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Sorry I'm so late with uploading this pictures... I've been very busy with school so my apologize. But here it is! My ah1w Super Cobra. It's based on Aleksander Stein's ah1z, so all credits are for him, make sure you check his copper out!

 

The Whiskey is one of my favorite attack helicopter, it's a little bit more classic than the viper. It has smaller 'wings' and a few other technical differences than the viper.

 

My chopper is a little bit smaller than Aleksander Stein's chopper, but it's not perfect yet. I've planned to update it (I think the update will be in July) and I really want to build a uh1y next to it. I hope you guys like it! comments and faves are appreciated! :)

So I've updated my ah-1w to an older version (different engines) and improved some stuff on it. It still needs a few changes though.

If you have tips or compliments, I'd happy to read them in the comments!

 

Also, I'm sorry I didn't post any good pictures of my as350 yet... I didn't really have the time and when I did have time I'd rather build with Lego.

Not many will be interested in this photograph. Simply a trip down memory lane for me. Ahh, the smell of cordite on the night breeze.

Picture detailing my modern USMC vehicles. The latest in tech, toughness, speed, and firepower!

Builds such as my UH-1N, CH-46, and AH-1W were left out as they are outdated vehicles that have been replaced in the military by vehicles depicted here.

Wow... it's been a long time since I've posted something on flickr... I'm sorry guys, I didn't have time to build and when I had time, I didn't really have the motivation to build something. But... here are some quick pictures of my upcoming uploads!

 

I've been building two choppers. An AH1W attack helicopter, which is almost exactly copied from Alexander Stein's AH1Z, so all credits are going to him (check his chopper, it's awesome! ;) ).

The other helicopter is something like an as350 or something like that.

 

Better pics will be coming soon! I hope you guys enjoy :)

Soldiers with the 1-151st Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, South Carolina Army National Guard, conduct night interdiction attack training during a battalion level exercise with 16 AH-64 Apache helicopters at McEntire Joint National Guard Base in Eastover, S.C., Jan. 10, 2015. The event included hot refueling at a forward arming and refueling point (FARP) and flight operations at Poinsett Electronic Combat Range in Sumter, South Carolina. The goal of the training was to refine night operation skills for the battalion and was planned as part of drill weekend for the unit. (U.S. Army National Guard photo by Sgt. Brian Calhoun/Released)

Spending time at Boeing Field, hanging out with pilots and their helos is super inspiring. Just finishing up the details on my new Separatist attack helicopter (the one with the TEETH!!!!). Stay tuned...

A U.S. Army UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter with Alpha Company, 5th Battalion, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade conducts a run-up during a winter storm at Bagram Airfield in Parwan province, Afghanistan, Dec. 27, 2012. (DoD photo by Sgt. Duncan Brennan, U.S. Army/Released)

Ka-52 during its first service flight, February 10, 2011.

Although rotor-wing airframes were being phased out before the beginning of the Great War, the AWG AH-42 "Dragonfly" was a favorite among the Marines who flew them. Renowned for their maneuverability and surprisingly, their speed, Dragonflies could also unleash a terrifying amount of firepower into their prey. Typically outfitted with small wing pylons with the ability to carry a variety of munitions, the pylons could also be jettisoned once the weapons were spent. Dragonflies also had a trait unique to the airframe- both the rotors AND wings could change pitch independently of eachother. To reach it's top speed, the wings would rotate out and down, and the rotors reverse rotation direction to become props.

Despite sporting two large rotors, Dragonflies were relatively quiet and were used with much success for quick target-destroy missions.

When returning from missions, Dragonflies were affectionately refferred to as being "nekkid" without the bottom wing pylons.

This model shown with green forest camoflauge.

CAMP TAJI, Iraq- Under the cover of night, an AH-64D Apache attack helicopter from the 1st Air Cavalry Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, departs the flight line to conduct operations in support Operation Iraqi Freedom, here, Dec. 2, 2009.

 

See more at www.army.mil

Still don't have all my lights set up so here's what you get. I've changed some things on the helo since this was taken, so stay tuned. The Separatist Army is manufacturing some pretty rad aircraft.

Although rotor-wing airframes were being phased out before the beginning of the Great War, the AWG AH-42 "Dragonfly" was a favorite among the Marines who flew them. Renowned for their maneuverability and surprisingly, their speed, Dragonflies could also unleash a terrifying amount of firepower into their prey. Typically outfitted with small wing pylons with the ability to carry a variety of munitions, the pylons could also be jettisoned once the weapons were spent. Dragonflies also had a trait unique to the airframe- both the rotors AND wings could change pitch independently of eachother. To reach it's top speed, the wings would rotate out and down, and the rotors reverse rotation direction to become props.

Despite sporting two large rotors, Dragonflies were relatively quiet and were used with much success for quick target-destroy missions.

When returning from missions, Dragonflies were affectionately refferred to as being "nekkid" without the bottom wing pylons.

This model shown with green forest camoflauge.

 

(My entry for the Annual Lego Military Build Competition, in the No Runway, No Problem category).

Allied Armorers Manufacturing designed and built the AH74K Sparrowhawk for the Separatist Army towards the end of The War. The AAM Sparrowhawk was not too different than the RAM Kite Gunship, with the obvious exception of the Sparrowhawk's contra-rotating coaxial rotors. Contra-rotating blades made the Sparrowhawk incredibly maneuverable, fuel efficient, and quiet. It also eliminated the need for a rear rotor and gave the bird a small footprint. The Sparrowhawk could carry a tremendous payload depending on it's mission set. They usually flew in groups of two or three but also escorted Kestrel Light Utility Helicopters from time to time.

Although rotor-wing airframes were being phased out before the beginning of the Great War, the AWG AH-42 "Dragonfly" was a favorite among the Marines who flew them. Renowned for their maneuverability and surprisingly, their speed, Dragonflies could also unleash a terrifying amount of firepower into their prey. Typically outfitted with small wing pylons with the ability to carry a variety of munitions, the pylons could also be jettisoned once the weapons were spent. Dragonflies also had a trait unique to the airframe- both the rotors AND wings could change pitch independently of eachother. To reach it's top speed, the wings would rotate out and down, and the rotors reverse rotation direction to become props.

Despite sporting two large rotors, Dragonflies were relatively quiet and were used with much success for quick target-destroy missions.

When returning from missions, Dragonflies were affectionately refferred to as being "nekkid" without the bottom wing pylons.

This model shown with green forest camoflauge.

Apache AH1 (Army Air Corps)

ON BOARD USS NASSAU (LHA 4) - USS Austin trails NASSAU off her port quarter as an AH-1 Cobra attack helicopter attached to NASSAU'S Air Combat Element (ACE) prepares to land on the flight deck. NASSAU is underway for Expeditionary Strike Group Exercise, one of the ships final training exercises where Sailors and Marines train together in preparation for NASSAU's upcoming deployment. (U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Evan Priesthoff)(Released)

Army AgustaWestland Apache AH1 Attack Helicopter.

HAL's Rudra a.k.a Weaponised Dhruv MK4

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The crew of this AAC Apache Mk1 running in for a fast pass!

 

© Lloyd Horgan. All Rights Reserved - Unauthorized use of this photo is strictly prohibited

A visual comparison of two rotor-wing airframes made by Revolutionary Aircraft Manufacturing for the Separatist Army.

 

These two helicopters worked in hunter/killer teams, RH17 "Shrikes" would identify and isolate threats, while the AH51 "Kites" would eliminate said targets. The RH17 specialized in reconnaissance amd was lightly armed, whereas the AH51 was a pure attack helicopter, specializing in death.

Sorry I'm so late with uploading this pictures... I've been very busy with school so my apologize. But here it is! My ah1w Super Cobra. It's based on Aleksander Stein's ah1z, so all credits are for him, make sure you check his copper out!

 

The Whiskey is one of my favorite attack helicopter, it's a little bit more classic than the viper. It has smaller 'wings' and a few other technical differences than the viper.

 

My chopper is a little bit smaller than Aleksander Stein's chopper, but it's not perfect yet. I've planned to update it (I think the updat will be in July) and I really want to build a uh1y next to it. I hope you guys like it! comments and faves are appreciated! :)

The VASP (Vtol Assault and Support Platform) is a small twin engined Gunship, widely utilized by the western pre-collapse military. Most still intact units are in service of various post-collapse governments and can sometimes be seen patrolling still inhabited cities. Outfitted with a 30mm chain gun, these armored VTOLs perform well in strafe runs, escorts or direct infantry support. Additional armament, including anti tank missiles for the VASP have proven ineffective in post collapse days and have been abandoned. Designed to have a significantly low heat signature and a compact design, the VASP proves a difficult target for handheld anti aircraft systems.

 

This recent addition to my collection of Gunships has strongly been influenced by Chewk´s Hornet variant. Recently I felt like I need a smaller sort of aircraft, since Gunships of the Serpent´s size are difficult to use within other creations, because they seem to be out of proportion. Chewk´s Hornet pretty much proved that also a smaller design approach can fit a figure, so I felt like trying my luck at it, too. This is part of another project which won't be revealed just yet.

Sorry I'm so late with uploading this pictures... I've been very busy with school so my apologize. But here it is! My ah1w Super Cobra. It's based on Aleksander Stein's ah1z, so all credits are for him, make sure you check his copper out!

 

The Whiskey is one of my favorite attack helicopter, it's a little bit more classic than the viper. It has smaller 'wings' and a few other technical differences than the viper.

 

My chopper is a little bit smaller than Aleksander Stein's chopper, but it's not perfect yet. I've planned to update it (I think the updat will be in July) and I really want to build a uh1y next to it. I hope you guys like it! comments and faves are appreciated! :)

Sorry I'm so late with uploading this pictures... I've been very busy with school so my apologize. But here it is! My ah1w Super Cobra. It's based on Aleksander Stein's ah1z, so all credits are for him, make sure you check his copper out!

 

The Whiskey is one of my favorite attack helicopter, it's a little bit more classic than the viper. It has smaller 'wings' and a few other technical differences than the viper.

 

My chopper is a little bit smaller than Aleksander Stein's chopper, but it's not perfect yet. I've planned to update it (I think the updat will be in July) and I really want to build a uh1y next to it. I hope you guys like it! comments and faves are appreciated! :)

ON BOARD USS NASSAU (LHA 4) - USS Austin trails NASSAU off her port quarter as an AH-1 Cobra attack helicopter attached to NASSAU'S Air Combat Element (ACE) prepares to land on the flight deck. NASSAU is underway for Expeditionary Strike Group Exercise, one of the ships final training exercises where Sailors and Marines train together in preparation for NASSAU's upcoming deployment. (U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Evan Priesthoff)(Released)

AH-70 Diamondback Specs:

Top Speed: 550 MPH

Weight: 4.3 Tons

Armor: Composite of Carbon Steel, carbon nanotubes, carbon fiber, titanium alloys, Kevlar, and aluminum alloys (flares are also standard)

Primary Armament: M129 35mm Coil-gatling gun

Secondary Armament: 6x external hard points, shown here with 4x quad AGM-99 Hellfire 2 pods, and RFR-7 70mm Rocket pods

Power Plant: 2x TZ-74 jet turbine engines, powering coaxial rotor system

Combat range: 2,500 miles

Crew: 2

The lean, mean, AH-64 in a fancy digital arctic camo!

Although rotor-wing airframes were being phased out before the beginning of the Great War, the AWG AH-42 "Dragonfly" was a favorite among the Marines who flew them. Renowned for their maneuverability and surprisingly, their speed, Dragonflies could also unleash a terrifying amount of firepower into their prey. Typically outfitted with small wing pylons with the ability to carry a variety of munitions, the pylons could also be jettisoned once the weapons were spent. Dragonflies also had a trait unique to the airframe- both the rotors AND wings could change pitch independently of eachother. To reach it's top speed, the wings would rotate out and down, and the rotors reverse rotation direction to become props.

Despite sporting two large rotors, Dragonflies were relatively quiet and were used with much success for quick target-destroy missions.

When returning from missions, Dragonflies were affectionately refferred to as being "nekkid" without the bottom wing pylons.

This model shown with green forest camoflauge.

“Dustoff to strike force. Ready your wounded. ETA (Estimated Time of Arrival) 60 seconds from your LZ (landing zone). We’re coming in.”

 

One of my first Modern Warfare vehicles. What do you think?

ON BOARD USS NASSAU (LHA 4) - USS Austin trails NASSAU off her port quarter as an AH-1 Cobra attack helicopter attached to NASSAU'S Air Combat Element (ACE) prepares to land on the flight deck. NASSAU is underway for Expeditionary Strike Group Exercise, one of the ships final training exercises where Sailors and Marines train together in preparation for NASSAU's upcoming deployment. (U.S. Navy Photo by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Evan Priesthoff)(Released)

Rendered view of the Apache I made a few months ago

The VASP (Vtol Assault and Support Platform) is a small twin engined Gunship, widely utilized by the western pre-collapse military. Most still intact units are in service of various post-collapse governments and can sometimes be seen patrolling still inhabited cities. Outfitted with a 30mm chain gun, these armored VTOLs perform well in strafe runs, escorts or direct infantry support. Additional armament, including anti tank missiles for the VASP have proven ineffective in post collapse days and have been abandoned. Designed to have a significantly low heat signature and a compact design, the VASP proves a difficult target for handheld anti aircraft systems.

 

This recent addition to my collection of Gunships has strongly been influenced by Chewk´s Hornet variant. Recently I felt like I need a smaller sort of aircraft, since Gunship´s of the Serpent´s size are difficult to use within other creations, because they seem to be out of proportion. Chewk´s Hornet pretty much proved that also a smaller design approach can fit a figure, so I felt like trying my luck at it, too. This is part of another project which won't be revealed just yet.

A UH-60 Black Hawk Helicopter with A Company, 5th Battalion, 101st Combat Aviation Brigade gets run up to ensure mission readiness during a snow storm on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan Dec. 27. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Duncan Brennan, 101st CAB public affairs)

Mil Mi-24V Hind 3368 of the Czech Air Force performing at ILA 2016

 

Categories:

Mil - Mi-24 Hind - Cold War Aircraft - Czech Air Force - ILA 2016

 

Collections:

Aircraft - Airports - Airshows - Top 100

An AH-64E Apache Guardian from 1st Armed Reconnaissance Battalion, 25th Aviation Regiment, 25th Combat Aviation Brigade, 25th Infantry Division, and a Mi-35 Attack Helicopter from 31st Squadron, Tentara Nasional Indonesia Angkatan Darat, take off for a flight together during an attack/reconnaissance training mission in Semarang, Indonesia, Sept. 9. The training is part of Garuda Shield 2014, where units from United States Army Pacific are focusing on peace support training capacity and stability operations with the TNI-AD. (U.S. Army photo courtesy of 25th Combat Aviation Brigade)

Allied Armorers Manufacturing designed and built the AH74K Sparrowhawk for the Separatist Army towards the end of The War. The AAM Sparrowhawk was not too different than the RAM Kite Gunship, with the obvious exception of the Sparrowhawk's contra-rotating coaxial rotors. Contra-rotating blades made the Sparrowhawk incredibly maneuverable, fuel efficient, and quiet. It also eliminated the need for a rear rotor and gave the bird a small footprint. The Sparrowhawk could carry a tremendous payload depending on it's mission set. They usually flew in groups of two or three but also escorted Kestrel Light Utility Helicopters from time to time.

The Westland WAH-64 Apache is a licence-built version of the Boeing AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopter for the British Army. The first eight were built by Boeing; the remaining 59 were assembled by Westland at Yeovil from kits. The WAH-64 is designated Apache AH Mk 1 or AH.1 by the MoD.

 

The UK's Strategic Defence Review called for Apaches to undertake amphibious attack missions, operating from the helicopter carrier HMS Ocean, the Invincible class aircraft carriers and their successors, the (Royal Navy CVF programme), and possibly the amphibious assault vessels HMS Bulwark and Albion. As such, one of the major differences between the WAH-64 and AH-64 Apache variants is the folding blade mechanism, required to stow the helicopters in the confined space onboard ships.

 

There are other differences from the American AH-64D, including Rolls-Royce Turbomeca RTM322 engines instead of the GE T700s. The Rolls-Royce engines produce nearly 25% more power than their GE counterparts, although only exploited during take-offs due to the existing Apache transmission system. This engine is currently under evaluation by the US Government, with a view to updating their AH-64s. A new transmission system to utilise all the available power is also in development.

 

In British Army service the Apache replaces the Westland Lynx AH.7 anti-tank helicopters. The Apache's first operational tour was as part of Herrick 1, led by 16 Air Assault Brigade in Afghanistan in 2005. On 22 May 2006, a UK Apache operating in Helmand province fired a Hellfire missile to destroy a French armoured vehicle crippled during a firefight the previous day and in too difficult a position to recover. This is the first "kill" by a UK Apache in a hostile theatre.

 

This WAH-64 was seen during the British Army Air Corp's open day at its headquarters airfield, Middle Wallop, in the summer of 2008.

Multi-National armed forces conduct gunfire support during exercise Joint Warrior in Cape Wrath, Scotland. Picture: LA(Phot) Dan Rosenbaum

 

During the multinational exercise Joint Warrior, a large element of the exercise was conducted on land in the area of Cape Wrath in Durness. During the week of the 13th April, members of the Swedish Army, 29 Army Commando, and US Marines took part in various firing exercises ranging from 105mm Artillary firing, mortar firing and spotting for Naval Gunfire Support (NGS).

During the week a visit was made by the Commander of the Amphibious Task Group, Commodore Martin Connell COMATG and also by Japanese Delegates to witness first hand the land firing exercise taking place. Their visit concluded with a flypast by two Royal Airforce Typhoons. FX150111

Testing out a digital style of camouflage. It was a particulary difficult concept to come up with seeing as there is no existing examples of aircraft sporting this sort of design, but I'm happy with how it turned out :)

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