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Model: Giovanni Riccioni

ph: Giovanni Riccioni

 

...The Bitterness...

don't waste time to regret yourself if our targets are not or cannot be achieved, look at forward for reaching another one!

Storms will come and go in life, but its how you come out on the other end that matters.

 

1 Einstein/alienbee-e640 into a small litedome softbox camera left

Manfrotto Tripod

Composite Image: done with 3-7 layers

A few layers of rain and a few layers of clouds.& adjustment layers.

Would like to Thank Fellow Flickrer Michael Herb. I got the idea and inspiration from his photo. It really caught the essence of what life for me has felt like the last few months. Please check out Micheal's work and website. I also scored this great cloud background from his site www.layerjunkie.com

 

If you like my work then please feel free to checkout my site and pass it along to a friend who may like my images.

www.dlaughinghouseimages.com/

 

Model: Doris

 

*new title - thanks A, katrin and tess for ideas :)

Therefore you can`t expect anything great today! ;)

Model: Giovanni Riccioni

Ph: Giovanni Riccioni

 

A shooting developed during the session "Giovanni|Portrait 6" where the body ends (foot, hand and head) has been held outside the frame giving priority to the lines made by the limbs

White text on a black shirt:

 

”I’m a miracle

a big miracle

and I thank you for that”

 

Please NO adding Favourites without comments. You risk being BLOCKED

At 10th Avenue Studios

Marina di Pisa & the Tuscan Coast 2003.

 

Gabriele D'Annunzio

 

The Italian poet Gabriele D'Annunzio spoke of Marina di Pisa as "Eden". During his stay in Pisa, he lived in a villa near the mouth of the River Arno. Here he began to compose "The Tension": "O Marina of Pisa, when it blows the solenoid!". This is now enshrined on a plaque affixed to a fallen limestone stalactite which has been placed where the Dannunzian mansion once stood. Here the Tyrrhenian Sea, with an ungroomed pine forest facing it, recalls the ancient mythic imagination, the well of so much great artistic production from the past. However, D'Annunzio drank from this well not only to fuel his poetry, but to develop almost the entire ritual of fascism from sources such as "The Iliad" [see Wikipedia entry on D'Annunzio quoted in part below].

 

The Bocca d’Arno in Marina di Pisa is the ultimate outlet of the Arno river, whose journey through Tuscany takes 240 kilometers. D’Annunzio described it as a “a lake of salt […] seen through stilted huts, and through enormous nets hanging from poles and struts arranged like crosses” (“Halcyon”, 1902).

 

The nets D’Annunzio mentions are from the so-called “retoni”, wooden structures that dot the landscape in this area of the Tyrrhenian coast, with the majestic Apuan Alps in the background. “They are hanging nets. Some / hang like balance scales from antennas / supporting tall, jutting-out bridges / where men keep watch, ready to roll up the rope” (G. D’Annunzio, “Bocca d’Arno”, July 6, 1899).

 

The poet, who was originally from Pescara in The Abruzzo, wrote to his friend Giuseppe Treves: “I spent the last few days in deep quiet, lying on a boat in the sun. You don’t know these places: they are divine. The Arno’s estuary is so purely pleasing that for me it is beyond comparison even with the mouth of a beloved woman. I wish I could stay here and sing. I have such a strong desire to sing that lyrics gush spontaneously from my soul like foam from waves.”

 

See also: www.italianways.com/bocca-darno-a-muse-for-gabriele-dannu...

www.quinewspisa.it/la-casa-di-dannunzio.htm

balbruno.altervista.org/index-1179.html

 

From Wikipedia: Gabriele D'Annunzio, (1863 – 1938), sometimes spelled d'Annunzio, was an Italian writer, poet, journalist, playwright and soldier during World War I. He occupied a prominent place in Italian literature from 1889 to 1910 and later political life from 1914 to 1924. He was often referred to under the epithets Il Vate ("the Poet") or Il Profeta ("the Prophet").

 

D'Annunzio was associated with the Decadent movement in his literary works, which interplayed closely with French Symbolism and British Aestheticism. Such works represented a turn against the naturalism of the preceding romantics and was both sensuous and mystical. He came under the influence of Friedrich Nietzsche which would find outlets in his literary and later political contributions. His affairs with several women, including Eleonora Duse and Luisa Casati, received public attention.

During the First World War, perception of D'Annunzio in Italy transformed from literary figure into a national war hero. He was associated with the elite Arditi storm troops of the Italian Army and took part in actions such as the Flight over Vienna. As part of an Italian nationalist reaction against the Paris Peace Conference, he set up the short-lived Italian Regency of Carnaro in Fiume [in present day Croatia] with himself as Duce. The constitution made "music" the fundamental principle of the state and was corporatist in nature. Some of the ideas and aesthetics influenced Italian fascism and the style of Benito Mussolini and, thereby, Adolf Hitler.

 

... [Benito Mussolini imitated and learned] the culture of dictatorship... from D'Annunzio. D'Annunzio has been described as the John the Baptist of Italian Fascism, as virtually the entire ritual of Fascism was invented by D'Annunzio during his occupation of Fiume and his leadership of the Italian Regency of Carnaro. These included the balcony address, the Roman salute, the cries of "Eia, eia, eia! Alala!" taken from the Achilles' cry in the Iliad, the dramatic and rhetorical dialogue with the crowd, the use of religious symbols in new secular settings. It also included his method of government in Fiume, the economics of the corporate state; stage tricks; large emotive nationalistic public rituals; blackshirted followers, the Arditi, with their disciplined, bestial responses and strongarm repression of dissent. He was even said to have originated the practice of forcibly dosing opponents with large amounts of castor oil, a very effective laxative, to humiliate, disable or kill them, a practice which became a common tool of Mussolini's blackshirts.

 

... At the height of his success, D'Annunzio was celebrated for the originality, power and decadence of his writing. Although his work had immense impact across Europe, and influenced generations of Italian writers, his fin de siècle works are now little known, and his literary reputation has always been clouded by his fascist associations. Indeed, even before his fascist period, he had his strong detractors. A New York Times review in 1898 of his novel The Intruder referred to him as "evil", "entirely selfish and corrupt". Three weeks into its December 1901 run at the Teatro Constanzi in Rome, his tragedy Francesca da Rimini was banned by the censor on grounds of morality.

White Jean Jacket – Diesel

Black Shirt – Giordano

Jeans – The Gap

Boots – Espirit

© 2013 Lyn Randle

Please do not use this image without my permission.

5/104

 

This is my freestyle for week 3 because I have a feeling since this week is finals I'm not gonna have a lot of time to upload except for the theme one at the end of the week hopefully! I really don't like the lighting in this photo at all. :(

This lamp has been sitting on the floor of my bedroom with a busted lampshade for several months. I've been meaning to get a new lampshade but have also been contemplating doing a series with the lamp. Photo series wins out so I will try to come up with some different ways to use it in pictures.

Exclusive... 51216941 Actor Stephen Amell takes a break from filming 'Arrow' to have lunch on set with his pregnant wife Cassandra Jean on September 24, 2013 in Vancouver, Canada. FameFlynet, Inc - Beverly Hills, CA, USA - +1 (818) 307-4813

Wolverine The Nebraska Fan

She was walking by the beach, alone, staring at the brave ocean with a beer in her hand... pacing on the sand...

 

Perhaps, like me, she felt in her bones that summer is coming to an end... and she prepared her soul to say good-bye to the heat until 2011...

 

SmithPoint Beach

Long Island

New York

 

Taken with an iPhone 4 using CrossProcess app, and filtered to Antique in iPhoto.

Marina di Pisa & the Tuscan Coast 2003

 

Gabriele D'Annunzio

 

The Italian poet Gabriele D'Annunzio spoke of Marina di Pisa as "Eden". During his stay in Pisa, he lived in a villa near the mouth of the River Arno. Here he began to compose "The Tension": "O Marina of Pisa, when it blows the solenoid!". This is now enshrined on a plaque affixed to a fallen limestone stalactite which has been placed where the Dannunzian mansion once stood. Here the Tyrrhenian Sea, with an ungroomed pine forest facing it, recalls the ancient mythic imagination, the well of so much great artistic production from the past. However, D'Annunzio drank from this well not only to fuel his poetry, but to develop almost the entire ritual of fascism from sources such as "The Iliad" [see Wikipedia entry on D'Annunzio quoted in part below].

 

The Bocca d’Arno in Marina di Pisa is the ultimate outlet of the Arno river, whose journey through Tuscany takes 240 kilometers. D’Annunzio described it as a “a lake of salt […] seen through stilted huts, and through enormous nets hanging from poles and struts arranged like crosses” (“Halcyon”, 1902).

 

The nets D’Annunzio mentions are from the so-called “retoni”, wooden structures that dot the landscape in this area of the Tyrrhenian coast, with the majestic Apuan Alps in the background. “They are hanging nets. Some / hang like balance scales from antennas / supporting tall, jutting-out bridges / where men keep watch, ready to roll up the rope” (G. D’Annunzio, “Bocca d’Arno”, July 6, 1899).

 

The poet, who was originally from Pescara in The Abruzzo, wrote to his friend Giuseppe Treves: “I spent the last few days in deep quiet, lying on a boat in the sun. You don’t know these places: they are divine. The Arno’s estuary is so purely pleasing that for me it is beyond comparison even with the mouth of a beloved woman. I wish I could stay here and sing. I have such a strong desire to sing that lyrics gush spontaneously from my soul like foam from waves.”

 

See also: www.italianways.com/bocca-darno-a-muse-for-gabriele-dannu...

www.quinewspisa.it/la-casa-di-dannunzio.htm

balbruno.altervista.org/index-1179.html

 

From Wikipedia: Gabriele D'Annunzio, (1863 – 1938), sometimes spelled d'Annunzio, was an Italian writer, poet, journalist, playwright and soldier during World War I. He occupied a prominent place in Italian literature from 1889 to 1910 and later political life from 1914 to 1924. He was often referred to under the epithets Il Vate ("the Poet") or Il Profeta ("the Prophet").

 

D'Annunzio was associated with the Decadent movement in his literary works, which interplayed closely with French Symbolism and British Aestheticism. Such works represented a turn against the naturalism of the preceding romantics and was both sensuous and mystical. He came under the influence of Friedrich Nietzsche which would find outlets in his literary and later political contributions. His affairs with several women, including Eleonora Duse and Luisa Casati, received public attention.

During the First World War, perception of D'Annunzio in Italy transformed from literary figure into a national war hero. He was associated with the elite Arditi storm troops of the Italian Army and took part in actions such as the Flight over Vienna. As part of an Italian nationalist reaction against the Paris Peace Conference, he set up the short-lived Italian Regency of Carnaro in Fiume [in present day Croatia] with himself as Duce. The constitution made "music" the fundamental principle of the state and was corporatist in nature. Some of the ideas and aesthetics influenced Italian fascism and the style of Benito Mussolini and, thereby, Adolf Hitler.

 

... [Benito Mussolini imitated and learned] the culture of dictatorship... from D'Annunzio. D'Annunzio has been described as the John the Baptist of Italian Fascism, as virtually the entire ritual of Fascism was invented by D'Annunzio during his occupation of Fiume and his leadership of the Italian Regency of Carnaro. These included the balcony address, the Roman salute, the cries of "Eia, eia, eia! Alala!" taken from the Achilles' cry in the Iliad, the dramatic and rhetorical dialogue with the crowd, the use of religious symbols in new secular settings. It also included his method of government in Fiume, the economics of the corporate state; stage tricks; large emotive nationalistic public rituals; blackshirted followers, the Arditi, with their disciplined, bestial responses and strongarm repression of dissent. He was even said to have originated the practice of forcibly dosing opponents with large amounts of castor oil, a very effective laxative, to humiliate, disable or kill them, a practice which became a common tool of Mussolini's blackshirts.

 

... At the height of his success, D'Annunzio was celebrated for the originality, power and decadence of his writing. Although his work had immense impact across Europe, and influenced generations of Italian writers, his fin de siècle works are now little known, and his literary reputation has always been clouded by his fascist associations. Indeed, even before his fascist period, he had his strong detractors. A New York Times review in 1898 of his novel The Intruder referred to him as "evil", "entirely selfish and corrupt". Three weeks into its December 1901 run at the Teatro Constanzi in Rome, his tragedy Francesca da Rimini was banned by the censor on grounds of morality.

Please NO adding Favourites without comments. You risk being BLOCKED

Please NO adding Favourites without comments. You risk being BLOCKED

Am I still alive,

Or has the light gone black?

 

People will say that you're never as good or as bad as you think but when people say nothing it leaves you to wonder.

50846687 British model Kelly Brook and her boyfriend Thom Evans head out for lunch in London, England on July 30, 2012. Kelly is using women's vollyball as her "gymspiration" tweeting a picture of the Olympic event as her encouragement to hit the gym and keep in shape... British model Kelly Brook and her boyfriend Thom Evans head out for lunch in London, England on July 30, 2012. Kelly is using women's vollyball as her "gymspiration" tweeting a picture of the Olympic event as her encouragement to hit the gym and keep in shape... FameFlynet, Inc - Beverly Hills, CA, USA - +1 (818) 307-4813 RESTRICTIONS APPLY: USA/AUSTRALIA/NEW ZEALAND ONLY

the world is shifting, tilting sideways and my mind starts swinging, and at the top it jumps off and flies.

 

8.365 dec. 1/09

December 6, 2008: Vanessa Hudgens and Zac Efron spotted out shopping for furniture for Vanessa's house at Design Within Reach in West Hollywood, California today.

Credit: Star Pix/INFphoto.com Ref.: infusla-34

When my original photo plans fell apart last autumn, and with just a few hours to go before the sun disappeared completely, stunning Chris stepped in for one of my briefest photo sessions in some of my favourite woodland. Full set

More of my work can be found at the following-

www.ellaruth.co.uk

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View On Black

76/365

This picture took way to much time to do. My editing thing kept crashing. So im pissed bout that. Im happy though cause I redid my room today. And it looks better and so yea

Do you feel like this sometime? For me, time simply goes too fast these days... and I don't have the time to do all I want to do and even if I like it, this 365 is quite more demanding than I thought. I am not thinking of quiting but I need to find a process to get shooting faster. I guess, the more I do practice and the more I will achieve good results in less time but it might just be wishful thinking. Anyway, here is another one that shows my state of mind for the moment. It will pass.. i am sure. :P

 

See you tomorrow flickr friends! As usual, your comments are like my cold beer after hard work. ;-)

old-skool from end of '08

Bigger, On Black.

 

Sooo... was going for an Edie Sedgwick kinda thing... how could I NOT, with this new hair???? I think I may do it again and use more opaque black tights and a striped sweater, and maybe lose the softbox to create a large shadow... but overall, I kinda like these. : ) I think she was absolutely adorable. I also think her life story is a very sad one. Factory Girl is one of my favorite movies, but I am not sure it portrays things as they actually were. Edie had a lot of problems BEFORE she met Andy Warhol... but the life she led once their relationship blossomed probably didn't help. At any rate, her style is just damn sexy and fun. Gotta love it. ;)

 

Tuesday's Truth: I went through a period where I did a lot of drugs. It was right after my best friend passed away, right after high school. I had another friend, whose father passed away. I think it was an escape for us. We didn't have to think about anything except having a good time, leading this life-style. And believe me, we did! Haha. But it's not worth it. It's really not. I'm ashamed at the way I treated people, and how it reflected on my loved ones. And it was very dangerous... at one point we had to drive a friend who OD'd to the hospital... ew. So glad I have moved on from that to better things. Those few years of my life are a lesson learned...

 

Been a long road since those hands I left my tears in.

Custom Wall for Premium Football's Myspace page

www.myspace.com/premiumfootball

Shot right out of the venue after a high-end cosmetic brand hair trends demonstration. I just started building my Flickr profile and it seems I had to do this much earlier :) Follow me for more fashion and portrait shots. Thanks.

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