new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged bugshot

2018 Bugshot Alabama at the Solon Dixon Forestry Center, outside of Andalusia, AL.

What a beautiful pest! Here's the Azalea lace bug, Stephanitis pyrioides - shot with a new Venus 60mm lens in the style of the stacked images I was producing for the lab a few months back. This specimen was alive and healthy (and resultingly, not terribly cooperative) - shot atop a clear plastic petri dish with black velvet below. Crop from a 5 shot stack at f/8 or so. Imaging these guys on a black background doesn't show off the diagnostic black-brown maculations but really brings out the beautiful iridescence present in these tingids.

 

Here's another shot I took at work that's a better (although less attractive) representation: www.flickr.com/photos/oragriculture/14824547766/in/set-72...

 

Here's a review I did recently of this new Venus 60mm macro (that can do 2:1 *and* infinity focus!) petapixel.com/2015/02/02/review-venus-60mm-f2-8-worlds-fi...

 

And a special announcement for west-coast folks (or anybody else!) that would like to join me and some other macro guys for a macro workshop - I'll be instructing again with Bugshot - this time in California! More info here: bugshot.net/

Alright! Spring has sprung here in Oklahoma - and the salticids are returning once again!

 

This handsome little Maevia inclemens may not be the best example I've seen of his species in terms of boldness of coloration/markings - but he was in pretty good shape and was quite a bit of fun to work with. The shot above was taken by holding the dandelion leaf he was perched upon up towards the clouds yesterday afternoon. A single shot cropped to about 75% of the original frame to balance out the composition a bit (just now noticed this is almost the exact same diagonal composition I've used in my last couple salticid shots: high left down to a low right). Taken with my 50mm reversed to extension tubes and my usual flash diffuser.

 

To read about the odd dimorphism present in the males of this species - head over here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maevia_inclemens

 

---------------------------------------------

 

In other news - BugShot, the macrophotography workshop I will co-teach with Alex Wild and John Abbott in Florida this coming August, has now filled up - but go ahead and check out the website HERE to keep track of updates on where we will be next year!

 

If you want to keep up with me and my work - feel free to follow me on twitter here: twitter.com/thomasshahan

 

...also if you are interested in buying any of my art, I've started selling my prints on etsy here: www.etsy.com/shop/tshahan

2018 Bugshot Alabama at the Solon Dixon Forestry Center, outside of Andalusia, AL.

Join me together with Thomas Shahan, Alex Wild and John Abbott in this year's BugShot in Belize!

sgmacro.blogspot.com/2015/02/macro-photography-workshop-b...

 

Photo :copyright: www.ThomasShahan.com

Here's an overlooked shot I took of a handsome little Freya sp. male during the last BugShot course in Belize a few months back. I realize I've posted this species before - but this specimen was much larger with more color present in the eyes and cleaner maculations throughout the body.

 

To give a sense of scale, here's a crappy wide-angle macro of the same species (but a different specimen missing some legs) atop my ring finger: i.imgur.com/qil9G8s.jpg

 

Here's a review I did recently of this new Venus 60mm macro (that can do 2:1 *and* infinity focus!) petapixel.com/2015/02/02/review-venus-60mm-f2-8-worlds-fi...

 

Once again, I will be co-instructing a workshop course in Belize this year with Alex Wild, John Abbott, and for the first time - the fantastic Nicky Bay! (www.flickr.com/photos/nickadel/)

 

More information on upcoming workshops here: bugshot.net/

 

...and finally, if you're not *solely* interested in macro - I regularly post new photos over here - but be forewarned, there'll be a lot of boring waterfall photos because I don't have the access to salticids I used to now that I've moved: www.flickr.com/photos/49580580@N02/

View on Tumblr

 

I caught this guy wandering around the house and got a few shots of it before getting it out the door.

 

I managed to get photo number 20,000 with the D800e in the process. It doesn't feel like that many pictures, thats for sure!

Click here for a larger view as flickr tends to over-sharpen these smaller thumbnails!

 

This apparently tipsy female Phidippus regius female (found by a helpful Guillaume Dury) was more than willing to pose for photos from several attendees at the 2012 Bugshot workshop. Given that one of my ultimate goals while in Florida was to find this exact species - I'm grateful that I finally got a chance to photograph one of North America's largest and most beautiful Phidippus species!

 

The image above is a single shot taken with a 50mm prime reversed on a set of extension tubes.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

If you're into macro photography, entomology, or just want to hang out in Central America - I'm proud to announce I will once again co-instructing a Bugshot, a macro-photography workshop with Alex Wild, John Abbott, and Piotr Naskrecki - this time in BELIZE! More information can be found here and here

Follow me on:

 

Instagram | Facebook | 500px | Twitter

  

Araneae

 

Constitute a large group, distinct and diffuse with more than 3,700 described species in North America and more than 38,000 worldwide. The oldest evidence of spiders comes from a Devonian fossil over 380 million years old (Shear et al. 1989). Spiders occur in varied habitats and often very abundant. Among these, those not typical desert spider can hold up to 800 per square meter. Estimates of spider diversity ranging from 20 species per hectare in temperate zone to more than 600 species per hectare in tropical forests. (Colwell and Coddington 2001).

 

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

 

Araneae

 

Constituem um grupo grande, distinto e difuso com mais de 3.700 espécies descritas na América do Norte e mais de 38 mil no mundo todo. A evidência mais antiga das aranhas vem de um fóssil Devoniano com mais de 380 milhões de anos de idade (Shear et al. 1989). As aranhas ocorrem em habitats variados e costumam ser muito abundantes. Dentre estes, aqueles não desérticos típicos podem sustentar até 800 aranhas por metro quadrado. Estimativas da diversidade de aranhas variam entre 20 espécies por hectare na zona temperada a mais de 600 espécies por hectare nas florestas tropicais. (Coddington e Colwell 2001).

Make sure to click here to view the larger image as Flickr's resizing creates moiré artifacts and over-sharpens a bit!

 

Alright! It's been far too long! I nearly ran over this wonderful little female with my bike while returning from a book sale this weekend. Initially, I wasn't quite sure if she was a salticid or not as I careened around her, but after momentarily debating turning back – I decided to do so and was instantly ecstatic upon realizing that the little speck of arthropod I’d instinctively avoided killing was none other than the most resplendent salticid of them all – Phidippus mystaceus! And not only that – she was in absolutely wonderful shape with fantastic hair coverage, a plump abdomen, and clean eyes!

 

The shot above was achieved by letting her hop on a sunflower leaf and holding her up to the sky to get a blue-sky background bright enough in the exposure. The image is a focus-stack of three images taken at about f/11 or f/16 with my old (now scratched) 50mm prime reversed on extension tubes. Also noteworthy is the fact that this is one of my first salticid shots taken with the new Pentax K-x body and in RAW nonetheless (all my previous work was shot in jpeg!). She ended up being quite cooperative and didn’t require too much pain or toil on my part – working with salticids is always a pleasure - even when difficult!

 

Apologies for the infrequent uploads lately, I’ve just been busy outside of the macrophotography world – but be assured – I’m still taking shots and searching for subjects and likely always will.

 

In other news – Bugshot 2011 with Alex Wild and John Abbott was a resounding success and proved to be a wonderful opportunity to hear and learn from a variety of entomologists, macro photographers, and more. Should it happen again next year – I’m fully behind it and consider it an invaluable resource.

  

Click here for a larger view as flickr tends to over-sharpen these smaller thumbnails!

 

I've been back from Bugshot 2012 for about a week now and am just now getting around to editing some of the salticid photos I took while down in Florida. This wonderfully fluffy Phidippus regius female (found by a helpful Guillaume Dury) was more than willing to pose for photos from several attendees to the workshop. Given that one of my ultimate goals while in Florida was to find this exact species - I'm grateful that I finally got a chance to photograph one of North America's largest and most beautiful Phidippus species!

 

The image above is a focus stack of 2 shots taken with a 50mm prime reversed on a set of extension tubes.

 

---------------

 

In other, non arthropod photography related news, the physics based puzzle platformer video game I've been working on for the past year with Colin Northway, Incredipede, is nearing completion and will be launched soon. Check out the trailer, complete with all my weird woodcutty illustrations come to life here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIxef7gelnI

 

...also - for those of you with Steam accounts, vote for the game to be picked up by Steam here: steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=92701947&a...

Click here for a larger view as flickr tends to over-sharpen these smaller thumbnails!

 

Here's yet another image of that beautiful Phidippus regius found during the Florida Bugshot workshop back in August.

 

This wonderfully fluffy Phidippus regius female (found by a helpful Guillaume Dury) was more than willing to pose for photos from several attendees to the workshop. Given that one of my ultimate goals while in Florida was to find this exact species - I'm grateful that I finally got a chance to photograph one of North America's largest and most beautiful Phidippus species!

 

The image above is a focus stack of 5(!) shots taken with a 28mm prime reversed on a set of extension tubes. The stacking was done in Zerene Stacker.

 

---------------

 

In other, non arthropod photography related news, the physics based puzzle platformer video game I've been working on for the past year with Colin and Sarah Northway, Incredipede, has been released! Check out the trailer, complete with all my weird woodcutty illustrations come to life here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=TIxef7gelnI

 

...also - for those of you with Steam accounts, vote for the game to be picked up by Steam here: steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=92701947&a...

2018 Bugshot Alabama at the Solon Dixon Forestry Center, outside of Andalusia, AL.

BugShot 2012, Photography by Josh Mayes

Yet another amazing Phidippus species I had been dying to find while down in Florida while teaching the last Bugshot class back in August. Just look at those chelicerae! Phidippus workmani is within the P. audax species group - and although the males are relatively close in appearance to P. audax males - the females are just fantastically marked! This awesome female specimen was found by Josh Mayes, an attendee of the workshop.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

If you're into macro photography, entomology, or just want to hang out in Central America - I'm proud to announce I will once again co-instructing a Bugshot, a macro-photography workshop with Alex Wild, John Abbott, and Piotr Naskrecki - this time in BELIZE! More information can be found here and here

Probably my favorite photo from BugShot. Before you go criticizing me that these are vertebrates, there is an insect present in the photo!

Caves Branch Jungle Lodge, Belize

An adult katydid that just finished emerging from her old exoskeleton, which she is still clinging to. Only the female katydids have the blade-like ovipositor at the tip of the abdomen. The background is dark because the katydid was photographed after sunset.

 

Amusingly enough, discovering and photographing this katydid was the reason why I and several other Belize Bugshot photographers were late to Piotr Naskrecki's presentation on--you guessed it--katydids.

I'm the last person to stay awake at the workshop today. I'm so glad I have forgone sleep, because I got THIS SUPER-FUN SHOT!!! It's a weevil in the act of taking off...species ID to come, but it's an acorn specialist (Curculio sp.)...

2018 Bugshot Alabama at the Solon Dixon Forestry Center, outside of Andalusia, AL.

2018 Bugshot Alabama at the Solon Dixon Forestry Center, outside of Andalusia, AL.

Click here for a larger view!

  

I’m back! Just returned from a week with the Elias Lab out south of Tucson, AZ while they carried out their field research involving Habronattus jumping spiders. It was great to spend some time in such beautiful country with the company of fellow spider-fans that never seemed to tire of my endless questions and ramblings about salticids. The amount of beautiful and varied species we found was just overwhelming too – and I ended up taking quite a lot of shots – so expect to see more wild Arizona salticids around here soon!

 

This little Habronattus virgulatus male, after much coaxing, eventually allowed a few portraits to be taken of his beautifully colored face - despite his odd behavior of turning about 45 degrees every time I pointed the camera in his face. I suspect he was threatened a bit by my massive new 8x10” flash diffuser I’ve started using lately. The image is a pretty significant crop from a focus stack of 2 images (would have loved to have gotten a 3rd for the foremost legs – but he began to groom himself shortly after the above images) taken with an old SMC Pentax 50mm reversed on two sets of extension tubes.

 

So – stay tuned and I’ll be posting more species soon!

 

---------------------------------------------

 

In other news - I'm planning on producing a short series of how-to macro tutorial videos. If you're interested - go ahead and suggest any topics you'd like me to cover!

 

If you want to keep up with me and my work - feel free to follow me on twitter here: twitter.com/thomasshahan

 

I recently shot a segment with This Land Press about my macrophotography, which you can view online *here* or by clicking on the image in the comments below!

 

BugShot, the macrophotography workshop I will co-teach with Alex Wild and John Abbott in Florida this coming August, has now filled up - but go ahead and check out the website HERE to keep track of updates on where we will be next year!

2018 Bugshot Alabama at the Solon Dixon Forestry Center, outside of Andalusia, AL.

A fantastically fluffy moth found by Jena Johnson during last week's Bugshot Macrophotography course in Belize.

 

More info and photos to come! Dorsal view of this specimen here: www.flickr.com/photos/49580580@N02/with/15078052249/

 

Follow me on:

 

Instagram | Facebook | 500px | Twitter

  

Aranha-espinhosa - Espécie: Micrathena schreibersi - Aranha com projeções abdominais muito fortes, que são confundidas com espinhos ou chifres. Essas projeções servem para que a aranha não seja predada por vespas solitárias. Constroem teias e se alimentam de insetos alados. Apresentam coloração chamativa e as fêmeas são bem maiores que os machos.

 

Ordem: Araneae.

Família: Araneidae.

Espécie: Micrathena schreibersi.

 

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-

 

Micrathena schreibersi - Spider with strong abdominal projections, which are confused with spines or horns. These projections are for the spider is not preyed on solitary wasps. Build webs and feed on flying insects. Exhibit striking coloration and females are larger than males.

 

Orde: Araneae

Familie: Araneidae.

Specie: Micrathena schreibersi.

 

Click here for a larger view!

 

This beauty was definitely one of the larger Rabidosa specimens I've found in Oklahoma. Thankfully, she was cooperative enough to stay put for a couple shots yesterday afternoon as I released her back into the field where I found her. I carefully let her loose on a leaf I had placed atop a log and she sat still for a while happily grooming herself before hopping down and scampering through the field.

 

Taken with a newly built (and bigger at ~8x10") and fold-able flash softbox inspired by the wonderful work of Colin Hutton. Also, this is one of my first shots with a new flash that I'm still getting used to. Focus stacked from 3 photos @ f/13 or so. (actually don't know - think it was set between f/11 and f/16). More or less full frame.

 

---------------------------------------------

 

In other news - I recently shot a segment with This Land Press about my macrophotography, which you can view online *here* or by clicking on the image in the comments below!

 

BugShot, the macrophotography workshop I will co-teach with Alex Wild and John Abbott in Florida this coming August, has now filled up - but go ahead and check out the website HERE to keep track of updates on where we will be next year!

 

If you want to keep up with me and my work - feel free to follow me on twitter here: twitter.com/thomasshahan

 

...also if you are interested in buying any of my art, I've started selling my prints on etsy here: www.etsy.com/shop/tshahan

Follow me on:

 

Instagram | Facebook | 500px | Twitter

  

Fotografia noturna em campo.

 

Registro: Quinta-feira 14.11.2013

Ilhéus, Bahia - Brasil.

Horário: 18:42

 

Os insetos pertencentes à família Phloeidae são todos ocorrentes na Região Neotropical. No Brasil, distribuem-se na Mata Atlântica lato sensu, estendendo-se até a região amazônica. Apresentam hábito fitófago, provavelmente alimentando-se da seiva de plantas arbóreas, porém não há registros de danos às plantas utilizadas. Phloeidae inclui os gêneros Phloea Lepeletier & Serville, 1825, com Phloea corticata (Drury, 1773) e Phloea subquadrata Spinola, 1837, e Phloeophana Kirkaldy, 1908, monotípico, com Phloeophana longirostris (Spinola, 1837). Os insetos desta família apresentam o corpo achatado, com expansões lobadas e foliáceas, olhos divididos em uma porção dorsal e outra ventral, e antenas triarticuladas, inseridas anteriormente aos olhos e encobertas pelas expansões cefálicas. Os fleídeos vivem sobre troncos de árvores, as quais se assemelham na coloração e forma, além da textura.

 

=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-

 

Night photography in the field.

 

Registration: Thursday 11.14.2013

Ilhéus, Bahia - Brazil.

Horário: 18:42

 

Phloeidae insects belonging to the family are all occurring in the Neotropical Region. In Brazil, are distributed in the Atlantic Forest sensu lato, extending to the Amazon region. Present phytophagous habit, probably feeding on the sap of woody plants, but there are no records of damage to the plants used. Phloeidae includes genres Phloea Lepeletier & Serville, 1825, with Phloea Corticata (Drury, 1773) and Phloea subquadrata Spinola, 1837, and Phloeophana Kirkaldy, 1908 monotypic with Phloeophana longirostris (Spinola, 1837). The insects of this family have a flattened body, with lobed and foliaceous expansions, eyes divided into a dorsal and ventral another, and triarticuladas antennae inserted above the eyes and covert the cephalic expansions. The fleídeos live on tree trunks, which are similar in color and shape in addition to the texture.

 

(Image Courtesy SNOMNH)

 

The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History and I recently organized an exhibit called "Beautiful Beasts: The Unseen life of Oklahoma Spiders and Insects" which features several large-scale prints of my macrophotographs. The exhibit layout and printing turned out fantastic and I am immensely proud of everyone who helped put it together.

 

The museum is located in Norman, Oklahoma and the exhibit runs until September 8th, 2013. Also worth noting - my girlfriend, Kathleen Neeley did several illustrations (many of salticids!) for the didactic panels in this exhibit - more information on her illustration/artwork can be found here: www.kinkprints.com

 

The exhibit is definitely worth visiting if just for the giant inflatable Phidippus mystaceus!

 

-------------

 

In other big news: I will be once again co-instructing Bugshot, a macro-photography workshop with Alex Wild, John Abbott, and Piotr Naskrecki - this time in BELIZE! More information can be found here and here.

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 67 68