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According to the legend, Tuscania was founded by Aeneas' son, Ascanius, where he had found twelve dog pups (whence the Etruscan name Tus-Cana, cana being similar to Latin canis for "dog"). Another legend attributes the foundation to one Tusco, son of Hercules and Araxes.

 

Evidence of human presence in the area dates from the Neolithic age, but probably the city proper was built around the 7th century BC when the acropolis on St. Peter Hill was surrounded by a line of walls. Villages existed in the neighbourhood. In the following years the strategical position granted Tuscania a leader role in the Etruscan world. After the defeat of the coastal cities by the Greeks (4th century BC), Tuscania became also a maritime trade center through the port of Regas (next today's Montalto di Castro). There are no record of Tuscania being involved in the battles that led to the Roman conquest of the Etruscan northern Lazio (280 BC), as the city probably entered into the Roman orbit in a Pacific way. The agricultural development and construction of the Via Clodia, further boosted the economic situation of the city. It became a municipium in 88 BCE.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuscania

 

Schmidt's Red Tailed monkey, Cercopithecus ascanius. San Diego Zoo. Conservation status: least concern

Claude Lorrain (Claude Gellée), Chamagne/Lothringen ca. 1600 - Rom 1682

Aeneas auf Delos / Landscape with Aeneas at Delos (1672)

National Gallery, London.

 

The painting shows Aeneas, a hero of the Trojan War, at Delos, an island sacred to the sun god Apollo, and Diana, his twin. Aeneas (wearing red) is accompanied by his father Anchises (wearing blue) and his son Ascanius. They are met by Anius, king of Delos and priest of Apollo, who points to the olive and the palm to which Latona clung while giving birth to Apollo and Diana. The balcony relief on the building at the top right shows Apollo and Diana killing the giant Tityus, who had tried to rape their mother.

 

Claude's written sources were Virgil's 'Aeneid' and Ovid's 'Metamorphoses'. Claude based the Temple of Apollo on the Pantheon, an ancient temple in Rome. This is the first of the six works based on Virgil painted by Claude in the last ten years of his life.

 

Source: National Gallery, London

Claude Lorrain, detail from "Landscape with Ascanius Shooting the Stag of Silvia"

Claude Lorrain (also Claude Gellée or Le Lorrain) (Lorraine, c. 1600 – Rome, 21 or 23 November 1682) was an artist of the Baroque era who was active in Italy, and is admired for his achievements in landscape painting. The above landscape was painted for Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna in 1681-2 as a pendant to the "Dido and Aeneas before Carthage " of 1675 - 76 (Kunsthalle, Hamburg), it was to be Claude's last picture. The subject is from Virgil's Aeneid VII, 483-99: Ascanius, hunting in Latium with his companions, becomes the instrument of the Fury Allecto who is sent by Juno to provoke war.

 

Founded in 1683, The Ashmolean re-opened on Saturday 7th November 2009. Their new display approach is "crossing culture crossing time." It was my first glimpse today, the much loved older museum is still here, but now enormously extended and plenty more to enjoy.

Supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Ashmolean is currently undergoing a £61 million redevelopment. Award-winning architect Rick Mather has designed a new building to replace all but the Grade I listed Cockerell building. His design will double the existing gallery space, allow environmental control, and create a dedicated Education Centre and conservation facilities.

 

I've tried to show something of the atmosphere and texture of the museum in many of the photos, I also wanted to convey the sense of movement and people's interaction with the art objects, therefore razor sharp clarity (were I to achieve that) was not my number one objective. This set will grow as I explore the new galleries, I hope you'll forgive me if I do not tag or describe everything right away as there is so much to take in!

The New Ashmolean

Martin Beek Oxford, November 2009

Going through some old shots I found this one from a visit to a zoo and can not identify the breed of ape or monkey but his expression was so soulful I had to work on it. I suspect that the image loses a little impact as in thumbnail it looks like some kind of muppet but larger he just breaks my heart and the image itself I feel has that hint of the kind of hand-coloured illustration Darwin would have made. Thanks to Zuzka who faster than a speeding bullet landed in her superhero cape and identified this chap as a red-tail monkey: Cercopithecus ascanius.

According to the legend, Tuscania was founded by Aeneas' son, Ascanius, where he had found twelve dog pups (whence the Etruscan name Tus-Cana, cana being similar to Latin canis for "dog"). Another legend attributes the foundation to one Tusco, son of Hercules and Araxes.

 

Evidence of human presence in the area dates from the Neolithic age, but probably the city proper was built around the 7th century BC when the acropolis on St. Peter Hill was surrounded by a line of walls. Villages existed in the neighbourhood. In the following years the strategical position granted Tuscania a leader role in the Etruscan world. After the defeat of the coastal cities by the Greeks (4th century BC), Tuscania became also a maritime trade center through the port of Regas (next today's Montalto di Castro). There are no record of Tuscania being involved in the battles that led to the Roman conquest of the Etruscan northern Lazio (280 BC), as the city probably entered into the Roman orbit in a Pacific way. The agricultural development and construction of the Via Clodia, further boosted the economic situation of the city. It became a municipium in 88 BCE.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuscania

 

The tail of the Schmidt’s guenon is red and longer than its body, giving it the additional common name of the red-tailed monkey. They are also called the spot-nosed monkey because of their face markings.

 

Scientific Name: Cercopithecus ascanius schmidti

Range: Uganda, Zaire, Kenya, Zambia, Angola, Central African Republic

Status in the Wild: Stable

Location in the Zoo: Wortham World of Primates

Cool Animal Fact: Live in social groups of 7-35 individuals, with one adult male, multiple females and their young.

According to the legend, Tuscania was founded by Aeneas' son, Ascanius, where he had found twelve dog pups (whence the Etruscan name Tus-Cana, cana being similar to Latin canis for "dog"). Another legend attributes the foundation to one Tusco, son of Hercules and Araxes.

 

Evidence of human presence in the area dates from the Neolithic age, but probably the city proper was built around the 7th century BC when the acropolis on St. Peter Hill was surrounded by a line of walls. Villages existed in the neighbourhood. In the following years the strategical position granted Tuscania a leader role in the Etruscan world. After the defeat of the coastal cities by the Greeks (4th century BC), Tuscania became also a maritime trade center through the port of Regas (next today's Montalto di Castro). There are no record of Tuscania being involved in the battles that led to the Roman conquest of the Etruscan northern Lazio (280 BC), as the city probably entered into the Roman orbit in a Pacific way. The agricultural development and construction of the Via Clodia, further boosted the economic situation of the city. It became a municipium in 88 BCE.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuscania

 

Schmidt's Red-tailed Monkey at San Diego Zoo.

 

According to the legend, Tuscania was founded by Aeneas' son, Ascanius, where he had found twelve dog pups (whence the Etruscan name Tus-Cana, cana being similar to Latin canis for "dog"). Another legend attributes the foundation to one Tusco, son of Hercules and Araxes.

 

Evidence of human presence in the area dates from the Neolithic age, but probably the city proper was built around the 7th century BC when the acropolis on St. Peter Hill was surrounded by a line of walls. Villages existed in the neighbourhood. In the following years the strategical position granted Tuscania a leader role in the Etruscan world. After the defeat of the coastal cities by the Greeks (4th century BC), Tuscania became also a maritime trade center through the port of Regas (next today's Montalto di Castro). There are no record of Tuscania being involved in the battles that led to the Roman conquest of the Etruscan northern Lazio (280 BC), as the city probably entered into the Roman orbit in a Pacific way. The agricultural development and construction of the Via Clodia, further boosted the economic situation of the city. It became a municipium in 88 BCE.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuscania

 

Schmidt's Red-tailed Monkey at the San Diego Zoo.

According to the legend, Tuscania was founded by Aeneas' son, Ascanius, where he had found twelve dog pups (whence the Etruscan name Tus-Cana, cana being similar to Latin canis for "dog"). Another legend attributes the foundation to one Tusco, son of Hercules and Araxes.

 

Evidence of human presence in the area dates from the Neolithic age, but probably the city proper was built around the 7th century BC when the acropolis on St. Peter Hill was surrounded by a line of walls. Villages existed in the neighbourhood. In the following years the strategical position granted Tuscania a leader role in the Etruscan world. After the defeat of the coastal cities by the Greeks (4th century BC), Tuscania became also a maritime trade center through the port of Regas (next today's Montalto di Castro). There are no record of Tuscania being involved in the battles that led to the Roman conquest of the Etruscan northern Lazio (280 BC), as the city probably entered into the Roman orbit in a Pacific way. The agricultural development and construction of the Via Clodia, further boosted the economic situation of the city. It became a municipium in 88 BCE.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuscania

 

Nicolas Poussin 1594-1665. Rome. Vénus montrant ses armes à Enée. Rouen. Le tableau a été peint en 1639 pour son ami Jacques Stella.

Enée est fils de Vénus et d'Anchise. La scène se passe à la veille d'une bataille décisive qui décidera de la conquête du Latium. Enée, prince troyen, est le fils d'Anchise et d'Aphrodite (Vénus). il épouse Créuse fille du roi de Troie Priam, dont il a un fils, Ascagne. Après la prise de Troie par les Achéens Enée parvient avec Ascagne dans le Latium où il fonde Albe et Lavinium. Les armes ont été forgées par le mari de Aphrodite, Hephaïstos (Vulcain) à la demande de Vénus. Enée serait mort dans une bataille contre les Rutules et les Etrusques ou, selon la version légendaire, enlevé au ciel par sa mère Vénus.D'après Virgile Romulus et Remus, les fondateurs de Rome, seraient les descendants d'Enée par leur mère et du Dieu Mars (Ares en grec).

  

Nicolas Poussin 1594-1665. Rome. Venus Presenting Arms to Aeneas. Rouen. The picture was painted in 1639 for his friend Jacques Stella.

Aeneas is the son of Venus and Anchises. The scene takes place on the eve of a decisive battle that will decide the conquest of Latium. Aeneas, the Trojan prince, the son of Anchises and Aphrodite (Venus). he married Creusa daughter of King Priam of Troy, he has a son, Ascanius. After the capture of Troy by the Achaeans Aeneas with Ascanius arrives in Latium, where he founded Alba and Lavinium. The weapons were forged by the husband of Aphrodite, Hephaestus (Vulcan) at the request of Venus. Aeneas died in a battle against the Etruscans and Rutulians or, as the legendary version into heaven by his mother Vénus.D after Virgil Romulus and Remus, the founders of Rome, were the descendants of Aeneas through their mother and God of Mars (Ares in Greek).

 

According to the legend, Tuscania was founded by Aeneas' son, Ascanius, where he had found twelve dog pups (whence the Etruscan name Tus-Cana, cana being similar to Latin canis for "dog"). Another legend attributes the foundation to one Tusco, son of Hercules and Araxes.

 

Evidence of human presence in the area dates from the Neolithic age, but probably the city proper was built around the 7th century BC when the acropolis on St. Peter Hill was surrounded by a line of walls. Villages existed in the neighbourhood. In the following years the strategical position granted Tuscania a leader role in the Etruscan world. After the defeat of the coastal cities by the Greeks (4th century BC), Tuscania became also a maritime trade center through the port of Regas (next today's Montalto di Castro). There are no record of Tuscania being involved in the battles that led to the Roman conquest of the Etruscan northern Lazio (280 BC), as the city probably entered into the Roman orbit in a Pacific way. The agricultural development and construction of the Via Clodia, further boosted the economic situation of the city. It became a municipium in 88 BCE.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuscania

 

The San Diego Zoo!

 

Schmidt's Red-Tailed Monkey

The Finest Known Portrait Denarius of Julius Caesar

  

Julius Caesar. August 43 BC. AR Denarius (3.96 g, 12h). Rome mint. L Flaminius Chilo, quattuorvir aere argento auro flando feriundo. Laureate head right within within pelleted border / L • FLAMINIVS down right field, IIII VIR up left, Venus Genetrix as Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus in outstretched right hand and long scepter in left; all within pelleted border. Crawford 485/1; CNR I 102/1 (same obv. die); CRI 113; Sydenham 1089; RSC 26. Superb attractively toned. Well-struck with obverse die of fine style on large flan. Very rare.

 

While this coin derives its general type from those issues struck at Rome in the month prior to Caesar’s assassination in March 44 BC, its anepigraphic obverse now shows an idealized head of Caesar that is no longer veiled, while on the reverse, Venus Genetrix holds a caduceus in place of the traditional Victory. This revised, decidedly pro-Caesarian imagery comports with the events of 43 BC. Following his assassination, it was Caesar’s fellow consul and second-in-command, Antony, and not Octavian, Caesar’s official heir, who was in power. Within days of the funeral, Antony proclaimed himself as Caesar’s dictatorial successor, first by surrounding himself with a bodyguard made up of Caesar’s veterans and then by compelling the Senate in June 44 BC to transfer the provinces of Gallia Transalpina and Gallia Cisalpina – the latter under the control of one of the conspirators, Decimus Brutus – to himself for a five-year period. When Brutus refused to yield his province, Antony sent a military expedition to oust him, and laid siege to Brutus at Mutina (mod. Modena), beginning in October 44 BC.

  

At the same time as Antony began to flex his quasi-dictatorial muscle, Cicero, who had been sympathetic to the conspirators, but later moved that the Senate not declare Caesar as a tyrant in order to gain their amnesty, began denouncing Antony through a series of speeches, known as the Philippics. He soon became the subject of a campaign of blandishment by Octavian, newly arrived at Rome to claim his inheritance, who hoped to acquire Cicero as an ally (and with him, other influential senators). Octavian also began raising an army. Many of the recruits had been veterans of Caesar’s army, yet Octavian was also able to acquire two of Antony’s own legions with promises of money. These events demonstrated clearly that Octavian was developing the necessary personal political skills that would give him the ultimate victory in the unfolding conflict. In January 43 BC, the Senate granted Octavian the office of propraetor along with the power of imperium (military command), sending him, along with the consuls for that year, Aulus Hirtius and Gaius Vibius Pansa to break up the siege. At Forum Gallorum and then again at Mutina, Antony was successfully defeated, although both of the consuls died as a result. Octavian was now in sole command of the army sent to defeat Antony. Young and inexperienced at the beginning of the campaign, after Mutina he had shown himself to be Antony’s military equal.

  

Antony, whom the Senate now declared hostis (an enemy of the state), meanwhile, withdrew further into Gallia Transalpina to Parma (which he sacked) and then to Placentia (mod. Piacenza). He then made his way into Liguria, where he met up with Marcus Lepidus, who had been his ally since Caesar’s assassination. There they remained until November 43 BC.

  

Octavian, now proven in the field, was slighted by the Senate’s miscalculated decision to reward Decimus Brutus for Antony’s defeat by transferring command of the legions away from Octavian to Brutus. As a result, he remained stationary in the Po Valley and refused any further assistance in the pursuit of Antony. In July 43 BC, Octavian dispatched emissaries to the Senate. He demanded hat he be appointed the consulship now left vacant by the deaths of Hirtius and Pansa and that the declaration of Antony as a hostis be rescinded. When the Senate refused his demands, Octavian marched on Rome in force. Facing no opposition (Cicero by now being resigned to the fact that Octavian would ally himself with Antony), Octavian was elected consul on 19 August 43 BC along with his cousin (and fellow great-nephew of Julius Caesar), Quintus Pedius, who would oversee the creation of the Lex Pedia in September, making Caesar’s murder, or the calling for it, capital crimes punishable by death.

  

Into this dramatic political period, Flaminius Chilo oversaw the striking of this coin with its definite pro-Caesarian imagery. The idealized portrait of Julius Caesar, with its definite impression of divinity, is not an individual die-engraver’s attempt at artistic fancy, but must have been influenced by Octavian’s consciously conceived program of manipulating public images (including that of Caesar) at Rome. On 1 January 42 BC, the Senate recognized Caesar’s new divine status as the Divus Julius and constructed a temple on the site of his cremation in the Forum. The Venus Genetrix on the reverse shows a similar manipulation. Deriving from the Greek Aphrodite Ourania, or heavenly Aphrodite, Venus Genetrix became not only the divine patroness of Rome through her son Aeneas, but also the ancestor of the gens Julia, through Aeneas’ son, Ascanius (Iulus). On the night before Pharsalus in 48 BC, Caesar vowed to construct a temple in her honor in Rome if he was successful against Pompey. Once completed, this temple, which housed a statue of the goddess, then became the centerpiece of his new forum in Rome. There are marked differences, however, between the statue (evidenced by several extant copies) and her depiction on the denarii struck in the month before his assassination. While the statue emphasized her procreative powers, the coins show her in a more martial and political context: holding a Victory in her right hand and a scepter in her left, either surrounded by weaponry (sometime set on a globe), or with the scepter set on a star (a sign of divinity). While these attributes may shift from one to another, they emphasize not only the divine assistance in Caesar’s military and political victories, but also allude tentatively to his semi-divinity. The Venus of this coin, however, minimizes her connection to earlier associations; instead, she now presents an image of Felicitas (Good Fortune), by replacing the Victory with a caduceus. It is not the Venus Genetrix of Julius Caesar, then, but now Venus Felix of all Rome who is at work. Thus, through the assistance of the two transformed divine agencies - the impending one of the Divus Julius, and that of Venus – that Octavian was able to take his first few steps toward political ascendancy. cngcoins.com

Red-tailed Guenon (Cercopithecus ascanius)

The elf riding his back is Ascanius, leader of the Illyrion elves.

According to the legend, Tuscania was founded by Aeneas' son, Ascanius, where he had found twelve dog pups (whence the Etruscan name Tus-Cana, cana being similar to Latin canis for "dog"). Another legend attributes the foundation to one Tusco, son of Hercules and Araxes.

 

Evidence of human presence in the area dates from the Neolithic age, but probably the city proper was built around the 7th century BC when the acropolis on St. Peter Hill was surrounded by a line of walls. Villages existed in the neighbourhood. In the following years the strategical position granted Tuscania a leader role in the Etruscan world. After the defeat of the coastal cities by the Greeks (4th century BC), Tuscania became also a maritime trade center through the port of Regas (next today's Montalto di Castro). There are no record of Tuscania being involved in the battles that led to the Roman conquest of the Etruscan northern Lazio (280 BC), as the city probably entered into the Roman orbit in a Pacific way. The agricultural development and construction of the Via Clodia, further boosted the economic situation of the city. It became a municipium in 88 BCE.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuscania

 

Smithsonian Zoo Enrichment Lab, Smithsonian's National Zoological Park, Washington, DC

 

Swamp, mountain and lowland forests of central Africa comprise the native habitats of Schmidt's red-tailed monkeys that subsist on a diet of fruit supplemented by leaves, flowers and insects.

From the National Gallery description:

The eight-year-old Arthur Fitzgerald Kinnaird (1814-1887), son of the 8th Lord Kinnaird, is portrayed with a Phrygian (Trojan) cap as Ascanius from Virgil's Aeneid. After the Greek destruction of Troy, Ascanius and his father Aeneas fled to Italy and the site where Rome was founded. Campbell's sculpture was commissioned at the suggestion of Lord Byron, a friend of the Kinnairds, and commemorates Arthur's appearance at a costume ball in Rome.

Detail of a frieze found in a tomb belonging to the family of T. Statilius Taurus. The paintings were discovered in 1875 and are now displayed in the National Museum of Rome (Palazzo Massimo). The themes of the frieze have been interpreted as representing stories from Rome's legendary past. This particular scene has been interpreted as the foundation of Alba Longa by the son of Aeneas, Ascanius. Men in tunics work to built a massive fortification wall of squared ashlar blocks. They are watched on the left by a seated female figure wearing a "mural" crown; she may well be a personification of the city. The frieze was later covered with a fresh coat of stucco: the damaged area on the left was created so help the new layer "stick." Dated to the mid-late first century BCE.

RBU2005

ID Number: P05483.001

Maker: Eden Studios

Ballarat, Victoria, Australia

 

Studio portrait of 1626 Private (Pte) Walter Henry Chibnall, 10th Light Trench Mortar Battery, pictured with his son William Beresford (Billy) Chibnall. A miner of Beaufort Vic, Pte Chibnall enlisted on 15 March 1916 and embarked on HMAT Ascanius with the 1st Reinforcements on 27 May 1916. He was transferred to the 10th Light Trench Mortar Battery on 7 August 1916 where he was promoted to Corporal (Cpl) on 15 September 1917. He was killed in action at Passchendaele, Belgium, on 12 October 1917, aged 32, when he and a comrade were hit by a shell while taking shelter in a crater. He is commemorated on The Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Belgium. Serving with the number VX39948, Pte Billy Chibnall enlisted during the Second World War, serving with the 2/21st Battalion. He was taken prisoner of war and died, aged 30, on 20 February 1942 at Ambon.

 

Rights Info: No known copyright restrictions.

 

This photograph is from the Australian War Memorial's collection www.awm.gov.au

 

Persistent URL: http://cas.awm.gov.au/photograph/P05483.001

Federico Barocci, Urbino 1535 ? - 1612

Flucht des Aeneas aus Troja / Aeneas' Flight from Troy / Fuga di Enea da Troia (1598)

Galleria Borghese, Rom

 

Federico Barrocci's Aeneas' Flight from Troy with Anchises, his son Ascanius and his wife Creusa is the second version painted in 1598 of a picture executed ten years earlier for Emperor Rudolf II of Austria. Cardinal Giuliano della Rovere presented Cardinal Scipione with this second version, which entered the Borghese collection before 1613. It was this painting that inspired Cardinal Scipione to commission a large marble group on the same subject from Gian Lorenzo Bernini (also in the Borghese Gallery). The myth of Aeneas, ancestor of Romulus and Remus, referred to the birth of Rome and thus confirmed the Borghese family's high status in the city.

 

Barrocci's many drawings of nature led him to achieve a spontaneity and naturalness in movement, colour and airy effects, and a silvery luminosity that was to influence the 17th-century masters, particularly Rubens. Never before had flames been painted so close to, with an energy suggesting even the crackle of the fire, from which Ascanius seems to be protecting himself by covering his ears. But the human delicacy of Barrocci's anti-heroic and anti-rhetorical figures was not to be really appreciated in Rome, because it could not compete with the classical antique statuary.

 

Source: Web Gallery of Art

  

Red-tailed Monkey - Cercopithecus ascanius

Cute and cuddly as he may be, monkeys like this sadly would invariably end up in someones cooking pot

Image taken from:

 

Title: "Some Account of the Barony and Town of Okehampton ... Including the journals kept by Messrs. Rattenbury and Shebbeare ... from the 21 James I., to the death of William III.; with notes genealogical, descriptive, and explanatory ... Edited and enlarged from the collections made by W. B. Bridges, the Rev. C. Thomas and the Rev. H. G. Fothergill ... A new edition, with additional chapters, edited by W. H. K. Wright"

Author: Bridges, William B.

Contributor: FOTHERGILL, Henry George.

Contributor: RATTENBURY, John - Mayor of Okehampton

Contributor: SHEBBEARE, Richard.

Contributor: THOMAS, Charles Ascanius Thomas.

Contributor: WRIGHT, William Henry Kearley.

Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 010358.e.3."

Page: 85

Place of Publishing: Tiverton

Date of Publishing: 1889

Publisher: William Masland

Issuance: monographic

Identifier: 000470940

 

Explore:

Find this item in the British Library catalogue, 'Explore'.

Open the page in the British Library's itemViewer (page image 85)

Download the PDF for this book Image found on book scan 85 (NB not a pagenumber)Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

 

Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

 

Order a higher quality version from here.

  

Farewell to the troopship ASCANIUS at Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, 1916. The black and white photograph depicts an elevated view of the midship deck of the troopship ASCANIUS packed with soldiers who throw streamers to the crowd of civilians on the wharf below. A gangway is still in place with people on it and soldiers are crowded onto the bridge and lifeboats. The bow of the lifeboats are marked `A11' and the reverse of the print has a lead pencil inscription reading `ASCANIUS 27-5-16'.

 

The Australian National Maritime Museum undertakes research and accepts public comments that enhance the information we hold about images in our collection. If you can identify a person, vessel or landmark, write the details in the Comments box below.

 

Thank you for helping caption this important historical image.

 

Object number 00027620

 

Photographer J E Barnes

 

See also from the Australian War Memorial's collection: cas.awm.gov.au/item/PB0132

According to the legend, Tuscania was founded by Aeneas' son, Ascanius, where he had found twelve dog pups (whence the Etruscan name Tus-Cana, cana being similar to Latin canis for "dog"). Another legend attributes the foundation to one Tusco, son of Hercules and Araxes.

 

Evidence of human presence in the area dates from the Neolithic age, but probably the city proper was built around the 7th century BC when the acropolis on St. Peter Hill was surrounded by a line of walls. Villages existed in the neighbourhood. In the following years the strategical position granted Tuscania a leader role in the Etruscan world. After the defeat of the coastal cities by the Greeks (4th century BC), Tuscania became also a maritime trade center through the port of Regas (next today's Montalto di Castro). There are no record of Tuscania being involved in the battles that led to the Roman conquest of the Etruscan northern Lazio (280 BC), as the city probably entered into the Roman orbit in a Pacific way. The agricultural development and construction of the Via Clodia, further boosted the economic situation of the city. It became a municipium in 88 BCE.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuscania

 

Image taken from:

 

Title: "Some Account of the Barony and Town of Okehampton ... Including the journals kept by Messrs. Rattenbury and Shebbeare ... from the 21 James I., to the death of William III.; with notes genealogical, descriptive, and explanatory ... Edited and enlarged from the collections made by W. B. Bridges, the Rev. C. Thomas and the Rev. H. G. Fothergill ... A new edition, with additional chapters, edited by W. H. K. Wright"

Author: Bridges, William B.

Contributor: FOTHERGILL, Henry George.

Contributor: RATTENBURY, John - Mayor of Okehampton

Contributor: SHEBBEARE, Richard.

Contributor: THOMAS, Charles Ascanius Thomas.

Contributor: WRIGHT, William Henry Kearley.

Shelfmark: "British Library HMNTS 010358.e.3."

Page: 262

Place of Publishing: Tiverton

Date of Publishing: 1889

Publisher: William Masland

Issuance: monographic

Identifier: 000470940

 

Explore:

Find this item in the British Library catalogue, 'Explore'.

Open the page in the British Library's itemViewer (page image 262)

Download the PDF for this book Image found on book scan 262 (NB not a pagenumber)Download the OCR-derived text for this volume: (plain text) or (json)

 

Click here to see all the illustrations in this book and click here to browse other illustrations published in books in the same year.

 

Order a higher quality version from here.

  

from ift.tt/1cA1vZo

 

funkysafari:

 

Red-tailed monkey (Cercopithecus ascanius) Ndali-Kasenda crater lakes area, western Uganda by JulGlouton

 

Turns out "he" is a "she"...when they sedated Nagano for a check-up, they discovered she's a girl and not a boy as originally thought!

According to the legend, Tuscania was founded by Aeneas' son, Ascanius, where he had found twelve dog pups (whence the Etruscan name Tus-Cana, cana being similar to Latin canis for "dog"). Another legend attributes the foundation to one Tusco, son of Hercules and Araxes.

 

Evidence of human presence in the area dates from the Neolithic age, but probably the city proper was built around the 7th century BC when the acropolis on St. Peter Hill was surrounded by a line of walls. Villages existed in the neighbourhood. In the following years the strategical position granted Tuscania a leader role in the Etruscan world. After the defeat of the coastal cities by the Greeks (4th century BC), Tuscania became also a maritime trade center through the port of Regas (next today's Montalto di Castro). There are no record of Tuscania being involved in the battles that led to the Roman conquest of the Etruscan northern Lazio (280 BC), as the city probably entered into the Roman orbit in a Pacific way. The agricultural development and construction of the Via Clodia, further boosted the economic situation of the city. It became a municipium in 88 BCE.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuscania

 

Identifier: bookshelfforboys19univ19

Title: The Bookshelf for boys and girls Little Journeys into Bookland

Year: 1912 (1910s)

Authors: University Society, New York

Subjects: Children's literature Children's encyclopedias and dictionaries Literature Encyclopedias and dictionaries

Publisher: New York : University Society

Contributing Library: Brigham Young University-Idaho, David O. McKay Library

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Odyssey youwill meet several old friends in the ^Eneid. Ittells all about the wooden horse and the captureof Troy, and then goes on to describe the wonder-ful adventures of ^Eneas, a Trojan prince, whoescaped after the fall of Troy with his old father,Anchises, and his little son, Ascanius. iEneaswanders over the world and meets with manystrange adventures, just as Ulysses did; in fact,he sees some of the very persons and things thatHomer tells us Ulysses saw. Now he meets thegiant Polyphemus; now, Andromache, the widowof Hector, the hope of Troy; at another time hegoes down into the lower regions and speaks tothe spirits of many great Greeks and Trojans, aswell as to the spirits of many famous Romanswho were not yet born. Finally he lands inItaly, and after conquering the people who op-pose him he settles down there. Many yearsafterward his descendants founded Rome. Andthe nation founded by a Trojan became, greaterthan the great nation of the Greeks who con-quered and destroyed Troy!

 

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GREEK DIVINITIES. ZEITS.ATHENA. DIONYSUS.HKKMES- XIX—9 IIQ 120 SOME GREAT WRITERS OF OLDEN TIMES LIVY As I have told you, Rome in the reign of Augus-tus contained many other writers besides Vergil.In fact, so many great writers were producedduring this time that the Augustan Age, as it iscalled, is regarded as the golden age of Romanliterature. Among the greatest of those writerswere the poets Horace and Propertius, and thehistorian Livy. It is about Livy that I want totell you especially, because he is very important.He holds about the same place in Roman litera-ture that Herodotus holds in Greek literature,and most of the information we have about Romeup to his time we owe to him. Titus Livius, whom we call Livy, was born inPadua, Italy, in the year 59 B.C., and was edu-cated there and at Rome. He was of a noblefamily and so had not the same trouble in gettingon that Vergil had. He led a quiet life and keptout of public view as much as he could, partlybecause he was fond of work a

  

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Rule One - You will receive a body. Whether you love it or hate it, it's yours for life, so accept it. What counts is what's inside.

 

Rule Two - You will be presented with lessons. Life is a constant learning experience, which every day provides opportunities for you to learn more. These lessons specific to you, and learning them 'is the key to discovering and fulfilling the meaning and relevance of your own life'.

 

Rule Three - There are no mistakes, only lessons. Your development towards wisdom is a process of experimentation, trial and error, so it's inevitable things will not always go to plan or turn out how you'd want. Compassion is the remedy for harsh judgement - of ourselves and others. Forgiveness is not only divine - it's also 'the act of erasing an emotional debt'. Behaving ethically, with integrity, and with humour - especially the ability to laugh at yourself and your own mishaps - are central to the perspective that 'mistakes' are simply lessons we must learn.

..more-->

Rule Four - The lesson is repeated until learned. Lessons repeat until learned. What manifest as problems and challenges, irritations and frustrations are more lessons - they will repeat until you see them as such and learn from them. Your own awareness and your ability to change are requisites of executing this rule. Also fundamental is the acceptance that you are not a victim of fate or circumstance - 'causality' must be acknowledged; that is to say: things happen to you because of how you are and what you do. To blame anyone or anything else for your misfortunes is an escape and a denial; you yourself are responsible for you, and what happens to you. Patience is required - change doesn't happen overnight, so give change time to happen.

 

Rule Five - Learning does not end. While you are alive there are always lessons to be learned. Surrender to the 'rhythm of life', don't struggle against it. Commit to the process of constant learning and change - be humble enough to always acknowledge your own weaknesses, and be flexible enough to adapt from what you may be accustomed to, because rigidity will deny you the freedom of new possibilities.

 

Rule Six - "There" is no better than "here". The other side of the hill may be greener than your own, but being there is not the key to endless happiness. Be grateful for and enjoy what you have, and where you are on your journey. Appreciate the abundance of what's good in your life, rather than measure and amass things that do not actually lead to happiness. Living in the present helps you attain peace.

 

Rule Seven - Others are only mirrors of you. You love or hate something about another person according to what love or hate about yourself. Be tolerant; accept others as they are, and strive for clarity of self-awareness; strive to truly understand and have an objective perception of your own self, your thoughts and feelings. Negative experiences are opportunities to heal the wounds that you carry. Support others, and by doing so you support yourself. Where you are unable to support others it is a sign that you are not adequately attending to your own needs.

 

Rule Eight - What you make of your life is up to you. You have all the tools and resources you need. What you do with them is up to you. Take responsibility for yourself. Learn to let go when you cannot change things. Don't get angry about things - bitter memories clutter your mind. Courage resides in all of us - use it when you need to do what's right for you. We all possess a strong natural power and adventurous spirit, which you should draw on to embrace what lies ahead.

 

Rule Nine - Your answers lie inside of you. Trust your instincts and your innermost feelings, whether you hear them as a little voice or a flash of inspiration. Listen to feelings as well as sounds. Look, listen, and trust. Draw on your natural inspiration.

 

Rule Ten - You will forget all this at birth. We are all born with all of these capabilities - our early experiences lead us into a physical world, away from our spiritual selves, so that we become doubtful, cynical and lacking belief and confidence. The ten Rules are not commandments, they are universal truths that apply to us all. When you lose your way, call upon them. Have faith in the strength of your spirit. Aspire to be wise - wisdom the ultimate path of your life, and it knows no limits other than those you impose on yourself.

 

by Cherie Carter-Scott

 

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Lazuli, Laser Lemon, Laurel Green, Lava, Lavender, Lavender Blue, Lavender Blush, Lavender Gray, Lavender Indigo, Lavender Magenta, Lavender Mist, Lavender Pink, Lavender Purple, Lavender Rose, Lawn Green, Lemon, Lemon Chiffon, Lemon Lime, Lemon Yellow, Light Apricot, Light Blue Light Brown, Light Carmine Pink, Light Coral, Light Cornflower Blue, Light Crimson, Light Cyan, Light Fuchsia Pink, Light Goldenrod Yellow, Light Gray, Light Green, Light Khaki, Light Pastel Purple, Light Pink, Light Salmon, Light Salmon Pink, Light Sea Green, Light Sky Blue, Light Slate Gray, Light Taupe, Light Thulian Pink, Light Yellow, Lilac, Lime, Lime Green, Lincoln Green, Linen, Lion, Liver, Lust, Macaroni and Cheese, Magenta, Magic Mint, Magnolia, Mahogany, Maize, Majorelle Blue, Malachite, Manatee, Mango Tango, Mantis, Maroon, Mauve, Mauve Taupe, Mauvelous, Maya Blue, Meat Brown, Medium Aquamarine, Medium Blue, Medium Candy Apple Red, Medium Carmine, Medium Champagne, Medium Electric Blue, Medium Jungle Green, Medium Lavender Magenta, Medium Orchid, Medium Persian Blue, Medium Purple, Medium Red Violet, Medium Sea Green, Medium Slate Blue, Medium Spring Bud, Medium Spring Green, Medium Taupe, Medium Teal Blue, Medium Turquoise, Medium Violet Red, Melon, Midnight Blue, Midnight Green, Mikado Yellow, Mint, Mint Cream, Mint Green, Misty Rose, Moccasin, Mode Beige, Moonstone Blue, Mordant Red 19, Moss Green, Mountain Meadow, Mountbatten Pink, MSU Green, Mulberry, Munsell, Mustard, Myrtle, Nadeshiko Pink, Napier Green, Naples Yellow, Navajo White, Navy Blue, Neon Carrot, Neon Fuchsia, Neon Green, Non-Photo Blue, North Texas Green, Ocean Boat Blue, Ochre, Office Green, Old Gold, Old Lace, Old Lavender, Old Mauve, Old Rose, Olive, Olive Drab, Olive Green, Olivine, Onyx, Opera Mauve, Orange, Orange Peel, Orange Red, Orange Yellow, Orchid, Otter Brown, OU Crimson Red, Outer Space, Outrageous Orange, Oxford Blue, Pacific Blue, Pakistan Green, Palatinate Blue, Palatinate Purple, Pale Aqua, Pale Blue, Pale Brown, Pale Carmine, Pale Cerulean, Pale Chestnut, Pale Copper, Pale Cornflower Blue, Pale Gold, Pale Goldenrod, Pale Green, Pale Lavender, Pale Magenta, Pale Pink, Pale Plum, Pale Red Violet, Pale Robin Egg Blue, Pale Silver, Pale Spring Bud, Pale Taupe, Pale Violet Red, Pansy Purple, Papaya Whip, Paris Green, Pastel Blue, Pastel Brown, Pastel Gray, Pastel Green, Pastel Magenta, Pastel Orange, Pastel Pink, Pastel Purple, Pastel Red, Pastel Violet, Pastel Yellow, Patriarch, Payne Grey, Peach, Peach Puff, Peach Yellow, Pear, Pearl, Pearl Aqua, Peridot, Periwinkle, Persian Blue, Persian Indigo, Persian Orange, Persian Pink, Persian Plum, Persian Red, Persian Rose, Phlox, Phthalo Blue, Phthalo Green, Piggy Pink, Pine Green, Pink, Pink Flamingo, Pink Pearl, Pink Sherbet, Pistachio, Platinum, Plum, Portland Orange, Powder Blue, Princeton Orange, Prussian Blue, Psychedelic Purple, Puce, Pumpkin, Purple, Purple Heart, Purple Mountain Majesty, Purple Mountain's Majesty, Purple Pizzazz, Purple Taupe, Rackley, Radical Red, Raspberry, Raspberry Glace, Raspberry Pink, Raspberry Rose, Raw Sienna, Razzle Dazzle Rose, Razzmatazz, Red, Red Brown, Red Orange, Red Violet, Rich Black, Rich Carmine, Rich Electric Blue, Rich Lilac, Rich Maroon, Rifle Green, Robin's Egg Blue, Rose, Rose Bonbon, Rose Ebony, Rose Gold, Rose Madder, Rose Pink, Rose Quartz, Rose Taupe, Rose Vale, Rosewood, Rosso Corsa, Rosy Brown, Royal Azure, Royal Blue, Royal Fuchsia, Royal Purple, Ruby, Ruddy, Ruddy Brown, Ruddy Pink, Rufous, Russet, Rust, Sacramento State Green, Saddle Brown, Safety Orange, Saffron, Saint Patrick Blue, Salmon, Salmon Pink, Sand, Sand Dune, Sandstorm, Sandy Brown, Sandy Taupe, Sap Green, Sapphire, Satin Sheen Gold, Scarlet, School Bus Yellow, Screamin Green, Sea Blue, Sea Green, Seal Brown, Seashell, Selective Yellow, Sepia, Shadow, Shamrock, Shamrock Green, Shocking Pink, Sienna, Silver, Sinopia, Skobeloff, Sky Blue, Sky Magenta, Slate Blue, Slate Gray, Smalt, Smokey Topaz, Smoky Black, Snow, Spiro Disco Ball, Spring Bud, Spring Green, Steel Blue, Stil De Grain Yellow, Stizza, Stormcloud, Straw, Sunglow, Sunset, Sunset Orange, Tan, Tangelo, Tangerine, Tangerine Yellow, Taupe, Taupe Gray, Tawny, Tea Green, Tea Rose, Teal, Teal Blue, Teal Green, Terra Cotta, Thistle, Thulian Pink, Tickle Me Pink, Tiffany Blue, Tiger Eye, Timberwolf, Titanium Yellow, Tomato, Toolbox, Topaz, Tractor Red, Trolley Grey, Tropical Rain Forest, True Blue, Tufts Blue, Tumbleweed, Turkish Rose, Turquoise, Turquoise Blue, Turquoise Green, Tuscan Red, Twilight Lavender, Tyrian Purple, UA Blue, UA Red, Ube, UCLA Blue, UCLA Gold, UFO Green, Ultra Pink, Ultramarine, Ultramarine Blue, Umber, United Nations Blue, University Of California Gold, Unmellow Yellow, UP Forest Green, UP Maroon, Upsdell Red, Urobilin USC Cardinal, USC Gold, Utah Crimson, Vanilla, Vegas Gold, Venetian Red, Verdigris, Vermilion, Veronica, Violet, Violet Blue, Violet Red, Viridian, Vivid Auburn, Vivid Burgundy, Vivid Cerise, Vivid Tangerine, Vivid Violet, Warm Black, Waterspout, Wenge, Wheat, White, White Smoke, Wild Blue Yonder, Wild Strawberry, Wild Watermelon, Wine, Wisteria, Xanadu, Yale Blue, Yellow, Yellow Green, Yellow Orange, Zaffre, Zinnwaldite Brown

  

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