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Familia: Orchidaceae • Subfamilia: Epidendroideae • Tribus: Dendrobieae • Subtribus: Bulbophyllinae • Genus: Bulbophyllum • Species: Bulbophyllum lobbii . Lindl. (1847)

 

The Bulbophyllum lobbii is one of about 2000 species in the genus, with many of them looking similar but for slight differences in colours. This one is widespread in Asia, from north eastern India to Phillipines. It thrives in the lowland and montane forests between 200m to 2,200m above sea level. It was discovered by Thomas Lobb in Java in 1846. It

is also called Thailand Bulbophyllum or Sumatran Bulbophyllum.

 

The generic name comes from “bolbos" (bulb) and “phyllum" (leaf) and refers to the thick leaves. It is an epiphyte, an 'air plant' that grows on other plants or objects, but it is non parasitic. It obtains moisture and nutrients from the atmosphere and rain, and also from the debris accumulating around it.

 

Interestingly, the labellum works as an ellastic. When an insect lands there, it will move violently up and down, throwing the insect against the pollen which sticks on their back.

When the fly visits another flower, the movement of the labellum makes it deposit the pollen onto the flower.

 

Having done some reading after I started photographing them, I find myself overwhelmed by the diversity in orchids. This photo was taken at the Kipandi Butterfly Park which also houses the two nurseries for wild orchids. The nursery is an orchid conservation project, growing orchids collected from the forests, and from areas felled for their logs.

  

Bulbophyllum Jan Ragan

 

(lobbii ‘Kathy’s Gold’ AM/AOS x facetum ‘Interlaken’AM/AOS)

 

Endemic to North Eastern Borneo. There is some debate as to whether this is just a form of Bulbophyllum lobbii

Size: RAW

 

Location: Ba' Kelalan/Sarawak

 

Stock Photo Request : edwinmeru@gmail.com

Bulbophyllum Jersey "Black's Red Star"

(Bulb. lobbii x Bulb. echinolabium)

84 pt. CCM at NCOS Annual Show NCJC Judging

 

bulbophyllum lobbii

 

Location: Ba' Kelalan/ Borneo stock photo

 

request : edwinmeru@gmail.com

Canon EOS 400D / EF-S60mm Macro

Explore #409 on 8 September 2007

 

well it WAS an echinolabium but now looks like a lobbii?!?! I am confused! lol

Flower buds of Bulbophyllum lobbii

B. dearei x B. lobbii, at Orchid Trail Nursery.

One of my favourite Bulbophyllum is it a widespread beautiful species found from Arunachal Pradesh across to the Philippines.

A friend made this cross and this is the only seedling to throw an umbel with this many flowers.

A variable and outstanding species with some of the largest flowers in the genus.

I purchased this labeled as B. piestoglossum. It most likely some form of B. lobbii

Impressions of Bulbophyllum lobbii orchid.

After 3 months my plants are still flowering!

P'shop layers and my own textures.

John Lindley (1799-1865) again (see my posting of Epidendrum radicans on January 28, 2011)! An aesthete of nature he was, besides being a careful observer and describer. In 1847 he waxes eloquent on the shape and colors of this Bulbophyllum, and he sums up with an exclamation: 'We know of no species of the genus comparable for beauty.' He was apparently especially taken by its 'cinnamon sprinkle'.

Lindley named it for Thomas Lobb (1817-1894) who together with his brother William (1809-1864) collected plants in far-off climes for the famous Veitch Nurseries of Exeter. Thomas collected on Java, Indonesia, from 1843-1847, and he'd sent this orchid directly from there to England. Much to the enthusiasm of Lindley, who immediately describes this 'New Garden Plant.' Rather caustically he takes a bit of a swipe at Hooker's Herbarium where this plant according to him is misidentified. Continuing, Lindley writes: 'We have named this fine plant after Mr. Thomas Lobb, whose zeal and ability, as a botanical collector, are beyond all praise, and whose dried specimens are unrivalled for beauty, and admirable selection'. It's fitting that Lobb be remembered in such words, for the low, ivy-covered marker on his grave at Devoran, Cornwall, is starkly devoid of anything except for his name and year of death, and his age.

This is one of many orchids that was graciously shown to me by an intrepid orchid hunter of today, Made Raharja Pendit, of the Bali Botanic Gardens. To him I am grateful, too, for showing me a recently discovered Bulbophyllum from Sulawesi Selatan. Perhaps I'll post a photo later, if I'm satisfied it's good enough.

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