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Anonymous galaxy in Virgo. Part of a search for intermediate mass black holes and attempt to discover any correlation between them and galactic bulges. See Proposal 10596.

 

Not the cleanest data or resulting image in the world but who else is looking?

 

Red: HST_10596_14_ACS_WFC_F814W_sci

Green: Pseudo

Blue: HST_10596_14_ACS_WFC_F435W_sci

 

North is NOT up. It is 84.8° clockwise from up.

Update 2012 09 20: I am delighted that this image was HIGHLY COMMENDED in the 2012 Astronomy Photographer of the Year Competition. It is now in the Exhibition at the Royal Greenwich Observatory and appears in the book of the event.

 

This comet is still going strong (2012 March). High up for northern observers, in UMa. You can get a chart here.

Canon EOS 5D MkII ISO6400 65x32s

254mm Newtonian f=1200mm f/4.8

HEQ5 equatorial mount, driven but not guided

2012 Mar 19 00:01:37-00:39:18 UT

From Rookhope 54.8N 2.1W 330m asl

Software: GRIP (www.grelf.net)

The brightest star is HIP 54721, 11 12 10.9 +68 16 18.7, mV = 6.40

 

I did not track the comet directly. My equatorial mount simply did its usual thing of driving at sidereal rate (ie, star rate, compensating for the rotation of the Earth). The comet does not move perceptibly in each individual half-minute exposure. But between the first and last of the 65 exposures the motion of the comet against the stars was significant, as is evident in my image.

The key is software. I have written the stacking part of my GRIP application so that for comets and asteroids the object of interest can be held still in the stacked result.

 

Another image I've been meaning to clean up. I was initially going for a 30-minute exposure to capture the comet's proper motion, but after about 5 minutes a beautifully bright sporadic meteor blazed right through the frame and I decided to play it safe and end the exposure.

I'm spoilt, I admit it- I live 20 miles from some of the best dark-sky sites on the East Coast. But where I shoot is surrounded by cities and towns so my landscape options are more limited than other parts of the country. When the skies cleared at 1am last night, I didn't feel like driving or hiking all over in search of a new vantage point, so I tried a few different ways of shooting an area I've covered many times before.

  

Lunar Eclipse: 16-06-2011/ 3:13 AM, Lakhimpur-Kheri India

Redone with longer exposures (binned)

Trying to get more red..

Enough on this.... as it is really hitting the tree tops...keeping me up a bit.(!)

Glad I got it at all...

Bit of a lapse before more NB targets float along....

Time to bear down on finding a good (ie a compromise) dark site for some tests..

Imaging scope: AstroProfessional 102mm refractor (focal 714mm) with reducer 0.8x

Imaging camera: Atik 314L+ (-15°c)

Imaging software : Artemis capture

Mount: EQ6 Pro autoguided

Guide scope: Takahashi FS60

Guide camera: DMK31 B&W

Guide software: PHD Guiding

 

Luminance : 30 x 2 min (Astrodon filter), binning 1x1

RGB : 10 x 2 min each layer (Astrodon filter), binning 1x1

 

Processing with Iris: pre-processing (15 offsets, 9 darks, 11 flats for each filter), global register, arithmetic addition, DDP, black, saturation

 

Location: Saint-Etienne-les-Orgues (Alpes de Haute Provence - FRANCE)

SQM : 21.2 mag/arcsec²

Imaging camera: ATIK 314L+.

Imaging scope: AstroProfessional 102mm refractor (focal 714mm).

Mount: HEQ5 Pro autoguided.

.

31 x 4 min, H alpha (binning 1x1 at -10°c).

.

Processing:.

- Iris: pre-processing, global register, arithmetic addition, DDP.

.

Location : Peltre (Moselle - FRANCE)

Canon EOS 5D MkII ISO6400 33x30s

254mm Newtonian f/4.8 (f=1200mm)

HEQ5 mount, driven but not guided

Taken from Rookhope, Co.Durham, UK

2011 Sep 28 22:50:49-23:10:12 UT

Processed by my own GRIP software (Java)

 

This nebula, embedded in the Milky Way at the north end of Cygnus, appears to have cleared a path through the stars. That is not possible. A more reasonable explanation is that, at about 4,000 light years away, it is closer to us than most of the stars in the photo and it has an associated dust cloud that is obscuring stars behind. The dust cloud is one of many "dark nebulae" catalogued by Barnard and this is B168.

 

A different approach to star trails...

Barnard 92 dark nebula. RCOS 14.25" telecope

total of approximately 8 hours of HaLRGB data taken with a SBIG STX 16803 CCD.

Taken with a 31.75cm (12.5") RCOS Ritchey Chretien working at F9 and a SBIG STL6303E CCD camera.

 

This is a LRGB image 220💯100:100 using Astrodon generation 2 filters with all exposures unbinned.

Top row left to right: IC4406,NGC4071, IC5148/50. Bottom row left to right: Longmore 5, NGC 3132, Shapley 1.

 

All images from a 31.75cm (12.5") RCOS Ritchey Chretien working at F9 and a STL6303E CCD camera. Astrodon series 2 filters were used. All images were either LRGB or RGB shots with total exposure times ranging from 3 to 7 hours.

This region in southern Ophiuchus is perhaps the most celebrated area of dark nebulae in the sky. Revealed as E.E. Barnard would have done it.

 

High cirrus clouds bloated bright stars.

 

Pentax 67 200mm f/4 SMC Takumar @ f/4 40 minutes exposure on Fuji Acros 100 film.

Still getting some OIII frames but this is coming along.

Binned 25 minute exposures.

The OIII is at f/5

Ha at f/6.3 (from 2010)

Calibrated in DSS,stacked in Pixinsight....which does seem to do a nice job..(!)

Looks too saturated on one monitor and not enough on my laptop..........

Nasty salmon color in the Ha areas.

View Large On Black ?

Orion Optics AG12 12" F3.8 Astrograph

FLI ProLine 16803 CCD & CFW-5-7 + Atlas Focuser

SII Ha OIII (RGB) = 135 130 110min (10 10 10min) bin 1X1 Astronomik filters

-30C chip temp, darks and flats (Astronomik Aurora Light Panel used for flats)

Focal length 1180mm

FOV = 1.8deg X 1.8deg (2.6deg diagonal)

Image scale 1.57"/pix

Guide Camera: Starlightxpress SXVH9

 

M51

10" meade acf F6.7 Losmandy G11+gemini v4 sbig st2000xm

L 235 min

G 90

B 125

R 125

RGB bin 2x

5min subs

Saturn with its very active Serpent storm and the moons Dione (top L) and Rhea (bot R).

The Whirlpool Galaxy prior and present showing the recent super nova (marked).

Orion nebula. An combination of normal licht image with an narrowband image (SII/Ha/OIII).

Spiral outburst of astroide Scheila-596, A combination of two images made with two diverent telescopes from Global-Rent-A-Scope.

 

This is the only color image of this object.

Comet Hartley-2 my first image with an remote telescope from GRAS.

M42 the great Nebula in Orion

 

This is a re-edit of some older data taken back in December. On my new monitor my older image of M42 looks a bit dark so I re-edited in GIMP and I am happy with this result.

 

Imaging camera: ATIK 314L+

Imaging scope: AstroProfessional 102mm refractor (focal 714mm)

Mount: HEQ5 Pro autoguided

 

17 x 2 min (binning 1x1 at -10°c)

 

Processing:

- Iris: pre-processing, global register, sigma median addition, DDP, unsharp mask

 

Location : Lentillac-du-Causse (Lot - FRANCE)

Imaging camera: ATIK 314L+

Imaging scope: AstroProfessional 102mm refractor (focal 714mm)

Mount: HEQ5 Pro autoguided

 

30 x 2 min (binning 1x1 at -15°c)

 

Processing:

- Iris: pre-processing, global register, sigma median addition, DDP, unsharp mask

 

Location : Lentillac-du-Causse (Lot - FRANCE)

Imaging camera: ATIK 314L+

Imaging scope: AstroProfessional 102mm refractor (focal 714mm)

Mount: HEQ5 Pro autoguided

 

60 x 2 min (binning 1x1 at -15°c)

 

Processing:

- Iris: pre-processing, global register, sigma median addition, DDP, unsharp mask

- Photoshop : curves

 

Location : Lentillac-du-Causse (Lot - FRANCE)

Imaging camera: ATIK 314L+

Imaging scope: AstroProfessional 102mm refractor (focal 714mm)

Mount: HEQ5 Pro autoguided

 

LRGB

Luminance: 30 x 2 min (binning 1x1 at -10°c)

RGB: 10 x 2 min (binning 1x1) each layer

 

Processing:

- Iris: pre-processing, global register, sigma median addition, DDP, unsharp mask

 

Location : Lentillac-du-Causse (Lot - FRANCE)

Atik 314L+ (-15°c)

AstroProfessional 102mm refractor (focal 714mm)

HEQ5 Pro autoguided (DMK31 + PHD guiding + Pierro astro kit + FS60 refractor)

 

Halpha (Astrodon) : 14 x 5 min (binning 1x1)

5 darks, 15 flats, 15 offsets

 

Processed with Iris (global registration, sigma clipping addition, DDP)

 

Location : Le Champ du Feu (Bas-Rhin - FRANCE)

Date: 09/04/2010 from 20h52 to 22h16 UT

The Red planet Mars at Oppositions to the Earth (L) and the Sun (R). Mt. Olympus could be seen at the limb with orographic clouds.

 

Equipment: LX200ACF 12in., CGE mount, DMK21AF04 Ccd, TeleVue 3x barlows, Astronomik LRGB filter set.

mounted on the back of my celestron astromaster 130eq and taken with a sony a390 DSLR

Taken from Coral Towers Observatory

 

Start time of recording.....2011-03-30, 05:56:24 UTC +10 hours

Recording duration..........41.34s

 

Telescope...................Astrophysics 130 at F/5

 

Camera......................SKYnyx2-2M b/w #7050326

Bayer matrix................MONO

Image size..................1616x1216

Binning.....................1x1

Pixel format................8Bit grayscale

Camera stream rate..........12 fps

 

Captured frames.............500

Dropped frames..............0

Capture frame speed.........12.1 fps

 

Exposure....................4.67ms

Gain........................8.00

Gamma.......................1.00

Contrast....................1.00

Brightness..................0.00

  

Taken from New Mexico Skies using a 20" RCOS and STL11K

50 x 45 sec exposures using clear filter from 11h08m to 11h51m UT

Animation: www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/5588511526/

Widefield: www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/5588508836/

Narrowfield stack on stars: www.flickr.com/photos/43846774@N02/5588508264/

M51

10"meade ACF F6.7LLRGB image..

125min-R

125min-B

90min-G

235min-L

RGB bin 2x

Messier 3

 

26 x 5 minutes @ ISO800.

 

Canon 450d with a GSO 6" RC telescope, mounted on a guided HEQ5.

 

Modified Canon EOS 40D and Borg ED101 refractor at f/5.3

 

35x15min and 166x10min exposures at ISO800

 

This is a 5-frame mosaic

 

larger image can be found here:

www.starpointing.com/dslr/veil.html

STL11000 camera and Borg ED101 refractor at f/5.3

 

(HaL)RGB=405,50,40,40,60min

total: 9h 55min of total exposure time

 

larger image and a central crop can be found here:

www.starpointing.com/ccd/rosetta.html

STL11000 camera and Borg ED101 refractor at f/5.7

 

LRGB = 900,290,280,240min

total: 28.5h of exposure time

 

larger image and an inverted version can be found here:

www.starpointing.com/ccd/leotrio.html

 

A deep image of the orion nebula area. Taken with a Borg ED101 and an STL11k camera.

A total of 60.9 hours of data were collected between November 2009 and March 2011.

 

a larger image as well as a bw-image can be found here:

www.starpointing.com/ccd/orion.html

 

Equipment used: BorgED101, STL11000M, Baader HaRGB filter set

Ligeramente movida por 5 segs de la rotación de la Tierra

- Marzo 29 de 2011

- 2:36 a.m. (GMT-5)

- Popayán, Colombia

- Lat: 2° 23' 38" N

- Lon: 76° 36' 23" W

- Alt. 1850 mts.

Our moon, just beginning to exit the Earths shadow during the December 2010 full eclipse. The moon was dim enough to allow stars to be captured in the same image. Shot near Fort Smith, NT.

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