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Oriental Institute, University of Chicago

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Colossal statue of king Tutankhamun excavated by the Oriental Institute at Medinet Habu in 1930. The seventeen-foot, four-inch-tall statue was relocated to the entrance of the new gallery where it can be viewed in the round.

   

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Oriental Institute, University of Chicago

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"Oriental Institute archaeologists working at Thebes excavated this statue of King Tutankhamun. It had been usurped by succeeding kings and now bears the name of Horemheb.

 

Tutankhamun wears the double crown and the royal nemes headcloth of the pharaohs; a protective cobra goddess (uraeus serpent) rears above his forehead. In his hands the king grasps scroll-like objects thought to be containers for the documents by which the gods affirmed the monarch's right to divine rule. The sword at his waist has a falcon's head, symbol of the god Horus, who was believed to be manifested by the living pharaoh. The small feet at the king's left side were part of a statue of his wife, Ankhesenpaamun, whose figure was more nearly life-sized.

 

The facial features of this statue strongly resemble other representations of Tutankhamun from his famous tomb, which was discovered relatively intact in the Valley of the Kings." - museum website

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"Oriental Institute archaeologists working at Thebes excavated this statue of King Tutankhamun. It had been usurped by succeeding kings and now bears the name of Horemheb.

 

Tutankhamun wears the double crown and the royal nemes headcloth of the pharaohs; a protective cobra goddess (uraeus serpent) rears above his forehead. In his hands the king grasps scroll-like objects thought to be containers for the documents by which the gods affirmed the monarch's right to divine rule. The sword at his waist has a falcon's head, symbol of the god Horus, who was believed to be manifested by the living pharaoh. The small feet at the king's left side were part of a statue of his wife, Ankhesenpaamun, whose figure was more nearly life-sized.

 

The facial features of this statue strongly resemble other representations of Tutankhamun from his famous tomb, which was discovered relatively intact in the Valley of the Kings." - museum website

    

CHI2005.267

Diversey station opened in June 1900 as part of the original stretch of the Northwestern Elevated. The headhouse was one of several stations built from a design by William Gibb on what is now the Brown Line. Constructed entirely of brick with terra-cotta trim, the Classical Revival design was inspired by the work of the great 16th century Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio1. The bold modeling of the details, especially the columns and segmented arched windows, is characteristic of Italianate work of the late 19th century. The interior featured plaster walls with extensive wood detailing in the door and window frames, ceiling moldings, and tongue-in groove chair rail paneling. Nearly all of this detail remains today, although nearly all of it has been painted over. Also still in place at Diversey is the ornate, intricately-detailed ticket agent's booth designed for the station. With its paneled walls, dentils ands moldings around the top, and ornate metal grill over the window formally used by the ticket agent, this is one of only two such original 1900-vintage Northwestern Elevated booth left on the system (the other is at Sedgwick; another was at Chicago until 1999).

www.chicago-l.org/stations/diversey.html

 

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Richard Anderson at the Development Consortium

Oriental Institute, University of Chicago

   

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The Palace of Fine Arts was designed by Charles B. Atwood and, unlike the other White City buildings, was constructed with a brick substructure under its plaster facade. After the World's Fair, it initially housed the Columbian Museum, which evolved into the Field Museum of Natural History. When a new Field Museum building opened downtown in 1920, the museum organization moved and the former site was left vacant. Art Institute of Chicago professor Lorado Taft led a public campaign to restore the building and turn it into another art museum, one devoted to sculpture. After a few years, the building was selected as the site for a new science museum. During its conversion into the MSI, the building's exterior was re-cast in limestone, retaining its 1893 Beaux Arts look, while the interior was replaced with a new one in Art Moderne style designed by Alfred Shaw.

 

The new Museum of Science and Industry opened to the public in three stages between 1933 and 1940. The first opening ceremony took place during the Century of Progress Exposition.

  

CHI2005.274 MSI

The scene was inspired by a diner (since demolished) in Greenwich Village, Hopper's home neighborhood in Manhattan. Hopper began painting it immediately after the attack on Pearl Harbor. After this event there was a large feeling of gloominess over the country, a feeling that is portrayed in the painting. The urban street is empty outside the diner, and inside none of the three patrons is apparently looking or talking to the others but instead is lost in their own thoughts. Two are a couple, while the third is a man sitting alone, with his back to the viewer. The couple's noses resemble beaks, perhaps a reference to the title. The diner's sole attendant, looking up from his work, appears to be peering out the window past the customers. His age is ambiguous.

 

This portrayal of modern urban life as empty or lonely is a common theme throughout Hopper's work. This is sharply outlined by the fact that the man with his back to us appears more lonely because of the couple sitting next to him. If one looks closely, it becomes apparent that there is no way out of the bar area, as the three walls of the counter form a triangle which traps the attendant. It is also notable that the diner has no visible door leading to the outside, which illustrates the idea of confinement and entrapment. Hopper denied that he had intended to communicate this in Nighthawks, but he admitted that "unconsciously, probably, I was painting the loneliness of a large city." At the time of the painting, fluorescent lights had just been developed, perhaps contributing to why the diner is casting such an eerie glow upon the almost pitch black outside world. An advertisement for Phillies cigars is featured on top of the diner. -WIKIPEDIA

   

Art Institute of Chicago

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Possibly the strangest conference swag. AOL antibacterial hand gel, with carabiner. They were using it at CHI2005 to, uh, recruit people to work for them. What does this say about the company? "You're going to need to keep this handy if you work here."?

 

(oh, and sorry about the dirty mirror--we're cleaning this weekend and haven't gotten to it)

The scene was inspired by a diner (since demolished) in Greenwich Village, Hopper's home neighborhood in Manhattan. Hopper began painting it immediately after the attack on Pearl Harbor. After this event there was a large feeling of gloominess over the country, a feeling that is portrayed in the painting. The urban street is empty outside the diner, and inside none of the three patrons is apparently looking or talking to the others but instead is lost in their own thoughts. Two are a couple, while the third is a man sitting alone, with his back to the viewer. The couple's noses resemble beaks, perhaps a reference to the title. The diner's sole attendant, looking up from his work, appears to be peering out the window past the customers. His age is ambiguous.

 

This portrayal of modern urban life as empty or lonely is a common theme throughout Hopper's work. This is sharply outlined by the fact that the man with his back to us appears more lonely because of the couple sitting next to him. If one looks closely, it becomes apparent that there is no way out of the bar area, as the three walls of the counter form a triangle which traps the attendant. It is also notable that the diner has no visible door leading to the outside, which illustrates the idea of confinement and entrapment. Hopper denied that he had intended to communicate this in Nighthawks, but he admitted that "unconsciously, probably, I was painting the loneliness of a large city." At the time of the painting, fluorescent lights had just been developed, perhaps contributing to why the diner is casting such an eerie glow upon the almost pitch black outside world. An advertisement for Phillies cigars is featured on top of the diner. -WIKIPEDIA

    

Art Institute of Chicago

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860–880 Lake Shore Drive is a twin pair of glass-and-steel apartment towers. The 26 floor, 254 ft (82 m) tall towers were designed by the famous architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and dubbed the "Glass House" apartments. They were completed in 1951.

 

May 30 2005

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Pierre Auguste Renoir

French, 1841-1919

Lunch at the Restaurant Fournaise (The Rowers' Lunch)

  

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860–880 Lake Shore Drive is a twin pair of glass-and-steel apartment towers. The 26 floor, 254 ft (82 m) tall towers were designed by the famous architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and dubbed the "Glass House" apartments. They were completed in 1951.

 

May 30 2005

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De izquierda a derecha, Marcela, Jill, Natalia y Lan

The Museum has artifacts from digs in Egypt, Israel, Syria, Turkey, Iraq, and Iran. Notable possessions are the famous Megiddo Ivories, various treasures from Persepolis, the old Persian capital, a huge 40 ton human-headed winged bull (or lamassu) from Khorsabad, the capital of Sargon II, and finally a monumental statue of King Tutankhamun.

   

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Harold Leonard Stuart Hall

William Rainey Harper Memorial Library

 

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The Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum in Chicago, Illinois was the first planetarium built in the Western Hemisphere and is the oldest in existence today. The Adler was founded and built in 1930 by the philanthropist Max Adler, with the assistance of the first director of the planetarium, Philip Fox. It is located among the Shedd Aquarium and Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago's Museum Campus on the shores of Lake Michigan.

 

Max Adler was married to Julius Rosenwald's sister- their family controlled Sears

 

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Oriental Institute, University of Chicago

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"Carved in the court style typical of the Achaemenid Empire, this highly polished stone head originally belonged to one of two guardian bulls flanking the portico of the hundred-columned Throne Hall at Persepolis. The heads of the bulls projected in the round and the bodies were carved in relief on the sidewalls of the porch; the ears and horns had been added separately. The use of pairs of guardian figures such as these to protect important buildings was a common architectural feature in the ancient Near East." (the museum)

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The Oriental Institute (OI), established in 1919, is the University of Chicago's archeology museum and research center for ancient Near Eastern studies.

 

oi.uchicago.edu/i/Persian-Bull_72dpi.gif

 

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4611 N. Lincoln Avenue

Chicago, Illinois

 

The entire facade is covered in an ornate gray terra cotta design. Though a story shorter than its neighbors on both sides, the Krause's elaborate facade stands out from the other buildings on the block.

 

William P. Krause hired architect William Presto to design a music store with an apartment above. Presto in turn commissioned Louis Sullivan to design the facade. The building was completed in 1922. Sullivan, among the greatest American architects, ended his career taking gigs like this.....

 

It was registered as a Chicago Landmark by the City of Chicago in 1977.

 

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In 1922, the Chicago Daily Tribune organized a competition for the 'most beautiful and eye-catching building in the world'. Raymond Hood - who would later build the Rockefeller Center in New York - and John Howell won the first place due to their familiar gothic design and because the building fulfilled the needs of the newspaper best. www.aviewoncities.com/chicago/tribunetower.htm

 

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4611 N. Lincoln Avenue

Chicago, Illinois

 

The entire facade is covered in an ornate gray terra cotta design. Though a story shorter than its neighbors on both sides, the Krause's elaborate facade stands out from the other buildings on the block.

 

William P. Krause hired architect William Presto to design a music store with an apartment above. Presto in turn commissioned Louis Sullivan to design the facade. The building was completed in 1922. Sullivan, among the greatest American architects, ended his career taking gigs like this.....

 

It was registered as a Chicago Landmark by the City of Chicago in 1977.

  

CHI2005.474

4611 N. Lincoln Avenue

Chicago, Illinois

 

The entire facade is covered in an ornate gray terra cotta design. Though a story shorter than its neighbors on both sides, the Krause's elaborate facade stands out from the other buildings on the block.

 

William P. Krause hired architect William Presto to design a music store with an apartment above. Presto in turn commissioned Louis Sullivan to design the facade. The building was completed in 1922. Sullivan, among the greatest American architects, ended his career taking gigs like this.....

 

It was registered as a Chicago Landmark by the City of Chicago in 1977.

  

CHI2005.472

4611 N. Lincoln Avenue

Chicago, Illinois

 

The entire facade is covered in an ornate gray terra cotta design. Though a story shorter than its neighbors on both sides, the Krause's elaborate facade stands out from the other buildings on the block.

 

William P. Krause hired architect William Presto to design a music store with an apartment above. Presto in turn commissioned Louis Sullivan to design the facade. The building was completed in 1922. Sullivan, among the greatest American architects, ended his career taking gigs like this.....

 

It was registered as a Chicago Landmark by the City of Chicago in 1977.

 

CHI2005.473

The Lincoln Park Conservatory (1.2 ha / 3 acres) is a conservatory and botanical garden located at 2391 North Stockton Drive, next to the Lincoln Park Zoo, in Chicago, Illinois. It is open daily; admission is free.

 

The Lincoln Park Commission first established a greenhouse in 1877 and planted an adjacent formal garden in 1880. Today's conservatory was built in stages from 1890-1895, to designs by Joseph Lyman Silsbee and M. E. Bell, and consists of four halls:

 

Palm House - giant palms and rubber trees, with a 15 m (50-foot) fiddle-leaf rubber tree planted in 1891

Fernery - plants of the forest floor, primarily ferns

Tropical House - flowering trees, vines, and bamboo

Show House - seasonal flower exhibits

  

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Address: 2433-43 N. Lincoln Ave.

Year Built: 1914

Architect: Samuel N. Crowen

 

Perhaps best known for its historical connection to the infamous gangster John Dillinger, the Biograph Theater is also one of Chicago's oldest remaining neighborhood movie houses. Designed in 1914 by Samuel N. Crowen, an architect known for his classically detailed designs, the Biograph Theater possesses many of the distinguishing characteristics of the earliest movie houses, including a simple storefront-width lobby, recessed entrance, free-standing ticket booth, and canopy marquee. The building is finished with red pressed brick and white-glazed terra cotta, and its construction typifies the first-generation movie houses whose architectural style gave legitimacy and respectability to the fledgling motion picture industry. Dillinger's death here in 1934, after being named "Public Enemy No. 1" by the FBI, guarantees the Biograph's place in Chicago crime history. Dillinger fell dead in an alley to the right.

 

1934 photo: www.ci.chi.il.us/Landmarks/B/BiographTheater2.html

 

Newspaper recreation of Dillinger's death; www.ci.chi.il.us/Landmarks/B/BiographTheater3.html

 

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860–880 Lake Shore Drive is a twin pair of glass-and-steel apartment towers. The 26 floor, 254 ft (82 m) tall towers were designed by the famous architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and dubbed the "Glass House" apartments. They were completed in 1951.

 

May 30 2005

CHI2005.390

The Lincoln Park Conservatory (1.2 ha / 3 acres) is a conservatory and botanical garden located at 2391 North Stockton Drive, next to the Lincoln Park Zoo, in Chicago, Illinois. It is open daily; admission is free.

 

The Lincoln Park Commission first established a greenhouse in 1877 and planted an adjacent formal garden in 1880. Today's conservatory was built in stages from 1890-1895, to designs by Joseph Lyman Silsbee and M. E. Bell, and consists of four halls:

 

Palm House - giant palms and rubber trees, with a 15 m (50-foot) fiddle-leaf rubber tree planted in 1891

Fernery - plants of the forest floor, primarily ferns

Tropical House - flowering trees, vines, and bamboo

Show House - seasonal flower exhibits

 

CHI2005.404

The architecture of this building typifies the style initiated by the World's Columbian Exposition, of the 1890s and major portions of the early collections were acquired after their display at the Exposition. It was originally named the "Columbian Museum of Chicago" on September 16, 1893 but renamed after Marshall Field, a major donor who provided a significant amount of the funding needed to found the museum, in 1905. The museum was originally housed in the Palace of Fine Arts from the Exposition, the structure now occupied by the Museum of Science and Industry. The current location is a building that opened in 1921

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Architect: Daniel H. Burnham & Co.; Burnham Graham & Co.

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Grant Park (Chicago)

 

CHI2005.280 Field Museum

Standing Lincoln is a bronze statue in Lincoln Park, Chicago. Completed by Augustus Saint-Gaudens in 1887, it has been described as the most important sculpture of Abraham Lincoln from the nineteenth century. Abraham Lincoln II, Lincoln's only grandson, was present at the unveiling.

 

The sculpture depicts a contemplative Lincoln rising from a chair, about to give a speech. It is set upon a pedestal designed by architect Stanford White. The monument was a favorite of Hull House founder Jane Addams, who once wrote, "I walked the wearisome way from Hull-House to Lincoln Park . . . in order to look look at and gain magnanimous counsel from the statue." Journalist Andrew Ferguson discusses the statue at length in his book Land of Lincoln, writing that the statue presents "a sort of world-weariness that seems almost kind."

   

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Built in 1910, it is located near the campus of the University of Chicago in Hyde Park (a neighborhood on the South Side of Chicago), and was given to the university by developer William Zeckendorf in 1963. It was designated a National Historic Landmark on November 27, 1963.

 

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built 1908-1910

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Frank Lloyd Wright originated the Prairie Style (open plans, horizontality, natural materials) which was part of the American Arts and Crafts movement (hand craftsmanship, simplicity, function) an alternative to the then dominant Classical Revival Style (Greek forms with occasional Roman influences). He was also heavily influenced by the Idealistic Romantics (better homes would create better people) and the Modernist Movement. Particularly the Minimalists (less is more) and Bauhaus (form follows function), which was a mixture of De Stijl (grid-based design) and Constructivism (which emphasized the structure itself & the building materials), would be influenced by the Prairie School

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built between 1925 and 1928. architect: Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue

Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Carillon and tower built 1932

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- The stained glass windows are among the largest in the world.

- Part of the original stipulation for the chapel's plan required that no building on the university ever be built higher than the tower, which stands 207 feet above the street (200 feet 8 inches above floor level).

- The architect Goodhue died before completion, and his associates placed a statue of him holding a model of the Cadet Chapel over the tower door.

may 28, 2005

 

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Due to financial probelms incurred by the death of Frederick's father George T. Robie, the family had to sell the house after only 14 months of residence. Two other families lived in the home until June 1926 when a seminary purchased the property with the intention of demolishing the building for a larger dormitory.

 

The house was saved from demolition mostly due to the Great Depression, World War II, and the Korean War. At one point, Wright appeared in person, at the age of 90, to protest the intended demolition of the house. In 1958, William Zeckendorf took ownership of the building and five years later donated it to the University of Chicago who used it for the Adlai Stevenson School of International Studies and later for the headquarters for the university's Alumni Association.

   

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The architectural shape of the Wrigley Building is patterned after the Seville Cathedral’s Giralda Tower in Spain. However, the ornamental design of the building is based on an American adaptation of French Renaissance style. Mr. Charles Beersman, chief designer for the building’s architects, Graham, Anderson, Probst and White, used his talent and imagination to combine the two concepts.

 

One of the most striking features of the Wrigley Building results from being clad in approximately 250,000 individual glazed terra cotta tiles, the most extensive use of terra cotta in the world during the time of construction. Each tile is uniquely identified in a computer database that enables consistent tracking and maintenance of each and every tile located on the building. The interior of the building contains extensive brasswork throughout each of the tower's lobbies, including the entryway, elevator doors and lobby clock.

 

www.wrigley.com/wrigley/about/about_story_building.asp

 

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built 1908-1910

 

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built between 1925 and 1928. architect: Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue

Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Carillon and tower built 1932

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-The design of the chapel is similar to that of Goodhue's Cadet Chapel at West Point.

- The exterior is adorned with sculptures of Christian apostles and martyrs as well as Plato, Zoroaster, and others who express the chapel's mission of religious inquiry.

- The architect Goodhue died before completion, and his associates placed a statue of him holding a model of the Cadet Chapel over the tower door.

- The construction budget was restricted because of inflation after World War I, and to save costs the tower was moved in the design from the center of the crossing to the east side of the transept. - emporis.com

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Univ of Chicago May 28, 2005

 

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William Rainey Harper Memorial Library

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When ground was broken for the Wrigley Building in 1920, there were no major office buildings north of the Chicago River and the Michigan Avenue Bridge, which spans the river just south of the building was still under construction. The land was selected by chewing gum magnate William Wrigley Jr. to headquarter his gum company. The building was designed by the architectural firm of Graham, Anderson, Probst & White using the shape of the Giralda tower of Seville's Cathedral combined with French Renaissance details. The 425-foot (130 m) south tower was completed in April 1921 and the north tower in May 1924. Walkways between the towers were added at the ground level and the third floor. In 1931, another walkway was added at the fourteenth floor to connect to offices of a bank in accordance with a Chicago statute concerning bank branch offices. The two towers, not including the levels below Michigan Avenue, have a combined area of 453,433 square feet (42,125.3 m2).

 

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