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The pretty harbor view at blue hour.

Early Meeting Someone....What Shall I Do ?

What an exciting outing to see this bird... lifer for me.

 

Barred Owl

Grand Manan NB Canada

July 14, 2017

Increased the ISO a little to keep the exposure shorter with the boats.

Seeing this Barred Owl for the first time in the wild was the absolute highlight of this trip to Vancouver Island. I saw "something" fly and then saw robins bothering him. He sat patiently for a few minutes allowing me to get this shot.

Here is a capture taken in Bar Harbor, Maine with some neat clouds around after sunset.

www.texastargetbirds.com

 

This Barred Antshrike is a species that I always look forward to seeing whenever I visit Costa Rica. This one popped in on our first morning of last month’s visit and thought he didn’t hang around long he did give a nice pose for a few seconds.

 

Thamnophilus doliatus

 

_MG_1134-web

This was a great bar at Guarda do Embaú, SC, Brazil.

 

The owner and his family kept the bar for 25 years without electric energy, still the beer was always cold and they had fresh fish.

 

They were obligated to close it due to some political/environmental issues.

 

The stars are out of focus, which I don't like, but at the time I had no way to keep the shutter longer than 30 secs.

 

The Barred Owl’s hooting call, “Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you-all?” is a classic sound of old forests and treed swamps. But this attractive owl, with soulful brown eyes and brown-and-white-striped plumage, can also pass completely unnoticed as it flies noiselessly through the dense canopy or snoozes on a tree limb. Originally a bird of the east, during the twentieth century it spread through the Pacific Northwest and southward into California.

 

Source: Cornell Lab of Orinthology

Asian barred owlet, Glaucidium cuculoides

This is a species of true owl, resident in northern parts of the Indian Subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia, in the temperate forest.

Exif: f8, 1/250, ISO 320, focal length 400mm, Cik Canon EOS 50D, lens Canon 400mm, tripod

 

One year anniversary from the trip to Maine ... here is what the sunset looked like a year ago up in Bar Harbor, Maine ... great spot to stay when you visit Acadia National Park.

 

My wife was able to shop while I walked around taking sunset shots there at the marina area ... best of both worlds in one location ;)

The Barred Owl’s hooting call, “Who cooks for you? Who cooks for you-all?” is a classic sound of old forests and treed swamps. But this attractive owl, with soulful brown eyes and brown-and-white-striped plumage, can also pass completely unnoticed as it flies noiselessly through the dense canopy or snoozes on a tree limb. Originally a bird of the east, during the twentieth century it spread through the Pacific Northwest and southward into California.

Vicious nasty American Robins chased this poor young Barred Owl into some conifers just because it wanted to see their babies.

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www.facebook.com/wasifyaqeenphotography/

 

The bar-headed goose is one of the world's highest-flying birds, having been heard flying across Mount Makalu – the fifth highest mountain on earth at 8,481 m (27,825 ft) – and apparently seen over Mount Everest – 8,848 m (29,029 ft) – although this is a second-hand report with no verification. This demanding migration has long puzzled physiologists and naturalists: "there must be a good explanation for why the birds fly to the extreme altitudes... particularly since there are passes through the Himalaya at lower altitudes, and which are used by other migrating bird species." In fact, bar-headed geese have never been directly tracked (using GPS or satellite logging technology) flying higher than 6,540 metres (21,460 ft), and it is now believed that they do take the high passes through the mountains. The challenging northward migration from lowland India to breed in the summer on the Tibetan Plateau is undertaken in stages, with the flight across the Himalaya (from sea-level) being undertaken non-stop in as little as seven hours. Surprisingly, despite predictable tail winds that blow up the Himalayas (in the same direction of travel as the geese), bar-headed geese spurn these winds, waiting for them to die down overnight, when they then undertake the greatest rates of climbing flight ever recorded for a bird, and sustain these climbs rates for hours on end, according to research published in 2011.

 

-wikipedia

A juvenile Barred Owl which has matured since this image was taken.

OM goodness, just one more then I've got to go do errands! Jumping ahead YET AGAIN to yesterday. A kind gentlemen showed me where this beauty was at the Cemetery ... am I blessed or what! I had looked and looked before when I learned there was a couple there. There's a nest in the crevice of an old Live Oak tree too.

 

OK, I cannot resist ... he was trying to get a little "shut eye" in the middle of the day!

 

I haven't seen one in a couple of years, and they are one of my faves for sure!

Turtle Back Zoo / West Orange / New Jersey

 

Jessica Kirste Photography I Facebook I Instagram

 

All the photos & video on this gallery are protected by copyright and they are not for being used on any site, blog or forum without the explicit permission from the photographer, Jessica Kirste.

Bar-headed goose (Anser indicus) - Хээрийн галуу

One more shot of these Barred Owls. I rarely get the opportunity to photograph a pair.

 

Member of the Flickr Bird Brigade

Activists for birds and wildlife

Sleepy wild Barred Owl in Florida posing as the sun was starting to set. We could hear another one calling across the hammock (perhaps he/she was just trying to get away for a moment's peace). The background is blowing palms.

 

Canon 1DX, Canon 500, F10, 1/400, ISO 400

 

Copyright Barb D'Arpino

Happy 100th Anniversary Nikon!!! :tada::100::dash:ISO 8000 Handheld

The bird I have been looking for for a long time. I was told where to look for it but never found it. A friend then told me about a Screech Owl and where to look for the tree hole where it resides. I went to the place but before I found the tree hole, I spotted the Barred Owl sitting about 40 yards partly hidden by the Spanish Moss. As I looked for a better angle, this bird flew to a closer branch and stared me right in the eye.

Canon EOS 7D Mark II, EF400mm f/5.6L USM, EF1.4X Converter II, Focal length 560mm, f/8, 1/2000, ISO 3200

Bar on MSC Fantasia

This female barred owl was only about 12 feet away, so this isn't cropped. In fact, there wasn't enough depth of field, so I focus stacked two images, one focused on the face, one on the body. I then put her into my picture of the super moon from earlier in the year shot from my front yard. Both the moon and the owl were shot with the 7D with the 100-400mm at 400mm, but the owl was at f/7.1, shutter of 1/125 and ISO 2500 and shot in April. Colleyville Nature Center and Keller, Texas, USA, April 2017

 

Best viewed large by pressing "L". All rights reserved

Distrito Restaurant, Saguaro Hotel, Scottsdale AZ

 

one of several inlaid in the bar top

I am looking and looking and I am unable to find owls. Two woman doing their walk and chatting away with each other spot this Barred Owl low in the trees and point it out to me. Another woman walking her dog sees them and says there are more a couple trails over. I never found those.

Right place, right time.

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