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USA surfer Patrick Gudauskas at the Bells Beach Rip Curl Pro World Surfing League event yesterday.

Michel Bourez (PYF) advanced directly to Round Three of the Tahiti Pro 2018 after winning Heat 8 of Round 1 at Teahupoo, French Polynesia

Australian surfing legend Mick Fanning during his heat of the Bells Beach Rip Curl Pro World Surfing League event yesterday.

 

Explored 31 Mar 2018 # 229

FACTS ! In 1966..................................................................................

Austria won the Eurovision song contest.

Atletico Madrid won the Spanish league title.

Real Madrid won the European cup.

ENGLAND won the world cup.

 

IN 2014

Austria won the Eurovision song contest.

Atletico Madrid won the Spanish league title.

Real Madrid won the European cup

ENGLAND........?

First Cape Hatteras lighthouse was built in 1802 and lit in 1803

An addition was made, between 1845 and 1854, to add height to the structure

Present tower at Cape Hatteras was built in 1870

It cost $150,000 to complete at that time

The current Cape Hatteras lighthouse is America’s tallest lighthouse at 198 feet high.

There are a total of 257 steps to the top

It took 1.25 million bricks to build the tower

Coast Survey Chart: 35 15 ‘ 32 ” N latitude, 75 31′ 44″ W longitude

Light is still operational day and night and visible for 20 mile.

Over 175,000 tourists visit the tower each year to climb the structure

Cape Hatteras is also the worlds tallest brick lighthouse

www.carolinalights.com/north-carolina-lighthouses/cape-ha...

2014 World Champion Gabriel Medina (BRA) advances directly to Round 3 of the 2018 Oi Rio Pro after winning Heat 5 of Round 1 at Barrinha, Saquarema, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Defending event winner Owen Wright (AUS) advances to Round 4 of the Quiksilver Pro Gold Coast after winning Heat 1 of Round 3 at Snapper Rocks, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia.

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

Lofoten (Norse Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is ló (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with a foot of a lynx. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "the foot of a wolf", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000[ yrs in Lofoten, and] the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BC.

The town of Vågan (Norse Vágar) is the first known town formation in northern Norway. It existed in the early Viking Age, maybe earlier, and was located on the southern coast on eastern Lofoten, near today's village Kabelvåg in Vågan municipality. However, the Lofotr Viking Museum with the reconstructed 83-meter-long longhouse (the largest known) is located near Borg on Vestvågøy, which have many archeological finds from the Iron Age and Viking Age.

The islands have for more than 1,000 years been the centre of great cod fisheries, especially in winter, when the cod migrates south from the Barents Sea and gathers in Lofoten to spawn. Bergen in southwestern Norway was for a long time the hub for further export south to large parts of Europe, particularly so when trade was controlled by the Hanseatic League. In the lowland areas, particularly Vestvågøy, agriculture plays a significant role, as it has done since the Bronze Age.

Lofotr was originally the name of the island of Vestvågøy only. Later it became the name of the chain of islands. The chain of islands with its pointed peaks looks like a lynx foot from the mainland. In Norwegian, it is always a singular. Another name one might come across, is "Lofotveggen" or the Lofoten wall. The archipelago looks like a closed wall when seen from elevated points around Bodø or when arriving from the sea, some 100 km long, and 800-1,000 m. high.

In 1941 the islands were raided by British Commandos during Operation Claymore in March and a subsequent diversionary attack to support the Vaagso raid in December.

Lofoten is located at the 68th and 69th parallels north of the Arctic Circle in North Norway. It is well known for its natural beauty within Norway. Lofoten encompasses the municipalities of Vågan, Vestvågøy, Flakstad, Moskenes, Værøy, and Røst. The principal islands, running from north to south, are

Southern tip of Hinnøya.

Southern 60% (approx.) of Austvågøy (526.7 km² in total 68°20′N 14°40′E),

Gimsøy (46.4 km² 68°18′N 14°11′E),

Vestvågøy (411.1 km² 68°10′N 13°45′E),

Flakstadøya (109.8 km² 68°5′N 13°20′E),

Moskenesøya (185.9 km² 67°55′N 13°0′E),

whilst further to the south are the small and isolated islands of Værøy (67°40′N 12°40′E) and Røst (67°37′N 12°7′E). The total land area amounts to 1,227 km², and the population totals 24,500. Many will argue that Hinnøya, the northern part of Austvågøy and several hundred smaller islands, skerries and rocks to the east of Austvågøy are also part of the Lofoten complex. Historically the territorial definition of Lofoten has changed significantly. Between the mainland and the Lofoten archipelago lies the vast, open Vestfjorden, and to the north is Vesterålen. The principal towns in Lofoten are Leknes in Vestvågøy and Svolvær in Vågan. The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. The highest mountain in Lofoten is Higravstinden (1,161 m / 3,800 ft) in Austvågøy; the Møysalen National Park just northeast of Lofoten has mountains reaching 1,262 meters. The famous Moskstraumen (Malstrøm) system of tidal eddies is located in western Lofoten, and is indeed the root of the term maelstrom.

The sea is rich with life, and the world's largest deep water coral reefis located west of Røst. Lofoten has a very high density of sea eagles and cormorants, and millions of other sea birds, among them the colourful puffin. Otters are common, and there are moose on the largest islands. There are some woodlands with Downy birch and Rowan. There are no native conifer forests in Lofoten, but some small areas with private spruce plantations. Sorbus hybrida ("Rowan whitebeam") and Malus sylvestris occur in Lofoten, but not further north.

The animals mistaken as the extinct Great Auk turned out to be some of the nine King penguins released around Norway’s Lofoten Islands in August 1936, there until at least 1944.

Winter temperatures in Lofoten are very mild considering their location north of the Arctic Circle – Lofoten has the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. This is a result of the Gulf Stream and its extensions: the North Atlantic Current and the Norwegian Current. Røst and Værøy are the most northerly locations in the world where average temperatures are above freezing all year. May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4°C (87°F).

Strong winds can occur in late autumn and winter. Snow and sleet are not uncommon in winter, the mountains can have substantial amounts of snow, and in some winters, avalanches might come down from steep mountain slopes. Two of the top ten deadliest rainstorms ever recorded passed through Lofoten.

In Svolvær, the sun is above the horizon continuously ("midnight sun") from 25 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 4 December to 7 January. In Leknes, the sun is above the horizon from 26 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 9 December to 4 January.

The temperature in the sea has been recorded since 1935. At 1 m depth in the sea near Skrova, water temperatures varies from a low of 3°C in March to 14°C in August. Some years peaking above 17°C. November is around 7-8°C. At a depth of 200 m the temperature is near 8°C all year.

Mountaineering and rock climbing

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøya and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya is the most complete area for climbing. For more information, see the books by Dyer and Webster.

Surfing

Unstad is one of its better known locations for surfing.

Cycling

There is a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north. The route is part public road, part cycle-path with the option to bypass all of the tunnels by either cycle-path (tunnels through mountains) or boat. Traffic is generally light, although in July there may be a lot of campervans. Some of the more remote sections are on gravel roads. There is a dedicated cycling ferry which sails between Ballstad and Nusfjord, allowing cyclists to avoid the long, steep Nappstraum tunnel. The route hugs the coastline for most of its length where it is generally flat. As it turns inland through the mountain passes there are a couple of 3-400 meter climbs.

The Lofoten Insomnia Cycling Race takes place every year around midsummer, possible in the midnight sun, but surely in 24-hr daylight, along the whole Lofoten archipelago.

 

View On Black

I miss Florida, my home for 58 yrs. One of these days "it is my dream" that my daughter in the Army will be stationed at MacDill & we will move back to the Gulf coast that I love.....

St. Pete Beach, Florida is a great place to stay if you enjoy the beautiful & pristine beaches of the Gulf coast of Florida. My favorite place is Ft Desoto Park, which is located about 15 minutes south of St Pete Beach. We didn't make it there for an afternoon. Hopefully the next time. I've always felt the Gulf coast is "valium for the restless soul."

 

I took the original image into Photoshop CS, then used the ReDynaMix (my favorite plug-in )on it & played with it until I got the look that I wanted.

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

 

Lofoten (Norse Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is ló (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with a foot of a lynx. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "the foot of a wolf", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

 

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000[ yrs in Lofoten, and] the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BC.

 

The town of Vågan (Norse Vágar) is the first known town formation in northern Norway. It existed in the early Viking Age, maybe earlier, and was located on the southern coast on eastern Lofoten, near today's village Kabelvåg in Vågan municipality. However, the Lofotr Viking Museum with the reconstructed 83-meter-long longhouse (the largest known) is located near Borg on Vestvågøy, which have many archeological finds from the Iron Age and Viking Age.

The islands have for more than 1,000 years been the centre of great cod fisheries, especially in winter, when the cod migrates south from the Barents Sea and gathers in Lofoten to spawn. Bergen in southwestern Norway was for a long time the hub for further export south to large parts of Europe, particularly so when trade was controlled by the Hanseatic League. In the lowland areas, particularly Vestvågøy, agriculture plays a significant role, as it has done since the Bronze Age.

Lofotr was originally the name of the island of Vestvågøy only. Later it became the name of the chain of islands. The chain of islands with its pointed peaks looks like a lynx foot from the mainland. In Norwegian, it is always a singular. Another name one might come across, is "Lofotveggen" or the Lofoten wall. The archipelago looks like a closed wall when seen from elevated points around Bodø or when arriving from the sea, some 100 km long, and 800-1,000 m. high.

In 1941 the islands were raided by British Commandos during Operation Claymore in March and a subsequent diversionary attack to support the Vaagso raid in December.

 

Lofoten is located at the 68th and 69th parallels north of the Arctic Circle in North Norway. It is well known for its natural beauty within Norway. Lofoten encompasses the municipalities of Vågan, Vestvågøy, Flakstad, Moskenes, Værøy, and Røst. The principal islands, running from north to south, are

Southern tip of Hinnøya.

Southern 60% (approx.) of Austvågøy (526.7 km² in total 68°20′N 14°40′E),

Gimsøy (46.4 km² 68°18′N 14°11′E),

Vestvågøy (411.1 km² 68°10′N 13°45′E),

Flakstadøya (109.8 km² 68°5′N 13°20′E),

Moskenesøya (185.9 km² 67°55′N 13°0′E),

whilst further to the south are the small and isolated islands of Værøy (67°40′N 12°40′E) and Røst (67°37′N 12°7′E). The total land area amounts to 1,227 km², and the population totals 24,500. Many will argue that Hinnøya, the northern part of Austvågøy and several hundred smaller islands, skerries and rocks to the east of Austvågøy are also part of the Lofoten complex. Historically the territorial definition of Lofoten has changed significantly. Between the mainland and the Lofoten archipelago lies the vast, open Vestfjorden, and to the north is Vesterålen. The principal towns in Lofoten are Leknes in Vestvågøy and Svolvær in Vågan. The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. The highest mountain in Lofoten is Higravstinden (1,161 m / 3,800 ft) in Austvågøy; the Møysalen National Park just northeast of Lofoten has mountains reaching 1,262 meters. The famous Moskstraumen (Malstrøm) system of tidal eddies is located in western Lofoten, and is indeed the root of the term maelstrom.

 

The sea is rich with life, and the world's largest deep water coral reefis located west of Røst. Lofoten has a very high density of sea eagles and cormorants, and millions of other sea birds, among them the colourful puffin. Otters are common, and there are moose on the largest islands. There are some woodlands with Downy birch and Rowan. There are no native conifer forests in Lofoten, but some small areas with private spruce plantations. Sorbus hybrida ("Rowan whitebeam") and Malus sylvestris occur in Lofoten, but not further north.

The animals mistaken as the extinct Great Auk turned out to be some of the nine King penguins released around Norway’s Lofoten Islands in August 1936, there until at least 1944.

 

Winter temperatures in Lofoten are very mild considering their location north of the Arctic Circle – Lofoten has the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. This is a result of the Gulf Stream and its extensions: the North Atlantic Current and the Norwegian Current. Røst and Værøy are the most northerly locations in the world where average temperatures are above freezing all year. May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4°C (87°F).

Strong winds can occur in late autumn and winter. Snow and sleet are not uncommon in winter, the mountains can have substantial amounts of snow, and in some winters, avalanches might come down from steep mountain slopes. Two of the top ten deadliest rainstorms ever recorded passed through Lofoten.

In Svolvær, the sun is above the horizon continuously ("midnight sun") from 25 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 4 December to 7 January. In Leknes, the sun is above the horizon from 26 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 9 December to 4 January.

The temperature in the sea has been recorded since 1935. At 1 m depth in the sea near Skrova, water temperatures varies from a low of 3°C in March to 14°C in August. Some years peaking above 17°C. November is around 7-8°C. At a depth of 200 m the temperature is near 8°C all year.

 

Mountaineering and rock climbing

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøya and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya is the most complete area for climbing. For more information, see the books by Dyer and Webster.

 

Surfing

Unstad is one of its better known locations for surfing.

 

Cycling

There is a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north. The route is part public road, part cycle-path with the option to bypass all of the tunnels by either cycle-path (tunnels through mountains) or boat. Traffic is generally light, although in July there may be a lot of campervans. Some of the more remote sections are on gravel roads. There is a dedicated cycling ferry which sails between Ballstad and Nusfjord, allowing cyclists to avoid the long, steep Nappstraum tunnel. The route hugs the coastline for most of its length where it is generally flat. As it turns inland through the mountain passes there are a couple of 3-400 meter climbs.

The Lofoten Insomnia Cycling Race takes place every year around midsummer, possible in the midnight sun, but surely in 24-hr daylight, along the whole Lofoten archipelago.

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

 

Lofoten (Norse Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is ló (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with a foot of a lynx. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "the foot of a wolf", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

 

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000[ yrs in Lofoten, and] the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BC.

 

The town of Vågan (Norse Vágar) is the first known town formation in northern Norway. It existed in the early Viking Age, maybe earlier, and was located on the southern coast on eastern Lofoten, near today's village Kabelvåg in Vågan municipality. However, the Lofotr Viking Museum with the reconstructed 83-meter-long longhouse (the largest known) is located near Borg on Vestvågøy, which have many archeological finds from the Iron Age and Viking Age.

The islands have for more than 1,000 years been the centre of great cod fisheries, especially in winter, when the cod migrates south from the Barents Sea and gathers in Lofoten to spawn. Bergen in southwestern Norway was for a long time the hub for further export south to large parts of Europe, particularly so when trade was controlled by the Hanseatic League. In the lowland areas, particularly Vestvågøy, agriculture plays a significant role, as it has done since the Bronze Age.

Lofotr was originally the name of the island of Vestvågøy only. Later it became the name of the chain of islands. The chain of islands with its pointed peaks looks like a lynx foot from the mainland. In Norwegian, it is always a singular. Another name one might come across, is "Lofotveggen" or the Lofoten wall. The archipelago looks like a closed wall when seen from elevated points around Bodø or when arriving from the sea, some 100 km long, and 800-1,000 m. high.

In 1941 the islands were raided by British Commandos during Operation Claymore in March and a subsequent diversionary attack to support the Vaagso raid in December.

 

Lofoten is located at the 68th and 69th parallels north of the Arctic Circle in North Norway. It is well known for its natural beauty within Norway. Lofoten encompasses the municipalities of Vågan, Vestvågøy, Flakstad, Moskenes, Værøy, and Røst. The principal islands, running from north to south, are

Southern tip of Hinnøya.

Southern 60% (approx.) of Austvågøy (526.7 km² in total 68°20′N 14°40′E),

Gimsøy (46.4 km² 68°18′N 14°11′E),

Vestvågøy (411.1 km² 68°10′N 13°45′E),

Flakstadøya (109.8 km² 68°5′N 13°20′E),

Moskenesøya (185.9 km² 67°55′N 13°0′E),

whilst further to the south are the small and isolated islands of Værøy (67°40′N 12°40′E) and Røst (67°37′N 12°7′E). The total land area amounts to 1,227 km², and the population totals 24,500. Many will argue that Hinnøya, the northern part of Austvågøy and several hundred smaller islands, skerries and rocks to the east of Austvågøy are also part of the Lofoten complex. Historically the territorial definition of Lofoten has changed significantly. Between the mainland and the Lofoten archipelago lies the vast, open Vestfjorden, and to the north is Vesterålen. The principal towns in Lofoten are Leknes in Vestvågøy and Svolvær in Vågan. The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. The highest mountain in Lofoten is Higravstinden (1,161 m / 3,800 ft) in Austvågøy; the Møysalen National Park just northeast of Lofoten has mountains reaching 1,262 meters. The famous Moskstraumen (Malstrøm) system of tidal eddies is located in western Lofoten, and is indeed the root of the term maelstrom.

 

The sea is rich with life, and the world's largest deep water coral reefis located west of Røst. Lofoten has a very high density of sea eagles and cormorants, and millions of other sea birds, among them the colourful puffin. Otters are common, and there are moose on the largest islands. There are some woodlands with Downy birch and Rowan. There are no native conifer forests in Lofoten, but some small areas with private spruce plantations. Sorbus hybrida ("Rowan whitebeam") and Malus sylvestris occur in Lofoten, but not further north.

The animals mistaken as the extinct Great Auk turned out to be some of the nine King penguins released around Norway’s Lofoten Islands in August 1936, there until at least 1944.

 

Winter temperatures in Lofoten are very mild considering their location north of the Arctic Circle – Lofoten has the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. This is a result of the Gulf Stream and its extensions: the North Atlantic Current and the Norwegian Current. Røst and Værøy are the most northerly locations in the world where average temperatures are above freezing all year. May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4°C (87°F).

Strong winds can occur in late autumn and winter. Snow and sleet are not uncommon in winter, the mountains can have substantial amounts of snow, and in some winters, avalanches might come down from steep mountain slopes. Two of the top ten deadliest rainstorms ever recorded passed through Lofoten.

In Svolvær, the sun is above the horizon continuously ("midnight sun") from 25 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 4 December to 7 January. In Leknes, the sun is above the horizon from 26 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 9 December to 4 January.

The temperature in the sea has been recorded since 1935. At 1 m depth in the sea near Skrova, water temperatures varies from a low of 3°C in March to 14°C in August. Some years peaking above 17°C. November is around 7-8°C. At a depth of 200 m the temperature is near 8°C all year.

 

Mountaineering and rock climbing

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøya and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya is the most complete area for climbing. For more information, see the books by Dyer and Webster.

 

Surfing

Unstad is one of its better known locations for surfing.

 

Cycling

There is a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north. The route is part public road, part cycle-path with the option to bypass all of the tunnels by either cycle-path (tunnels through mountains) or boat. Traffic is generally light, although in July there may be a lot of campervans. Some of the more remote sections are on gravel roads. There is a dedicated cycling ferry which sails between Ballstad and Nusfjord, allowing cyclists to avoid the long, steep Nappstraum tunnel. The route hugs the coastline for most of its length where it is generally flat. As it turns inland through the mountain passes there are a couple of 3-400 meter climbs.

The Lofoten Insomnia Cycling Race takes place every year around midsummer, possible in the midnight sun, but surely in 24-hr daylight, along the whole Lofoten archipelago.

Michel Bourez (PYF) finishes RUNNER-UP in men's 2018 Corona Bali Protected after placing second in the final at Keramas, Bali, Indonesia. The results is the second runner-up finish for Bourez in a final at Keramas, in 2013 he finished second in the final.

Brazilian surfer Filipe Toledo getting amongst it at the Bells Beach Rip Curl Pro World Surfing League event yesterday.

Bronte Macaulay (AUS) will surf in Round 2 of the Women's 2018 Corona Bali Protected after placing third in Heat 2 of Round 1 at Keramas, Bali, Indonesia.

Patrick Gudauskas (USA) will surf in Round 2 of the 2018 Corona Open J-Bay after placing third in Heat 9 of Round 1 at Supertubes, Jeffreys Bay, South Africa.

Rookie Tomas Hermes (BRA) will surf in Round 2 of the 2018 Margaret River Pro after placing third in Heat 2 of Round 1 at North Point, Margaret River, WA, Australia.

Malia Manuel (HAW) is eliminated from the Roxy Pro Gold Coast after placing second in Semifinal 1 at Kirra, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia.

3X World Champion Carissa Moore (HAW) is eliminated from the 2018 Corona Bali Protected with an equal 9th finish after placing third in Heat 4 of Round 3 at Keramas, Bali, Indonesia.

Ezekiel Lau (HAW) advances directly to Round 3 of the 2018 Tahiti Pro Teahupo'o after winning Heat 2 of Round 1 at Teahupo'o.

The Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center is a convention center located in Long Beach, California. Built on the former site of the Long Beach Municipal Auditorium; the venue is composed of the Long Beach Convention Center, Long Beach Arena and the Long Beach Performing Arts Center.

Long Beach Arena was the first building to be completed in the complex. Capacities are as follows: 11,200 for hockey, 13,609 for basketball and either 4,550, 9,200 or 13,500 for concerts, depending on the seating arrangement.

The arena has hosted various entertainment and professional and college sporting events, most notably the volleyball events of the 1984 Summer Olympic Games.

For trade shows, the arena features 46,000 square feet (4300 m2) of space, with an additional 19,000 square feet (1800 m2) of space in the lobby and 29,000 square feet (2700 m2) in the concourse. Hanging from the arena's 77 foot (23 m) high ceiling is a center-hung scoreboard with four White Way "Mega Color" Animation Screens. There is an 11 by 15 foot SACO Smartvision LED Wall located on the south end of the arena.

The arena was the site of the first NHL game involving a 1967 expansion team, as the Los Angeles Kings and the Philadelphia Flyers, both expansion teams, played on October 14, 1967, the Kings won 4–2. The Kings played in Long Beach for the first half of their expansion season while The Forum was being completed.

In the 1970s, the arena hosted several games of the Los Angeles Sharks, of the WHA and regular appearances of the Los Angeles Thunderbirds roller derby team. The Grateful Dead played the arena on December 15th, 1972; the first of 13 concerts there through 1988.

In 1980–81 the arena was also home to the California Surf of the North American Soccer League for one season of indoor soccer.

The arena was home to the former Long Beach Ice Dogs team, which played professional ice hockey in the IHL, WCHL and ECHL. The Ice Dogs ceased operations of the team in 2007.

The Eagles performed during a benefit concert for California Senator Alan Cranston on July 31, 1980, on what has been described as "Long Night at Wrong Beach".Tempers boiled over as Glenn Frey and Don Felder spent the entire show telling each other about the beating each planned to administer backstage. "Only three more songs until I kick your ass, pal," Frey recalls Felder telling him near the end of the band's set.Felder recalls Frey making a similar threat to him during "Best of My Love"."We're out there singing ‘Best of My Love', but inside both of us are thinking, 'As soon as this is over, I'm gonna kill him,' " recalled Frey. The animosity purportedly developed as a result of Felder's response of "You're welcome – I guess" to Senator Cranston as he was thanking the band for doing the benefit for his reelection. A live recording of their song "Life in the Fast Lane" from this show was included on their live album, entitled Eagles Live. This marked their final live performance, as The Eagles, for 14 years, until April 25, 1994.

Iron Maiden performed four consecutive shows during their World Slavery Tour on March 14–17, 1985. The show on the 15th was recorded and released as a double live-album, entitled Live After Death.

The arena was also one of the sites of the 1986 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship Rounds of 64 and 32. The teams, which played at the arena, included Maryland, Pepperdine & UNLV. Maryland's Len Bias played his final collegiate game at the arena on March 14, 1986, in a loss to UNLV in the Round of 32. The arena was also the site of the Big West Conference men's basketball tournament from 1989 to 1993. It was the home court for Long Beach State's men's basketball team for several seasons in the 1970s and 1980s.

Run–D.M.C. performed during their Raising Hell Tour on August 17, 1986, with Whodini, LL Cool J, The Beastie Boys and The Timex Social Club as their opening act. The show made news worldwide when gang fights broke out between the Long Beach-based Insane Crips and the Los Angeles based Rollin 60's Crips within the audience, with 42 reported injuries during the incident.

From 2009 to 2016, the FIRST Robotics Competition Los Angeles Regional was held at the Long Beach Arena.

On July 1 and 2, 2017, the arena hosted New Japan Pro-Wrestling's G1 Special in USA shows, which marked the company's first independently promoted shows in the United States.

The arena will host handball during the 2028 Summer Olympics.

 

Vissla Sydney Surf Pro event at Manly Beach.

Paige Hareb.

photographymiguel.co.uk/

 

#Zarautz in Pais Vasco is an exposed beach break. The World Surf League host here the PRO Zarautz as part of the WQS (World Qualifying Series). This goes to show the high quality #surf that is accessible here.

The best wind direction is from the south. Tends to receive a mix of groundswells and windswells and the best swell direction is from the north northwest. Waves at the beach break both left and right. Best around high tide.

Italo Ferreira (BRA) advances directly to Round 3 of the 2018 Tahiti Pro Teahupo'o after winning Heat 3 of Round 1 at Teahupo'o.

Italo Ferreira (BRA) advances to the final of the 2018 Corona Bali Protected after winning Semifinal Heat 2 at Keramas, Bali, Indonesia. Ferreira posted a only perfect ten point ride of the event for a massive rotation aerial maneuver.

SANTA MONICA, Calif./USA (Saturday, April 28, 2018) - The world’s best big wave surfers gathered in Santa Monica tonight for the 2018 World Surf League (WSL) Big Wave Awards. The show at the Red Bull Headquarters awarded the best rides of the past year, including a new World Record from Brazil’s Rodrigo Koxa.

 

Rodrigo Koxa is now the official World Record holder for the biggest wave ever surfed in history after being awarded the Quiksilver XXL Biggest Wave award tonight. The judging panel for the Big Wave Awards concluded that the record-breaking wave surfed by Koxa at Nazaré, Portugal on November 8, 2017 was 80 feet (24.38 meters) overtaking Garrett McNamara’s record, whose wave was marked at 78 feet (23.77 meters) in 2011. The Quiksilver XXL Biggest Wave Award goes to the surfer who, by any means available, catches the biggest wave of the year. Not only did Koxa win this year’s honor, but he now holds the Guinness World Record for the biggest wave surfed.

Frederico Morais (PRT) advances to Round 4 of the 2018 Rip Curl Pro Bells Beach after winning Heat 8 of Round 3 at Bells Beach, VIC, Australia.

Ian Gouveia (BRA) advanced to Round 3 of the Tahiti Pro 2018 after winning Heat 5 of Round 2 at Teahupoo, French Polynesia

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

 

Lofoten (Norse Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is ló (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with a foot of a lynx. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "the foot of a wolf", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

 

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000[ yrs in Lofoten, and] the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BC.

 

The town of Vågan (Norse Vágar) is the first known town formation in northern Norway. It existed in the early Viking Age, maybe earlier, and was located on the southern coast on eastern Lofoten, near today's village Kabelvåg in Vågan municipality. However, the Lofotr Viking Museum with the reconstructed 83-meter-long longhouse (the largest known) is located near Borg on Vestvågøy, which have many archeological finds from the Iron Age and Viking Age.

The islands have for more than 1,000 years been the centre of great cod fisheries, especially in winter, when the cod migrates south from the Barents Sea and gathers in Lofoten to spawn. Bergen in southwestern Norway was for a long time the hub for further export south to large parts of Europe, particularly so when trade was controlled by the Hanseatic League. In the lowland areas, particularly Vestvågøy, agriculture plays a significant role, as it has done since the Bronze Age.

Lofotr was originally the name of the island of Vestvågøy only. Later it became the name of the chain of islands. The chain of islands with its pointed peaks looks like a lynx foot from the mainland. In Norwegian, it is always a singular. Another name one might come across, is "Lofotveggen" or the Lofoten wall. The archipelago looks like a closed wall when seen from elevated points around Bodø or when arriving from the sea, some 100 km long, and 800-1,000 m. high.

In 1941 the islands were raided by British Commandos during Operation Claymore in March and a subsequent diversionary attack to support the Vaagso raid in December.

 

Lofoten is located at the 68th and 69th parallels north of the Arctic Circle in North Norway. It is well known for its natural beauty within Norway. Lofoten encompasses the municipalities of Vågan, Vestvågøy, Flakstad, Moskenes, Værøy, and Røst. The principal islands, running from north to south, are

Southern tip of Hinnøya.

Southern 60% (approx.) of Austvågøy (526.7 km² in total 68°20′N 14°40′E),

Gimsøy (46.4 km² 68°18′N 14°11′E),

Vestvågøy (411.1 km² 68°10′N 13°45′E),

Flakstadøya (109.8 km² 68°5′N 13°20′E),

Moskenesøya (185.9 km² 67°55′N 13°0′E),

whilst further to the south are the small and isolated islands of Værøy (67°40′N 12°40′E) and Røst (67°37′N 12°7′E). The total land area amounts to 1,227 km², and the population totals 24,500. Many will argue that Hinnøya, the northern part of Austvågøy and several hundred smaller islands, skerries and rocks to the east of Austvågøy are also part of the Lofoten complex. Historically the territorial definition of Lofoten has changed significantly. Between the mainland and the Lofoten archipelago lies the vast, open Vestfjorden, and to the north is Vesterålen. The principal towns in Lofoten are Leknes in Vestvågøy and Svolvær in Vågan. The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. The highest mountain in Lofoten is Higravstinden (1,161 m / 3,800 ft) in Austvågøy; the Møysalen National Park just northeast of Lofoten has mountains reaching 1,262 meters. The famous Moskstraumen (Malstrøm) system of tidal eddies is located in western Lofoten, and is indeed the root of the term maelstrom.

 

The sea is rich with life, and the world's largest deep water coral reefis located west of Røst. Lofoten has a very high density of sea eagles and cormorants, and millions of other sea birds, among them the colourful puffin. Otters are common, and there are moose on the largest islands. There are some woodlands with Downy birch and Rowan. There are no native conifer forests in Lofoten, but some small areas with private spruce plantations. Sorbus hybrida ("Rowan whitebeam") and Malus sylvestris occur in Lofoten, but not further north.

The animals mistaken as the extinct Great Auk turned out to be some of the nine King penguins released around Norway’s Lofoten Islands in August 1936, there until at least 1944.

 

Winter temperatures in Lofoten are very mild considering their location north of the Arctic Circle – Lofoten has the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. This is a result of the Gulf Stream and its extensions: the North Atlantic Current and the Norwegian Current. Røst and Værøy are the most northerly locations in the world where average temperatures are above freezing all year. May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4°C (87°F).

Strong winds can occur in late autumn and winter. Snow and sleet are not uncommon in winter, the mountains can have substantial amounts of snow, and in some winters, avalanches might come down from steep mountain slopes. Two of the top ten deadliest rainstorms ever recorded passed through Lofoten.

In Svolvær, the sun is above the horizon continuously ("midnight sun") from 25 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 4 December to 7 January. In Leknes, the sun is above the horizon from 26 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 9 December to 4 January.

The temperature in the sea has been recorded since 1935. At 1 m depth in the sea near Skrova, water temperatures varies from a low of 3°C in March to 14°C in August. Some years peaking above 17°C. November is around 7-8°C. At a depth of 200 m the temperature is near 8°C all year.

 

Mountaineering and rock climbing

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøya and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya is the most complete area for climbing. For more information, see the books by Dyer and Webster.

 

Surfing

Unstad is one of its better known locations for surfing.

 

Cycling

There is a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north. The route is part public road, part cycle-path with the option to bypass all of the tunnels by either cycle-path (tunnels through mountains) or boat. Traffic is generally light, although in July there may be a lot of campervans. Some of the more remote sections are on gravel roads. There is a dedicated cycling ferry which sails between Ballstad and Nusfjord, allowing cyclists to avoid the long, steep Nappstraum tunnel. The route hugs the coastline for most of its length where it is generally flat. As it turns inland through the mountain passes there are a couple of 3-400 meter climbs.

The Lofoten Insomnia Cycling Race takes place every year around midsummer, possible in the midnight sun, but surely in 24-hr daylight, along the whole Lofoten archipelago.

Gabriel Medina of Brazil won Heat 4 of the Quarterfinals at the Rip Curl Pro, Bells Beach, 2018.

Ian Gouveia (BRA) will surf in Round 2 of the 2018 Tahiti Pro Teahupo'o after placing second in Heat 2 of Round 1 at Teahupo'o.

at the Rip Curl Pro 2016, Bells Beach, Australia

rookie with wild card

www.youtube.com/watch?v=G32xpqv-K-c

  

NME (New Musical Express) published its list of the 500 all time greatest albums this week, based on its poll of roughly 80 critics who work for it. I saw a listing on the internet of the NME top 500 and it's set out below. The stars indicate the albums that would probably make my personal top 500 and the check marks indicate albums I've listened to that don't make my personal top 500.

 

This is in my sweet spot. When a bunch of highly knowledgeable critics decide on the "best ever' I'm going to seek that music out. They've heard more music than I ever have (there are 188 records on the list that I've never listened to).

 

Still, I have some quibbles about the list. The Smiths at #1? I've never understood the appeal of the Smiths. I went back and listened again to "The Queen Is Dead" and found it just as unbearable as ever. Maybe it's a British thing.

 

Second, no Robert Johnson or Hank Williams? I'm betting this is because the list seems to ban compilation albums and Johnson and Williams recorded exclusively as singles artists. But it just seems wrong to claim that the 500 best all time records don't include Hank Williams or Robert Johnson.

 

Third, where are the great British folkies? How can there be no Richard Thompson, no Fairport Convention, and no Pentangle? [Update: I see I'm wrong and that Fairport Convention is at #110. Still, why no Richard Thompson?]

 

Fourth, the list seems to ignore most of the world (maybe there's a rule saying English language only). But you can't have a list of the 500 best of all time with no Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan and not a single album from Brazil.

 

Fifth, where's WIllie Nelson?

 

-----------------------------

★ - Would be on my personal Top 500

✓ - Have listened to album and would not be in my personal Top 500

? - Have listened to album and still undecided about it

~ - Have listened to album and it stinks

  

~1. The Smiths - The Queen Is Dead (1986)

★ 2. The Beatles - Revolver (1966)

★ 3. David Bowie - Hunky Dory (1972)

★4. The Strokes - Is This It (2001)

★5. The Velvet Underground - The Velvet Underground & Nico (1966)

★ 6. Pulp - Different Class (1995)

★7. The Stone Roses - The Stone Roses (1989)

★8. Pixies - Doolittle (1989)

★9. The Beatles - The Beatles (1968)

✓ 10. Oasis - Definitely Maybe (1994)

★11. Nirvana - Nevermind (1991)

✓ 12. Patti Smith - Horses (1975)

✓ 13. Arcade Fire - Funeral (2004)

★14. David Bowie - Low (1977)

✓ 15. PJ Harvey - Let England Shake (2011)

✓ 16. Joy Division - Closer (1980)

✓ 17. Public Enemy - It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back (1988)

✓ 18. My Bloody Valentine - Loveless (1991)

✓ 19. Arctic Monkeys - Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not (2006)

✓ 20. Radiohead - OK Computer (1997)

✓ 21. Kanye West - My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy (2010)

✓ 22. Blur - Parklife (1994)

★23. David Bowie - The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust And The Spiders From Mars (1972)

✓ 24. The Rolling Stones - Exile On Main St. Street (1972)

★25. Marvin Gaye - What's Going On (1971)

✓ 26. The Beach Boys - Pet Sounds (1966)

✓ 27. Primal Scream - Screamadelica (1991)

✓ 28. Amy Winehouse - Back To Black (2006)

★29. Television - Marquee Moon (1977)

✓ 30. Wu-Tang Clan - Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) (1993)

✓ 31. Suede - Dog Man Star (1994)

✓ 32. Beastie Boys - Paul's Boutique (1989)

✓ 33. Blur - Modern Life Is Rubbish (1993)

★34. The Beatles - Abbey Road (1969)

★35. Nirvana - In Utero (1993)

★36. Bob Dylan - Blood On The Tracks (1975)

✓ 37. Love - Forever Changes (1967)

★38. Sex Pistols - Never Mind The Bollocks... Here's The Sex Pistols (1977)

✓ 39. The Clash - London Calling (1979)

★40. Joy Division - Unknown Pleasure (1979)

★41. Sonic Youth - Daydream Nation (1988)

~ 42. Stevie Wonder - Innervisions (1973)

★43. The Beatles - Rubber Soul (1965)

44. Manic Street Preachers - The Holy Bible (1994)

✓ 45. Blondie - Parallel Lines (1978)

~ 46. Björk - Debut (1993)

47. The Smiths - Strangeways, Here We Come (1987)

48. Kate Bush - Hounds Of Love (1985)

✓ 49. LCD Soundsystem - Sound Of Silver (2007)

★50. Dusty Springfield - Dusty In Memphis (1969)

 

✓ 51. Fleetwood Mac - Rumours (1977)

✓ 52. The Rolling Stones - Let It Bleed (1969)

✓ 53. David Bowie - Station To Station (1976)

★54. Talking Heads - Remain In Light (1980)

✓ 55. The Rolling Stones - Sticky Fingers (1971)

✓ 56. Neil Young - After The Gold Rush (1970)

57. Kraftwerk - The Man Machine (1978)

★58. Pixies - Surfer Rosa (1988)

59. Radiohead - In Rainbows (2007)

✓ 60. Massive Attack - Blue Lines (1991)

✓ 61. The Clash - The Clash (1977)

★62. Bob Dylan - Blonde On Blonde (1966)

✓ 63. Joni Mitchell - Blue (1971)

★64. Bob Dylan - Highway 61 Revisited (1965)

✓ 65. REM - Automatic For The People (1992)

66. Radiohead - The Bends (1995)

✓ 67. Oasis - (What's The Story) Morning Glory (1995)

★ 68. Van Morrison - Astral Weeks (1968)

✓ 69. REM - Murmur (1983)

70. The Libertines - Up The Bracket (2002)

✓ 71. Neil Young - Harvest (1972)

★ 72. Lou Reed - Transformer (1972)

★ 73. Bob Dylan - Bringing It All Back Home (1965)

74. Nas - IIImatic (1994)

✓ 75. Green Day - Dookie (1994)

76. Daft Punk - Discovery (2001)

★ 77. The White Stripes - White Blood Cells (2001)

✓ 78. Suede - Suede (1993)

✓ 79. Miles Davis - Kind Of Blue (1959)

★ 80. Iggy And The Stooges - Raw Power (1973)

✓ 81. Kraftwerk - Trans-Europe Express (1977)

✓ 82. Carole King - Tapestry (1971)

★ 83. The Band - The Band (1969)

✓ 84. Hole - Live Through This (1994)

✓ 85. Bruce Springsteen - Born To Run (1975)

✓ 86. Jeff Buckley - Grace (1994)

★ 87. The Beatles - Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967)

★ 88. Roxy Music - For Your Pleasure (1973)

✓ 89. Lauryn Hill - The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill (1998)

90. The Streets - A Grand Don't Come For Free (2004)

✓ 91. Prince And The Revolution - Purple Rain (1984)

? 92. Super Furry Animals - Radiator (1997)

93. Queens Of The Stone Age - Songs For The Deaf (2002)

★ 94. The Rolling Stone - Beggars Banquet (1968)

95. Talk Talk - Spirit Of Eden (1988)

✓ 96. Public Enemy - Fear Of A Black Planet (1990)

✓ 97. The Smiths - The Smiths (1984)

✓ 98. Neutral Milk Hotel - In The Aeroplane Over The Sea (1998)

99. The Libertines - The Libertines (2004)

100. The Smiths - Hatful Of Hollow (1984)

  

✓ 101. Kraftwerk - Computer World

102. The Flaming Lips - The Soft Bulletin

★ 103. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Electric Ladyland

★ 104. The Stooges - Funhouse

★ 105. Tom Waits - Rain Dogs

★ 106. Led Zeppelin - IV

107. Rage Against the Machine - Rage Against the Machine

108. Weezer - Pinkerton

✓ 109. Bruce Springsteen - Darkness on the Edge of Town

✓ 110. Fairport Convention - Liege and Lief

111. The Human League - Dare

112. GZA - Liquid Swords

★ 113. Belle and Sebastian - If You're Feeling Sinister

✓ 114. Radiohead - Kid A

✓ 115. Teenage Fanclub - Bandwagonesque

★ 116. The White Stripes - Elephant

✓ 117. ABC - The Lexicon of Love

✓ 118. Dexys Midnight Runners - Searching or the Young Soul Rebels

119. Pulp - His 'N' Hers

★ 120. De La Soul - 3 Feet High and Rising

121. Aphex Twin - Selected Ambient Works 85-92

122. New Order - Technique

★ 123. Blur - 13

★ 124. Paul Simon - Graceland

✓ 125. James Brown - Live at the Apollo

✓ 126. Beastie Boys - Ill Communication

✓ 127. Ramones - Ramones

✓ 128. The Verve - Urban Hymns

✓ 129. Neil Young - On the Beach

130. Interpol - Turn on the Bright Lights

✓ 131. Michael Jackson - Thriller

✓ 132. Pink Floyd - Dark Side of the Moon

★ 133. John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band - John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band

★ 134. PJ Harvey - Stories From the City, Stories From the Sea

★ 135. Eminem - The Marshall Mathers LP

✓ 136. Yeah Yeah Yeahs - Fever to Tell

✓ 137. Blur - Blur

~ 138. Sufjan Stevens - Illinois

139. The Cure - Disintegration

✓ 140. Nick Drake - Bryter Layter

★ 141. Bob Marley and the Wailers - Natty Dread

✓ 142. Serge Gainsbourg - Histoire De Melody Nelson

✓ 143. Bob Dylan - Desire

★ 144. The Jimi Hendrix Experience - Are You Experienced

★ 145. The Zombies - Odessey and Oracle

✓ 146. At the Drive-In - Relationship of Command

✓ 147. Frank Ocean - Channel Orange

~ 148. Bruce Springsteen - Nebraska

149. Elliot Smith - Either/Or

✓ 150. The Streets - Original Pirate Material

  

★ 151. PJ Harvey - Dry

152. Mercury Rev - Deserter's Songs

✓ 153. The La's - The La's

★ 154. PJ Harvey - To Bring You My Love

155. The Prodigy - Music For the Jilted Generation

★ 156. Spiritualized - Ladies and Gentlemen We're Floating In Space

★ 157. The Jesus and Mary Chain - Psychocandy

158. Wild Beasts - Two Dancers

★ 159. Gang of Four - Entertainment!

160. Primal Scream - XTRMTR

✓ 161. Arcade Fire - The Suburbs

✓ 162. The National - The Boxer

163. Neu - Neu '75!

✓ 164. Johnny Cash - At Folsom Prison

165. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds - Let Love In

★ 166. Pulp - This is Hardcore

★ 167. Aretha Franklin - Lady Soul

168. Portishead - Dummy

169. Dexys Midnight Runners - Don't Stand Me Down

170. Smashing Pumpkins - Siamese Dream

★ 171. Talking Heads - Fear of Music

~172. Stevie Wonder - Songs in the Key of Life

★ 173. Led Zeppelin - III

174. Bright Eyes - I'm Wide Awake, It's Morning

★ 175. David Bowie - Young Americans

~176. Rufus Wainwright - Want One

177. Mogwai - Young Team

178. The Coral - The Coral

✓ 179. Missy Elliott - Miss E…So Addictive

★ 180. X-Ray Spex - Germ Free Adolescents

181. Boards of Canada - Music Has the Right to Children

182. Manic Street Preachers - Everything Must Go

✓ 183. OutKast - Speakerboxxx/The Love Below

✓ 184. MIA - Kala

✓ 185. Eric B and Rakim - Paid in Full

? 186. Jay-Z - The Blueprint

187. My Bloody Valentine - Isn't Anything

188. John Coltrane - A Love Supreme

✓ 189. Todd Rungren - A Wizard, A True Star

190. Pink Floyd - Piper At the Gates of Dawn

★ 191. Elastica - Elastica

✓ 192. Franz Ferdinand - Franz Ferdinand

193. Ryan Adams - Gold

✓ 194. Guns N' Roses - Appetite For Destruction

★ 195. The Beatles - A Hard Day's Night

✓ 196. The Stranglers - Rattus Norvegicus

✓ 197. AC/DC - Back in Black

✓ 198. Prince - Sign O' The Times

199. The Boo Radleys - Giant Steps

✓ 200. The Breeders - Last Splash

 

201. The Fall - Hex Enduction Hour

✓ 202. Tricky - Maxinquaye

? 203. Beach House - Teen Dream

✓ 204. Michael Jackson - Bad

✓ 205. NWA - Straight Outta Compton

★ 206. Pavement - Slanted and Enchanted

★ 207. Janis Joplin - Pearl

✓ 208. Chic - Risque

209. Kate Bush - The Kick Inside

★ 210. The Magnetic Fields - 69 Love Songs

✓ 211. Grace Jones - Nightclubbing

212. Kings of Leon - Youth and Young Manhood

✓ 213. Funkadelic - One Nation Under a Groove

✓ 214. Air - Moon Safari

215. Massive Attack - Mezzanine

✓ 216. New Order - Power, Lies and Corrruption

✓ 217. Iggy Pop - Lust for Life

218. The Horrors - Primary Colours

✓ 219. The Jam - All Mod Cons

220. The National - Alligator

✓ 221. Marianne Faithful - Broken English

222. Fever Ray - Fever Ray

✓ 223. Arcade Fire - Neon Bible

224. Echo and the Bunnymen - Heaven Up Here

★ 225. T Rex - Electric Warrior

★ 226. The Doors - The Doors

★ 227. John Lennon - Imagine

✓ 228. Pavement - Brighten the Corners

✓ 229. Public Image Ltd - Metal Box

★ 230. David Bowie - Aladdin Sane

✓ 231. Dr. Dre - The Chronic

★ 232. Leonard Cohen - The Songs of Leonard Cohen

233. Babyshambles - Down In Albion

234. Pet Shop Boys - Behaviour

235. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds - Murder Ballads

★ 236. Suicide - Suicide

237. The xx - The xx

238. Yeah Yeah Yeahs - Show Your Bones

239. Dizzee Rascal - Boy In Da Corner

✓ 240. Ian Dury - New Boots and Panties!!

241. Madonna - Ray of Light

✓ 242. Michael Jackson - Off the Wall

✓ 243. Joni Mitchell - The Hissing of Summer Lawns

244. Wild Beasts - Smother

245. Super Furry Animals - Fuzzy Logic

★ 246. Nirvana - MTV Unplugged In New York

247. Glasvegas - Glasvegas

★ 248. Eminem - The Slim Shady LP

✓ 249. Prodigy - The Fat of the Land

250. Weezer - Weezer

 

✓ 251. The Beach Boys - Surf's Up

252. Grimes - Visions

253. Pussy Galore - Exile on Main St

✓ 254. The Smiths - Meat is Murder

255. Metronomy - The English Riviera

★ 256. Elvis Costello and the Attractions - This Year's Model

257. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds - The Boatman's Call

✓ 258. Nick Drake - Five Leaves Left

✓ 259. Public Enemy - Yo! Bum Rush the Stage

★ 260. The Specials - The Specials

★ 261. Bob Marley and the Wailers - Live!

✓ 262. Boogie Down Productions - Criminal Minded

263. Laura Marling - I Speak Because I Can

★ 264. The Beatles - Please Please Me

265. Hole - Celebrity Skin

266. Coldplay - A Rush of Blood to the Head

267. Dr. Feelgood - Stupidity

268. Todd Rungren - Todd

269. The Horrors - Skying

✓ 270. The Kinks - The Village Green Preservation Society

✓ 271. The Velvet Underground - Loaded

272. Coldplay - Parachutes

✓ 273. Kanye West - The College Dropout

✓ 274. R.E.M. - Green

✓ 275. The Who - Quadrophenia

276. Echo and the Bunnymen - Ocean Rain

277. The Sunday - Reading, Writing and Arithmetic

✓ 278. The Slits - Cut

★ 279. Captain Beefhart and his Magical Band - Trout Mask Replica

280. Aphex Twin - Drukqs

★ 281. Elvis Costello - My Aim is True

282. Teenage Fanclub - Grand Prix

★ 283. Roxy Music - Roxy Music

★ 284. Fugazi - 13 Songs

285. Marvin Gaye - Midnight Love

286. Screaming Trees - Dust

✓ 287. Slayer - Reign In Blood

288. Stevie Wonder - Music of My Mind

★ 289. The Modern Lovers - The Modern Lovers

290. The Bluetones - Expecting to Fly

★ 291. The Byrds - Younger than Yesterday

292. The Cribs - The New Fellas

✓ 293. Aztec Camera - High Land Hard Rain

294. Klaxons - Myths of the Near Future

✓ 295. Snoop Doggy Dogg - Doggystyle

✓ 296. David Bowie - Let's Dance

297. Can - Ege Bamyasi

298. Malcolm McLaren -

✓ 299. The Go-Betweens - 16 Lovers Lane

✓ 300. The Who - The Who By Numbers

 

301. Arthur Russell - World of Echo

302. Daft Punk - Homework

303. Charles Mingus - Mingus Ah Um

304. The Orb - UFOrb

★ 305. Rod Stewart - Every Picture Tells a Story

★ 306. Bob Dyan - The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan

✓ 307. Beck - Midnight Vultures

308. Lemonheads - It's a Shame About Ray

309. Metallica - Metallica

✓ 310. Steely Dan - Countdown to Ecstacy

311. Super Furry Animals - Guerilla

312. Cocteau Twins - Treasure

★ 313. Tom Waits - Frank's Wild Years

✓ 314. Slint - Spiderland

★ 315. Big Brother and the Holding Company - Cheap Thrills

✓ 316. Elvis Costello and the Attractions - Imperial Bedroom

★ 317. Gram Parsons - Grievous Angel

✓ 318. Ice-T - OG Original Gangster

✓ 319. The Who - Who's Next

★ 320. Tom Waits - Swordfishtrombones

321. Doves - Lost Souls

322. LCD - This is Happening

✓ 323. Miles Davis - Bitches Brew

✓ 324. R.E.M. - Life's Rich Pageant

325. Beck - Sea Change

★ 326. Yo La Tengo - I Can Hear the Heart Beating As One

✓ 327. Beck - Mutations

✓ 328. The Flaming Lips - Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots

★ 329. David Bowie - "Heroes"

330. Portishead - Third

✓ 331. MC5 - Kick out the Jams

332. Shack - HMS Fable

~ 333. Paul McCartney and Wings - Band on the Run

334. The Avalanches - Since I Left You

335. Queens of the Stoneage - …Like Clockwork

✓ 336. Neneh Cherry - Raw Like Sushi

337. Danger Mouse - The Grey Album

✓ 338. Notorious BIG - Ready to Die

339. Pearl Jam - Ten

✓ 340. Sister Sledge - We Are Family

★ 341. Tom Waits - Closing Time

★ 342. Spritualized - Lazer Guided Melodies

★ 343. Bob Dylan - John Wesley Harding

✓ 344. Eels - Beautiful Freak

✓ 345. Elvis Costello - Punch the Clock

✓ 346. New Order - Low Life

★ 347. Sonic Youth - Dirty

348. Whitney Houston - Whitney

349. Alt-J - An Awesome Wave

350. Black Rebel Motorcycle Club - BRMC

  

★ 351. The Byrds - Sweetheart of the Rodeo

★ 352. The Velvet Underground - White Light/White Heat

353. Mclusky - Mclusky Do Dallas

354. Isaac Hayes - Hot Buttered Soul

★ 355. New York Dolls - New York Dolls

★ 356. Pixies - Bossanova

✓ 357. Sugar - Copper Blue

358. Robert Wyatt - Rock Bottom

✓ 359. The Mothers of Invention - We're Only In it for the Money

360. The Strokes - Room on Fire

✓ 361. The Faces - A Nod is as Good as a Wink…the a Bliind Horse

✓ 362. Beastie Boys - Hello Nasty

✓ 363. Black Flag - Damaged

✓ 364. Bon Iver - For Emma, Forever Ago

✓ 365. Dead Kennedys - Fresh Fruit for Rotting Vegatables

366. Leonard Cohen - Songs of Love and Hate

367. Metronomy - Nights Out

368. Radiohead - Hail to the Thief

369. St Vincent - Strange Mercy

✓ 370. The Cribs - Men's Needs, Women's Needs, Whatever

★ 371. Beck - Odelay

★ 372. Big Black - Atomizer

373. Curtis Mayfield - There's No Place Like America Today

★ 374. Frank Sinatra - In the Wee Small Hours

375. Morrissey - Vauxhall and I

376. Sam Cooke - Live At The Harlem Square Club

377. Roy Harper - Stormcock

★ 378. Wire - Pink Flag

✓ 379. Belle & Sebastian - The Boy With The Arab Strap

380. Bloc Party - Silent Alarm

✓ 381. David Bowie - Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps)

✓ 382. Simon and Garfunkel - Bridge Over Troubled Water

383. The Long Blondes - Someone To Drive You Home

★ 384. Elvis Presley - Elvis Presley

★ 385. The White Stripes - Get Behind Me Satan

★ 386. Gillian Wellch - Revival

✓ 387. The Clash - Combat Rock

388. Tim Buckley - Happy Sad

★ 389. Le Tigre - Le Tigre

390. The Verve - A Northern Soul

391. Burial - Burial

392. Edan - Beauty and the Beat

★ 393. Prince - Dirty Mind

★ 394. Wire - Chairs Missing

★ 395. The White Stripes - De Stijl

✓ 396. Heartbreakers - L.A.M.F.

397. Jay-Z - Reasonable Doubt

★ 398. Neil Young - Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere

399. Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds - The Lyre of Orpheus/Abattoir Blues

★ 400. The Fall - This Nation's Saving Grace

  

✓ 401. 20 Jazz Funk Greats - Throbbing Gristle

402. Twenty One - Mystery Jets

403. Vespertine - Bjork

404. No Other - Gene Clark

★ 405. Otis Blue - Otis Redding

✓ 406. Rated R - Queens of the Stone Age

407. Going Blank Again - Ride

★ 408. Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain - Pavement

409. Tago Mago - Can

410. Antics - Interpol

411. Madvillainy - Madvillain

✓ 412. Entroducing... - DJ Shadow

413. Pills N Thrills and Bellyaches - Happy Mondays

✓ 414. Dig Your Own Hole - The Chemical Brothers

✓ 415. Chet Baker Sings - Chet Baker

✓ 416. Merriweather Post Pavillion - Animal Collective

417. 1977 - Ash

✓ 418. Electro-Shock Blues - Eels

419. Let It Come Down - Spiritualized

420. People's Instinctive Travels... - A Tribe Called Quest

★ 421. Radio City - Big Star

422. Too-Rye-Ay - Dexys Midnight Runners

✓ 423. Live at Leeds - The Who

424. The Joshua Tree - U2

425. Nancy and Lee - Nancy Sinatra and Lee Hazelwood

★ 426. Goo - Sonic Youth

★ 427. Here Comes the Warm Jets - Brian Eno

✓ 428. Born in the USA - Bruce Springsteen

429. Bleed America - Jimmy Eat World

430. Scott 4 - Scott Walker

431. Badmotorfinger - Soundgarden

★ 432. Tindersticks - Tindersticks

433. 2001 - Dr. Dre

434. Steve McQueen - Prefab Sprout

✓ 435. Easter - Patti Smith

436. Mirrored - Battles

★ 437. Dear Science - TV on the Radio

438. Aha Shake Heartbreak - Kings of Leon

439. The Futureheads - The Futureheads

✓ 440. Life's a Riot with Spy vs. Spy - Billy Bragg

441. Arrival - ABBA

✓ 442. Al Green is Love - Al Green

✓ 443. Sometimes I Wish We Were an Eagle - Bill Callahan

444. Violator - Depeche Mode

✓ 445. Tusk - Fleetwood Mac

446. The Warning - Hot Chip

✓ 447. Diamond Dogs - David Bowie

448. Sci-Fi Lullabies - Suede

449. AM - Arctic Monkeys

★ 450. Rid of Me - PJ Harvey

  

★ 451. Third/Sister Lovers- Big Star

★ 452. The B-52's- The B-52's

453. The House of Love- The House of Love

454. The Writing on the Wall- Destiny's Child

✓ 455. Vampire Weekend- Vampire Weekend

456. September of My Years- Frank Sinatra

✓ 457. Black Cherry- Goldfrapp

✓ 458. Yankee Hotel Foxtrot- Wilco

★ 459. The Black Album- Jay-Z

★ 460. Bleach- Nirvana

461. Generation Terrorists- Manic Street Preachers

462. Master of Puppets- Metallica

✓ 463. Pod- The Breeders

464. Because of the Times- Kings of Leon

465. High Violet- The National

✓ 466. The W- Wu-Tang Clan

✓ 467. The Idiot- Iggy Pop

468. Chutes Too Narrow- The Shins

469. Holland- The Beach Boys

470. Graduation- Kanye West

471. Oracular Spectacular- MGMT

✓ 472. Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness- Smashing Pumpkins

473. A Storm in Heaven- The Verve

474. Tarot Sport- f**k Buttons

475. Smoke Ring for My Halo- Kurt Vile

476. Foo Fighters- Foo Fighters

477. Crystal Castles- Crystal Castles

478. Trouble Will Find Me- The National

479. The Real Ramona- Throwing Muses

★ 480. I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You- Aretha Franklin

✓ 481. Smile- Brian Wilson

482. Lady in Satin- Billie Holiday

✓ 483. Blood and Chocolate- Elvis Costello & The Attractions

✓ 484. The River- Bruce Springsteen

★ 485. Good Kid, M.A.A.D City- Kendrick Lamar

✓ 486. Homogenic- Bjork

✓ 487. Sound Affects- The Jam

488. I'm Your Man- Leonard Cohen

489. George Best- The Wedding Present

★ 490. Back in the USA- MC5

✓ 491. Actually- Pet Shop Boys

492. Hidden- These New Puritans

493. Blood- This Mortal Coil

494. The Head on the Door- The Cure

★ 495. Hot Fuss- The Killers

496. Album- Girls

497. Random Access Memories- Daft Punk

★ 498. Berlin- Lou Reed

✓ 499. Star- Belly

✓ 500. Stankonia- OutKast

 

Owen Wright of Australia placed second in Heat 1 of the Quarterfinals at the Rip Curl Pro, Bells Beach, 2018.

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

 

Lofoten (Norse Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is ló (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with a foot of a lynx. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "the foot of a wolf", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

 

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000[ yrs in Lofoten, and] the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BC.

 

The town of Vågan (Norse Vágar) is the first known town formation in northern Norway. It existed in the early Viking Age, maybe earlier, and was located on the southern coast on eastern Lofoten, near today's village Kabelvåg in Vågan municipality. However, the Lofotr Viking Museum with the reconstructed 83-meter-long longhouse (the largest known) is located near Borg on Vestvågøy, which have many archeological finds from the Iron Age and Viking Age.

The islands have for more than 1,000 years been the centre of great cod fisheries, especially in winter, when the cod migrates south from the Barents Sea and gathers in Lofoten to spawn. Bergen in southwestern Norway was for a long time the hub for further export south to large parts of Europe, particularly so when trade was controlled by the Hanseatic League. In the lowland areas, particularly Vestvågøy, agriculture plays a significant role, as it has done since the Bronze Age.

Lofotr was originally the name of the island of Vestvågøy only. Later it became the name of the chain of islands. The chain of islands with its pointed peaks looks like a lynx foot from the mainland. In Norwegian, it is always a singular. Another name one might come across, is "Lofotveggen" or the Lofoten wall. The archipelago looks like a closed wall when seen from elevated points around Bodø or when arriving from the sea, some 100 km long, and 800-1,000 m. high.

In 1941 the islands were raided by British Commandos during Operation Claymore in March and a subsequent diversionary attack to support the Vaagso raid in December.

 

Lofoten is located at the 68th and 69th parallels north of the Arctic Circle in North Norway. It is well known for its natural beauty within Norway. Lofoten encompasses the municipalities of Vågan, Vestvågøy, Flakstad, Moskenes, Værøy, and Røst. The principal islands, running from north to south, are

Southern tip of Hinnøya.

Southern 60% (approx.) of Austvågøy (526.7 km² in total 68°20′N 14°40′E),

Gimsøy (46.4 km² 68°18′N 14°11′E),

Vestvågøy (411.1 km² 68°10′N 13°45′E),

Flakstadøya (109.8 km² 68°5′N 13°20′E),

Moskenesøya (185.9 km² 67°55′N 13°0′E),

whilst further to the south are the small and isolated islands of Værøy (67°40′N 12°40′E) and Røst (67°37′N 12°7′E). The total land area amounts to 1,227 km², and the population totals 24,500. Many will argue that Hinnøya, the northern part of Austvågøy and several hundred smaller islands, skerries and rocks to the east of Austvågøy are also part of the Lofoten complex. Historically the territorial definition of Lofoten has changed significantly. Between the mainland and the Lofoten archipelago lies the vast, open Vestfjorden, and to the north is Vesterålen. The principal towns in Lofoten are Leknes in Vestvågøy and Svolvær in Vågan. The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. The highest mountain in Lofoten is Higravstinden (1,161 m / 3,800 ft) in Austvågøy; the Møysalen National Park just northeast of Lofoten has mountains reaching 1,262 meters. The famous Moskstraumen (Malstrøm) system of tidal eddies is located in western Lofoten, and is indeed the root of the term maelstrom.

 

The sea is rich with life, and the world's largest deep water coral reefis located west of Røst. Lofoten has a very high density of sea eagles and cormorants, and millions of other sea birds, among them the colourful puffin. Otters are common, and there are moose on the largest islands. There are some woodlands with Downy birch and Rowan. There are no native conifer forests in Lofoten, but some small areas with private spruce plantations. Sorbus hybrida ("Rowan whitebeam") and Malus sylvestris occur in Lofoten, but not further north.

The animals mistaken as the extinct Great Auk turned out to be some of the nine King penguins released around Norway’s Lofoten Islands in August 1936, there until at least 1944.

 

Winter temperatures in Lofoten are very mild considering their location north of the Arctic Circle – Lofoten has the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. This is a result of the Gulf Stream and its extensions: the North Atlantic Current and the Norwegian Current. Røst and Værøy are the most northerly locations in the world where average temperatures are above freezing all year. May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4°C (87°F).

Strong winds can occur in late autumn and winter. Snow and sleet are not uncommon in winter, the mountains can have substantial amounts of snow, and in some winters, avalanches might come down from steep mountain slopes. Two of the top ten deadliest rainstorms ever recorded passed through Lofoten.

In Svolvær, the sun is above the horizon continuously ("midnight sun") from 25 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 4 December to 7 January. In Leknes, the sun is above the horizon from 26 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 9 December to 4 January.

The temperature in the sea has been recorded since 1935. At 1 m depth in the sea near Skrova, water temperatures varies from a low of 3°C in March to 14°C in August. Some years peaking above 17°C. November is around 7-8°C. At a depth of 200 m the temperature is near 8°C all year.

 

Mountaineering and rock climbing

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøya and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya is the most complete area for climbing. For more information, see the books by Dyer and Webster.

 

Surfing

Unstad is one of its better known locations for surfing.

 

Cycling

There is a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north. The route is part public road, part cycle-path with the option to bypass all of the tunnels by either cycle-path (tunnels through mountains) or boat. Traffic is generally light, although in July there may be a lot of campervans. Some of the more remote sections are on gravel roads. There is a dedicated cycling ferry which sails between Ballstad and Nusfjord, allowing cyclists to avoid the long, steep Nappstraum tunnel. The route hugs the coastline for most of its length where it is generally flat. As it turns inland through the mountain passes there are a couple of 3-400 meter climbs.

The Lofoten Insomnia Cycling Race takes place every year around midsummer, possible in the midnight sun, but surely in 24-hr daylight, along the whole Lofoten archipelago.

Ezekiel Lau (HAW) will surf in Round 2 of the 2018 Corona Bali Protected after placing third in Heat 2 of Round 1 at Keramas, Bali, Indonesia.

Jordy Smith (ZAF) advances directly to Round 3 of the 2018 Margaret River Pro after winning Heat 2 of Round 1 at North Point, Margaret River, WA, Australia.

Avoca Beach big swell running for the 4 day pro surf event

Adrian Buchan (AUS) is the RUNNER-UP of the Quiksilver Pro Gold Coast after placing second to Julian Wilson (AUS) in the final at Kirra, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia.

Barron Mamiya of Hawaii placed second in Heat 2 of Round 2 at the Corona Bali Protected, 2018.

Rookie Michael February (ZAF) will surf in Round 2 of the 2018 Oi Rio Pro after placing second in Heat 8 of Round 1 at Barrinha, Saquarema, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Sally Fitzgibbons of Australia won Heat 4 of the Quarterfinals at the Corona Bali Protected, 2018.

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

 

Lofoten (Norse Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is ló (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with a foot of a lynx. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "the foot of a wolf", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

 

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000[ yrs in Lofoten, and] the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BC.

 

The town of Vågan (Norse Vágar) is the first known town formation in northern Norway. It existed in the early Viking Age, maybe earlier, and was located on the southern coast on eastern Lofoten, near today's village Kabelvåg in Vågan municipality. However, the Lofotr Viking Museum with the reconstructed 83-meter-long longhouse (the largest known) is located near Borg on Vestvågøy, which have many archeological finds from the Iron Age and Viking Age.

The islands have for more than 1,000 years been the centre of great cod fisheries, especially in winter, when the cod migrates south from the Barents Sea and gathers in Lofoten to spawn. Bergen in southwestern Norway was for a long time the hub for further export south to large parts of Europe, particularly so when trade was controlled by the Hanseatic League. In the lowland areas, particularly Vestvågøy, agriculture plays a significant role, as it has done since the Bronze Age.

Lofotr was originally the name of the island of Vestvågøy only. Later it became the name of the chain of islands. The chain of islands with its pointed peaks looks like a lynx foot from the mainland. In Norwegian, it is always a singular. Another name one might come across, is "Lofotveggen" or the Lofoten wall. The archipelago looks like a closed wall when seen from elevated points around Bodø or when arriving from the sea, some 100 km long, and 800-1,000 m. high.

In 1941 the islands were raided by British Commandos during Operation Claymore in March and a subsequent diversionary attack to support the Vaagso raid in December.

 

Lofoten is located at the 68th and 69th parallels north of the Arctic Circle in North Norway. It is well known for its natural beauty within Norway. Lofoten encompasses the municipalities of Vågan, Vestvågøy, Flakstad, Moskenes, Værøy, and Røst. The principal islands, running from north to south, are

Southern tip of Hinnøya.

Southern 60% (approx.) of Austvågøy (526.7 km² in total 68°20′N 14°40′E),

Gimsøy (46.4 km² 68°18′N 14°11′E),

Vestvågøy (411.1 km² 68°10′N 13°45′E),

Flakstadøya (109.8 km² 68°5′N 13°20′E),

Moskenesøya (185.9 km² 67°55′N 13°0′E),

whilst further to the south are the small and isolated islands of Værøy (67°40′N 12°40′E) and Røst (67°37′N 12°7′E). The total land area amounts to 1,227 km², and the population totals 24,500. Many will argue that Hinnøya, the northern part of Austvågøy and several hundred smaller islands, skerries and rocks to the east of Austvågøy are also part of the Lofoten complex. Historically the territorial definition of Lofoten has changed significantly. Between the mainland and the Lofoten archipelago lies the vast, open Vestfjorden, and to the north is Vesterålen. The principal towns in Lofoten are Leknes in Vestvågøy and Svolvær in Vågan. The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. The highest mountain in Lofoten is Higravstinden (1,161 m / 3,800 ft) in Austvågøy; the Møysalen National Park just northeast of Lofoten has mountains reaching 1,262 meters. The famous Moskstraumen (Malstrøm) system of tidal eddies is located in western Lofoten, and is indeed the root of the term maelstrom.

 

The sea is rich with life, and the world's largest deep water coral reefis located west of Røst. Lofoten has a very high density of sea eagles and cormorants, and millions of other sea birds, among them the colourful puffin. Otters are common, and there are moose on the largest islands. There are some woodlands with Downy birch and Rowan. There are no native conifer forests in Lofoten, but some small areas with private spruce plantations. Sorbus hybrida ("Rowan whitebeam") and Malus sylvestris occur in Lofoten, but not further north.

The animals mistaken as the extinct Great Auk turned out to be some of the nine King penguins released around Norway’s Lofoten Islands in August 1936, there until at least 1944.

 

Winter temperatures in Lofoten are very mild considering their location north of the Arctic Circle – Lofoten has the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. This is a result of the Gulf Stream and its extensions: the North Atlantic Current and the Norwegian Current. Røst and Værøy are the most northerly locations in the world where average temperatures are above freezing all year. May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4°C (87°F).

Strong winds can occur in late autumn and winter. Snow and sleet are not uncommon in winter, the mountains can have substantial amounts of snow, and in some winters, avalanches might come down from steep mountain slopes. Two of the top ten deadliest rainstorms ever recorded passed through Lofoten.

In Svolvær, the sun is above the horizon continuously ("midnight sun") from 25 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 4 December to 7 January. In Leknes, the sun is above the horizon from 26 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 9 December to 4 January.

The temperature in the sea has been recorded since 1935. At 1 m depth in the sea near Skrova, water temperatures varies from a low of 3°C in March to 14°C in August. Some years peaking above 17°C. November is around 7-8°C. At a depth of 200 m the temperature is near 8°C all year.

 

Mountaineering and rock climbing

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøya and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya is the most complete area for climbing. For more information, see the books by Dyer and Webster.

 

Surfing

Unstad is one of its better known locations for surfing.

 

Cycling

There is a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north. The route is part public road, part cycle-path with the option to bypass all of the tunnels by either cycle-path (tunnels through mountains) or boat. Traffic is generally light, although in July there may be a lot of campervans. Some of the more remote sections are on gravel roads. There is a dedicated cycling ferry which sails between Ballstad and Nusfjord, allowing cyclists to avoid the long, steep Nappstraum tunnel. The route hugs the coastline for most of its length where it is generally flat. As it turns inland through the mountain passes there are a couple of 3-400 meter climbs.

The Lofoten Insomnia Cycling Race takes place every year around midsummer, possible in the midnight sun, but surely in 24-hr daylight, along the whole Lofoten archipelago.

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

 

Lofoten (Norse Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is ló (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with a foot of a lynx. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "the foot of a wolf", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

 

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000[ yrs in Lofoten, and] the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BC.

 

The town of Vågan (Norse Vágar) is the first known town formation in northern Norway. It existed in the early Viking Age, maybe earlier, and was located on the southern coast on eastern Lofoten, near today's village Kabelvåg in Vågan municipality. However, the Lofotr Viking Museum with the reconstructed 83-meter-long longhouse (the largest known) is located near Borg on Vestvågøy, which have many archeological finds from the Iron Age and Viking Age.

The islands have for more than 1,000 years been the centre of great cod fisheries, especially in winter, when the cod migrates south from the Barents Sea and gathers in Lofoten to spawn. Bergen in southwestern Norway was for a long time the hub for further export south to large parts of Europe, particularly so when trade was controlled by the Hanseatic League. In the lowland areas, particularly Vestvågøy, agriculture plays a significant role, as it has done since the Bronze Age.

Lofotr was originally the name of the island of Vestvågøy only. Later it became the name of the chain of islands. The chain of islands with its pointed peaks looks like a lynx foot from the mainland. In Norwegian, it is always a singular. Another name one might come across, is "Lofotveggen" or the Lofoten wall. The archipelago looks like a closed wall when seen from elevated points around Bodø or when arriving from the sea, some 100 km long, and 800-1,000 m. high.

In 1941 the islands were raided by British Commandos during Operation Claymore in March and a subsequent diversionary attack to support the Vaagso raid in December.

 

Lofoten is located at the 68th and 69th parallels north of the Arctic Circle in North Norway. It is well known for its natural beauty within Norway. Lofoten encompasses the municipalities of Vågan, Vestvågøy, Flakstad, Moskenes, Værøy, and Røst. The principal islands, running from north to south, are

Southern tip of Hinnøya.

Southern 60% (approx.) of Austvågøy (526.7 km² in total 68°20′N 14°40′E),

Gimsøy (46.4 km² 68°18′N 14°11′E),

Vestvågøy (411.1 km² 68°10′N 13°45′E),

Flakstadøya (109.8 km² 68°5′N 13°20′E),

Moskenesøya (185.9 km² 67°55′N 13°0′E),

whilst further to the south are the small and isolated islands of Værøy (67°40′N 12°40′E) and Røst (67°37′N 12°7′E). The total land area amounts to 1,227 km², and the population totals 24,500. Many will argue that Hinnøya, the northern part of Austvågøy and several hundred smaller islands, skerries and rocks to the east of Austvågøy are also part of the Lofoten complex. Historically the territorial definition of Lofoten has changed significantly. Between the mainland and the Lofoten archipelago lies the vast, open Vestfjorden, and to the north is Vesterålen. The principal towns in Lofoten are Leknes in Vestvågøy and Svolvær in Vågan. The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. The highest mountain in Lofoten is Higravstinden (1,161 m / 3,800 ft) in Austvågøy; the Møysalen National Park just northeast of Lofoten has mountains reaching 1,262 meters. The famous Moskstraumen (Malstrøm) system of tidal eddies is located in western Lofoten, and is indeed the root of the term maelstrom.

 

The sea is rich with life, and the world's largest deep water coral reefis located west of Røst. Lofoten has a very high density of sea eagles and cormorants, and millions of other sea birds, among them the colourful puffin. Otters are common, and there are moose on the largest islands. There are some woodlands with Downy birch and Rowan. There are no native conifer forests in Lofoten, but some small areas with private spruce plantations. Sorbus hybrida ("Rowan whitebeam") and Malus sylvestris occur in Lofoten, but not further north.

The animals mistaken as the extinct Great Auk turned out to be some of the nine King penguins released around Norway’s Lofoten Islands in August 1936, there until at least 1944.

 

Winter temperatures in Lofoten are very mild considering their location north of the Arctic Circle – Lofoten has the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. This is a result of the Gulf Stream and its extensions: the North Atlantic Current and the Norwegian Current. Røst and Værøy are the most northerly locations in the world where average temperatures are above freezing all year. May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4°C (87°F).

Strong winds can occur in late autumn and winter. Snow and sleet are not uncommon in winter, the mountains can have substantial amounts of snow, and in some winters, avalanches might come down from steep mountain slopes. Two of the top ten deadliest rainstorms ever recorded passed through Lofoten.

In Svolvær, the sun is above the horizon continuously ("midnight sun") from 25 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 4 December to 7 January. In Leknes, the sun is above the horizon from 26 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 9 December to 4 January.

The temperature in the sea has been recorded since 1935. At 1 m depth in the sea near Skrova, water temperatures varies from a low of 3°C in March to 14°C in August. Some years peaking above 17°C. November is around 7-8°C. At a depth of 200 m the temperature is near 8°C all year.

 

Mountaineering and rock climbing

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøya and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya is the most complete area for climbing. For more information, see the books by Dyer and Webster.

 

Surfing

Unstad is one of its better known locations for surfing.

 

Cycling

There is a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north. The route is part public road, part cycle-path with the option to bypass all of the tunnels by either cycle-path (tunnels through mountains) or boat. Traffic is generally light, although in July there may be a lot of campervans. Some of the more remote sections are on gravel roads. There is a dedicated cycling ferry which sails between Ballstad and Nusfjord, allowing cyclists to avoid the long, steep Nappstraum tunnel. The route hugs the coastline for most of its length where it is generally flat. As it turns inland through the mountain passes there are a couple of 3-400 meter climbs.

The Lofoten Insomnia Cycling Race takes place every year around midsummer, possible in the midnight sun, but surely in 24-hr daylight, along the whole Lofoten archipelago.

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

 

Lofoten (Norse Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is ló (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with a foot of a lynx. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "the foot of a wolf", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

 

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000[ yrs in Lofoten, and] the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BC.

 

The town of Vågan (Norse Vágar) is the first known town formation in northern Norway. It existed in the early Viking Age, maybe earlier, and was located on the southern coast on eastern Lofoten, near today's village Kabelvåg in Vågan municipality. However, the Lofotr Viking Museum with the reconstructed 83-meter-long longhouse (the largest known) is located near Borg on Vestvågøy, which have many archeological finds from the Iron Age and Viking Age.

The islands have for more than 1,000 years been the centre of great cod fisheries, especially in winter, when the cod migrates south from the Barents Sea and gathers in Lofoten to spawn. Bergen in southwestern Norway was for a long time the hub for further export south to large parts of Europe, particularly so when trade was controlled by the Hanseatic League. In the lowland areas, particularly Vestvågøy, agriculture plays a significant role, as it has done since the Bronze Age.

Lofotr was originally the name of the island of Vestvågøy only. Later it became the name of the chain of islands. The chain of islands with its pointed peaks looks like a lynx foot from the mainland. In Norwegian, it is always a singular. Another name one might come across, is "Lofotveggen" or the Lofoten wall. The archipelago looks like a closed wall when seen from elevated points around Bodø or when arriving from the sea, some 100 km long, and 800-1,000 m. high.

In 1941 the islands were raided by British Commandos during Operation Claymore in March and a subsequent diversionary attack to support the Vaagso raid in December.

 

Lofoten is located at the 68th and 69th parallels north of the Arctic Circle in North Norway. It is well known for its natural beauty within Norway. Lofoten encompasses the municipalities of Vågan, Vestvågøy, Flakstad, Moskenes, Værøy, and Røst. The principal islands, running from north to south, are

Southern tip of Hinnøya.

Southern 60% (approx.) of Austvågøy (526.7 km² in total 68°20′N 14°40′E),

Gimsøy (46.4 km² 68°18′N 14°11′E),

Vestvågøy (411.1 km² 68°10′N 13°45′E),

Flakstadøya (109.8 km² 68°5′N 13°20′E),

Moskenesøya (185.9 km² 67°55′N 13°0′E),

whilst further to the south are the small and isolated islands of Værøy (67°40′N 12°40′E) and Røst (67°37′N 12°7′E). The total land area amounts to 1,227 km², and the population totals 24,500. Many will argue that Hinnøya, the northern part of Austvågøy and several hundred smaller islands, skerries and rocks to the east of Austvågøy are also part of the Lofoten complex. Historically the territorial definition of Lofoten has changed significantly. Between the mainland and the Lofoten archipelago lies the vast, open Vestfjorden, and to the north is Vesterålen. The principal towns in Lofoten are Leknes in Vestvågøy and Svolvær in Vågan. The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. The highest mountain in Lofoten is Higravstinden (1,161 m / 3,800 ft) in Austvågøy; the Møysalen National Park just northeast of Lofoten has mountains reaching 1,262 meters. The famous Moskstraumen (Malstrøm) system of tidal eddies is located in western Lofoten, and is indeed the root of the term maelstrom.

 

The sea is rich with life, and the world's largest deep water coral reefis located west of Røst. Lofoten has a very high density of sea eagles and cormorants, and millions of other sea birds, among them the colourful puffin. Otters are common, and there are moose on the largest islands. There are some woodlands with Downy birch and Rowan. There are no native conifer forests in Lofoten, but some small areas with private spruce plantations. Sorbus hybrida ("Rowan whitebeam") and Malus sylvestris occur in Lofoten, but not further north.

The animals mistaken as the extinct Great Auk turned out to be some of the nine King penguins released around Norway’s Lofoten Islands in August 1936, there until at least 1944.

 

Winter temperatures in Lofoten are very mild considering their location north of the Arctic Circle – Lofoten has the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. This is a result of the Gulf Stream and its extensions: the North Atlantic Current and the Norwegian Current. Røst and Værøy are the most northerly locations in the world where average temperatures are above freezing all year. May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4°C (87°F).

Strong winds can occur in late autumn and winter. Snow and sleet are not uncommon in winter, the mountains can have substantial amounts of snow, and in some winters, avalanches might come down from steep mountain slopes. Two of the top ten deadliest rainstorms ever recorded passed through Lofoten.

In Svolvær, the sun is above the horizon continuously ("midnight sun") from 25 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 4 December to 7 January. In Leknes, the sun is above the horizon from 26 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 9 December to 4 January.

The temperature in the sea has been recorded since 1935. At 1 m depth in the sea near Skrova, water temperatures varies from a low of 3°C in March to 14°C in August. Some years peaking above 17°C. November is around 7-8°C. At a depth of 200 m the temperature is near 8°C all year.

 

Mountaineering and rock climbing

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøya and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya is the most complete area for climbing. For more information, see the books by Dyer and Webster.

 

Surfing

Unstad is one of its better known locations for surfing.

 

Cycling

There is a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north. The route is part public road, part cycle-path with the option to bypass all of the tunnels by either cycle-path (tunnels through mountains) or boat. Traffic is generally light, although in July there may be a lot of campervans. Some of the more remote sections are on gravel roads. There is a dedicated cycling ferry which sails between Ballstad and Nusfjord, allowing cyclists to avoid the long, steep Nappstraum tunnel. The route hugs the coastline for most of its length where it is generally flat. As it turns inland through the mountain passes there are a couple of 3-400 meter climbs.

The Lofoten Insomnia Cycling Race takes place every year around midsummer, possible in the midnight sun, but surely in 24-hr daylight, along the whole Lofoten archipelago.

Adriano de Souza surfing as a member of Team Brazil during Qualifying Run 3 of the 2018 Founders Cup at the WSL Surf Ranch in Lemoore, CA, USA.

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

 

Lofoten (Norse Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is ló (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with a foot of a lynx. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "the foot of a wolf", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

 

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000[ yrs in Lofoten, and] the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BC.

 

The town of Vågan (Norse Vágar) is the first known town formation in northern Norway. It existed in the early Viking Age, maybe earlier, and was located on the southern coast on eastern Lofoten, near today's village Kabelvåg in Vågan municipality. However, the Lofotr Viking Museum with the reconstructed 83-meter-long longhouse (the largest known) is located near Borg on Vestvågøy, which have many archeological finds from the Iron Age and Viking Age.

The islands have for more than 1,000 years been the centre of great cod fisheries, especially in winter, when the cod migrates south from the Barents Sea and gathers in Lofoten to spawn. Bergen in southwestern Norway was for a long time the hub for further export south to large parts of Europe, particularly so when trade was controlled by the Hanseatic League. In the lowland areas, particularly Vestvågøy, agriculture plays a significant role, as it has done since the Bronze Age.

Lofotr was originally the name of the island of Vestvågøy only. Later it became the name of the chain of islands. The chain of islands with its pointed peaks looks like a lynx foot from the mainland. In Norwegian, it is always a singular. Another name one might come across, is "Lofotveggen" or the Lofoten wall. The archipelago looks like a closed wall when seen from elevated points around Bodø or when arriving from the sea, some 100 km long, and 800-1,000 m. high.

In 1941 the islands were raided by British Commandos during Operation Claymore in March and a subsequent diversionary attack to support the Vaagso raid in December.

 

Lofoten is located at the 68th and 69th parallels north of the Arctic Circle in North Norway. It is well known for its natural beauty within Norway. Lofoten encompasses the municipalities of Vågan, Vestvågøy, Flakstad, Moskenes, Værøy, and Røst. The principal islands, running from north to south, are

Southern tip of Hinnøya.

Southern 60% (approx.) of Austvågøy (526.7 km² in total 68°20′N 14°40′E),

Gimsøy (46.4 km² 68°18′N 14°11′E),

Vestvågøy (411.1 km² 68°10′N 13°45′E),

Flakstadøya (109.8 km² 68°5′N 13°20′E),

Moskenesøya (185.9 km² 67°55′N 13°0′E),

whilst further to the south are the small and isolated islands of Værøy (67°40′N 12°40′E) and Røst (67°37′N 12°7′E). The total land area amounts to 1,227 km², and the population totals 24,500. Many will argue that Hinnøya, the northern part of Austvågøy and several hundred smaller islands, skerries and rocks to the east of Austvågøy are also part of the Lofoten complex. Historically the territorial definition of Lofoten has changed significantly. Between the mainland and the Lofoten archipelago lies the vast, open Vestfjorden, and to the north is Vesterålen. The principal towns in Lofoten are Leknes in Vestvågøy and Svolvær in Vågan. The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. The highest mountain in Lofoten is Higravstinden (1,161 m / 3,800 ft) in Austvågøy; the Møysalen National Park just northeast of Lofoten has mountains reaching 1,262 meters. The famous Moskstraumen (Malstrøm) system of tidal eddies is located in western Lofoten, and is indeed the root of the term maelstrom.

 

The sea is rich with life, and the world's largest deep water coral reefis located west of Røst. Lofoten has a very high density of sea eagles and cormorants, and millions of other sea birds, among them the colourful puffin. Otters are common, and there are moose on the largest islands. There are some woodlands with Downy birch and Rowan. There are no native conifer forests in Lofoten, but some small areas with private spruce plantations. Sorbus hybrida ("Rowan whitebeam") and Malus sylvestris occur in Lofoten, but not further north.

The animals mistaken as the extinct Great Auk turned out to be some of the nine King penguins released around Norway’s Lofoten Islands in August 1936, there until at least 1944.

 

Winter temperatures in Lofoten are very mild considering their location north of the Arctic Circle – Lofoten has the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. This is a result of the Gulf Stream and its extensions: the North Atlantic Current and the Norwegian Current. Røst and Værøy are the most northerly locations in the world where average temperatures are above freezing all year. May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4°C (87°F).

Strong winds can occur in late autumn and winter. Snow and sleet are not uncommon in winter, the mountains can have substantial amounts of snow, and in some winters, avalanches might come down from steep mountain slopes. Two of the top ten deadliest rainstorms ever recorded passed through Lofoten.

In Svolvær, the sun is above the horizon continuously ("midnight sun") from 25 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 4 December to 7 January. In Leknes, the sun is above the horizon from 26 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 9 December to 4 January.

The temperature in the sea has been recorded since 1935. At 1 m depth in the sea near Skrova, water temperatures varies from a low of 3°C in March to 14°C in August. Some years peaking above 17°C. November is around 7-8°C. At a depth of 200 m the temperature is near 8°C all year.

 

Mountaineering and rock climbing

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøya and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya is the most complete area for climbing. For more information, see the books by Dyer and Webster.

 

Surfing

Unstad is one of its better known locations for surfing.

 

Cycling

There is a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north. The route is part public road, part cycle-path with the option to bypass all of the tunnels by either cycle-path (tunnels through mountains) or boat. Traffic is generally light, although in July there may be a lot of campervans. Some of the more remote sections are on gravel roads. There is a dedicated cycling ferry which sails between Ballstad and Nusfjord, allowing cyclists to avoid the long, steep Nappstraum tunnel. The route hugs the coastline for most of its length where it is generally flat. As it turns inland through the mountain passes there are a couple of 3-400 meter climbs.

The Lofoten Insomnia Cycling Race takes place every year around midsummer, possible in the midnight sun, but surely in 24-hr daylight, along the whole Lofoten archipelago.

Italo Ferreira of Brazil won the Rip Curl Pro, Bells Beach, 2018.

Lofoten is an archipelago and a traditional district in the county of Nordland, Norway. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world's largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude.

 

Lofoten (Norse Lófót) was originally the old name of the island Vestvågøya. The first element is ló (i.e., "lynx") and the last element is derived from Norse fótr (i.e., "foot"), as the shape of the island must have been compared with a foot of a lynx. (The old name of the neighbouring island Flakstadøya was Vargfót, "the foot of a wolf", from vargr "wolf". See also Ofoten.)

 

"There is evidence of human settlement extending back at least 11,000[ yrs in Lofoten, and] the earliest archaeological sites ... are only about 5,500 yrs old, at the transition from the early to late Stone Age." Iron Age agriculture, livestock, and significant human habitation can be traced back to ~250 BC.

 

The town of Vågan (Norse Vágar) is the first known town formation in northern Norway. It existed in the early Viking Age, maybe earlier, and was located on the southern coast on eastern Lofoten, near today's village Kabelvåg in Vågan municipality. However, the Lofotr Viking Museum with the reconstructed 83-meter-long longhouse (the largest known) is located near Borg on Vestvågøy, which have many archeological finds from the Iron Age and Viking Age.

The islands have for more than 1,000 years been the centre of great cod fisheries, especially in winter, when the cod migrates south from the Barents Sea and gathers in Lofoten to spawn. Bergen in southwestern Norway was for a long time the hub for further export south to large parts of Europe, particularly so when trade was controlled by the Hanseatic League. In the lowland areas, particularly Vestvågøy, agriculture plays a significant role, as it has done since the Bronze Age.

Lofotr was originally the name of the island of Vestvågøy only. Later it became the name of the chain of islands. The chain of islands with its pointed peaks looks like a lynx foot from the mainland. In Norwegian, it is always a singular. Another name one might come across, is "Lofotveggen" or the Lofoten wall. The archipelago looks like a closed wall when seen from elevated points around Bodø or when arriving from the sea, some 100 km long, and 800-1,000 m. high.

In 1941 the islands were raided by British Commandos during Operation Claymore in March and a subsequent diversionary attack to support the Vaagso raid in December.

 

Lofoten is located at the 68th and 69th parallels north of the Arctic Circle in North Norway. It is well known for its natural beauty within Norway. Lofoten encompasses the municipalities of Vågan, Vestvågøy, Flakstad, Moskenes, Værøy, and Røst. The principal islands, running from north to south, are

Southern tip of Hinnøya.

Southern 60% (approx.) of Austvågøy (526.7 km² in total 68°20′N 14°40′E),

Gimsøy (46.4 km² 68°18′N 14°11′E),

Vestvågøy (411.1 km² 68°10′N 13°45′E),

Flakstadøya (109.8 km² 68°5′N 13°20′E),

Moskenesøya (185.9 km² 67°55′N 13°0′E),

whilst further to the south are the small and isolated islands of Værøy (67°40′N 12°40′E) and Røst (67°37′N 12°7′E). The total land area amounts to 1,227 km², and the population totals 24,500. Many will argue that Hinnøya, the northern part of Austvågøy and several hundred smaller islands, skerries and rocks to the east of Austvågøy are also part of the Lofoten complex. Historically the territorial definition of Lofoten has changed significantly. Between the mainland and the Lofoten archipelago lies the vast, open Vestfjorden, and to the north is Vesterålen. The principal towns in Lofoten are Leknes in Vestvågøy and Svolvær in Vågan. The Lofoten Islands are characterised by their mountains and peaks, sheltered inlets, stretches of seashore and large virgin areas. The highest mountain in Lofoten is Higravstinden (1,161 m / 3,800 ft) in Austvågøy; the Møysalen National Park just northeast of Lofoten has mountains reaching 1,262 meters. The famous Moskstraumen (Malstrøm) system of tidal eddies is located in western Lofoten, and is indeed the root of the term maelstrom.

 

The sea is rich with life, and the world's largest deep water coral reefis located west of Røst. Lofoten has a very high density of sea eagles and cormorants, and millions of other sea birds, among them the colourful puffin. Otters are common, and there are moose on the largest islands. There are some woodlands with Downy birch and Rowan. There are no native conifer forests in Lofoten, but some small areas with private spruce plantations. Sorbus hybrida ("Rowan whitebeam") and Malus sylvestris occur in Lofoten, but not further north.

The animals mistaken as the extinct Great Auk turned out to be some of the nine King penguins released around Norway’s Lofoten Islands in August 1936, there until at least 1944.

 

Winter temperatures in Lofoten are very mild considering their location north of the Arctic Circle – Lofoten has the largest positive temperature anomaly in the world relative to latitude. This is a result of the Gulf Stream and its extensions: the North Atlantic Current and the Norwegian Current. Røst and Værøy are the most northerly locations in the world where average temperatures are above freezing all year. May and June are the driest months, while October has three times as much precipitation. The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4°C (87°F).

Strong winds can occur in late autumn and winter. Snow and sleet are not uncommon in winter, the mountains can have substantial amounts of snow, and in some winters, avalanches might come down from steep mountain slopes. Two of the top ten deadliest rainstorms ever recorded passed through Lofoten.

In Svolvær, the sun is above the horizon continuously ("midnight sun") from 25 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 4 December to 7 January. In Leknes, the sun is above the horizon from 26 May to 17 July, and in winter the sun does not rise from 9 December to 4 January.

The temperature in the sea has been recorded since 1935. At 1 m depth in the sea near Skrova, water temperatures varies from a low of 3°C in March to 14°C in August. Some years peaking above 17°C. November is around 7-8°C. At a depth of 200 m the temperature is near 8°C all year.

 

Mountaineering and rock climbing

Lofoten offers many rock climbing and mountaineering opportunities. It has 24 hours of daylight in the summer and has Alpine-style ridges, summits and glaciers, but at a height of less than 1,200 metres. The main centre for rock climbing is Henningsvær on Austvågøya.

The main areas for mountaineering and climbing are on Austvågøya and Moskenesøya. Moskenesøya is the most complete area for climbing. For more information, see the books by Dyer and Webster.

 

Surfing

Unstad is one of its better known locations for surfing.

 

Cycling

There is a well marked cycling route that goes from Å in the south and continues past Fiskebøl in the north. The route is part public road, part cycle-path with the option to bypass all of the tunnels by either cycle-path (tunnels through mountains) or boat. Traffic is generally light, although in July there may be a lot of campervans. Some of the more remote sections are on gravel roads. There is a dedicated cycling ferry which sails between Ballstad and Nusfjord, allowing cyclists to avoid the long, steep Nappstraum tunnel. The route hugs the coastline for most of its length where it is generally flat. As it turns inland through the mountain passes there are a couple of 3-400 meter climbs.

The Lofoten Insomnia Cycling Race takes place every year around midsummer, possible in the midnight sun, but surely in 24-hr daylight, along the whole Lofoten archipelago.

Julian Wilson (AUS) will surf in Round 2 of the 2018 Tahiti Pro Teahupo'o after placing second in Heat 5 of Round 1 at Teahupo'o.

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