new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged beautiful+renanthera

Subfamily: Epidendroideae Tribe: Vandeae SubTribe: Aeridinae Genus: Renanthera Species: Renanthera bella J.J. Wood 1981. Common Name The Beautiful Renanthera .

 

This is a rare orchid that is found in Sabah (north Borneo). It is a hot to warm growing epiphyte at elevations of 400 to 1200 meters. It grows on tree trunks and blooms from fall to summer on an almost horizontal and long inflorescence of about 45 cm, bearing up to 16 red flowers 6 cm across.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Photographed at Kipandi Butterfly Park. It rained while I was there, and I had the pleasure of meeting Linus Gokusing who had a rare orchid specie named after him (Cleisocentron gokusingli). We had a good hour looking through some books. And I am really happy not to have missed this rare orchid in bloom. {next post: a very fragrant orchid.}

Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw03amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

114 The American Florist. Oct. 15,

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Rochester Notes. Apart from being one of the most com- plete and valuable collections in the country, the Kimball orchids are one of the best grown, and not only are they grown with a view to good looks as plants but also for flowers. When European nurserymen begin to attach the names of American cultivators to orchids of sterling merit, for instance Vanda Kimbslliana, Vanda Amesiana, and Cypripedium Mor- ganianum it means that these names are of much importance in the new world. Orchids that bloom in winter are more to be desired than those that bloom in sum- mer when "nobody" is at home and we have lots of outdoor blossoms, hence an effort is made to retard the too early or hasten the too late to suit the winter season; but in so large a collection as Mr. Kimball's there are lots of orchids in bloom all the time, and not only one plant of a kind, but perhaps hundreds of a kind. Lselia Dayana was in all its glory in little baskets and pans suspended near the glass. Some Brassavolas were in bloom and although not very showy are much liked amorg cut flowers. Oncid- ium varico'um and its variety Rogersii, both magnificent orchids had thrown up flower spikes as stout and long as stems of garden asparagus. The lovely gilded butterflies of O. Kra- merianum occurred most everywhere. Mr. S. says the secret of success in its cultivation is don't give it much water. O. Forbesi and O. crispum displayed the vast floral profusion of some orchids in comparison with the size of the plants. Saccolabium Blumei was both striking and beautiful ; its dense racemes of fra- grant rose-tinted flowers hung down 17 inches long and several to each little basket. The perfumed Odontoglossum hastila- bium was in good bloom. And I noticed that all the plants of O. citrosmum were grown in suspended pots or pans ; this is to preserve the young flower spikes from the voracious slugs. Many cypripediums were in bloom. One compartment was nearly filled with large plants of C insigne (not in bloom, of course) which Mr. S. called my atten- tion to to show that cool, airy treatment in summer is better for them than warm, close quarters; they may not make such rank foliage but they will out-blossom any coddled plants. The pretty little Lffilia monophylla was in bloom, so too were Phahenopsis Esmer- alda, Epidendrum vitellinum majus, Max- illaria grandiflora and venusta, and some others. Some renantheras interested me much, for unlike as we usually see them they were strong and vigorous and had been in grand bloom shortly before I saw them, the long and branched spikes and faded blossoms attested this fact. They included R. mutatina, R. histrionica and R. Storiei. Bulbophyllum Lindleyanum and its varieties album and roseum were the lilli- putians among the orchids ; their pseudo- bulbs were about the size of peas and their leaves about an inch long. Among Utricularias, which are bladder- worts, besides montana and Endresii, Mr. Kimball has several other tropical species, conspicuous among them being a gigantic one from Brazil and called U. reniformis. Mr. Savage likes small glass houses for growing orchids in very much better than large ones. Cockroaches trouble him as they do the rest of us. As traps for them he uses wide-mouthed, transparent, glass bottles, about one-fourth filled with sweet- ened water; the cockroaches in attempt- ing to get at the sweets fall in and as they cannot climb out again, get drowned. And Mr. S. assures me that in bottles in which one or two roaches are already drowned he can catch more than in those from which the dead roaches have all been removed. The presence of one or two of their kind already floating in the liquid instills confidence into the others to come in too. W. F. Hail Storm at Philadelphia, A severe hail storm struck this city on Tuesday October i, shortly after 5 p. m. It was accompanied by sharp claps of thunder and the most vivid lightning that I ever recollect. It is unusual to have hail storms at this season of the year. The damage done can hardly be esti- mated, and especially is this so just now, when everything should be snug and tight ready for winter. It extended about six miles square. On the west from 60th street to loth street on the east, and from Susquehanna avenue on the north to Baltimore avenue on the south. So far as can be ascertained the follow- ing are among the heaviest losers: Craig & Bro. about 7,000 square feet; August Lu'z and David Beam one fifth of ttieir glass; Jacob Becker one eighth; D. D. L. I'arson one sixth; James Shelly light; Frederick R. Krebs very heavy; Henry Eagler two new houses recently finished completely wrecked, in addition to his other houses; Julius WolflT, Sr., only 100 square feet, whereas Edward Bauyard not far away lost very heavily; W. F. Fan- court, Phillip Alburger and the Fergusson Bros , near neighbors to the two last named, did not lose a pane; James Kent and George W. Carpenter were badly damaged; James Cole about one eighth of his glass; Clarence Dunn and William Sutherland were both hit hard. The storm seemed heaviest in the neighborhood of 22nd and Diamond Sts. Habermehl Bros, lost quite three fourths of their glass; Charles Fox and Joseph McMurray lost some, and A. Blanc's cactus houses were slightly damaged; Supplee & Brown and William Scott & vSon are among the unfortunates. The storm which equaled this one in severity and the area covered happened May I (Sunday), 1870, and two years later a heavy one struck here, and not more than two years ago Dennison Bros and Faust & Bro. were damaged by hail to a great extent. In 1S70 the Darby Road florists caught it very bad, but on this occasion we are glad to record they were not touched nor were the last two firms named. Robert Craig says that on their place the double thick glass was not broken nearly so bad as the single thick. Wm. K. Harris says that he would not use single thick glass for glazing greenhouses if he could get it for nothing. Dan Farson says he "thought he was outside the hail belt, but he was belted by the hail like hail." Some of the flo- rists were insured in "The Florists' Hail Association of America," but the majority of them were not. Some glass was broken in the green- houses in Fairmount Park, and the houses in the Girard College grounds were sadly damaged. One redeeming feature in this unfor- tunate matter was that very few plants were injured. Edwin Lonsdalb. Boston. The frost has kept away from us most persistently thus far, a most gratifying condition of things to those who possess or who admire outdoor floral decorations, but not so pleasing to those who depend upon the sale of flowers for their living. Much as the latter may admire verdure clad shrubberies and gardens gay with salvias, geraniums and cannas, yet they can not keep down the longing for the withering frosts and cheerless cloudy days which bring life to the flower market and put prices somewhere near a living figure. As it is the rose market is in a deplorable state, with slim prospects of immediate improvement. All the stand- ard kinds are abundant, good and cheap. Outside of roses there is nothing extra choice with the exception of lily of the valley. There is a fair supply of carna- tions and asters, the white varieties being the only kind salable however. Tube- roses, mignonette, candytuft, with a few violets and callas are about all there is besides. A few straggling chrysanthe- mums are seen. They are of finest qual- ity and bring almost orchid prices. Adiantums and smilax are in good supply. The monthly meeting of the Gardeners' and Florists' Club on October i was well attended and was a most interesting occa- sion. The subject of "bulbs" was dis- cussed, particular attention being paid to freesias and anemones. The drift of the freesia discussion indicated that the aver- age market price of this favorite had got about as low as any one can afford to grow it. Regarding anemones it seems that there is a possible future for them, but care is required in handling the bulbs, especially in the matter of keeping them dry or nearly so from the time they are planted until they begin to grow. Dahlias were also discussed and a very handsome vase of the blooms was shown by Mr. John Parker. Mr. C. M. Atkinson exhibited at Horti- cultural Hall on October 5, a nice plant of Vanda Kimballiana with a fine spike of flowers on it. It was specially inter- esting from the fact that this was the first time any one has succeeded in blooming it in this country. It was awarded a silver medal. The annual election of officers in the Mass. Hort. Society was held on Saturday October 5, and resulted in the choice by a large majority of Wm H. Spooner for president, and Patrick Norton as chair- man of the committee of arrangements. These were the two principal oflices over which there was any contest. The oppo- sition took advantage of the apparent loyalty of the gardeners and florists to the regular nominations to cast discredit upon their motives and to create an un- just prejudice against this element in the society. This fact, together with the adoption by the opposition of certain other tactics which were geuer.illy disap- proved resulted in an enthusiastic rally to the support of the regular ticket which was elected by an overwhelming majority. It would certainly be most discouraging were this society to admit the plea that with a record of over half a century it had failed to develop a floricultural con- stituency within its membership worthy to be entrusted with a fair share of its responsibilities and an equable repre- sentation in its councils, and it is to the

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

Beautiful Orchid seen at the Missouri Botanical Garden.

One of the most beautiful and delicate plants, the Orchid is available in abundance in south east asia. While visiting Singapore, I dropped into the famous Botanical Garden, where they had hundreds of Orchids on display.

 

The Phalaenopsis (moth orchids) from east Asia and the western Pacific get their name from “phalaina; moth” and “opsis; appearance.” Most are slow growing, monopodial, epiphytic orchids with dark, glossy-green or bluish mottled leathery leaves. There are about thirty-five species and hundreds of hybrids. Phalaenopsis have been hybridized since 1887, not only within the genus, but also with other closely related genera such as Doritis, Renanthera, Rhynchostylis, and Vanda.

 

The long lasting flowers of Phalaenopsis orchids come in shades of white, cream, pink, and lavender. The hybrids usually have larger flowers than the species. After blooming, if the stem is cut off just under the first flower, the stem may branch and produce more flower buds. Individual plants can have fifty to seventy-five individual flowers in a year. Plants started from seed often are ready to flower in two years.

 

Scientific classification

Kingdom: Plantae

(unranked): Angiosperms

(unranked): Monocots

Order: Asparagales

Family: Orchidaceae

Subfamily: Epidendroideae

Tribe: Vandeae

Subtribe: Aeridinae

Alliance: Phalaenopsis

Genus: Phalaenopsis

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

Orchid Market Darmo Satelit Surabaya :

The Education and Agro Business Tourism

 

Orchid Market in Darmo Satelit Surabaya area had stood since August 2005. It has been 7 gardeners who merged into Surabaya Orchid Society such as; Renny Orchid, Foresta Orchid, Bale Air, Nona Orchid. The Jasa Marga Area is managed with rent per month system. Strategic location because is located in front of Darmo highway door and luxuriant housing area.

 

Here is sold various orchid types, start from Dendrobium sp., Cattleya sp., Oncidium sp, and Cymbidium sp. which is symposia orchid type in general have epiphyte character. While monopodium orchid type is orchid being distinguished by growing point which there is in tip of bar, pertumbuhann of straight to the above of by one bars like Vanda sp., Arachnis sp., Renanthera sp., Phalaenopsis sp., and Aranthera sp.

 

Besides, in this area also stand up some restaurants, which are representative enough for family and also to serve the business relationship. The cold situation with its wide view that is decorated various beautiful plantations.

 

Plant orchid media is also sold here like fern, coconut fiber, charcoal, and wood’s powder, accompanied by critical fraction mixture or brick. Leaf ornamental plant agloenema, adenium, palm type, euphorbia of orchid in bottle. Orchid price is range about 25000 –- 300000 rupiahs.

 

Generally, orchid conduct has require a temperature about 28° C so it need pollinate roof if it put down in open place. But the high temperature can caused dehydration, which can pursue plant growth.

 

More info: www.eastjava.com

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

Seen at the Orchid Exhibition Bad Salzuflen 2012.

 

Grown by Orchideenfreunde Niedersachsen.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_47_5

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

22 The Florists^ Review Apbil 14, 1921 rure and new varieties. A conservative estimate of the value of plants shown was $100,000 and tliere were many orehid enthusiasts from a distance. Orchids vied with roses in the popular interest. Jn tlie 200-foot group for private j^rowers, A. C Barrage, Douglas Ke.cleston, superintendent, won with a grand group. Some of his best sub- jects were ("attleya labiosa, Cattleya Schroedera? and Cattleya Dussoldorffei Undine; Brassocattleyas Veitehii, Se- denii, var. Rosalind and Empress of Russia; Cattleyas Triana; alba and Skinneri alba; Odontoglossums excel- lens, Mrs. H. L. Chalifoux and Lam- beauiana; Cculogyne pandurata; numer- ous varieties of odontiodas and many superb cymbidiunis, phalsenopsis, on- cidiums, renantheras and other species. For a grou]) covering 100 square feet for private growers, A. N. Cooley, Pitts- field, Mass., Oliver Lines, gardener, led with a glorious group, practically every plant new or rare. Some of the best were Brassocattleya Queen Alexandra, langleyensis, Madeline, Digbyano- Schroedera; and speciosa grandis; Cat- tleya Triana; virginale, Cattleya Trianaj albo, Cattleya SchroedersB Dainty, Cattleya Schroedera; alba, Cat- tleya luminosa, Cattleya Mossise Reineckiana; Sophrolteliocattleya Meusc, var. General Neville and some magnificent Odontoglossum crispum, odontiodas and phala^nopsis. For the nO-foot group, Walter Hunne- woll, T. D. Hatfield, superintendent, took both first and second. His cym- bidiums were superb, some of the spikes carrying as many as thirty flowers each, and he had a noteworthy collec- Iffinopsis, oncidiums and renantheras. For the 100-foot group, J. T. Butter- worth captured first with wonderful cymbidiunis, dendrobiums, Lycaste Skinneri, odontoglossums and cattleyas. For twelve specimen orchids, A. C. Barrage was first, with E. S. Webster, Peter A]:nott, gardener, an excellent second. For six plants, A. C. Barrage won and was also first and second for huge single specimens of Cattleya Schroederse, carrying 150 flowers, and C. Skinneri, with treble that number. Special Awards. Among the honorary awards for orchids were the following: Miss Cor- nelia Warren, Henry Stewart, gardener, had a group of large specimens of Dendrobium nobile, heavily flowered. Silver medals were awarded to the Julius Roehrs Co. for a grand collection of odontiodas; to A. N. Cooley for Sophrolseliocattleya Meuse, var. Gen- eral Neville; to Muller Sealey for a dis- play of Cypripedium Pawelsii cut in Belgium five weeks previously; to A. W. Preston, John L. Smith, gardener, for Brassodaeliocattleya Hilda. First-class certificates of merit went to A. N. Cooley for Brassola^liocattleya, var. Jean Potine, for Cattleya MossisB Reineckiana and Brassocattleya spe- ciosa grandis; to A. C. Barrage for Laeliocattleya California, Lseliocattleya labiosa and Miltonia Hyeana Flam- beau; to J. T. Butterworth for Cypri- pedium J. T. Butterworth; to E. S. Webster for Odontoglossum lutescens and to J. B. Duke, Somerville, N. J., Arthur B. Miles, gardener, for Odon- tioda Joan, var. Mrs. Harding. John

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Thomas Roland's Rose Gardens at the Boston Show Last Week. tion of varieties of Dendrobium nobile, beautifully flowered. For the'200-foot group of orchids for commercial growers Julius Roehrs Co., Rutherford, N. J., led with a beautiful group, artistically arranged. Among his plants were numerous Cypripedium Maudise and odontiodas, Cattleya Triana; alba and Schroederfie alba, brassocattleyas in variety and many fine odontoglossums, cymbidiums, pha- Aff'mann received a certificate for su- perior culture of cymbidiums. A. C. Burrage had the best collection of cut orchids. The Azaleas. Since Quarantine 37 went into force, azaleas have almost disappeared com- mercially, but at tlie Boston shows they continue to be shown in unusual num- bers and attract great attention. A grouj) of over 100 Kurume azaleas. splendidly flowered, from John 8. Ames, William Swan, superintendent, received a gold medal. They were artistically arranged in a small Japanese garden by R. & J. Farquhar & Co., a wonderful improvement on last year's arrange- ment of the plants from the Arnold Arboretum and Prof. Sargent. Charles Sander, superintendent to Prof. C. S. Sargent, had a splendid group of azaleas, all his own seedlings. He received silver medals for the varie- ties Hilda Hedlund and obtusa alba, similar to the Kurumes in size of flower, habit and floriferousness. A first-class certificate of merit went to Prof. Sargent for Azalea "Tebotan. Walter Hunnewell showed a large group of the beautiful, rich yellow azalea. Miss Louisa Hunnewell, again one of the great attractions of the show. For six specimen azaleas. Miss Cor- nelia Warren was first and George F. Stewart, superintendent to Arthur Lyman, second. These plants averaged four to five feet across. For a single specimen Mr. Stewart won with a huge, beautifully flowered plant of indica alba, eigljt feet across and nearly as high. Miss Warren's second prize specimen of the same variety was nearly as large. Finer azaleas were never shown here. The six specimens of Rhododendron Pink Pearl, from James Marlborough, surpassed anything ever seen here. Azalea Schlippenbuchii, from the same grower, received a silver medal. Miscellaneous Plants and Flowers. For twelve amaryllis, William T. Walke, of Salem, won first and second with a fine lot of seedlings. For six cyclamens, in spite of the lateness of the season, some grand plants were shown. Peter Arnott won, second going to E. H. Wetterlow, gardener to Mrs. Lester Leland. Henry Stewart was first in the classes for four genistas, one genista and six ericas, with fine specimens. Walter H. Golby, superintendent to E. A. Clark, was first for six hyacinths, one pan of hyacinths, six pans of large trumpet narcissi, six pans short trumpet narcissi and the finest bulb display, covering fifty square feet. Hydrangeas were exceptionally fine. For six plants, first prize went to E. S. Webster; second to Norbert Bros. For four schizanthus there were several en- tries. James Marlborough won with perfect specimens four to five feet across; E. S. Webster was second. For six Primula malacoides, Henry Stewart and George F. Stewart won in the order named. For an artistic group of flowering and foliage plants, Walter H. Golby was first, with an excellent and taste- fully arranged group, in which standard geraniums, roses, mcmesias, Fuchsia corynibiflora, marguerites and hydran- geas were specially good. F. E. Palmer, who was a good second, had a splendid wealth of flowering material rather more formally arranged. The bulbous material, hydrangeas, roses and genis- tas wore particularly good. For fifteen spikes of antirrhinums, R. J. Goddard was first and Peter Ar- nott second. For fifty lavender sweet peas, N. F. Comley won with splendid flowers; W. W. Thompson Co. was second. For fifty white sweet peas the W. W. Thompson Co. was first and N. F. Comley was second. For fifty pink

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

Title: An encyclopedia of plants; : comprising the specific culture, history, application in the arts, and every other desirable particular respecting all the plants indigenous, cultivated in, or introduced to Britain: combining much of the information contained

Identifier: 01063918.91195.emory.edu

Year: 1841 (1840s)

Authors: Loudon, J. C. (John Claudius), 1783-1843

Subjects: Botany

Publisher:

Contributing Library: Emory University, Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library

Digitizing Sponsor: Emory University, Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

762 GYNANDRIA MONANDRIA. CtAss XX. 1910. ORNITHOCE'PHALUS. Hook. Ornithocbphalus. Orchideee. Sp. 1. A G3spl A E3 el 12955 gladiatus Hook. sword-leaved tl911. BLE'TIA. Ft. per. Bletia. 12956 Tankervillias H. K. Tankerville's 12957 verecunda H. K. tall Limodorum altum B. M. 12958 norida H. K. purple A E3 el 12959 hyacinthina H. K. hyacinthine A 123 el 12960 capitata R. Br. headed A 23 el 12961 pallida Lodd. pallid A 23 el 1912. E'RIA. Lindl. Eria. 12962 stellata Lindl. stellate £ [Z3 el 12963 pubescens Lindl. downy j£ (22 el Dendrdbium pubescens Hooker. 1913. OCTOME'RIA. H. Br. Octomeria. 13964 graminifolia B. Br. Grass-leaved _£f [23 cu 1914. BRASAVO'LA. R. Br. Brasavola. 12965 cucullata R. Br. single-flowered £ [Z2 el 1915. SARCAN'THUS. Lindl. Sarcanthus. 12966 paniculatus Lindl. panicled jff (23 el 12967 teretifolius Lindl. slender-leaved [Z3 cu ^(23cu i ... G Trinidad 1823. Orchidea: Sp. 6—8. 2 mr.ap W.Br China 1778. 3 ja.my Pu W. Indies 1733. 2 jl.au Pu Pu mr.jn jn.jl f Pk W. Indies 1785. China 1802. W. Indies 1795. W. Indies 1820. Orchideee. Sp. 2—4. 2 f Br.Y E. Indies ? ... ljmr Y E.Indies 1830. Orchideee. I jn.jl Orchideee. i jn.s W Orchideee. Sp. 1. W. Indies 1793. Sp. 1—2. W. Indies 1793. rostrate £ (23 pr Vanda. many, flowered jg (23 el Roxburgh's £ (23 el ^[23pr 12968 rostratus Lindl. 1916. VAN'DA. R.Br. 12969 multifl6ra Lindl. 12970 Roxburghi R Br. 12971 trichorhiza Hooker hairy-rooted 1917. A'ERIDES. Svu. air-Plant. 12972 odoratum H. K. fragrant .f? 23 ft 12973 arachnites Sw. spider 23 or 1918. RENANTHE'RA. Lour. Renanthera. 12974 noccinea Lour. scarlet j¥ [23 spl 1919. IONOP'SIS. Kunth. Io.vopsis. 12975 utricularioidesiirerf/. small-flowered J? (Z3 P* J ant ha pallidijiora Hooker. 1920. EULO'PHIA R.Br. Eulophia. 12976 gracilis Lindl. slender A23 P' 12977 guineensis R. Br. shovel-flower'd A 123 el 2| my.au Y 1| n Sp. 3—5. China Y.Pu China 1819. 1" n Y.r China 1819. Orchideee. Sp. 3—6. 2 jn Y China 1800. 11 n W.pu China 1810. | au Pu.G E. Indies 1822. Orchideee. Sp. 2—11. lj ... Pk China 1800. 1 ... Br.P Japan 1793. Orchideee. Sp. 1. 5 ... Sc China 1816. Orchideee. Sp. 1—3. j o.n W.pu W. Indies 1822. Orchideee. Sp. 2—7. 2 my.n G S. Leone 1822. 1 my.n Pk S.Leone 1822. 12965 D p.r.w Hook. ex. fl. 127 R p.l Bot. mag. 1924 R p.l Bot. mag. 930 R p.l Redoute lil. 83 R p.l Bot. mag. 1492 R p.l R p.l Bot cab. 629 D p.r.w Bot reg. 904 D p.r.w Hook. ex. fl. 124 Dp.r.w Plum. ic. 176. f.l D p.r.w Bot mag. 543 C p.r.w Bot. reg. 220 C p.r.w Lindl. colL 6 C p.r.w Lindl. coll. 39 C p.r.w Lindl. coll. 38 C p.r.w Bot. reg. 506 C p.r.w Hook. ex. fl. 72 C p.r.w C p.r.w Kffimpf.t869.f.l C p.r.w Dp.r.w Hook. ex. fl. 113 R p.l Bot. reg. 742 R p.l Bot. reg. 686 12959

 

Text Appearing After Image:

History, Use, Propagation, Culture, 1910. Ornithocephalus. A very curious little plant, only an inch or two in height, found in Trinidad growing upon rotten sticks in the woods. It bears two or three green flowers, which contain a column, the upper extremity of which is lengthened out into a line subulate process, resembling a snipe's bill in miniature, whence the name, from ostitis, a bird, and xvpaXri, a head. No successful method of cultivating this plant has yet been discovered. 1911. Bletia. Dedicated to Luis Blet. a Spanish apothecary, who has always, as we are informed by the authors of the Flora Peruviana, distinguished himself in his botanical studies. Very noble plants, growing in the earth. Bletia Tankervillia is a common but beautiful species. The first plant which flowered in this country, was cultivated at Apperly Bridge, near Bradford, in Yorkshire, in May 1776, and had been sent there to Mr3. Hird, by her uncle, Dr. Kothergill, in a black Chinese pot full of stiff loam, in which it had been im- ported. Many small bulbs, with leaves like those of a snow drop, grew near the edge of the same pot in a re- gular circle, and these afterwards proved to be Amaryllis Aurea. The Bletia Tankervillia? delights in warmth, fresh loam, and plenty of water, by which treatment, and attention to fecundate the stigma, it will ripen fruit abundantly. 1912. Eria. From sjim, wool, on account of the woolliness of the flower of all the known species. Curious epiphytous plants, with bulbous roots, and flowers usually of a yellowish color. They differ from Dendrobium chiefly in the number of their pollen-masses, and in habit E. stellata is a fine free-growing plant, with long broad fleshy leaves, and spikes of beautiful brown-yellow flowers nearly a foot and half in length. 1913. Octomeria. So called by Mr. Brown, with reference to the eight parts, oxn, and ix&^os, into which the pollen is divided. A singular little plant, with filiform leaves and small nearly solitary flowers. The true limits between this genus and the last remain to be determined. The two seem to be separated by nature. 1914. Brasavola. Named after Antonio Musa Brasavola, an Italian botanist, born at Ferrara in 1500. Plants with long subulate fleshy leaves, and large white flowers. They are cultivated without difficulty in peat and sand, if good decomposed wood is not to be procured. 1915. Sarcanthus. A curious genus of plants not remarkable for their beauty. Their habit is various, but always caulescent; their flowers either yellow or yellowish, marked with various shades of purple. The name

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

Title: Florists' review [microform]

Identifier: 5205536_49_8

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors:

Subjects: Floriculture

Publisher: Chicago : Florists' Pub. Co

Contributing Library: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

r ■" •■/: ;• 48 The Florists'^ Review Junk 1. 1922 While it is generally stated that Memorial day broke all previous records, it is not easy to compare this year with previous years. There was undoubtedly more artificial material sold than ever, and probably as many fresh flowers, but I have seen more animation and snap to some i)reviou8 years' business. How- ever, about everyone seems satisfied. Flower Show at Chestnut Hill. The flower show staged by the Chest- nut Hill Garden Society and effectively arranged in two large tents on the beautiful grounds of E. B. Dane, May 24 to May 26, was the most charming flower show of its kind ever held here in May. Groups of flowering plants, covering 400 square feet each, were a feature in one tent. First prize and a gold medal were awarded to Peter Ar- nott, gardener for Mrs. E. S. Webster, with an artistically arranged group which included many beautiful godetias, clarkias, pelargoniums, campanulas, pimeleas, hydrangeas and calceolarias. An excellent second was William C. Eust, gardener for Mrs. C. G. Weld. Splendid gladioli, godetias, calceolarias, lilies and other plants were in this group, as also in the third prize group from L. C. Seagrove, gardener to Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, and Donald McKenzie, gardener for Mrs. E. B. Dane. For the best group of orchids Donald McKenzie won with a superb lot of odontoglossums, odontiodas, cattleyas, renantheras, masdevallias, oncidiums, brassocattleyas and other varieties. Peter Arnott, who was second, showed some choice varieties. Splendid stand- ard fuchsias and calceolarias were shown by J. Clancy, gardener for Mrs. Andrew Adie, while Arthur T. Bradlee had an excellent group of flowering plants. L. C. Seagrove had a splendid lot of Marshall strawberries loaded with luscious-looking berries. There was a keen contest for table centerpieces from ladies, and fine displays of native plants and vegetables. Thomas Roland judged the groups of plants. The attendance was large on all three days, the tents being crowded most of the time. Various Notes. An excellent half-page illustrated Memorial day advertisement appeared in the rotogravure section of the Boston Herald May 28. Participating firms were the Fottler, Fiske, Rawson Co., S. J. Goddard, Houghton-Gorney Co., Zinn the Florist, Beacon Florist, Belmont Flower Shop, H. M. Robinson & Co., Janiten & Kunan, Anderson Conservato- ries, Axel Magnuson, Galgay the Florist, W. C. Bowditch, J. K. Alexander, S. Irving Moody, William Sim, Littlefield & Wyman and H. R. Comley. An illus- tration showed the work of each adver- tiser. A fine, readable story appeared in the news section of the same paper, giving Boston's history and position as a floral and horticultural center. The executive committee of the Gar- deners' and Florists' Club met May 26 and completed arrangements for the ladies' night at Horticultural hall, June 20. The finest entertainment in the club's history will be given on this occa- sion. July 20 has been selected as the diate for the annual picnic at Cunning- ham park, East Milton. Andrew Christensen, at Stoneham, has sold Tiis greenhouse establishment, dwelling house, etc., to Joel Whittemore, who will continue to make carnations his leading specialty. Mr. Whittemore

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Meavywelsrht and Rieul Stock. Molstore Proof. Hinge ' reased. Uasjr Foldincr. Why Buy Boxes That Are Not So Good, When for Lesc Money You Can Have Boxes That Are Better? Send for Samples and Be Convinced. Milt Gray and Mist Green Boxes Pleaslngr shades of gray and grreen, white lined, hinge creased, heavy stock and stiff. For Violets and Corsases. Price per 100 Size 2-ln. Covers 9x6x6 $2.60 11x8x7 8.60 12x6xS 8.00 13x9x6 4.00 15x6xS 3.60 Manila Boxes Hinge creased, heavy board, suitable for parcel post and shipping in full telescope. FOB CUT FLOWEBS. ETC. Price per 100 . 81m Lid FullTsL 18x6x3 $2.10 $2.60 20x 4x3 2.10 2.60 21x 6x3% 2.60 8.00 24x 6x3V^ 3.00 8.60 28x 6x3V^ 3.60 4.60 21x 8x6 3.30 4.80 80x 6x3V^ 4.00 4.60 24x 8x6 4.60 6.46 28x 8x6 6.26 7.26 28x 8x6 5.76 8.26 80x 8x6 6.10 8.60 80x 8x6 6.26 8.76 30x10x6 7.60 9.60 86x 8x6 7.20 9.00 86x 8x6 7.70 8.90 30x12x6 8.0a 12.00 80x12x8 9.4ff 12.26 36x12x6 11.26 14.00 36x12x8 11.60 14.20 86x14x6 11.75 14.70 86x14x8 18.25 16.60 42x 8x6 8.10 18.00 FOR BOUQUETS 19x 9x8 6.00 8.60 Manila Boxes for Wreaths and Designs Heavyweight stock, strong and service- able, binge creased, easy folding. Price per 100 Size Shallow Lid Full 16xl.6x 6 $ 6.80 $ 9.60 16xl6x 7 7.60 11.60 18xl8x 6 8.26 12.00 18xl8x 8 9.26 12.60 20x20x 6 8.90 14.00 20x20x 8 11.26 16.00 20x20x10 12.00 18.00 22x22x 8 18.00 17.76 24x24x10 16.26 22.60 For Cut Flowers, Etc. I3x 6x8 2 -in. cover 2.76 20x 4x8 2 -In. cover 2.76 21x 6x8% 2 -In. cover 2.96 24x 6x8% 2 -in. cover 8.96 28x 6x3% 2 -In. cover 4.60 28x 6x4 2 -in. cover 6.1.0 21x 8x5 2 -In. cover 4.90 80x 6x8% 2 -In. cover 4.76 24x 8x6 2 -tn. cover 6.00 28x 8x6 2%-in. cover 7.00 30x 8x6 2%-in. cover 8.76 80x10x6 2%-in. cover 9.60 86x 8x6 2%-in. cover 9.26 80x12x7 2%-ln. cover 12.60 36x12x7 2%-in. cover 18.60 36x14x7 2%-in. cover 14.00 For Bonqnets 19x 9x8 2%-in. cover 9.00 SPECIAL DISCOUNT—On quantities of 2,000 or more—6%. PRINTING—$2.60 per 1,000 or less for ordinary card copy; $3.60 per 1,000 or less for color bionze. EMBOSSING—$4.60 per 1,000 or less in addition to printing charge, embossing plates to be furnished by customer or charged for at cost when we supply them. ALL PRICES ARE NET Do not be misled by bothersome discoants. BOSTON BOX COMPANY, Inc. Dept. E, S9 Clinton St. BOSTON 48, MASS. MANUFACTURERS OF FOLDING PAPER BOXES Mention The Review when you write.

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

One of the beautiful Renanthera, this one is from the island of Luzon in the Philippines.

The flower is beautiful. A nice edition to any collection. The growth is small and it doe' s fine with the aerial roots.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

Orchid Market Darmo Satelit Surabaya :

The Education and Agro Business Tourism

 

Orchid Market in Darmo Satelit Surabaya area had stood since August 2005. It has been 7 gardeners who merged into Surabaya Orchid Society such as; Renny Orchid, Foresta Orchid, Bale Air, Nona Orchid. The Jasa Marga Area is managed with rent per month system. Strategic location because is located in front of Darmo highway door and luxuriant housing area.

 

Here is sold various orchid types, start from Dendrobium sp., Cattleya sp., Oncidium sp, and Cymbidium sp. which is symposia orchid type in general have epiphyte character. While monopodium orchid type is orchid being distinguished by growing point which there is in tip of bar, pertumbuhann of straight to the above of by one bars like Vanda sp., Arachnis sp., Renanthera sp., Phalaenopsis sp., and Aranthera sp.

 

Besides, in this area also stand up some restaurants, which are representative enough for family and also to serve the business relationship. The cold situation with its wide view that is decorated various beautiful plantations.

 

Plant orchid media is also sold here like fern, coconut fiber, charcoal, and wood’s powder, accompanied by critical fraction mixture or brick. Leaf ornamental plant agloenema, adenium, palm type, euphorbia of orchid in bottle. Orchid price is range about 25000 –- 300000 rupiahs.

 

Generally, orchid conduct has require a temperature about 28° C so it need pollinate roof if it put down in open place. But the high temperature can caused dehydration, which can pursue plant growth.

 

More info: www.eastjava.com

A beautiful species from the Island of Luzon, Philippines.

Renanthera is found in tropical regions in Asia like Thailand, Indonesia and Philippines. This one seems to be a hybrid.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

This is a cross registered in 1967, parents are Neofinetia falcata x Renanthera monachica.

Grown by Orchideen Kopf and photographed in August 2012

This is a cross registered in 1967, parents are Neofinetia falcata x Renanthera monachica.

Grown by Orchideen Kopf and photographed in August 2012

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

This is Neofinetia falcata x Renanthera imschootiana - thanks to badlydrawnboy22 for identifying it.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

Inside the Renanthera Restaurant. Beautiful place but sadly, below average food.

Title: The American florist : a weekly journal for the trade

Identifier: americanfloristw24amer

Year: 1885 (1880s)

Authors: American Florists Company

Subjects: Floriculture; Florists

Publisher: Chicago : American Florist Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

  

View Book Page: Book Viewer

About This Book: Catalog Entry

View All Images: All Images From Book

 

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

  

Text Appearing Before Image:

780 The American Florist. June 21, these beautiful varieties in such perfec- tion. There was a beautiful display of cut roses by George Mount, many of them being cut with long stems. Frank Cant also had a fine collection, the new tea, Lady Roberts, which I referred to in pre- vious notes, being very fine. H. Orchids From the Philippines. Dr. Rudolph Schiffmann, of St. Paul, is an enthusiast in orchid growing and has probably the largest collection of plants in the northwest, as well as one of the largest collections in the country, largest both in point of number of plants and varieties. The Doctor began his collection about ten years ago and has steadily added to it, both by purchase from American and European collectors and by orchid hunting trips to Mexico and Central and South America. He but recently returned from his most ambitious trip, to the Philippines, bring- ing the largest importation of phalaenop- sis ever brought to this country. Among the thousands of plants now under cultivation Dr. Schiffmann has about 200 from the famous collection of the late Erastus Corning, of Albany. There are four houses, heated by hot water and heavily stocked. The cattleya house is 18x70 and also shelters the Iselias, many of them grand specimens, also the arides, burlingtonias, miltonias, dendrobiums and cypripediums. In the intermediate house, a lean-to 8x20 facing south, are the Mexican leelias, odonto- glossums, lycastes and oncidiums. The East Indian house Is an even-span building 16x20 and in it is a splendid collection of pbalasnopsii in many rare varieties, saccolabiums, vandas, the heat-loving varieties of dendrobium, Cattleya Dowiana, C. chrysotoia, C. speciosissima, C. superba, C. Schilleriana, Miltonia Roezlii in quantity and a choice importation of phatenopsis the Doctor says: "The plants were secured a year ago by my collectors and were estab- lished on blocks of wood of a uniform length, about fifty plants on each. In preparation for shipment the blocks were fixed securely to the inside of the cases and as many rows along the center as could be attached without endangering the foliage. Oblong holes were sawed through the sides and ends of the cases and these openings covered with wire cloth to protect the plants from the ravages of roaches and other insects which infest all steamers of the Orient. "The plants were in transit thirty-two days between the Philippines and St. Paul and arrived in fine condition. Had I not accompanied them and looked after their welfare every day, giving light and air on all favorable occasions, the result would have been difierent. As it is, the loss will not exceed ten per cent. As an experiment a portion of the plants were securely packed in dry excelsior, with holes for air, but the cases were not opened during the passage, and these did not arrive in as good condition as those which were placed upright in cases and given occasional light and air. "I am convinced that the reason it has been so difficult heretofore to import phalsnopsis in good condition is that they had not been properly prepared for the voyage and because of the careless manner in which they are handled on ship board. It was with the greatest diflSculiy that the stevedores could be made to understand that the rope handles at the ends of each case were for use and not for ornament. Unless you stand by and watch each case as it is brought aboard they will be treated as though they were bales of hemp, shaking the plants loose in the cases and bruis- ing the leaves, with consequent loss of foliage which means weeks of subsequent careful nursing.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

PORTION OF DR. SCHIFFMANN'S rMPORTATION OF PHAL/EN0P8I8 FROM PHILIPPINES. lot of ornamental foliage plants. The odontoglosEum house, a lean-to Sx20, contains over 500 specimens, principally of the Odontoglossum crispum section, alio some fine sobralias in variety. The climate of Minnesota, especially the cool nights in summer, seems particularly well adapted to the requirements of odontoglossums, as shown by their robust growth, healthy foliage and fine flower spikes. With regard to the recent great "Phalaenopsis amabilis and P. Schilleri- ana are found principally on the Island of Luzon. I am told the latter is found on none of the other islands. The plants are found growing on trees and rocks near the lagoons. P. Stuartianais found in Mindanao. While plants are said to be plentiful in the islands, yet on account of the present disturbed condition of afl'airs, which is likely to last for some time, coupled with the hazard of trans- portation and last, but not least, the absurdity of charging duly on these plants although derived from our own colony, prices are likely to be maintained for a long while to come. Steamers will receive plants only at owner's risk and refuse to assume any responsibility whatever. Besides, owing to the preva- lence of cholera in the Philippines at the present time, a clean bill of health must be secured from the U. S. Marine Hos- pital service, or the plants are liable to be denied a landing when reaching onr shores. "Let me suggest that the Society of American Florists take up this matter of duty imposed upon plants from our new colonies at the next meeting and petition congress for a repeal. The Philippines oflfer a great field for exploration for floral treasures, but under present condi- tions England and other countries derive the benefit, which should first accrue to Americans. "The plants 1 brought with me consist of Phalsenopsis amabilis, P. Schilleriana, P. intermedia, P. Luddemanniana, P. lencorrhoda, P. Sanderiana and P. Stuartiana; Vanda Boxalli, V. lamel- lata and V. Sanderiana; Saccolabinm gnttatum and S. violaceum; dendrob- iums in variety; Cypripedium Argus, C. Haynaldianum and Renanthera Storiei. I shall make the experiment of growing phalasnopsis flowers for the market and expect to return to the Philippines next year for a still larger lot of plants, which are now being secured by my collectors." William Whatton is the gardener in charge. ROSES. BENCHING THE VOONG STOCK. All those rose growers who have not planted their young stock in the benches should lose no time in doing so. The hot weather is upon us and you will find it almost impossible to keep the plants in pots in a growing condition; they drj' out so quickly that it is necessary to water at least twice a day and on account of this treatment they are soon in need of nourishment, as this frequent watering has washed all of the nutri- ment out of the soil. Of course, while the planting is being done, you will be very anxious to use all your men, but do not trust this work to any but those whom you know to be competent. It you have grafted stock you will find that a careless man will either break them off or he will not plant them deep enough. In planting grafted stock sink the ball into the soil far enough to allow the union to be completely cov- ered. By so doing you obviate the dan- ger of breaking and it also keeps the union strong. I think it is a good plan to place the stakes at once and if you are too badly rushed with work, make only one tie to a plant, so as to hold them in place when syringing, but as soon as possible they should all be tied, being careful to tie each branch separately and not in bunches. After the young stock is planted and has started to grow you will find that mildew is not quite as liable to bother you as when the plants were in pots. If you see that it is appearing, the sulphur machine should be put in action. Always take advantage of a rainy day and start the fires. By doing this you will do more towards checking mildew than is possi- ble in any other way. Attend carefully to the disbudding and watch for the ManettI shoots to appear. These should be cut out at once, as they

  

Note About Images

Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability - coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

1