new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged area3

Control work supervisors (Left-to-right): F. Paul Keen, Assistant Entomologist in charge of entomological supervision; William G. Durbin, Forest Supervisor and Area 3 Manager of Area 3; Alex J. Jaenicke, Forest Examiner and Entomological Supervisor of Area 3; and Harvey Abbey, Camp Foreman of Camp 33, Area 3. Southern Oregon Northern California control project.

 

Photo by: F.P. Keen

Date: May 1922

 

Credit: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection.

Collection: Bureau of Entomology Collection; La Grande, Oregon.

Image: BUR-3211 (FPK-91)

 

To learn more about this photo collection see:

Wickman, B.E., Torgersen, T.R. and Furniss, M.M. 2002. Photographic images and history of forest insect investigations on the Pacific Slope, 1903-1953. Part 2. Oregon and Washington. American Entomologist, 48(3), p. 178-185.

 

For related historical information see:

www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/21476

Wickman, Boyd E. 2005. Harry E. Burke and John M. Miller, pioneers in Western forest entomology. General Technical Report. PNW-GTR-638. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 163 p.

 

For additional historical forest entomology photos, stories, and resources see the Western Forest Insect Work Conference site: wfiwc.org/content/history-and-resources

 

For related historical program documentation see:

archive.org/details/AerialForestInsectAndDiseaseDetection...

Johnson, J. 2016. Aerial forest insect and disease detection surveys in Oregon and Washington 1947-2016: The survey. Gen. Tech. Rep. R6-FHP-GTR-0302. Portland, OR: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection. 280 p.

 

Image provided by USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection: www.fs.usda.gov/main/r6/forest-grasslandhealth

One World Trade Center

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This article is about the current supertall skyscraper in New York City. For the former building complex destroyed in the September 11 attacks at the same location, see World Trade Center.

"Freedom Tower" redirects here. For other uses, see Freedom Tower (disambiguation).

One World Trade Center

 

One World Trade Center on July 30, 2013.

Alternative names

1 WTC

Freedom Tower (pre-2009)[1]

General information

StatusTopped out, Interior furnishing and exterior under construction

TypeOffice, observation, communication

Architectural styleContemporary modern

Location72 Vesey Street

New York City, NY 10048

Coordinates40°42′46.8″N 74°0′48.6″WCoordinates: 40°42′46.8″N 74°0′48.6″W

Construction startedApril 27, 2006[2]

OpeningJanuary 2014[3][4]

CostUS$3.9 billion (April 2012 estimate)[5][6]

Height

Architectural1,776 ft (541.3 m)[3][7]

Tip1,792 ft (546.2 m)[3]

Roof1,368 ft (417.0 m)

Top floor1,268 ft (386.5 m)[3]

Observatory1,254 ft (382.2 m)[3]

Technical details

Floor count104 (+5 basement floors)[3]

Floor area3,501,274 sq ft (325,279 m2)[3]

Lifts/elevators73[3]

Design and construction

ArchitectDavid Childs (Skidmore, Owings & Merrill)[8]

DeveloperPort Authority of New York and New Jersey[3]

Structural engineerWSP Cantor Seinuk

Main contractorTishman Construction

References

[3][9]

Rebuilding of the

World Trade Center

One World Trade Center

2 World Trade Center

3 World Trade Center

4 World Trade Center

5 World Trade Center

6 World Trade Center

7 World Trade Center

National September 11 Memorial & Museum

Transportation Hub

v t e

One World Trade Center (also 1 World Trade Center or 1 WTC, also known as the Freedom Tower) is the primary building of the new World Trade Center complex in New York City's Lower Manhattan and is the tallest building in the United States and Western Hemisphere. The 104-story supertall skyscraper stands on the northwest corner of the 16-acre (6.5 ha) World Trade Center site, on the site of the original 6 World Trade Center. The building is bordered to the west by West Street, to the north by Vesey Street, to the south by Fulton Street, and to the east by Washington Street. Construction on below-ground utility relocations, footings, and foundations for the building began on April 27, 2006.[10] On March 30, 2009, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey confirmed that the building would be known by its legal name, One World Trade Center, rather than the colloquial name, Freedom Tower.[1]

The tower's steel structure topped out on August 30, 2012.[4][11] On May 10, 2013, the final component of the skyscraper's spire was installed, making One World Trade Center the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere and the fourth-tallest skyscraper in the world by pinnacle height. Its spire reaches a symbolic height of 1,776 feet (541 m) in reference to the year of the United States Declaration of Independence.[12][13][14] It has been the tallest structure in New York City since April 30, 2012, when it surpassed the height of the Empire State Building.[15][16] The new World Trade Center complex will also feature three other high-rise office buildings, located along Greenwich Street, and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, located just south of One World Trade Center, where the Twin Towers once stood. The construction is part of an effort to memorialize and rebuild following the destruction of the original World Trade Center complex during the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

620 S. SANTA FE AVE

PriceN/AProperty Use TypeVacant/Owner-User

Building Size1,200 SFNo. Stories1

Property TypeRetailLot Size16,117 SF

Property Sub-typeService/Gas Station

Listing ID: 14809476Date Created: 09/25/2006Last Updated: 11/17/2006

DESCRIPTION

Service Station, which includes the Land & Building with 5 pumps & approximately 1200 SqFt building, on a 0.37 Acres lot (16117 SqFt). The current lease will expire in September 30, 2008, with no renewal option. Property is part of the development plan of City of Vista and is zonned Commercial Downtown.

 

HWY 78, Exit Escondido Ave., Go North, Left on S. Santa Fe Ave.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

THE OFFERING

PriceUpon RequestNo. Stories1

Property TypeRetailParking Ratio2/1,000 SF

Property Sub-typeService StationNo. Drive In / Grade-Level Doors1

Building ClassBZoning DescriptionC2

Lot Size0.37 ACAPN / Parcel ID179-040-25

Gross Leasable Area3,000 SF

Listing ID: 16262913 Date Created: 6/6/2019 Last Updated: 6/17/2019

A wide shot looking north at construction underway to replace the south end of the Alaskan Way Viaduct in Seattle. A portion of the support pier in the center of the image will be removed during a full closure of the viaduct over the June 11-12 weekend. Crews are constructing bracing and driving support piles to reinforce the structure after the section of the pier is removed. Learn more about construction underway to replace the south end of the Alaskan Way Viaduct.

Indian Vegetarian Restaurant

charcoal, heat, fire, grill, orange, yellow, ash, burning, cooking, hot, outdoors, night, flame, coals, red-hot

Blue Shieldbug in the Kingmoor Sidings Nature Reserve (Area 3), Carlisle, 12 November 16.

 

Blue Shieldbug on a red leaf!

 

One lesson I've learned about finding shieldbugs this late in the year is to know where the sun is going to be shining at any given time on any given sunny day. My favoured spot in Kingmoor Sidings is a small embankment, sheltered on three sides, but with a completely open aspect to the south. Even in November it catches the sun from mid-morning to mid-afternoon, and it's where I've been finding some of my late Spiked Shieldbugs. No luck on that front this morning, but in addition to this Blue Shieldbug I found several Greens - both nymphs and adults - and a Sloe Bug within minutes of arriving!

 

Interestingly, this is an area of the reserve where I've not seen this species before. Also, with the exception of a pair found in Area 2 on 5/12/14, it's my latest Blue Shieldbug sighting to date.

The sidewalk and curb are removed and the material underneath is excavated to a depth of five feet.

Sloe Bug in the Kingmoor Sidings Nature Reserve, Carlisle, 21 November 15.

 

Despite low temperatures and a noticeable breeze this was still the best day for about three weeks, and this sunbathing Sloe Bug was making the most of it! A Hawthorn Shieldbug was also found in a shady spot nearby.

 

Earlier in the day I'd spent a few hours at Sowerby Wood but with the exception of a few Gorse Shieldbugs nothing of note was found - in particular, there was no sign of the Bronze Shieldbug nymphs last seen here on 1 November. The most promising - ie sunniest - of the Blue Shieldbug hotspots in Kingmoor North was also checked out, but with null result.

Snow scene. Spring control, Area 3. Southern Oregon Northern California (SONC) pine beetle control project. Fremont National Forest, Oregon.

 

Photo by: F.P. Keen

Date: April 5, 1923

 

Credit: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection.

Collection: Bureau of Entomology and F.P. Keen Collections; La Grande, Oregon.

Image: BUR-3216 and FPK-2

 

To learn more about this photo collection see:

Wickman, B.E., Torgersen, T.R. and Furniss, M.M. 2002. Photographic images and history of forest insect investigations on the Pacific Slope, 1903-1953. Part 2. Oregon and Washington. American Entomologist, 48(3), p. 178-185.

 

For related historical information see:

www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/21476

Wickman, Boyd E. 2005. Harry E. Burke and John M. Miller, pioneers in Western forest entomology. General Technical Report. PNW-GTR-638. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 163 p.

 

For additional historical forest entomology photos, stories, and resources see the Western Forest Insect Work Conference site: wfiwc.org/content/history-and-resources

 

Image provided by USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection: www.fs.usda.gov/main/r6/forest-grasslandhealth

Office area using Ikea Vika Amon tabletops, two 2x4 Expedit bookcases laying on sides and one 1x5 Expedit bookcase. Custom wall divider made from over 1100 feet of sisal rope, hand made custom frame to double as divider and cat ladder.

Tokyo SkyTree Tower and surroundings....

Bowman (A. Smith) Distillery, 1890 Old Reston Avenue

ca 1890-92

 

According to redfin.com, the distillery sold for $540,000 on July 20, 2010

www.redfin.com/VA/Reston/1890-Old-Reston-Ave-20190/home/9...

 

LOT SIZE: 10,212 Sq. Ft

 

From Fairfax County Comprehensive Plan - 2007 Edition, Amended through 3-9-2010:

 

"...Lake Anne Village and Bowman Distillery are significant heritage resources listed in the Fairfax County Inventory of Historic Sites. A list and map of heritage resources are included in the Upper Potomac Planning District Overview section, Figures 4, 5 and 6. Additional historic sites in this sector are also included in the inventory. Bowman Distillery is also listed in the Virginia Landmarks Register and the National Register of Historic Places. Lake Anne Village is protected by a County Historic Overlay District."

www.fairfaxcounty.gov/dpz/comprehensiveplan/area3/upperpo...

 

Interesting article about Bowman Distillery for sale (posted June, 2008) on Restonian blog, with comments:

www.restonian.org/2008/06/reston-real-estate-ole-distille....

  

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A._Smith_Bowman_Distillery

  

Area 3 survey crew. L-R: Max England, W.J. Buckhorn, and F.P. Keen. Southern Oregon-Northern California bark beetle control project. Modoc National Forest, California.

 

Photo by: F.P. Keen

Date: 1927

 

Credit: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection.

Collection: Bureau of Entomology, F.P. Keen Collection; La Grande, Oregon.

Image: FPK-343

 

To learn more about this photo collection see:

Wickman, B.E., Torgersen, T.R. and Furniss, M.M. 2002. Photographic images and history of forest insect investigations on the Pacific Slope, 1903-1953. Part 2. Oregon and Washington. American Entomologist, 48(3), p. 178-185.

 

For related historical information see:

www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/21476

Wickman, Boyd E. 2005. Harry E. Burke and John M. Miller, pioneers in Western forest entomology. General Technical Report. PNW-GTR-638. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 163 p.

 

For additional historical forest entomology photos, stories, and resources see the Western Forest Insect Work Conference site: wfiwc.org/content/history-and-resources

 

Image provided by USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection: www.fs.usda.gov/main/r6/forest-grasslandhealth

Area 3 survey crew. L-R: F.P. Keen, Max England, and W.J. Buckhorn. Southern Oregon-Northern California bark beetle control project. Modoc National Forest, California.

 

Photo by: F.P. Keen

Date: 1927

 

Credit: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection.

Collection: Bureau of Entomology, F.P. Keen Collection; La Grande, Oregon.

Image: FPK-344

 

To learn more about this photo collection see:

Wickman, B.E., Torgersen, T.R. and Furniss, M.M. 2002. Photographic images and history of forest insect investigations on the Pacific Slope, 1903-1953. Part 2. Oregon and Washington. American Entomologist, 48(3), p. 178-185.

 

For related historical information see:

www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/21476

Wickman, Boyd E. 2005. Harry E. Burke and John M. Miller, pioneers in Western forest entomology. General Technical Report. PNW-GTR-638. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 163 p.

 

For additional historical forest entomology photos, stories, and resources see the Western Forest Insect Work Conference site: wfiwc.org/content/history-and-resources

 

Image provided by USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection: www.fs.usda.gov/main/r6/forest-grasslandhealth

Flamboyant trees form part of the foilage over this road in Area 3 of Lilongwe

picnic and grilling area located next to the river

La Luna es el único satélite natural de la Tierra y el quinto satélite más grande del Sistema Solar. Es el satélite natural más grande en el Sistema Solar en relación al tamaño de su planeta, un cuarto del diámetro de la Tierra y 1/81 de su masa, y es el segundo satélite más denso después de Ío. Se encuentra en relación síncrona con la Tierra, siempre mostrando la misma cara a la Tierra.

 

This article is about Earth's Moon. For moons in general, see Natural satellite. For other uses, see Moon (disambiguation).

 

The Moon

 

Full moon as seen from Earth's northern hemisphere

Designations

Alternative namesLuna, Selene

Adjectivelunar, selenic

Orbital characteristics

Perigee362,570 km / 225,291 miles

(0.0024 AU)

Apogee405,410 km / 251,910 miles

(0.0027 AU)

Semi-major axis384,399 km / 238,854 miles (0.00257 AU)[1]

Eccentricity0.0549[1]

Orbital period27.321582 d (27 d 7 h 43.1 min[1])

Synodic period29.530589 d (29 d 12 h 44 min 2.9 s)

Average orbital speed1.022 km/s

Inclination5.145° to the ecliptic[2] (between 18.29° and 28.58° to Earth's equator)[1]

Longitude of ascending noderegressing by one revolution in 18.6 years

Argument of perigeeprogressing by one revolution in 8.85 years

Satellite ofEarth

Physical characteristics

Mean radius1,737.10 km (0.273 Earths)[1][3]

Equatorial radius1,738.14 km (0.273 Earths)[3]

Polar radius1,735.97 km (0.273 Earths)[3]

Flattening0.00125

Circumference10,921 km (equatorial)

Surface area3.793 × 107 km2 (0.074 Earths)

Volume2.1958 × 1010 km3 (0.020 Earths)

Mass7.3477 × 1022 kg (0.0123 Earths[1])

Mean density3.3464 g/cm3[1]

Equatorial surface gravity1.622 m/s2 (0.165 4 g)

Escape velocity2.38 km/s

Sidereal rotation period27.321582 d (synchronous)

Equatorial rotation velocity4.627 m/s

Axial tilt1.5424° (to ecliptic)

6.687° (to orbit plane)[2]

Albedo0.136[4]

Surface temp.minmeanmax

equator100 K220 K390 K

85°N[5]70 K130 K230 K

Apparent magnitude−2.5 to −12.9[a]

−12.74 (mean full moon)[3]

Angular diameter29.3 to 34.1 arcminutes[3][b]

Atmosphere[6]

Surface pressure10−7 Pa (day)

10−10 Pa (night)[c]

CompositionAr, He, Na, K, H, Rn

The Moon is the only natural satellite of the Earth,[d][7] and the fifth largest satellite in the Solar System. It is the largest natural satellite of a planet in the Solar System relative to the size of its primary,[e] having 27% the diameter and 60% the density of Earth, resulting in 1⁄81 its mass. The Moon is the second densest satellite after Io, a satellite of Jupiter.

Beetle control camp near Owens Ranch, Area 3. Southern Oregon Northern California (SONC) control project.

 

Photo by: F.P. Keen

Date: Spring 1922

 

Credit: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection.

Collection: Bureau of Entomology and F.P. Keen Collections; La Grande, Oregon.

Image: BUR-3214 and FPK-94

 

To learn more about this photo collection see:

Wickman, B.E., Torgersen, T.R. and Furniss, M.M. 2002. Photographic images and history of forest insect investigations on the Pacific Slope, 1903-1953. Part 2. Oregon and Washington. American Entomologist, 48(3), p. 178-185.

 

For related historical information see:

www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/21476

Wickman, Boyd E. 2005. Harry E. Burke and John M. Miller, pioneers in Western forest entomology. General Technical Report. PNW-GTR-638. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 163 p.

 

For additional historical forest entomology photos, stories, and resources see the Western Forest Insect Work Conference site: wfiwc.org/content/history-and-resources

 

Image provided by USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection: www.fs.usda.gov/main/r6/forest-grasslandhealth

Soldiers from the Polish Land Forces join 'Sky Soldiers' of U.S. Army Europe's 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team for a parachute jump into the Hohenfels (Germany) Training Area as part of the brigade's ongoing Full-Spectrum Training Exercise, Oct. 5. More than 100 Polish troops were among the appriximately 650 paratroopers who participated in this morning jump, while another 650 'Sky Soldiers' are scheduled to jump later in the day. (Photo by Richard Bumgardner)

 

Snow scene. Spring control, Area 3. Southern Oregon Northern California (SONC) pine beetle control project. Fremont National Forest, Oregon.

 

Photo by: F.P. Keen

Date: April 5, 1923

 

Credit: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection.

Collection: Bureau of Entomology and F.P. Keen Collections; La Grande, Oregon.

Image: BUR-3217 and FPK-3

 

To learn more about this photo collection see:

Wickman, B.E., Torgersen, T.R. and Furniss, M.M. 2002. Photographic images and history of forest insect investigations on the Pacific Slope, 1903-1953. Part 2. Oregon and Washington. American Entomologist, 48(3), p. 178-185.

 

For related historical information see:

www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/21476

Wickman, Boyd E. 2005. Harry E. Burke and John M. Miller, pioneers in Western forest entomology. General Technical Report. PNW-GTR-638. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 163 p.

 

For additional historical forest entomology photos, stories, and resources see the Western Forest Insect Work Conference site: wfiwc.org/content/history-and-resources

 

Image provided by USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection: www.fs.usda.gov/main/r6/forest-grasslandhealth

SOMN athletes competed at the Area 3 gymnastics competition on Sunday, June 2, 2013 in Duluth, Minn.

Area 3 survey crew. L-R: Max England, F.P. Keen, and W.J. Buckhorn. Southern Oregon-Northern California bark beetle control project. Modoc National Forest, California.

 

Photo by: F.P. Keen

Date: August 1927

 

Credit: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection.

Collection: Bureau of Entomology, F.P. Keen Collection; La Grande, Oregon.

Image: FPK-345

 

To learn more about this photo collection see:

Wickman, B.E., Torgersen, T.R. and Furniss, M.M. 2002. Photographic images and history of forest insect investigations on the Pacific Slope, 1903-1953. Part 2. Oregon and Washington. American Entomologist, 48(3), p. 178-185.

 

For related historical information see:

www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/21476

Wickman, Boyd E. 2005. Harry E. Burke and John M. Miller, pioneers in Western forest entomology. General Technical Report. PNW-GTR-638. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 163 p.

 

For additional historical forest entomology photos, stories, and resources see the Western Forest Insect Work Conference site: wfiwc.org/content/history-and-resources

 

Image provided by USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection: www.fs.usda.gov/main/r6/forest-grasslandhealth

Publisher: Lafreri, Antonio

Publication Date: before 1558

Huelsen Number: Hu 19a (cf. also p.127)

 

Text (lower left): THEATRUM SIVE COLISEUM ROMANUM

Translation: Roman Theatre or Colisseum

 

Signature: ANT. LAFRERI SEQUANI FORMIS

Location (creation): [Rome]

Measurements: 30.2 x 41.0 cm plate mark on 23.0 x 33.3 cm

References: A-B p.160, n.1585 (with different dimensions)

Techniques: Engraving

 

URL: speculum.lib.uchicago.edu/search.php?search%5B0%5D=Coloss...

 

Lafreri, Antonio Publisher before 1558 1558 Hu 19a (cf. also p.127) B 181 lower left THEATRUM SIVE COLISEUM ROMANUM THEATRUM SIVE COLISEUM ROMANUM Roman Theatre or Colisseum lower right ANT. LAFRERI SEQUANI FORMIS [Rome] Special Collections Research Center, University of Chicago DG62.5.L2 Chicago United States 30.2 x 41.0 cm plate mark on 23.0 x 33.3 cm 30.2 41.0 23.0 33.3 A-B p.160, n.1585 (with different dimensions) Engraving Engraving

Area 3 survey crew. L-R: Max England, F.P. Keen, and W.J. Buckhorn. Southern Oregon-Northern California bark beetle control project. Modoc National Forest, California.

 

(Is that a hand-crank phonograph between Keen and Buckhorn?)

 

Photo by: F.P. Keen

Date: August 1927

 

Credit: USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection.

Collection: Bureau of Entomology, F.P. Keen Collection; La Grande, Oregon.

Image: FPK-345

 

Note: This image has the same number but is slightly different than the image on the photo card with the same number.

 

To learn more about this photo collection see:

Wickman, B.E., Torgersen, T.R. and Furniss, M.M. 2002. Photographic images and history of forest insect investigations on the Pacific Slope, 1903-1953. Part 2. Oregon and Washington. American Entomologist, 48(3), p. 178-185.

 

For related historical information see:

www.treesearch.fs.fed.us/pubs/21476

Wickman, Boyd E. 2005. Harry E. Burke and John M. Miller, pioneers in Western forest entomology. General Technical Report. PNW-GTR-638. Portland, OR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station. 163 p.

 

For additional historical forest entomology photos, stories, and resources see the Western Forest Insect Work Conference site: wfiwc.org/content/history-and-resources

 

Image provided by USDA Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region, State and Private Forestry, Forest Health Protection: www.fs.usda.gov/main/r6/forest-grasslandhealth

Villa Shinta Dewi, named after one of the main mythical figures from the Ramayana in Indonesian folklore, is available to Bali holiday makers searching for an outstanding luxury villa. Located in the most fashionable part of Seminyak, close to beach, restaurants and the trendy shopping district, the design, and interiors, are sure to please the most discerning of holiday visitors.

 

The four tastefully decorated, air-conditioned, ensuite bedrooms, large open sided dining room, spacious upstairs and downstairs lounges, the cozy air-conditioned study and the small but well equipped fitness room overlook a generous pool and lush tropical garden areas. The poolside sun beds and two lounges offer guests the choice of sun or shade throughout the day. Enjoy the soft tropical breezes in the upstairs lounge, truly a place to relax. The trained staff of this beautiful modern Balinese villa look forward to welcoming the villas many guests on their Bali vacation.

 

Please Visit our Official Website: www.bali-individually.com/villas. If you have questions or need assistance with a reservation, please call or click to chat online or send us e-mail for inquiry, the best price and packages: sales@bali-individually.com | Telp. +62 - 361-7415637 | text message: +62-81338579071 | facebook: www.facebook.com/pages/Bali-Villa-Reservation/251116974245

exercise, fitness, woman, machine, stretch, workout, fit, running, training, runner, sport, gym, healthy, athlete, muscles

The Qaitbay Citadel in Alexandria is considered one of the most important defensive strongholds, not only in Egypt, but also along the Mediterranean Sea coast. It formulated an important part of the fortification system of Alexandria in the 15th century AD.

 

The Citadel is situated at the entrance of the eastern harbour on the eastern point of the Pharos Island. It was erected on the exact site of the famous Lighthouse of Alexandria, which was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The lighthouse continued to function until the time of the Arab conquest, then several disasters occurred and the shape of the lighthouse was changed to some extent, but it still continued to function. Restoration began in the period of Ahmed Ibn Tulun (about 880 AD). During the 11th century an earthquake occurred, causing damage to the octagonal part. The bottom survived, but it could only serve as a watchtower, and a small mosque was built on the top. In the 14th century there was a very destructive earthquake and the whole building was completely destroyed.

 

About 1480 AD, the Mameluke Sultan Al-Ashraf Qaitbay fortified the place as part of his coastal defensive edifices against the Turks, who were threatening Egypt at that time. He built the fortress and placed a mosque inside it. The Citadel continued to function during most of the Mameluke period, the Ottoman period and the Modern period, but after the British bombardment of the city of Alexandria in 1882, it was kept out of the spotlight. It became neglected until the 20th century, when it was restored several times by the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities.

Itaqui.

Municipio de Itaqui

"El Portal del Río Bravo"

Uruguay Río a la puesta del sol (fondo, ciudades de Alvear y La Cruz (Corrientes) Argentina)

Uruguay Río a la puesta del sol (fondo, ciudades de Alvear y La Cruz (Corrientes) Argentina)

bandera Itaqui

Escudo de Itaqui

banderaescudo de armas

himno

fundaciónDe 6 de diciembre de 1858 (157 años)

gentilitaquiense

Alcalde (a)Gil Marques Filho ( PDT )

(2013-2016)

ubicación

Localización de Itaqui

Localización de Itaqui en Rio Grande do Sul

Itaqui se encuentra en: Brasil

Itaqui

Localización de Itaqui en Brasil

29 ° 07 '30 "S 56 ° 33' 10" El

unidad federal Río Grande del Sur

mesorregiónRio Grande suroeste IBGE / 2008 [1]

microcampaña occidental IBGE / 2008 [1]

municipios vecinosAlegrete , Macambara , Manoel Viana , San Borja , Uruguaiana , La Cruz y Alvear - Argentina

Distancia a la capital de670 km

características geográficas

área3 404.047 km² [2]

población38 166 habitantes. IBGE Censo / 2010 [3]

densidad11.21 hab./km²

altitud57 m

climasubtropical

Huso horarioUTC-3

indicadores

HDI0.801 muy alta PNUD / 2000 [4]

PIBR $ 690,055247 millones IBGE / 2008 [5]

PIB per cápitaR $ 18 de 706,26 IBGE / 2008 [5]

web oficial

Itaqui es un municipio de Brasil 's estado de Rio Grande do Sul , que se encuentra en las orillas del río Uruguay , en la frontera de las ciudades de Alegrete , Macambara , Manoel Viana , San Borja , Uruguaiana , La Cruz y Alvear - Argentina

Historia [ editar | fuente editar ]

Al principio, el guaraní ocupó las cuencas del río Ibicuí . Su primer contacto con los europeos fue a través de una misión jesuita español en 1700 . La intensificación en el siglo siguiente a la liquidación se estaba desarrollando en conjunto con la actividad ganadera , a una economía de la región.

En el lugar donde hoy se encuentra la ciudad de Itaqui, que se hizo el primer asentamiento por el jesuita reducción o misiones de La Cruz (hoy localidad Argentina ), alrededor del año 1657 . Sólo a principios del siglo XIX que fue incorporado a la tierra portuguesa , y en 1802 la primera se concedieron asignaciones .

José Gervasio Artigas , en general y protector de la Liga Federal ( 1764 - 1850 ), la intención de reanudar la tierra de misión, empezando por el territorio de Itaqui. Encontró allí alrededor de tres ranchos y trece hombres que se asentaron con sus 1.600 indios . Este intento de mantenerse duró poco, porque llegó un destacamento militar, con el fin de expulsarlo, acampado en Cambaí corriente.

  

Una inundación obligó a buscar en otra parte, siendo elegido en lo que hoy es la ciudad de Itaqui. Esto fue en 1821 , y pronto llegó a varias familias de ese lugar. Durante la Revolución Farroupilha destacamento militar se encuentra en Itaqui, por lo que el líder Giuseppe Garibaldi, cuando se dirigió a la ciudad de Uruguaiana a la ciudad de San Borja, cruzó el río Uruguay en la ciudad de Uruguaiana, pasando por Argetina a la ciudad Santo Tomé, donde hay novemente cruzaron el río Uruguay a la ciudad de San Borja, debido a la existencia de un destacamento militar en tales Itaqui.

Así Itaqui nunca fue escenario de luchas farroupilhas, puede haber habido conflictos armados en su territorio en la frontera con los municipios de Uruguaiana y Sao Borja, o incluso dentro de estos municipios, el destacamento estaba en Itaqui.

De acuerdo con la Ley 419 del 6 de diciembre de 1858 , Itaqui se separó del municipio de San Borja . En ese momento la población de la localidad era de unos cuatro mil habitantes.

Itaqui fue de nuevo luchando acampar en la Guerra del Paraguay , cuando sus hombres tuvieron la oportunidad de enfrentarse a los soldados de Francisco Solano López , presidente de Paraguay .

En mayo de 1879 fue elevada a la categoría de ciudad. Inicialmente, el nombre era San Patricio de Itaqui, en honor a la patrona , a continuación, simplificado para Itaqui.

Origen del nombre Itaqui [ editar | fuente editar ]

El nombre del lugar tiene su origen etimológico en el idioma guaraní y se compone de dos términos: ita, piedra , y ku'i, arena y suave.

Probablemente el origen del nombre corresponde a las características físicas de la piedra roja existente en la ciudad y en las orillas del río Uruguay, que están llenos de buenas piedras para afilar cuchillos y herramientas utilizadas por los indios guaraníes, creando así el nombre de Itaqui, que significa piedra blanda "piedra de agua", adecuado para afilar.

  

También en el siglo XIX que fue desmembrado otros dos municipios estas tierras: San Francisco de Asís y Santiago , y más tarde Macambara.

  

Primero Reducción jesuítica guaraní del Rio Grande do Sul [ editar | Editar origen ]

Itaqui fue la primera reducción jesuítica guaraní de Rio Grande do Sul , con fecha del año 1657 , cuando en el momento de los sacerdotes de la ciudad argentina de La Cruz transponen el río Uruguay y fundaron esta reducción, he aquí, ¡cuán grande era el número de lados indios guaraníes brasileño, habiendo sido varias capillas y casas construidas, los sacerdotes y jesuitas indios.

  

Se destaca en su territorio el túnel misionera que tiene su extremo en las orillas del río Uruguay, y al otro lado del río en las orillas de la ciudad argentina de La Cruz, comienza otro túnel misionero, que lleva directamente a la ciudad de La cruzar.

  

Hubo varios cementerios guaraní en la ciudad de Itaqui, donde los edificios se construyeron en la parte superior de dichos sitios, como en los bloques amanecer, City College Escuela de Estado Otávio Silveira Dr. Roque DeGrazia, entre otros. Entre los cementerios guaraníes ubicadas en el interior, podemos mencionar el Curucu, Santo Cristo y la gran cementerio situado en la granja melocotón, esto ya no existe.

  

Varias pequeñas capillas Misiones existían en la ciudad de Itaqui, así como estatuas de varios santos y sillas de sacerdotes, entre otros objetos, todos ellos preparados por los indios guaraníes, que eran parte de la antigua Iglesia de San Patricio, antes de ser destruida y el sitio se construyó la actual Iglesia de San Patricio.

  

En territorio itaquiense destaca varios pueblos guaraníes , que ahora están designados como distritos , parte también, la ciudad de Macambara . Por lo tanto, podemos mencionar los antiguos pueblos indígenas Macambara, San Donato, San Canuto, Santo Cristo, Curucu, Itao, Borore, entre otros.

  

Todavía existe en la ciudad para albergar a los sacerdotes jesuitas situadas en la esquina de la calle Bento Gonçalves con José de Alencar Castello Branco Avenue, la misma reforma.

  

Hay varios sitios arqueológicos en el interior, puede haber la mayor colección arqueológica guaraní y otras culturas indígenas, pero por desgracia no hay estudios de este tipo de materiales, que están en el campo.

  

El río Ibicuí fue el hito de gran divisor Nación Guaraní, ya que estos indios tenían sus territorios empezando en el territorio itaquiense, que se encuentra por encima del río Ibicuí, por debajo de este río eran otras naciones indígenas.

  

El general José Gervasio Artigas , un descendiente de indios guaraníes, trató de reanudar la tierra de misión, invadiendo primero, en Brasil, Itaqui Pueblo - Reducción jesuítica guaraní Primera de Rio Grande do Sul.

  

Geografía [ editar | fuente editar ]

Se encuentra a una latitud 29º07'31 " sur y longitud 56º33'11" oeste , con una altitud de 57 metros.

  

Tiene una superficie de 3405.7 kilómetros cuadrados y una población estimada en 2004 era de 41 902 habitantes.

  

Clima [ editar | Editar origen ]

De acuerdo con el Instituto Nacional de Meteorología (INMET), para el período comprendido entre 1961 y 1983, la más baja temperatura registrada en Itaqui fue -2.5 ° C el 20 de julio de 1962, [6] y la más alta alcanzó 39,9 ° C el 25 de enero de 1964. [7] La mayor acumulado de lluvia en 24 horas fue de 182,9 mm, el 12 de mayo de 1975. acumularon otros grandes eran de 118,3 mm de 7 de febrero de 1970 116, 8 mm, el 27 de noviembre de 1978, 116,5 mm el 17 de febrero de 1969, 116,5 mm de cada 13 mayo de 1975 112 mm, el 24 de enero de 1966, 109,1 mm el 13 de junio, 1969 , 106,4 mm de cada 3 de febrero de 1970 106 mm el 14 de septiembre, 1977 y 101,7 mm en 6 de febrero de 1970. [8]

 

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 65 66