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Le Charlemagne est un ensemble de bureaux situé à Bruxelles abritant des organes de la Commission européenne dont ceux en charge de l'élargissement, de l'interprétariat, du commerce ainsi que des Conseillers. Il comporte 3 ailes et 15 étages.

Le bâtiment a été conçu par Jacques Cuisinier et a été construit en 1967 en même temps que le Berlaymont pour regrouper l'ensemble des départements de la Commission européenne. Cependant, suite au refus de la Commission de partager le Berlaymont avec le Conseil de l'Union européenne, le Charlemagne a été mis à disposition du secrétariat du Conseil en 1971.

En 1995, le Conseil a déménagé au Juste Lipse, permettant une rénovation du bâtiment. Cette rénovation a duré jusqu'en 1998 et a vu Helmut Jahn remplacer la façade extérieure par une surface vitrée. Depuis la restauration, le Charlemagne est occupé par la Commission.

Berlaymont complex, Bruxelas, Bélgica.

 

E com essa imagem me despeço do mês de Abril. Passarei duas semanas viajando e so estarei de volta no inicio de Maio.

Espero voltar com os cartões de memoria (os digitais e o humano) cheio de belas fotos e lembranças de momentos inesqueciveis!

um abraço para todos e até a volta!

 

________

 

Two weeks out of town. I'll be back! :D

 

l www.salvadorfotoclube.com.br l

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

On the picture: The City Hall of Den Bosch with the saturday market in the foreground

  

Did You know?

Many artists have been inspired by Hieronymus Bosch, including Pieter Bruegel, Salvador Dalí, Max Ernst, Joan Miró, Maurits Escher and Jan Fabre.

 

Hieronymus Bosch is one of the world’s most famous artists. His characteristic work full of illusions and hallucinations, bizarre monsters and nightmares, depicts the great themes of his time: temptation, sin and judgement. His work was no less popular after his death and inspired innumerable artists to the present day, making Bosch one of the most important artists of the late Middle Ages.

 

Jheronimus Bosch – Visions of a Genius will be the highlight of the Bosch Year 2016, a unique event and an unparalleled homage to the most important Medieval artist from the Netherlands.

 

Visit Jheronimus Bosch – Visions of a Genius and experience the incomparable power of an artist who, five centuries after his death, still inspires: 's-Hertogenbosch's most famous son: Jheronimus Bosch.

 

Sources:

boschexpo.hetnoordbrabantsmuseum.nl/en

www.bosch500.nl/en/the-event/2016-exhibition

 

Also have a look at this,

The Bosch Research and Conservation Project:

boschproject.org/

 

and

youtu.be/F6JqHN1n7UM?list=PLnZeTSd73Ej4jQNyNs7AlZ06QrVPA-6g-

_________________________________________________________

 

's-Hertogenbosch

'

s-Hertogenbosch, literally "The Duke's Forest" in English, and historically in French: Bois-le-Duc) is a city and municipality in the southern Netherlands. It is the capital of the province of North Brabant.

 

In speech, the Dutch seldom use the formal 's-Hertogenbosch but rather the colloquial Den Bosch. Den Bosch means "The Forest".

 

History

The city's official name is a contraction of the Dutch des Hertogen bosch—"the Duke's forest". The duke in question was Henry I, Duke of Brabant, whose family had owned a large estate at nearby Orthen for at least four centuries. He founded a new town located on some forested dunes in the middle of a marsh. At age 26, he granted 's-Hertogenbosch city rights and the corresponding trade privileges in 1185. This is, however, the traditional date given by later chroniclers; the first mention in contemporaneous sources is 1196. The original charter has been lost. His reason for founding the city was to protect his own interests against encroachment from Gelre and Holland; from its first days, he conceived of the city as a fortress. It was destroyed in 1203 in a joint expedition of Gelre and Holland, but was soon rebuilt. Some remnants of the original city walls may still be seen. In the late 15th century, a much larger wall was erected to protect the greatly expanded settled area. Artificial waterways were dug to serve as a city moat, through which the rivers Dommel and Aa were diverted.

 

Until 1520, the city flourished, becoming the second largest population centre in the territory of the present Netherlands, after Utrecht. The birthplace and home of one of the greatest painters of the northern Renaissance, Hieronymus Bosch, the city was also a center of music, and composers, such as Jheronimus Clibano, received their training at its churches. Others held positions there: Matthaeus Pipelare was musical director at the Confraternity of Our Lady; and renowned Habsburg copyist and composer Pierre Alamire did much of his work at 's-Hertogenbosch.

 

Eighty Years' War

The wars of the Reformation changed the course of the city's history. It became an independent bishopric. During the Eighty Years' War, the city took the side of the Habsburg (Catholic) authorities and thwarted a Calvinist coup. It was besieged several times by Prince Maurice of Orange, stadtholder of most of the Dutch Republic, who wanted to bring 's-Hertogenbosch under the rule of the rebel United Provinces. The city was successfully defended by Claude de Berlaymont, also known as Haultpenne.

 

...

 

Louis XIV to Bonaparte

After the Peace of Westphalia, the fortifications were again expanded. In 1672, the Dutch rampjaar, the city held against the army of Louis XIV of France. In 1794, French revolutionary troops under command of Charles Pichegru took the city with hardly a fight: in the Batavian Republic, both Catholics and Brabanders at last gained equal rights.

  

From 1806, the city became part of the Kingdom of Holland and, from 1810, it was incorporated into the French Empire. It was captured by the Prussians in 1814. The next year, when the United Kingdom of the Netherlands was established, it became the capital of North Brabant. Many newer and more modern fortresses were created in the vicinity of the city. Until 1878 it was forbidden to build outside the ramparts. This led to overcrowding and the highest infant mortality in the kingdom. The very conservative city government prevented industrial investment—they didn't want the number of workers to grow—and the establishment of educational institutions—students were regarded as disorderly. As a result, the relative importance of the city diminished.

 

...

 

Museums are the Stedelijk Museum 's-Hertogenbosch, Noordbrabants Museum and the Jheronimus Bosch Art Center. The painter Hieronymus Bosch (c. 1450–1516) remains probably the best known citizen of 's-Hertogenbosch.

 

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%27s-Hertogenbosch

Reflection in the Conseil Européen Europese Raad building in Brussels (Bruxelles Brussel) / Belgium.

Commission européenne

Europese Commissie

Europäische Kommission

The European Commission (EC) is the executive body of the European Union responsible for proposing legislation, implementing decisions, upholding the Union's treaties and day-to-day running of the EU. Commissioners swear an oath at the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg, pledging to respect the EU Treaties and to be completely independent in carrying out their duties during their mandate.

 

The Commission operates as a cabinet government, with 28 members of the Commission (informally known as "commissioners"). There is one member per member state, though members are bound to represent the interests of the EU as a whole rather than their home state. One of the 28 is the Commission President (currently José Manuel Durão Barroso) proposed by the European Council and elected by the European Parliament. The Council then appoints the other 27 members of the Commission in agreement with the nominated President, and then the 28 members as a single body are subject to a vote of approval by the European Parliament. The first Barroso Commission took office in late 2004 and its successor, under the same President, took office in 2010.

 

The term "Commission" is used either in the narrow sense of the 28-member College of Commissioners (or College) or to also include the administrative body of about 23,000 European civil servants who are split into departments called Directorates-General and Services. The usual procedural languages of the Commission are English, French and German. The Members of the Commission and their "cabinets" (immediate teams) are based in the Berlaymont building of Brussels.

 

More Photos At:

www.glynlowe.com/bruxelles-brussels

Berlaymont bulding, Brussels, Belgium

 

Architect: Lucien de Vestel

 

The star shaped Berlaymont building houses the European Commission, the executive branch of the European Union. The building is called 'Berlaymonster' or Death Star by eurokrats (bureaucrats of the EU). It was constructed on the site of a 300-year old monastery between 1963 and 1969 in the Leopold Quartier. Asbestos was found in the structure in 1993 which had to be removed. The work lasted 13 years, significantly longer than the construction itself. On weekdays the surroundings are full of euroworkers and well dressed politicians.

The Berlaymont houses the headquarters of the European Commission.

Made with an Iphone with HDR option. It is slighly slow so trying to catch people was a real game.

A fragment of the white dune at Witsand Bay that caught my eye. The sand is remarkably white, despite the slight magenta tint you see here.

 

Reworked version.

 

This is a rework of a photo that I took in the autumn. I think this works much better.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, and Vice President of the European Commission, Catherine Ashton deliver their public statements in a joint press conference on Pakistan at the Berlaymont building in Brussels, Belgium, on October 14, 2010. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton meets with EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, and Vice President of the European Commission, Catherine Ashton in her office at Berlaymont building in Brussels, Belgium, on October 14, 2010. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, and Vice President of the European Commission, Catherine Ashton deliver their public statements on Pakistan to the press at the Berlaymont building in Brussels, Belgium, on October 14, 2010. [State Department photo/ Public Domain]

while celebrating the 60 years of the Schuman declaration

Hasselblad 501 C/M | Carl Zeiss Plannar 80mm f:2.8 CF T* | Kodak Tri-X 400 | Rodinal (R09) one shot 1+50 13' @20° C | scan from film

Big on black - the building hosting the European Commission.

 

3 * 3 raw exposures merged in Luminance hdr / Qtpfsgui and stiched in Hugin. all handheld as I had not my tripod with me...

Berlaymont building, Brussels, Belgium.

The Berlaymont is an office building in Brussels, Belgium that houses the headquarters of the European Commission, which is the executive of the European Union (EU). The structure is located at Schuman roundabout at 200 Rue de la Loi, in what is known as the "European district".

 

The building has housed the European Commission since its construction, and has become a symbol of the Commission (its name becoming a metonymy for the Commission) and the European presence in Brussels. The Commission itself is spread over some 60 odd buildings, but the Berlaymont is the institution's headquarters, being the seat of the President of the European Commission and its College of Commissioners.

 

The following Directorates-General (departments) are also based in the Berlaymont: Personnel and Administration (ADMIN), Bureau of European Policy Advisers (BEPA), Communication (COMM), Brussels Office of Infrastructure and Logistics (OIB), Secretariat-General (SG) and the Legal Service

 

The office of the President and the Commission boardroom are on the 13th floor (occupied by the President in defiance of superstition surrounding the number), together with the meeting room of the Hebdo and the restaurant La Convivialité.

 

With the number of European civil servants rapidly growing since their arrival in Brussels in 1958, the European Commission required more and more office space across the city. By 1965, the Commission alone had 3,200 staff scattered across 8 different cramped buildings. The situation, which started as soon as they arrived due to the lack of large office blocks, became critical and the Commission tried to concentrate its staff in a number of rented buildings around Schuman roundabout. The Belgian government, becoming aware of the problem and keen to ensure that the Commission stayed, offered to build a prestigious administration complex large enough to house the entire staff. President Walter Hallstein was interested but cautious about making long-term commitments while the issue of where the institutions were based was still being discussed. However, the need for office space was overwhelming.

 

The Belgian government's proposal required sufficient land which would preferably be in the Leopold Quarter (where they were already based) and near the homes of the civil servants to the south and east. The land chosen was then occupied by the Dames de Berlaymont, a 300 year old convent which managed a venerable girls' school.The convent and school moved to a larger and quieter site out of the city centre in Waterloo. Once the Belgian state finished their new school and built infrastructure to it, the Dames de Berlaymont handed the site, which they had been under pressure to sell to developers for years, to the Belgian government in November 1963.

 

To organise what was needed, the Belgian Foreign Minister Pierre Wigny suggested a "Commission consultative Berlaymont", where the Commission, the Belgian Public Works Ministry, the contractors and the architects could draw up the plans. However, the Belgian state desired a building not just tailored to the Commission, but something that could be used by its own civil servants were the Commission to leave. This was also why they favoured a central office building rather than the project for the construction of a "European city" on the Etterbeek. Due to the plans not meeting their exact desires, the Commission gained a lower rent.

 

The work was planned so that as soon as each wing was complete, staff could move in while the rest of the building was still under construction. The north and east wings were to be completed first (estimated for August 1961 though that proved optimistic). The south would take longer given the need to demolish more buildings including the girls school, with the Dames du Berlaymont unable to vacate until 1963. The Belgian government, realising that budgetary constraints meant it could not meet any of the deadlines, resorted to outside funding from the Office de sécurité sociale d'Outre-mer (OSSOM). OSSOM would own the land but the building would be constructed and rented by the Belgian government with rent deducted from its contribution to OSSOM's budget. Eventually it would buy it in 1985 through regular instalments while it was being sublet to the Commission. OSSOM awarded the construction contract to an association of entrepreneurs: Enterprises François et Fils with Compagnie belge des Chemins de fer et d'entreprises, Compagnie industrielle de travaux and Armand Blaton. The lack of a public tender was criticised by the Belgian audit office.

  

The Berlaymont in 1975, President François-Xavier Ortoli seen in the centre.In 1963, the first wing (north east) entered its active phase and was scheduled to be finished by the end of 1965. Concreting on that wing was finished in November 1964, completion was pushed back from the start of 1966 by a year due to the rail companies failing to vault the nearby railway line that prevented access to the ground floor. The wing was completed on 1 February 1967, with the first civil servants moving in three months later. The three month gap was due to disagreements about the conditions of the lease. The Belgian state was to lease the whole building to the Commission starting from when the work was finished, however the other member states found the cost excessive and wanted to explore other options, gaining a lease for the one and only completed wing instead. The lease came into effect on 1 May 1967 and cost €545,366 (the whole building would be €4.82 million, a reduction of €2.48 million taking into account construction costs). The building was only fully occupied at the beginning of September of that year

 

Du Château fort, élevé sur une motte artificielle au Moyen-Age par Robert 1er de Montigny, demeure aujourd'hui un bel ensemble en grès qui a été classé monument historique en mars 1929. Celui-ci est composé d'une porte en arc brisé flanquée de deux tours en U, édifiées au XIIIè siècle. Elle furent surélevées au XVIè siècle d'un étage en brique et percées d'une fenêtre à colonnette afin d'y aménager des colombiers.

Cette entrée était défendue par des vantaux et une herse, dont les rainures sont encore visibles, ainsi que par un assommoir. Vous pouvez observer ce trou percé dans la voûte du couloir d'entrée et imaginer qu'autrefois les défenseurs du château pouvaient y laisser tomber divers projectiles sur les assaillants : pierres, eau bouillante, chaux vive liquide...

Au fil des siècles et des circonstances, le château a subi des travaux pour renforcer son caractère défensif jusqu'à ce qu'il soit en partie ravagé durant la Guerre de Cent Ans (entre 1337 et 1453). Il sera ensuite reconstruit mais deviendra davantage une demeure seigneuriale qu'un ouvrage militaire.

 

L'édifice reste dans le giron de ces fondateurs, les Montigny, jusqu'à la mort de Robert VII à Azincourt en 1415 puis passe dans celui des familles Hornes et Montmorency. Le roi d'Espagne, Philippe II, le confisque en 1570 à Floris de Montmorency et le restitue en 1598 lors de la Pacification de Gand à sa soeur Eléonore. L'héritage de Floris est disputé et le château est finalement vendu à Marguerite de Lalaing qui en fait don en 1626 aux chanoinesses de Berlaymont dont elle fonda le chapitre à Bruxelles. Ces dames se virent à leur tour confisquer leur bien en 1789 pendant la période révolutionnaire.

La famille Dovillers en devient propriétaire en 1793. Converti en exploitation agricole, le domaine est ensuite racheté par les Houillères du Nord-Pas de Calais en 1945. Elles y installent leur service vétérinaire pour les chevaux de traction, utilisés au fond.

Le Syndicat Intercommunal d'AIde à l'Enfance Inadaptée (SICAEI), qui y installe un Etablissement et Service d'AIde par le Travail (ESAT). Celui-ci est aujourd'hui dirigé par Patrick PENEL et accueille 60 travailleurs handicapés. Cet organisme médico-social permet aux employés d'exercer une activité professionnelle dans un environnement privilégié au sein duquel ils sont soutenus, encadrés et accompagnés. Sa spécificité : son ouverture au public de par la nature des activités qui y sont développées et dont le rôle intégrateur est très important.

  

Journées Européennes du Patrimoine 2013 : Commençons par l'extérieur.... ;-)

 

Berlaymont Building of the EU Commission - Brussels - Belgium

The Berlaymont is an office building in Brussels, Belgium, that houses the headquarters of the European Commission, which is the executive of the European Union (EU). The structure is located at Schuman roundabout at Wetstraat 200 Rue de la Loi, in what is known as the "European district".

 

The building has housed the European Commission since its construction, and has become a symbol of the Commission (its name becoming a metonym for the Commission) and the European presence in Brussels. The Commission itself is spread over some 60 odd buildings, but the Berlaymont is the institution's headquarters, being the seat of the President of the European Commission and its College of Commissioners.

 

With the number of European civil servants rapidly growing since their arrival in Brussels in 1958, the European Commission required more and more office space across the city. By 1965, the Commission alone had 3,200 staff scattered across 8 different cramped buildings. The situation, which started as soon as they arrived due to the lack of large office blocks, became critical and the Commission tried to concentrate its staff in a number of rented buildings around Schuman roundabout. The Belgian government, becoming aware of the problem and keen to ensure that the Commission stayed, offered to build a prestigious administration complex large enough to house the entire staff. President Walter Hallstein was interested but cautious about making long-term commitments while the issue of where the institutions were based was still being discussed. However, the need for office space was overwhelming.

 

The Belgian government's proposal required sufficient land which would preferably be in the Leopold Quarter (where they were already based) and near the homes of the civil servants to the south and east. The land chosen was then occupied by the Dames de Berlaymont, a 300-year old convent which managed a venerable girls' school. The convent and school moved to a larger and quieter site out of the city centre in Waterloo. Once the Belgian state finished their new school and built infrastructure to it, the Dames de Berlaymont handed the site, which they had been under pressure to sell to developers for years, to the Belgian government in November 1963.

 

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