flickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged blogjects

this picture was uploaded directly from my camera, i guess that makes the camera a blogject read more about it

No server required.... Arduino + LadyAda ethernet shield with Wiznet module, plus external power supply. The blue ethernet cable's plugged directly into my broadband router.

 

The lego stand for the current cost allows the black cable in the bottom.

 

This is now logging my electricity consumption to pachube.com!

 

See blog entry.

A "Flavonoid," a primitive blogject engineered by Julian Bleecker.

this picture was uploaded directly from my camera, i guess that makes the camera a blogject read more about the project

From the evolution of the concept from the 1st Blogject Workshop, we continued the idea of a networked object that could embody the various media/culture circulation practices of Flickr, specifically browsing, tagging and social networks (or, browsing/sharing, the interface and associations.) The camera would allow for tagging and taxonomic browsing on the device, and the device would create the serendipity of finding other personalities and other images through a proximity networking system whereby others with the device who came nearby would engage in a degree of anonymous media sharing. That is, if you pass by someone who has images that either fit the rough tag "cloud" of your historical images, or through other parameters you specify ("don't share", "share anything", "share with these tags", "share with this metadata (city, place, event, time)", etc.) The device would support in-the-palm media sharing and browsing, as most cameras do nowadays, but with a robust mechanism for searching, sorting, cataloging, creating sets/groups, etc. The camera would also allow for upload and download to/from fixed media sharing sites, like Flickr. The camera would be become more of an embodied flickr instance than a media capture device. The interface would allow one to taxonomically tag photos according to one's own semantics, as well as fixed semantics, through a carefully designed UI.

What would it be like to Google a room? I mean, really do an informatics-based search of physical space? What are the existing social practices for finding things in such contexts? Is this a research project? How do you go about such a thing? Ideas?

 

This?

 

http://socialfiction.org/Tax_of_a_Room.html

From the evolution of the concept from the 1st Blogject Workshop, we continued the idea of a networked object that could embody the various media/culture circulation practices of Flickr, specifically browsing, tagging and social networks (or, browsing/sharing, the interface and associations.) The camera would allow for tagging and taxonomic browsing on the device, and the device would create the serendipity of finding other personalities and other images through a proximity networking system whereby others with the device who came nearby would engage in a degree of anonymous media sharing. That is, if you pass by someone who has images that either fit the rough tag "cloud" of your historical images, or through other parameters you specify ("don't share", "share anything", "share with these tags", "share with this metadata (city, place, event, time)", etc.) The device would support in-the-palm media sharing and browsing, as most cameras do nowadays, but with a robust mechanism for searching, sorting, cataloging, creating sets/groups, etc. The camera would also allow for upload and download to/from fixed media sharing sites, like Flickr. The camera would be become more of an embodied flickr instance than a media capture device. The interface would allow one to taxonomically tag photos according to one's own semantics, as well as fixed semantics, through a carefully designed UI.

Here it is, in the "to be filed" bin.

 

Waiting for my Net News Wire to grind its gears against too many feeds, I happened to see the cover of the magazine on Sascha's blog, here what cause some t-shirts he's designed were on the cover..as was he.

 

I thought..geeze, that magazine looks familiar..

From the evolution of the concept from the 1st Blogject Workshop, we continued the idea of a networked object that could embody the various media/culture circulation practices of Flickr, specifically browsing, tagging and social networks (or, browsing/sharing, the interface and associations.) The camera would allow for tagging and taxonomic browsing on the device, and the device would create the serendipity of finding other personalities and other images through a proximity networking system whereby others with the device who came nearby would engage in a degree of anonymous media sharing. That is, if you pass by someone who has images that either fit the rough tag "cloud" of your historical images, or through other parameters you specify ("don't share", "share anything", "share with these tags", "share with this metadata (city, place, event, time)", etc.) The device would support in-the-palm media sharing and browsing, as most cameras do nowadays, but with a robust mechanism for searching, sorting, cataloging, creating sets/groups, etc. The camera would also allow for upload and download to/from fixed media sharing sites, like Flickr. The camera would be become more of an embodied flickr instance than a media capture device. The interface would allow one to taxonomically tag photos according to one's own semantics, as well as fixed semantics, through a carefully designed UI.

this picture was uploaded directly from my camera, i guess that makes the camera a blogject read more about the project

I'm seeing a demo of the "Hello World" for Sunspots. Two Sunspots in physical proximity pass along a running sequence of LED blips — kind of like The Wave (the one you see at sports events) only between two spimey Things. The goal — from opening the box to getting this "Hello World" app running in about 15 minutes. That's pretty cool..

 

A visit to Sun Microsystems in Menlo Park to say hi to Rob Tow and the Version E Sunspots! They'll come in a very nicely designed package designed to be ultra legible so that any ol' 14 year old could open it up and get a cool physical computing style hello world app up and running. These have plenty of I/O, three accelerometers, 802.15 radio, LEDs, pushbuttons, etc. They'll come in a package of two sensor boards and one base station for $499. That's slightly below cost. I think if you cost out configuring a BS2 or PIC or whatever with the same feature set you'd have more headaches and have spent more money..

 

www.sunspotworld.com/

Blogject paths. The "thing" in route, harvesting locales for later replay.

1 3 4 5