, who soon supplanted the Mughals as overlords of the region. This did not make for stability or peace, however; 50 years of wars and treaties dissipated the wealth of the state, which sought and gratefully entered into subsidiary alliance with the British in 1818.

 

During the British Raj, the state of Jodhpur had the largest land area of any in Rajputana. Jodhpur prospered under the peace and stability that were a hallmark of this era. The land area of the state was 60,980 km2 its population in 1901 was 44,73,759. It enjoyed an estimated revenue of £35,29,000/. Its merchants, the Marwaris, flourished without let or limit and came to occupy a position of dominance in trade across India. In 1947, when India became independent, the state merged into the union of India and Jodhpur became the second city of Rajasthan.

 

At the time of partition, ruler of Jodhpur Hanwant Singh did not want to join India, but finally due to the effective persuasion of Sardar Vallab Patel, the then Home Minister at the centre, the princely state of Jodhpur was included in Indian Republic. Later after State Reorganisation Act, 1956 it was made part of the state of Rajasthan.

 

DEMOGRAPHICS

As per provisional reports of Census India, population of Jodhpur is 1,033,918 in 2011; of which male and female nearly constitute 52.62 percent and 47.38 percent respectively. Average literacy rate of Jodhpur city is 81.56 percent of which male and female literacy was 88.42 and 73.93 percent respectively. Total children under 6 years of age constitute nearly 12.24 percent of city population. Jodhpur city is governed by Municipal Corporation which comes under Jodhpur Urban Agglomeration. The Jodhpur Urban/Metropolitan area include Jodhpur, Kuri Bhagtasani, Mandore Industrial Area, Nandri, Pal Village and Sangariya. Its Urban/Metropolitan population is 1,137,815 of which 599,332 are males and 538,483 are females,On the date: 01/07/2015 the record of citypopulation.de website shows Jodhpur city is having Population of 1,300,000

 

CLIMATE

The climate of Jodhpur is generally hot and semi-arid, but with a rainy season from late June to September (Köppen BShw). Although the average rainfall is around 450 millimetres, it is extraordinarily variable. In the famine year of 1899, Jodhpur received only 24 millimetres, but in the flood year 1917 it received as much as 1,178 millimetres.

 

Temperatures are extreme throughout the period from March to October, except when monsoonal rain produces thick clouds to lower it slightly. In the months of April, May and June, high temperatures routinely exceed 40 degrees Celsius. During the monsoon season, average temperatures decrease slightly. However, the city's generally low humidity rises and this adds to the normal discomfort from the heat. Phalodi, near Jodhpur, is the driest place of the district as well as in the state.

 

ECONOMY

The Handicrafts industry has in recent years eclipsed all other industries in the city. By some estimates, the furniture export segment is a $200 million industry, directly or indirectly employing as many as 200,000 people. Other items manufactured include textiles, metal utensils, bicycles, ink and sporting goods. A flourishing cottage industry exists for the manufacture of such items as glass bangles, cutlery, carpets and marble products.

 

After handicrafts, tourism is the second largest industry of Jodhpur. Crops grown in the district include wheat and the famous Mathania red chillies. Gypsum and salt are mined. The city serves as an important marketplace for wool and agricultural products. The Indian Air Force, Indian Army, Indo Tibetan Border Police and Border Security Force maintain training centres in Jodhpur.

 

The administration of Jodhpur consists of a District Collector, followed by 4 Additional District Magistrates (I, II, Land Conversion and City ADM). Presently, the Collector and District Magistrate is Dr. Preetam B. Yashwant (IAS). The city is also under Police Commissioner system, with Mr. Ashok Rathore (IPS) as Police Commissioner of the city.

 

The upcoming 9 MMTPA Refinery and Petrochemical complex to be set up by Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) in Pachpadra, Barmer will transform the industrial scene of the city drastically. Pachpadra lies just 60 kilometres from the industrial area of Boranada in Jodhpur. Around 120 by-products that are produced by the refinery are going to provide opportunities for new industries to be set up in and around Jodhpur.

 

India's most ambitious industrial development project, the over USD 100 dollars Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor Project is also going to impact industry in Jodhpur. Marwar Junction which is located about 100 kilometres from Jodhpur will be one of the nine freight loading points along the DMIC route. Jodhpur and Pali districts fall under the region that is going to be developed as a manufacturing hub for the DMIC.

 

STRATEDIC LOCATION

Jodhpur is the most important city of western Rajasthan and lies about 250 kilometres from the border with Pakistan. This location makes it an important base for the Indian army, Indian Air Force and Border Security Force (BSF). Jodhpur's air base is Asia's largest and one of the most critical and strategically located (Jodhpur Airport played the crucial role during Indo-Pakistan wars in 1965 &1971) airbases of the IAF deployed with fighter jets Sukhoi Su-30MKI and Advanced Light Helicopters Dhruv.

 

CULTURE

The city is famous for its food and its popularity can be judged from the fact that one can find sweet shops named 'Jodhpur Sweets' in many cities throughout India. Being at the onshore of Thar desert, life has been influenced with ways of the desert folks (gypsies can be found in many parts of the city).

 

TOURISM

Jodhpur's attractions include Mehrangarh Fort, Umaid Bhawan Palace, Jaswant Thada, Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower) and Flying Fox (Mehrangarh Fort). Tourists can make excursions to Mandore, Kaylana Lake and Garden, Balsamand Lake, Santoshi Mata Temple, Mahamandir, Siddhnath Mahadev, Achalnath Mahadev, Udai Mandir, Mandaleshwar Mahadev Temple (Mandalnath), Ratanada Ganesh Temple, Sardar Samand Lake and Palace, Masooria Hills, Rai Ka Bagh Palace, Veer Durgadas Smarak (monument, park and museum), Bhim Bhirak Cave.

 

The beautiful historic buildings and scenic landscapes of the city were featured in major films including The Dark Knight Rises directed by Christopher Nolan, and The Fall directed by Tarsem Singh, Hum Saath Saath Hain, Veer, and Shuddh Desi Romance. More recently, there have been many high-profile celebrations in the city including many celebrity weddings. This has given an impetus to a nascent lavish wedding industry and increased tourism.

 

CUISINE

A number of Indian delicacies have originated in Jodhpur. To name a few, the Makhaniya Lassi, Mawa Ki Kachori, Pyaaj Ki Kachori, Hot & Spicy Mirchi Bada (A preparation made with potato, onion, chilli and gramflour), Dal Bati Churma (dal is lentils; bati is baked wheat ball; and churma is powdered sweetened cereal), Lasan Ki Chutney (hot fiery garlic chutney), Mirchi Ka Kutaa (hot recipe of crushed green chilies), Gatte Ki Sabzi (A delicacy made up of gramflour balls, curd and spices), Ker Sangri Sabzi (also known as Pachkutaa - the five ingredients of Pachkutaa are sangri, ker, kumatiya, dried goonda and dried red chillies), Raab (pearl millet flour and yoghurt curry), Lapsi (a special kind of dessert made with cracked wheat, Jaggery, coconut and ghee), Aate Ka Halwa (wheat flour dessert), Kachara Mircha Sabzi (made with chilli and Kachara, a special type of vegetable grown in desert area) and Kadhi Pakoda (recipe made with gramflour, curd and chilli) with Baajre Ka Sogra (a thick flat and round bread of pearl millet). Jodhpur is known for its sweets ranging from traditional "Makhanbada", "Mawa Ki Kachori", "Malpua", "Ghevar", "Motichur Ke Laddu", "Besan barfi", "Thorr" and "Gulab Jamun" to Bengali "Rasgulla" and "Ras Malai" prepared by a traditional house "Jodhpur Sweets".

 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH

Jodhpur is fast becoming a major education hub for higher studies in India. Almost every major discipline has a dedicated institution in the city, with disciplines varying from Engineering, Medicine, Law, Design among others. With many renowned academicians, Jodhpur is also India's largest hub for preparation of the CA(Chartered Accountant) entrance examination held throughout India by ICAI (The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India).

 

TRANSPORTATION

The city has well established rail, road and air networks connecting it to other major cities of the country.

 

RAILWAYS

Jodhpur railway station is the divisional headquarters of the North Western Railways (NWR). It is well connected with railways to major Indian cities like Alwar, Delhi, Mumbai, Kolkata, Chennai, Bangalore, Trivandrum, Pune, Kota, Kanpur, Bareilly, Hyderabad, Ahmedabad, Indore, Bhopal, Dhanbad, Guwahati, Nagpur, Lucknow, Gwalior, Jaipur etc. To decongest the main Jodhpur station (JU), the suburban station Bhagat ki Kothi (BGKT) is being developed as the second main station for passenger trains. At present 106 trains serves to both the stations. Some of the important trains originating from Jodhpur railway station are- Ranthambore Express (Jodhpur to Indore), Mandore Express (Jodhpur to Delhi), Suryanagri Express (Jodhpur to Mumbai), Marudhar Express (Jodhpur to Lucknow), Howrah Superfast (From Jodhpur to Howrah) etc.

 

For further train running information, timings, halts etc. visit the official website of Indian Railways

 

Luxury train service- For experiencing the true magnificence and royal opulence of Rajasthan, luxury trains Palace on Wheels and Royal Rajasthan on Wheels are run jointly by RTDC and Indian railways. Jodhpur is one of the destinations of both of the trains. Recently a plan to start metro train service in jodhpur was proposed to decongest the city traffic.however the proposal is still pending with state government for its approval.

 

AIR

Jodhpur Airport is one of the prominent airports of Rajasthan. The airport is due for being transformed into an international airport. The work on which is going to start very soon. At present, there are daily flights from Delhi Mumbai and banglore to the city operated by Air India and Jet Airways.

 

ROAD

Jodhpur is connected by road to all major cities in Rajasthan and neighbouring states like Delhi, Ahmedabad, Surat, Ujjain, Agra etc. Apart from deluxe and express bus services to cities within the state, Rajasthan Roadways provides Volvo & Mercedes Benz bus service to Delhi, Ahmedabad, Jaipur, Udaipur and Jaisalmer (click here for time table and reservations). Recently, Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS) is launched in the city with low floor and semi low floor buses plying on major routes. Jodhpur is connected to the National Highway network with three National Highways and to the Rajasthan State Highway network with ten state highways. National Highways passing through Jodhpur:

 

WIKIPEDIA

with fragrant cinnamon rice and roasted sweet potato. Mango chutney (Sue Laflamme).

 

Make some rice with these additions and proceed as per usual.

 

1 cup of rice

2 cups of water

1 tsp light tasting oil or butter

1 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp tumeric

 

Saag Paneer (or tofu) with carrots and chickpeas

 

Chop finely in a food processor. Do these separately and set aside:

 

2 bags of fresh spinach (fine chop)

3 carrots, peeled (fine chop)

 

In a large saucepan saute until translucent:

 

6 tbsp of oil

1 large onion, diced fine

4 cloves of garlic, minced

 

Add and cook lightly for 2 minutes:

 

1/2 tsp cinnamon

3 tsp chili powder

1/2 vegetable cube, minced

3 tbsp of good curry powder

1/2 tsp garlic powder

1/2 tsp ginger powder

 

To the onion and spice mixture add:

 

chopped spinach

chopped carrots

 

Stir, stir, stir and add

 

1 can of recipe ready tomatoes, blended

1/2 cup of water

2 tbsp soy sauce

1 can of drained, rinsed chickpeas

 

Simmer with a lid 30 minutes. When ready to serve add 1/2 cup of packed chopped cilantro and 1/2 cup of vegan plain coconut yogurt or dairy yogurt.

 

You can tuck in some slices of tofu or paneer during the simmer. If you are using tofu, press out the water before adding. If you want more heat, add some chili peppers.

  

Don't use this image on websites, blogs, or other media without explicit permission :copyright: Colleen Watson-Turner. All rights reserved.

easy recipe

recipe from my mother in laws friend late Mrs.Muthachan

Nimmy (my wife) made this chutney without the red chili

Step by step pictures showing how to make onion+tomato chutney. 2 minutes chutney that nobody'll believe you made them in a hurry!

cooking.jingalala.org/2012/08/quick-and-easy-spicy-chutne...

Presented by Barry Anderson aka Chef Barry Gourmet & Raw from his Garden Villa Phuket in Thailand. This bitter sweet recipe is just that with some sour taste as well. This recipe was made in just 10 minutes for one, and I used the layering method that many chefs use when creating and building their recipe. Some people prefer non alcoholic looking wine beverages and I show you how to make one. Many of Barry,s fast and easy to make health recipes can be found at flic.kr/ps/QgogH

Written by Chef Barry Gourmet & Raw © Copyright April 21, 2013

 

Salad Ingredients :

 

Salad ingredients is a half a cup of your favorite mixed loose green leafy fresh herbal greens? I pick mine fresh from my organic garden but you can use any of the following examples to give your salad that savory aromatic flavor using , Mint , sage, rosemary ,broccoli leaf, cauliflower leaf, sweet basil, peppermint, chicory, dandelion , olive leaf, or any green leafy sprouts are also excellent choices for this recipe. One quarter cup of fresh coconut meat. 2 or 3 cherrie tomatoes.On the side some bee pollen ( Natures original multi supplement) A few pieces of sprouted non GMO soy sprouts.

  

Ingredients for the Blanched vegetables to make the Mock Red Wine :One half carrot medium One half beet medium 2 or 3 young hand size Noni Leaves or Kale leaves On the side some coconut flower vinegar or cold pressed apple cider vinegar that will be used later.

 

Tossed Salad Dressing Vinaigrette Ingredients:

½ fresh lemon One teaspoon of coconut flower vinegar or cold pressed apple cider vinegar One teaspoon of coconut flower syrup or unfiltered raw honey Flesh of one whole lime without the skin

   

Method for making your Bitter Sweet Recipe with Mock Red Wine:

One I work this recipe in layers. And always anything that requires the use of fire starts first.Your Noni or kale leaves One half carrot medium One half beet medium Cut both root vegetables into same size chunks and cover with just enough pure filtered water in a small sauce pan. One: In your small sauce pan of root vegetables submerged under the water boil the water and at the boiling point turn off the heat to let the vegetables blanch .

 

On the side some coconut flower vinegar or cold pressed apple cider vinegar used much later.

Two: Salad Dressing Method: On your gutting board and using your grater and knife. Make all the following ingredients into smaller pieces.

½ fresh lemon One teaspoon of coconut flower vinegar or cold pressed apple cider vinegar One teaspoon of coconut flower syrup or unfiltered raw honey One inch thick fresh pineapple slab without skinsOne inch thick fresh papaya slab .

 

Flesh of one whole lime without the skin A loose cup of your selected leafy greens

After this is done then add all of the ingredients to your blender and fill with coconut water or pure water half way. “Blend into a smooth green color consistency and there you have it . Your green smoothie for the day or two. I do this all the time as you can create more recipes of beverages ,toppings, puddings, dressings, chutney, and spreads. This is a good way to get the most out of your smoothie. “

 

For this recipe you only need a little of it for a topping so I would say quarter to half a cup is good on the side in a small bowl. The rest of the smoothie put into a large glass mason jar and place it in the back of your refrigerator where it is coldest.

Three:A Tossed Salad vinaigrette : Method : Mix all the following ingredients together in a mixing bowl.½ fresh lemon juice (include the small pieces of flesh and zest.

 

One teaspoon of coconut flower vinegar or cold pressed apple cider vinegar One teaspoon of coconut flower syrup or unfiltered raw honey One Lime of juice.

Finally Four: Is layering your prepared ingredients.

 

Lift your blanched Noni or Kale leaves out of your sauce pan and lay them across your serving dish.

Layer both root vegetables of carrot and beet across your Noni or Kale leaves.

Next in a large mixing bowl add your salad and your salad vinaigrette and toss.

 

Drain the excess vinaigrette into a glass jar ceil it and put into your refrigerator for your next salad toss.

Now place your tossed salad over top of your blanched leafy greens with beet and carrot.

Now work in some of your green salad smoothie between the vegetables.

 

To give that glossy fresh look splash some lemon water mixed with some coconut water over top and sprinkle with some of your bee pollen.

Pour the blanched broth into a wine glass then slowly add some raw coconut flower vinegar or some raw apple cider vinegar to taste. This beverage will certainly look like red wine but the taste will not be exact but getting close. After all this is a mock red wine that is made in under 5 minutes with out the fermentation process and alcohol. “Thats it your done and ready to serve and to enjoy your creative food art” A small bowl of brown garlic rice goes well with this meal.

 

“This recipe is Vegan and mostly raw with a lot of medicinal nutrition. A beautiful example of rainbow colors for this recipe. A well balanced meal of proteins , fats, and complex carbohydrates with life giving enzymes. You will taste the sweetness, sourness, and bitterness of this food presentation. “

“Good Health starts in your home kitchen, and eating right does not have to be complicated. “

Barry Anderson aka Chef Barry Gourmet & Raw

 

A short video introduction of Barry,s private and exclusive Garden Villa Phuket mini resort style natural retreat with organic gourmet food presentations can be viewed at www.gardenvillaphuket.com

            

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