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Edward Henry Weston was born March 24, 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois. He spent the majority of his childhood in Chicago where he attended Oakland Grammar School. He began photographing at the age of sixteen after receiving a Bull’s Eye #2 camera from his father. Weston’s first photographs captured the parks of Chicago and his aunt’s farm. In 1906, following the publication of his first photograph in Camera and Darkroom, Weston moved to California. After working briefly as a surveyor for San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, he began working as an itinerant photographer. He peddled his wares door to door photographing children, pets and funerals. Realizing the need for formal training, in 1908 Weston returned east and attended the Illinois College of Photography in Effingham, Illinois. He completed the 12-month course in six months and returned to California. In Los Angeles, he was employed as a retoucher at the George Steckel Portrait Studio. In 1909, Weston moved on to the Louis A. Mojoiner Portrait Studio as a photographer and demonstrated outstanding abilities with lighting and posing.) Weston married his first wife, Flora Chandler in 1909. He had four children with Flora; Edward Chandler (1910), Theodore Brett (1911), Laurence Neil (1916) and Cole (1919). In 1911, Weston opened his own portrait studio in Tropico, California. This would be his base of operation for the next two decades. Weston became successful working in soft-focus, pictorial style; winning many salons and professional awards. Weston gained an international reputation for his high key portraits and modern dance studies. Articles about his work were published in magazines such as American Photography, Photo Era and Photo Miniature. Weston also authored many articles himself for many of these publications. In 1912, Weston met photographer Margrethe Mather in his Tropico studio. Mather becomes his studio assistant and most frequent model for the next decade. Mather had a very strong influence on Weston. He would later call her, “the first important woman in my life.” Weston began keeping journals in 1915 that came to be known as his "Daybooks." They would chronicle his life and photographic development into the 1930’s.

 

In 1922 Weston visited the ARMCO Steel Plant in Middletown, Ohio. The photographs taken here marked a turning point in Weston’s career. During this period, Weston renounced his Pictorialism style with a new emphasis on abstract form and sharper resolution of detail. The industrial photographs were true straight images: unpretentious, and true to reality. Weston later wrote, “The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Weston also traveled to New York City this same year, where he met Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

In 1923 Weston moved to Mexico City where he opened a photographic studio with his apprentice and lover Tina Modotti. Many important portraits and nudes were taken during his time in Mexico. It was also here that famous artists; Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco hailed Weston as the master of 20th century art.

 

After moving back to California in 1926, Weston began his work for which he is most deservedly famous: natural forms, close-ups, nudes, and landscapes. Between 1927 and 1930, Weston made a series of monumental close-ups of seashells, peppers, and halved cabbages, bringing out the rich textures of their sculpture-like forms. Weston moved to Carmel, California in 1929 and shot the first of many photographs of rocks and trees at Point Lobos, California. Weston became one of the founding members of Group f/64 in 1932 with Ansel Adams, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and Sonya Noskowiak. The group chose this optical term because they habitually set their lenses to that aperture to secure maximum image sharpness of both foreground and distance. 1936 marked the start of Weston’s series of nudes and sand dunes in Oceano, California, which are often considered some of his finest work. Weston became the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for experimental work in 1936. Following the receipt of this fellowship Weston spent the next two years taking photographs in the West and Southwest United States with assistant and future wife Charis Wilson. Later, in 1941 using photographs of the East and South Weston provided illustrations for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

 

Weston began experiencing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in 1946 and in 1948 shot his last photograph of Point Lobos. In 1946 the Museum of Modern Art, New York featured a major retrospective of 300 prints of Weston’s work. Over the next 10 years of progressively incapacitating illness, Weston supervised the printing of his prints by his sons, Brett and Cole. His 50th Anniversary Portfolio was published in 1952 with photographs printed by Brett. An even larger printing project took place between1952 and 1955. Brett printed what was known as the Project Prints. A series of 8 -10 prints from 832 negatives considered Edward's lifetime best. The Smithsonian Institution held

the show, “The World of Edward Weston” in 1956 paying tribute to his remarkable accomplishments in American photography. Edward Weston died on January 1, 1958 at his home, Wildcat Hill, in Carmel, California. Weston's ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean at Pebbly Beach at Point Lobos.

www.edward-weston.com/edward_weston_biography.htm

2008 Royal Mosa ceramic tile, glass, millefiori and glass marbles

 

Photo by Stacy Smith Wildcat Studios

Edward Henry Weston was born March 24, 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois. He spent the majority of his childhood in Chicago where he attended Oakland Grammar School. He began photographing at the age of sixteen after receiving a Bull’s Eye #2 camera from his father. Weston’s first photographs captured the parks of Chicago and his aunt’s farm. In 1906, following the publication of his first photograph in Camera and Darkroom, Weston moved to California. After working briefly as a surveyor for San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, he began working as an itinerant photographer. He peddled his wares door to door photographing children, pets and funerals. Realizing the need for formal training, in 1908 Weston returned east and attended the Illinois College of Photography in Effingham, Illinois. He completed the 12-month course in six months and returned to California. In Los Angeles, he was employed as a retoucher at the George Steckel Portrait Studio. In 1909, Weston moved on to the Louis A. Mojoiner Portrait Studio as a photographer and demonstrated outstanding abilities with lighting and posing.) Weston married his first wife, Flora Chandler in 1909. He had four children with Flora; Edward Chandler (1910), Theodore Brett (1911), Laurence Neil (1916) and Cole (1919). In 1911, Weston opened his own portrait studio in Tropico, California. This would be his base of operation for the next two decades. Weston became successful working in soft-focus, pictorial style; winning many salons and professional awards. Weston gained an international reputation for his high key portraits and modern dance studies. Articles about his work were published in magazines such as American Photography, Photo Era and Photo Miniature. Weston also authored many articles himself for many of these publications. In 1912, Weston met photographer Margrethe Mather in his Tropico studio. Mather becomes his studio assistant and most frequent model for the next decade. Mather had a very strong influence on Weston. He would later call her, “the first important woman in my life.” Weston began keeping journals in 1915 that came to be known as his "Daybooks." They would chronicle his life and photographic development into the 1930’s.

 

In 1922 Weston visited the ARMCO Steel Plant in Middletown, Ohio. The photographs taken here marked a turning point in Weston’s career. During this period, Weston renounced his Pictorialism style with a new emphasis on abstract form and sharper resolution of detail. The industrial photographs were true straight images: unpretentious, and true to reality. Weston later wrote, “The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Weston also traveled to New York City this same year, where he met Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

In 1923 Weston moved to Mexico City where he opened a photographic studio with his apprentice and lover Tina Modotti. Many important portraits and nudes were taken during his time in Mexico. It was also here that famous artists; Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco hailed Weston as the master of 20th century art.

 

After moving back to California in 1926, Weston began his work for which he is most deservedly famous: natural forms, close-ups, nudes, and landscapes. Between 1927 and 1930, Weston made a series of monumental close-ups of seashells, peppers, and halved cabbages, bringing out the rich textures of their sculpture-like forms. Weston moved to Carmel, California in 1929 and shot the first of many photographs of rocks and trees at Point Lobos, California. Weston became one of the founding members of Group f/64 in 1932 with Ansel Adams, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and Sonya Noskowiak. The group chose this optical term because they habitually set their lenses to that aperture to secure maximum image sharpness of both foreground and distance. 1936 marked the start of Weston’s series of nudes and sand dunes in Oceano, California, which are often considered some of his finest work. Weston became the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for experimental work in 1936. Following the receipt of this fellowship Weston spent the next two years taking photographs in the West and Southwest United States with assistant and future wife Charis Wilson. Later, in 1941 using photographs of the East and South Weston provided illustrations for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

 

Weston began experiencing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in 1946 and in 1948 shot his last photograph of Point Lobos. In 1946 the Museum of Modern Art, New York featured a major retrospective of 300 prints of Weston’s work. Over the next 10 years of progressively incapacitating illness, Weston supervised the printing of his prints by his sons, Brett and Cole. His 50th Anniversary Portfolio was published in 1952 with photographs printed by Brett. An even larger printing project took place between1952 and 1955. Brett printed what was known as the Project Prints. A series of 8 -10 prints from 832 negatives considered Edward's lifetime best. The Smithsonian Institution held

the show, “The World of Edward Weston” in 1956 paying tribute to his remarkable accomplishments in American photography. Edward Weston died on January 1, 1958 at his home, Wildcat Hill, in Carmel, California. Weston's ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean at Pebbly Beach at Point Lobos.

www.edward-weston.com/edward_weston_biography.htm

Side view of a Lion walking, looking down, Panthera Leo, 10 years old, isolated on white

2010 Strung glass beads, cut stained and vitreous glass, plastic letter beads, millefiore, vintage bottle cap. I masked the dice and letter beads with Elmer's glue to keep the grout from getting into the crevases (two coats) then peeled it off while damp. Works great! Commissioned piece for one of my most favorite people, Tanya!!

Photo by Jerry Mark Wildcat Studios

Campo Imperatore is a mountain grassland or alpine meadow formed by a high basin shaped plateau located in the Province of L'Aquila in the Abruzzo region of Italy in the Gran Sasso massif. It is the largest plateau of the Apennine ridge. Known as Italy's "Little Tibet"; It is located in the natural park known as the "Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga National Park". Campo Imperatore has a tectonic origin shaped by alluviums and glaciers. The plateau, which is 27 km in length and an average of 8 km in width, lies adjacent to the Apennines' highest peak Corno Grande, and Europe's southernmost glacier, the Calderone; also surrounding the plateau are Monte Prena, Monte Aquila, and the Camicia Mountains to the north and Monte Scindarella, Mesola and Monte Bolza to the south.

 

The plateau's altitude ranges from 1500 to 1900 meters. It covers an expanse of approximately 80 km². Campo Imperatore is home to one of Italy's oldest alpine ski resorts. Located on the plateau's western edge, the resort began commercial operation in the 1920s and continues to thrive as a ski resort to this day due to its proximity to Rome (132 km or an hour-and-a-half by car). The resort became dictator Benito Mussolini's prison in August 1943 with his fall from power until he was freed by German commandos in September 1943. On the eastern side of the plateau is a 4 km cross country ski trail, which is maintained by the nearby town of Castel del Monte.

 

On the southeastern side of Campo Imperatore are medieval hill towns once ruled by the Medicis, Castel Del Monte and Santo Stefano di Sessanio as well as the ruin of one of Europe's highest fortresses, Rocca Calascio. In spring, summer and fall, shepherds from these neighboring hill towns maintain herds of sheep, "semi-wild" horses, and cattle in the plateau. The pastures are covered with field grasses and meadowland wild flowers. Campo Imperatore is also home to the Alpine Botanical Garden of Campo Imperatore. Founded in 1952, the garden is devoted to cultivation and study of some 300 species indigenous mountainous plants, including rare and endangered plant species, among them Vaccinium gaultherioides, Yellow Gentiana, (Gentiana lutea), Edelweiss of the Apennines (Leontopodium nivale), and Adonis distorta -- all plants that have adapted to Campo Imperatore's unique environment. Campo Imperatore is also the habitat for the Apennine wolf, Apennine wildcat and the Abruzzo chamois. Nearly extinct, the Abruzzo chamois, which naturalists consider one of the most beautiful varieties of chamois, is making a comeback through a joint effort by WWF Italia and the administration of the Gran Sasso National Park. Other species of wildlife include wild boar, foxes, grass snakes, and a wide variety of bird life including golden eagles and peregrine falcons.

 

Also located on the high plateau, taking advantage of the elevation and absence of man-made light, is the Campo Imperatore Near-Earth Objects Survey (CINEOS), an observatory built in 1951, which forms a branch of the Rome Observatory.

 

Campo Imperatore has been popular with filmmakers. The location has been used in more than twenty major films, among them The Name of the Rose, Krull, Ladyhawke, Il sole anche di notte, and L'Armata ritorna.

     

L'altopiano si estende per oltre 15 km di lunghezza e 5 di larghezza, a partire dai 1500m fino ai 2100m di quota, ed è parte del Parco Nazionale del Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga. È soprannominato "piccolo Tibet" per la somiglianza unica, su piccola scala, dei suoi scenari con quelli del vasto altopiano asiatico.

 

Contornato da cime che raggiungono e superano i 2500m con scenari suggestivi, Campo Imperatore è raggiungibile tramite una moderna funivia da 100 posti che parte da Fonte Cerreto (1150 m s.l.m.) ed impiega soli 7 minuti per raggiungere i 2130m di quota con un dislivello di 997m, oppure tramite una strada molto panoramica, la S.S.17 bis, (chiusa in inverno per neve) che, proseguendo la S.P.86 proveniente dal Passo delle Capannelle, sale da Assergi-Fonte Cerreto, ovvero dall'omonima Uscita Autostradale dell'A24 Roma-Teramo.

 

Consistenti sono gli accumuli nevosi d'inverno, tra i più cospicui d'Italia, mentre nella parte bassa della piana si raggiungono facilmente temperature di -25 °C. Con i suoi numerosi piccoli laghetti meteorici è inoltre luogo di pascolo e refrigerio estivo per mandrie e greggi dei centri limitrofi come Castel del Monte, Calascio, Santo Stefano di Sessanio, nonché luogo in passato a forte vocazione di transumanza. Buona anche la biodiversità arborea e quella aviforme con presenza di aquile, falchi, gracchi e numerose specie di passeriformi durante il periodo migratorio.

 

A quota 2117 m ha sede il Giardino Botanico Alpino, dedicato alla coltivazione e allo studio della flora d'elevata altitudine.

 

A 2130 m sorge lo storico Albergo di Campo Imperatore, dove nel 1943, fu tenuto prigioniero Benito Mussolini, fino alla sua liberazione avvenuta il 12 settembre 1943 da parte dei soldati tedeschi guidati dal capitano delle SS Otto Skorzeny (Operazione Quercia).

 

A 2200 m si stagliano le cupole dell'Osservatorio Astronomico, dotato di un telescopio di oltre un metro di diametro gestito dall’Osservatorio Romano di Monte Mario. Nei pressi c'è la piccola chiesa della Madonna della neve, la più alta d'Europa.

Campo Imperatore is a mountain grassland or alpine meadow formed by a high basin shaped plateau located in the Province of L'Aquila in the Abruzzo region of Italy in the Gran Sasso massif. It is the largest plateau of the Apennine ridge. Known as Italy's "Little Tibet"; It is located in the natural park known as the "Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga National Park". Campo Imperatore has a tectonic origin shaped by alluviums and glaciers. The plateau, which is 27 km in length and an average of 8 km in width, lies adjacent to the Apennines' highest peak Corno Grande, and Europe's southernmost glacier, the Calderone; also surrounding the plateau are Monte Prena, Monte Aquila, and the Camicia Mountains to the north and Monte Scindarella, Mesola and Monte Bolza to the south.

 

The plateau's altitude ranges from 1500 to 1900 meters. It covers an expanse of approximately 80 km². Campo Imperatore is home to one of Italy's oldest alpine ski resorts. Located on the plateau's western edge, the resort began commercial operation in the 1920s and continues to thrive as a ski resort to this day due to its proximity to Rome (132 km or an hour-and-a-half by car). The resort became dictator Benito Mussolini's prison in August 1943 with his fall from power until he was freed by German commandos in September 1943. On the eastern side of the plateau is a 4 km cross country ski trail, which is maintained by the nearby town of Castel del Monte.

 

On the southeastern side of Campo Imperatore are medieval hill towns once ruled by the Medicis, Castel Del Monte and Santo Stefano di Sessanio as well as the ruin of one of Europe's highest fortresses, Rocca Calascio. In spring, summer and fall, shepherds from these neighboring hill towns maintain herds of sheep, "semi-wild" horses, and cattle in the plateau. The pastures are covered with field grasses and meadowland wild flowers. Campo Imperatore is also home to the Alpine Botanical Garden of Campo Imperatore. Founded in 1952, the garden is devoted to cultivation and study of some 300 species indigenous mountainous plants, including rare and endangered plant species, among them Vaccinium gaultherioides, Yellow Gentiana, (Gentiana lutea), Edelweiss of the Apennines (Leontopodium nivale), and Adonis distorta -- all plants that have adapted to Campo Imperatore's unique environment. Campo Imperatore is also the habitat for the Apennine wolf, Apennine wildcat and the Abruzzo chamois. Nearly extinct, the Abruzzo chamois, which naturalists consider one of the most beautiful varieties of chamois, is making a comeback through a joint effort by WWF Italia and the administration of the Gran Sasso National Park. Other species of wildlife include wild boar, foxes, grass snakes, and a wide variety of bird life including golden eagles and peregrine falcons.

 

Also located on the high plateau, taking advantage of the elevation and absence of man-made light, is the Campo Imperatore Near-Earth Objects Survey (CINEOS), an observatory built in 1951, which forms a branch of the Rome Observatory.

 

Campo Imperatore has been popular with filmmakers. The location has been used in more than twenty major films, among them The Name of the Rose, Krull, Ladyhawke, Il sole anche di notte, and L'Armata ritorna.

     

L'altopiano si estende per oltre 15 km di lunghezza e 5 di larghezza, a partire dai 1500m fino ai 2100m di quota, ed è parte del Parco Nazionale del Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga. È soprannominato "piccolo Tibet" per la somiglianza unica, su piccola scala, dei suoi scenari con quelli del vasto altopiano asiatico.

 

Contornato da cime che raggiungono e superano i 2500m con scenari suggestivi, Campo Imperatore è raggiungibile tramite una moderna funivia da 100 posti che parte da Fonte Cerreto (1150 m s.l.m.) ed impiega soli 7 minuti per raggiungere i 2130m di quota con un dislivello di 997m, oppure tramite una strada molto panoramica, la S.S.17 bis, (chiusa in inverno per neve) che, proseguendo la S.P.86 proveniente dal Passo delle Capannelle, sale da Assergi-Fonte Cerreto, ovvero dall'omonima Uscita Autostradale dell'A24 Roma-Teramo.

 

Consistenti sono gli accumuli nevosi d'inverno, tra i più cospicui d'Italia, mentre nella parte bassa della piana si raggiungono facilmente temperature di -25 °C. Con i suoi numerosi piccoli laghetti meteorici è inoltre luogo di pascolo e refrigerio estivo per mandrie e greggi dei centri limitrofi come Castel del Monte, Calascio, Santo Stefano di Sessanio, nonché luogo in passato a forte vocazione di transumanza. Buona anche la biodiversità arborea e quella aviforme con presenza di aquile, falchi, gracchi e numerose specie di passeriformi durante il periodo migratorio.

 

A quota 2117 m ha sede il Giardino Botanico Alpino, dedicato alla coltivazione e allo studio della flora d'elevata altitudine.

 

A 2130 m sorge lo storico Albergo di Campo Imperatore, dove nel 1943, fu tenuto prigioniero Benito Mussolini, fino alla sua liberazione avvenuta il 12 settembre 1943 da parte dei soldati tedeschi guidati dal capitano delle SS Otto Skorzeny (Operazione Quercia).

 

A 2200 m si stagliano le cupole dell'Osservatorio Astronomico, dotato di un telescopio di oltre un metro di diametro gestito dall’Osservatorio Romano di Monte Mario. Nei pressi c'è la piccola chiesa della Madonna della neve, la più alta d'Europa.

Photography and Production by: Waleed Irfan

Location: Rawalpindi, Pakistan

 

www.flickr.com/fotorix

 

Copyright © 2011 Fotorix Studio. All rights reserved.

 

Note: Don't use without permission.

Edward Henry Weston was born March 24, 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois. He spent the majority of his childhood in Chicago where he attended Oakland Grammar School. He began photographing at the age of sixteen after receiving a Bull’s Eye #2 camera from his father. Weston’s first photographs captured the parks of Chicago and his aunt’s farm. In 1906, following the publication of his first photograph in Camera and Darkroom, Weston moved to California. After working briefly as a surveyor for San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, he began working as an itinerant photographer. He peddled his wares door to door photographing children, pets and funerals. Realizing the need for formal training, in 1908 Weston returned east and attended the Illinois College of Photography in Effingham, Illinois. He completed the 12-month course in six months and returned to California. In Los Angeles, he was employed as a retoucher at the George Steckel Portrait Studio. In 1909, Weston moved on to the Louis A. Mojoiner Portrait Studio as a photographer and demonstrated outstanding abilities with lighting and posing.) Weston married his first wife, Flora Chandler in 1909. He had four children with Flora; Edward Chandler (1910), Theodore Brett (1911), Laurence Neil (1916) and Cole (1919). In 1911, Weston opened his own portrait studio in Tropico, California. This would be his base of operation for the next two decades. Weston became successful working in soft-focus, pictorial style; winning many salons and professional awards. Weston gained an international reputation for his high key portraits and modern dance studies. Articles about his work were published in magazines such as American Photography, Photo Era and Photo Miniature. Weston also authored many articles himself for many of these publications. In 1912, Weston met photographer Margrethe Mather in his Tropico studio. Mather becomes his studio assistant and most frequent model for the next decade. Mather had a very strong influence on Weston. He would later call her, “the first important woman in my life.” Weston began keeping journals in 1915 that came to be known as his "Daybooks." They would chronicle his life and photographic development into the 1930’s.

 

In 1922 Weston visited the ARMCO Steel Plant in Middletown, Ohio. The photographs taken here marked a turning point in Weston’s career. During this period, Weston renounced his Pictorialism style with a new emphasis on abstract form and sharper resolution of detail. The industrial photographs were true straight images: unpretentious, and true to reality. Weston later wrote, “The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Weston also traveled to New York City this same year, where he met Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

In 1923 Weston moved to Mexico City where he opened a photographic studio with his apprentice and lover Tina Modotti. Many important portraits and nudes were taken during his time in Mexico. It was also here that famous artists; Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco hailed Weston as the master of 20th century art.

 

After moving back to California in 1926, Weston began his work for which he is most deservedly famous: natural forms, close-ups, nudes, and landscapes. Between 1927 and 1930, Weston made a series of monumental close-ups of seashells, peppers, and halved cabbages, bringing out the rich textures of their sculpture-like forms. Weston moved to Carmel, California in 1929 and shot the first of many photographs of rocks and trees at Point Lobos, California. Weston became one of the founding members of Group f/64 in 1932 with Ansel Adams, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and Sonya Noskowiak. The group chose this optical term because they habitually set their lenses to that aperture to secure maximum image sharpness of both foreground and distance. 1936 marked the start of Weston’s series of nudes and sand dunes in Oceano, California, which are often considered some of his finest work. Weston became the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for experimental work in 1936. Following the receipt of this fellowship Weston spent the next two years taking photographs in the West and Southwest United States with assistant and future wife Charis Wilson. Later, in 1941 using photographs of the East and South Weston provided illustrations for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

 

Weston began experiencing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in 1946 and in 1948 shot his last photograph of Point Lobos. In 1946 the Museum of Modern Art, New York featured a major retrospective of 300 prints of Weston’s work. Over the next 10 years of progressively incapacitating illness, Weston supervised the printing of his prints by his sons, Brett and Cole. His 50th Anniversary Portfolio was published in 1952 with photographs printed by Brett. An even larger printing project took place between1952 and 1955. Brett printed what was known as the Project Prints. A series of 8 -10 prints from 832 negatives considered Edward's lifetime best. The Smithsonian Institution held

the show, “The World of Edward Weston” in 1956 paying tribute to his remarkable accomplishments in American photography. Edward Weston died on January 1, 1958 at his home, Wildcat Hill, in Carmel, California. Weston's ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean at Pebbly Beach at Point Lobos.

www.edward-weston.com/edward_weston_biography.htm

Danielle Maye on a fur bed. Promo still from The Love Of Fur; full stills set at www.mrmockle.com

Woodrow Wilson High School, located at 100 S. Glasgow Rd in the East section of Dallas Texas.

** It was named in honor of former U.S. president Woodrow Wilson, who died just three years before the school building was completed. The structure is a Dallas Landmark, as well as a Recorded Texas Historic Landmark, "the highest honor the state can bestow on a historic structure." It has been called a "Historic School Success Story" by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The school has the highest ratings given by the Texas Education Agency. It met criteria in all four indices: student achievement; student progress; closing performance gaps; and college readiness. It earned distinction in all possible areas: reading/language arts; math; and top 25% student progress. Under the new STAAR tests in 2013, Woodrow upped its cumulative scores by 49.5 points and was cited as number one in academic gains for the district by The Dallas Morning News. The school also improved graduation rates by 19.8% from 2009 to 2012. The new 2014 TEA rankings are the same, with the school improving to four areas of distinction.

Woodrow enrolls students in grades 9-12 and is a part of the Dallas Independent School District. In 2009, DISD authorized Woodrow to apply to become certified as the first Dallas school to be authorized as an IB World School offering the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme, a/k/a the IB Degree. It earned its official designation as an IB World School on March 18, 2011. Designed by noted Dallas architect Mark Lemmon, the school opened in 1928 and was constructed in the Elizabethan style. At the cornerstone-laying ceremony in April 1927, a piece of the wedding cake of Woodrow Wilson's second daughter, Jessie, was included in the cornerstone "in memory of Mr. Wilson." At US$700,000, the school's cost exceeded that of the district's previous four high schools by at least $100,000. The ornamental lighting was made by Potter Art Metal Studios of Dallas; a 90 year company still in existence. Special features of the building included a gymnasium boasting "one entire wall of glass windows" and an auditorium that was to be the "best equipped and best lighted" in the district, with footlights and a separately ventilated orchestra pit. A theater organ was later placed in the pit and pipes put in special lofts on the third level. Also on the third floor was 'the largest eating place in Dallas', the school cafeteria; in previous Dallas high schools the cafeteria was at grade level, so at the new high school a special elevator was installed to service the eating facility. The September 1928, Dallas Herald said the school "presents a rare spectacle from afar." Photos and the original blueprints of the school building were featured in an exhibition celebrating the works of Mark Lemmon at The Meadows Museum.The school has been colloquially called "Woodrow" by students and community members from its beginning, fostered by first principal G.L. "Pop" Ashburn, who led the school until 1956. The mascot of the school is the Wildcat. A Parent Teacher Association chapter was formed for the school even before its 1928 opening. There have been several notable alumni to attend Woodrow Wilson.

Trammell Crow 1932, major Dallas builder and real estate mogul..

Burton Gilliam 1956, Character Actor in films and television..

Jerry Haynes 1944, actor and former children's television host "Mr. Peppermint"..

Dusty Hill, bassist for ZZ Top..

Jim Mattox 1961, Former Attorney General of Texas and U.S. Congressman..

Steve Miller 1961, musician..

Carroll Shelby 1940, race car driver, 1959 24 Heures du Mans Winner & Founder of Shelby-American Co & many others.**

**The information above & for more to read, is from the website:. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodrow_Wilson_High_School_(Dallas) ..

The structure was built Circa: 1928..

Photo Taken: October 5 2014..

Photo Taken By: Randy A. Carlisle

ALL Photos (Unless otherwise stated) Copyright RAC Photography

"Preserving AMERICAs History Thru Photography"

... ***NO Photos are to be posted on ANY other website, or any kind of publication Without MY Permission. No Exceptions! They are not to be "Lifted", Borrowed, reprinted, or by any other means other than viewing here on Facebook or Flickr. If you want to use a photo of mine for anything, please email First. I'll assist you any way I can. Thank You for your understanding. ALL Photos are For Sale.***

Bengal tiger on a dawn in prairie

Thank you to [inFocus] for use of his studio and some figures before we head off to Norway tomorrow.

Aubrey Drake Graham (born October 24, 1986), who records under the mononym Drake, is a Canadian recording artist and actor. He originally became known for playing character Jimmy Brooks on the television series Degrassi: The Next Generation. Graham continued to recognize a close affiliation with Lil Wayne's Young Money Entertainment,[1] before officially signing with the record label in June 2009.[2] In November 2009, Lil Wayne released a statement announcing that Drake's first studio album, Thank Me Later, had been completed; the album was released on June 15, 2010 and debuted at number one on the Billboard 200.[3]

 

Graham has worked with several other hip-hop artist such as Lil Wayne, Jeezy, Kanye West, Eminem, and Jay-Z. With the success of his mixtape turned EP So Far Gone, Graham has been nominated for several awards including the Grammys; even being selected to perform at the 2010 Grammy awards. Graham also won several awards, including two Juno Awards in 2010 for Best New Artist, and Rap Recording of the Year.

 

Personal life

 

Graham is good friends with many of his Degrassi cast-mates, particularly Shane Kippel, who played his best friend Spinner Mason on the show.

 

In 2008, Graham spoke about his past relationships on a song called "Deceiving" using each verse to address different women. In Verse 1, he spoke about video-girl Dia Edwards. In Verse 3, he spoke about classmate Alisha Phillips.

 

He then spoke about his past relationship with Keshia Chanté on the Verse 2 of his song "Deceiving", referencing Chanté's mother, Tessa,[35] stating "when I say I'm serious, you claim you're only teasing" and "What up Tessa? I love you like my own mama, and your daughters getting grown mama, and me, I'm just here working, waiting, patient for her to be ready for love and leave alone drama"[35]

 

In May 2009, Graham finally spoke with MuchMusic about his song "Deceiving" and addressed speculation of his past relationship with Chanté, "Would I call Keshia Chante an ex? I'd be proud to say she is an ex. I'm proud to say we had our time, when we were, like 16 years old. She's great. She's one of the first people in the industry that I met, we just connected."[36]

 

In June 2009, Graham did two remixes to Chante's song "Fallen" where he addresses his love for her; on Version 1 he raps "Keshia, Keshia, do you remember the old us? They said we'd never be together that's what they told us. Immature kids, to entrepreneur kids." On Version 2, he raps "you just hold it down for your boy until the plaques arrive, that's why I love you."

 

MuchMusic later asked Chanté on how she felt about Graham. She kept mum, later saying, "I will love that man unconditionally for the rest of my life. He knows what it is. We have history. I've known him since I was a little girl. We just have a love/hate relationship, so I prefer to love him from afar."

 

Online rumors swirled stating that Graham was in a relationship with Rihanna. Both parties denied that claim, with Graham stating "we're just good friends."[37]

 

Graham is a fan of the Kentucky Wildcats and a friend to head coach John Calipari. On October 16, 2009, Graham made an appearance at the University of Kentucky men's basketball event, "Big Blue Madness" at Rupp Arena. On January 2, 2009, Graham also attended Kentucky's game against the University of Louisville and accompanied Calipari to his post game radio show.[38] Graham returned to the University of Kentucky on April 27, 2010, to perform a concert.

 

He is featured on Complex Magazine first issue of 2010. In the February-March issue he discusses his relationship with Lil Wayne, competition with new coming artist, getting inspired by ex-girlfriends, and the details on his debut studio album, Thank Me Later.

 

In July 2010, Drake postponed his entire European tour due to his mother's illness.

 

www.myspace.com/thisisdrake

64321905 - eurasian lynx (lynx lynx)

Edward Henry Weston was born March 24, 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois. He spent the majority of his childhood in Chicago where he attended Oakland Grammar School. He began photographing at the age of sixteen after receiving a Bull’s Eye #2 camera from his father. Weston’s first photographs captured the parks of Chicago and his aunt’s farm. In 1906, following the publication of his first photograph in Camera and Darkroom, Weston moved to California. After working briefly as a surveyor for San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, he began working as an itinerant photographer. He peddled his wares door to door photographing children, pets and funerals. Realizing the need for formal training, in 1908 Weston returned east and attended the Illinois College of Photography in Effingham, Illinois. He completed the 12-month course in six months and returned to California. In Los Angeles, he was employed as a retoucher at the George Steckel Portrait Studio. In 1909, Weston moved on to the Louis A. Mojoiner Portrait Studio as a photographer and demonstrated outstanding abilities with lighting and posing.) Weston married his first wife, Flora Chandler in 1909. He had four children with Flora; Edward Chandler (1910), Theodore Brett (1911), Laurence Neil (1916) and Cole (1919). In 1911, Weston opened his own portrait studio in Tropico, California. This would be his base of operation for the next two decades. Weston became successful working in soft-focus, pictorial style; winning many salons and professional awards. Weston gained an international reputation for his high key portraits and modern dance studies. Articles about his work were published in magazines such as American Photography, Photo Era and Photo Miniature. Weston also authored many articles himself for many of these publications. In 1912, Weston met photographer Margrethe Mather in his Tropico studio. Mather becomes his studio assistant and most frequent model for the next decade. Mather had a very strong influence on Weston. He would later call her, “the first important woman in my life.” Weston began keeping journals in 1915 that came to be known as his "Daybooks." They would chronicle his life and photographic development into the 1930’s.

 

In 1922 Weston visited the ARMCO Steel Plant in Middletown, Ohio. The photographs taken here marked a turning point in Weston’s career. During this period, Weston renounced his Pictorialism style with a new emphasis on abstract form and sharper resolution of detail. The industrial photographs were true straight images: unpretentious, and true to reality. Weston later wrote, “The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Weston also traveled to New York City this same year, where he met Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

In 1923 Weston moved to Mexico City where he opened a photographic studio with his apprentice and lover Tina Modotti. Many important portraits and nudes were taken during his time in Mexico. It was also here that famous artists; Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco hailed Weston as the master of 20th century art.

 

After moving back to California in 1926, Weston began his work for which he is most deservedly famous: natural forms, close-ups, nudes, and landscapes. Between 1927 and 1930, Weston made a series of monumental close-ups of seashells, peppers, and halved cabbages, bringing out the rich textures of their sculpture-like forms. Weston moved to Carmel, California in 1929 and shot the first of many photographs of rocks and trees at Point Lobos, California. Weston became one of the founding members of Group f/64 in 1932 with Ansel Adams, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and Sonya Noskowiak. The group chose this optical term because they habitually set their lenses to that aperture to secure maximum image sharpness of both foreground and distance. 1936 marked the start of Weston’s series of nudes and sand dunes in Oceano, California, which are often considered some of his finest work. Weston became the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for experimental work in 1936. Following the receipt of this fellowship Weston spent the next two years taking photographs in the West and Southwest United States with assistant and future wife Charis Wilson. Later, in 1941 using photographs of the East and South Weston provided illustrations for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

 

Weston began experiencing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in 1946 and in 1948 shot his last photograph of Point Lobos. In 1946 the Museum of Modern Art, New York featured a major retrospective of 300 prints of Weston’s work. Over the next 10 years of progressively incapacitating illness, Weston supervised the printing of his prints by his sons, Brett and Cole. His 50th Anniversary Portfolio was published in 1952 with photographs printed by Brett. An even larger printing project took place between1952 and 1955. Brett printed what was known as the Project Prints. A series of 8 -10 prints from 832 negatives considered Edward's lifetime best. The Smithsonian Institution held

the show, “The World of Edward Weston” in 1956 paying tribute to his remarkable accomplishments in American photography. Edward Weston died on January 1, 1958 at his home, Wildcat Hill, in Carmel, California. Weston's ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean at Pebbly Beach at Point Lobos.

www.edward-weston.com/edward_weston_biography.htm

2010 Millefiori, glass, bakelite on steel Photo courtesy of Mr Stacy Smith of Wildcat Studios

East & West Mitten Buttes from

the Wildcat Trail. SNP15

This one is Miltonidium Wildcat ‘Chocolate Danish’, a Miltonia x Oncidium hybrid orchid grown by A and K Kerruish of the Cumberland Orchid Circle and photographed using a new mobile studio setup.

Edward Henry Weston was born March 24, 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois. He spent the majority of his childhood in Chicago where he attended Oakland Grammar School. He began photographing at the age of sixteen after receiving a Bull’s Eye #2 camera from his father. Weston’s first photographs captured the parks of Chicago and his aunt’s farm. In 1906, following the publication of his first photograph in Camera and Darkroom, Weston moved to California. After working briefly as a surveyor for San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, he began working as an itinerant photographer. He peddled his wares door to door photographing children, pets and funerals. Realizing the need for formal training, in 1908 Weston returned east and attended the Illinois College of Photography in Effingham, Illinois. He completed the 12-month course in six months and returned to California. In Los Angeles, he was employed as a retoucher at the George Steckel Portrait Studio. In 1909, Weston moved on to the Louis A. Mojoiner Portrait Studio as a photographer and demonstrated outstanding abilities with lighting and posing.) Weston married his first wife, Flora Chandler in 1909. He had four children with Flora; Edward Chandler (1910), Theodore Brett (1911), Laurence Neil (1916) and Cole (1919). In 1911, Weston opened his own portrait studio in Tropico, California. This would be his base of operation for the next two decades. Weston became successful working in soft-focus, pictorial style; winning many salons and professional awards. Weston gained an international reputation for his high key portraits and modern dance studies. Articles about his work were published in magazines such as American Photography, Photo Era and Photo Miniature. Weston also authored many articles himself for many of these publications. In 1912, Weston met photographer Margrethe Mather in his Tropico studio. Mather becomes his studio assistant and most frequent model for the next decade. Mather had a very strong influence on Weston. He would later call her, “the first important woman in my life.” Weston began keeping journals in 1915 that came to be known as his "Daybooks." They would chronicle his life and photographic development into the 1930’s.

 

In 1922 Weston visited the ARMCO Steel Plant in Middletown, Ohio. The photographs taken here marked a turning point in Weston’s career. During this period, Weston renounced his Pictorialism style with a new emphasis on abstract form and sharper resolution of detail. The industrial photographs were true straight images: unpretentious, and true to reality. Weston later wrote, “The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Weston also traveled to New York City this same year, where he met Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

In 1923 Weston moved to Mexico City where he opened a photographic studio with his apprentice and lover Tina Modotti. Many important portraits and nudes were taken during his time in Mexico. It was also here that famous artists; Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco hailed Weston as the master of 20th century art.

 

After moving back to California in 1926, Weston began his work for which he is most deservedly famous: natural forms, close-ups, nudes, and landscapes. Between 1927 and 1930, Weston made a series of monumental close-ups of seashells, peppers, and halved cabbages, bringing out the rich textures of their sculpture-like forms. Weston moved to Carmel, California in 1929 and shot the first of many photographs of rocks and trees at Point Lobos, California. Weston became one of the founding members of Group f/64 in 1932 with Ansel Adams, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and Sonya Noskowiak. The group chose this optical term because they habitually set their lenses to that aperture to secure maximum image sharpness of both foreground and distance. 1936 marked the start of Weston’s series of nudes and sand dunes in Oceano, California, which are often considered some of his finest work. Weston became the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for experimental work in 1936. Following the receipt of this fellowship Weston spent the next two years taking photographs in the West and Southwest United States with assistant and future wife Charis Wilson. Later, in 1941 using photographs of the East and South Weston provided illustrations for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

 

Weston began experiencing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in 1946 and in 1948 shot his last photograph of Point Lobos. In 1946 the Museum of Modern Art, New York featured a major retrospective of 300 prints of Weston’s work. Over the next 10 years of progressively incapacitating illness, Weston supervised the printing of his prints by his sons, Brett and Cole. His 50th Anniversary Portfolio was published in 1952 with photographs printed by Brett. An even larger printing project took place between1952 and 1955. Brett printed what was known as the Project Prints. A series of 8 -10 prints from 832 negatives considered Edward's lifetime best. The Smithsonian Institution held

the show, “The World of Edward Weston” in 1956 paying tribute to his remarkable accomplishments in American photography. Edward Weston died on January 1, 1958 at his home, Wildcat Hill, in Carmel, California. Weston's ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean at Pebbly Beach at Point Lobos.

www.edward-weston.com/edward_weston_biography.htm

Place Des Stars - Walt Disney Studios, Paris.

Model: Ria Berdin

HMUA: Lea Vanessa Ancheta

Location: Art Movement Studio in Pasig

Photographer: Choy Rosales

 

© Choy Rosales Photography

The cat (Felis catus), also known as the domestic cat or housecatto distinguish it from other felines and felids, is a small carnivorous mammal that is valued by humans for its companionship and its ability to hunt vermin and household pests. It has been associated with humans for at least 9,500 yearsand is currently the most popular pet in the world.

A skilled predator, the cat is known to hunt over 1,000 species for food. It can be trained to obey simple commands. Individual cats have also been known to learn on their own to manipulate simple mechanisms, such as doorknobs and toilet handles.Cats use a variety of vocalizations and types of body language for communication, including meowing, purring, trilling, hissing, growling, squeaking, chirping, clicking, and grunting.They are also bred and shown as registered pedigree pets. This hobby is known as cat fancy.

Until recently the cat was commonly believed to have been domesticated in ancient Egypt, where it was a cult animal. A study in 2007 found that the lines of descent of all house cats probably run through as few as five self-domesticating African Wildcats (Felis silvestris lybica) circa 8000 BC, in the Near East. The earliest direct evidence of cat domestication is a kitten that was buried with its owner 9,500 years ago in Cyprus.

 

Il gatto domestico (Felis silvestris catus) è un mammifero carnivoro di piccola taglia della famiglia dei felidi (genere Felis). Tradizionalmente l'antico Egitto e Mesopotamia viene indicato come luogo di origine, dove era considerato un animale sacro e, in alcuni casi, mummificato e messo nei sarcofagi delle famiglie più ricche. Un recente studio, pubblicato sulla rivista Science, ha evidenziato, attraverso studi genetici, che tale luogo andrebbe individuato nel Medio Oriente; precisamente nella mezzaluna fertile. Tutto ciò in coincidenza con lo sviluppo delle prime forme di agricoltura. Fu l'uomo, si presume nello studio, a favorire la diffusione del felino portandolo con lui nelle migrazioni. Si può trovare allo stato selvatico (ne esistono ancora diverse specie), ma prevalentemente vive nell'ambito domestico e spesso ha ruolo di animale da affezione. La sua temperatura corporea oscilla fra i 38° e i 38,5 °C; la frequenza respiratoria normale è di 10/20 respiri al minuto e quella cardiaca di 110/140 battiti al minuto. Il suo corpo è agile, flessibile e massiccio, tale da consentirgli di camminare in modo silenziosissimo e di spiccare grandi salti; le sue unghie retrattili (più precisamente protrattili, dato che nella condizione ordinaria di riposo si trovano nascoste e sono estratte solo all'occorrenza) gli permettono di arrampicarsi con grande agilità.

 

Fonte : Wikipedia

  

Edward Henry Weston was born March 24, 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois. He spent the majority of his childhood in Chicago where he attended Oakland Grammar School. He began photographing at the age of sixteen after receiving a Bull’s Eye #2 camera from his father. Weston’s first photographs captured the parks of Chicago and his aunt’s farm. In 1906, following the publication of his first photograph in Camera and Darkroom, Weston moved to California. After working briefly as a surveyor for San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, he began working as an itinerant photographer. He peddled his wares door to door photographing children, pets and funerals. Realizing the need for formal training, in 1908 Weston returned east and attended the Illinois College of Photography in Effingham, Illinois. He completed the 12-month course in six months and returned to California. In Los Angeles, he was employed as a retoucher at the George Steckel Portrait Studio. In 1909, Weston moved on to the Louis A. Mojoiner Portrait Studio as a photographer and demonstrated outstanding abilities with lighting and posing.) Weston married his first wife, Flora Chandler in 1909. He had four children with Flora; Edward Chandler (1910), Theodore Brett (1911), Laurence Neil (1916) and Cole (1919). In 1911, Weston opened his own portrait studio in Tropico, California. This would be his base of operation for the next two decades. Weston became successful working in soft-focus, pictorial style; winning many salons and professional awards. Weston gained an international reputation for his high key portraits and modern dance studies. Articles about his work were published in magazines such as American Photography, Photo Era and Photo Miniature. Weston also authored many articles himself for many of these publications. In 1912, Weston met photographer Margrethe Mather in his Tropico studio. Mather becomes his studio assistant and most frequent model for the next decade. Mather had a very strong influence on Weston. He would later call her, “the first important woman in my life.” Weston began keeping journals in 1915 that came to be known as his "Daybooks." They would chronicle his life and photographic development into the 1930’s.

 

In 1922 Weston visited the ARMCO Steel Plant in Middletown, Ohio. The photographs taken here marked a turning point in Weston’s career. During this period, Weston renounced his Pictorialism style with a new emphasis on abstract form and sharper resolution of detail. The industrial photographs were true straight images: unpretentious, and true to reality. Weston later wrote, “The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Weston also traveled to New York City this same year, where he met Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

In 1923 Weston moved to Mexico City where he opened a photographic studio with his apprentice and lover Tina Modotti. Many important portraits and nudes were taken during his time in Mexico. It was also here that famous artists; Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco hailed Weston as the master of 20th century art.

 

After moving back to California in 1926, Weston began his work for which he is most deservedly famous: natural forms, close-ups, nudes, and landscapes. Between 1927 and 1930, Weston made a series of monumental close-ups of seashells, peppers, and halved cabbages, bringing out the rich textures of their sculpture-like forms. Weston moved to Carmel, California in 1929 and shot the first of many photographs of rocks and trees at Point Lobos, California. Weston became one of the founding members of Group f/64 in 1932 with Ansel Adams, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and Sonya Noskowiak. The group chose this optical term because they habitually set their lenses to that aperture to secure maximum image sharpness of both foreground and distance. 1936 marked the start of Weston’s series of nudes and sand dunes in Oceano, California, which are often considered some of his finest work. Weston became the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for experimental work in 1936. Following the receipt of this fellowship Weston spent the next two years taking photographs in the West and Southwest United States with assistant and future wife Charis Wilson. Later, in 1941 using photographs of the East and South Weston provided illustrations for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

 

Weston began experiencing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in 1946 and in 1948 shot his last photograph of Point Lobos. In 1946 the Museum of Modern Art, New York featured a major retrospective of 300 prints of Weston’s work. Over the next 10 years of progressively incapacitating illness, Weston supervised the printing of his prints by his sons, Brett and Cole. His 50th Anniversary Portfolio was published in 1952 with photographs printed by Brett. An even larger printing project took place between1952 and 1955. Brett printed what was known as the Project Prints. A series of 8 -10 prints from 832 negatives considered Edward's lifetime best. The Smithsonian Institution held

the show, “The World of Edward Weston” in 1956 paying tribute to his remarkable accomplishments in American photography. Edward Weston died on January 1, 1958 at his home, Wildcat Hill, in Carmel, California. Weston's ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean at Pebbly Beach at Point Lobos.

www.edward-weston.com/edward_weston_biography.htm

Campo Imperatore is a mountain grassland or alpine meadow formed by a high basin shaped plateau located in the Province of L'Aquila in the Abruzzo region of Italy in the Gran Sasso massif. It is the largest plateau of the Apennine ridge. Known as Italy's "Little Tibet"; It is located in the natural park known as the "Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga National Park". Campo Imperatore has a tectonic origin shaped by alluviums and glaciers. The plateau, which is 27 km in length and an average of 8 km in width, lies adjacent to the Apennines' highest peak Corno Grande, and Europe's southernmost glacier, the Calderone; also surrounding the plateau are Monte Prena, Monte Aquila, and the Camicia Mountains to the north and Monte Scindarella, Mesola and Monte Bolza to the south.

 

The plateau's altitude ranges from 1500 to 1900 meters. It covers an expanse of approximately 80 km². Campo Imperatore is home to one of Italy's oldest alpine ski resorts. Located on the plateau's western edge, the resort began commercial operation in the 1920s and continues to thrive as a ski resort to this day due to its proximity to Rome (132 km or an hour-and-a-half by car). The resort became dictator Benito Mussolini's prison in August 1943 with his fall from power until he was freed by German commandos in September 1943. On the eastern side of the plateau is a 4 km cross country ski trail, which is maintained by the nearby town of Castel del Monte.

 

On the southeastern side of Campo Imperatore are medieval hill towns once ruled by the Medicis, Castel Del Monte and Santo Stefano di Sessanio as well as the ruin of one of Europe's highest fortresses, Rocca Calascio. In spring, summer and fall, shepherds from these neighboring hill towns maintain herds of sheep, "semi-wild" horses, and cattle in the plateau. The pastures are covered with field grasses and meadowland wild flowers. Campo Imperatore is also home to the Alpine Botanical Garden of Campo Imperatore. Founded in 1952, the garden is devoted to cultivation and study of some 300 species indigenous mountainous plants, including rare and endangered plant species, among them Vaccinium gaultherioides, Yellow Gentiana, (Gentiana lutea), Edelweiss of the Apennines (Leontopodium nivale), and Adonis distorta -- all plants that have adapted to Campo Imperatore's unique environment. Campo Imperatore is also the habitat for the Apennine wolf, Apennine wildcat and the Abruzzo chamois. Nearly extinct, the Abruzzo chamois, which naturalists consider one of the most beautiful varieties of chamois, is making a comeback through a joint effort by WWF Italia and the administration of the Gran Sasso National Park. Other species of wildlife include wild boar, foxes, grass snakes, and a wide variety of bird life including golden eagles and peregrine falcons.

 

Also located on the high plateau, taking advantage of the elevation and absence of man-made light, is the Campo Imperatore Near-Earth Objects Survey (CINEOS), an observatory built in 1951, which forms a branch of the Rome Observatory.

 

Campo Imperatore has been popular with filmmakers. The location has been used in more than twenty major films, among them The Name of the Rose, Krull, Ladyhawke, Il sole anche di notte, and L'Armata ritorna.

     

L'altopiano si estende per oltre 15 km di lunghezza e 5 di larghezza, a partire dai 1500m fino ai 2100m di quota, ed è parte del Parco Nazionale del Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga. È soprannominato "piccolo Tibet" per la somiglianza unica, su piccola scala, dei suoi scenari con quelli del vasto altopiano asiatico.

 

Contornato da cime che raggiungono e superano i 2500m con scenari suggestivi, Campo Imperatore è raggiungibile tramite una moderna funivia da 100 posti che parte da Fonte Cerreto (1150 m s.l.m.) ed impiega soli 7 minuti per raggiungere i 2130m di quota con un dislivello di 997m, oppure tramite una strada molto panoramica, la S.S.17 bis, (chiusa in inverno per neve) che, proseguendo la S.P.86 proveniente dal Passo delle Capannelle, sale da Assergi-Fonte Cerreto, ovvero dall'omonima Uscita Autostradale dell'A24 Roma-Teramo.

 

Consistenti sono gli accumuli nevosi d'inverno, tra i più cospicui d'Italia, mentre nella parte bassa della piana si raggiungono facilmente temperature di -25 °C. Con i suoi numerosi piccoli laghetti meteorici è inoltre luogo di pascolo e refrigerio estivo per mandrie e greggi dei centri limitrofi come Castel del Monte, Calascio, Santo Stefano di Sessanio, nonché luogo in passato a forte vocazione di transumanza. Buona anche la biodiversità arborea e quella aviforme con presenza di aquile, falchi, gracchi e numerose specie di passeriformi durante il periodo migratorio.

 

A quota 2117 m ha sede il Giardino Botanico Alpino, dedicato alla coltivazione e allo studio della flora d'elevata altitudine.

 

A 2130 m sorge lo storico Albergo di Campo Imperatore, dove nel 1943, fu tenuto prigioniero Benito Mussolini, fino alla sua liberazione avvenuta il 12 settembre 1943 da parte dei soldati tedeschi guidati dal capitano delle SS Otto Skorzeny (Operazione Quercia).

 

A 2200 m si stagliano le cupole dell'Osservatorio Astronomico, dotato di un telescopio di oltre un metro di diametro gestito dall’Osservatorio Romano di Monte Mario. Nei pressi c'è la piccola chiesa della Madonna della neve, la più alta d'Europa.

Studio Portrait

Siberian Tiger Cub

Natalia Forrest in silver fox and Jessica Lloyd in wildcat. Promo still from The Love Of Fur; full stills set at www.mrmockle.com

Cardigan Welsh Corgi sitting in front of a white background.

 

[url=http://www.istockphoto.com/file_search.php?action=file&userID=902692]Do you love animals? All my pictures are taken in a studio.[/url]

 

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Edward Henry Weston was born March 24, 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois. He spent the majority of his childhood in Chicago where he attended Oakland Grammar School. He began photographing at the age of sixteen after receiving a Bull’s Eye #2 camera from his father. Weston’s first photographs captured the parks of Chicago and his aunt’s farm. In 1906, following the publication of his first photograph in Camera and Darkroom, Weston moved to California. After working briefly as a surveyor for San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, he began working as an itinerant photographer. He peddled his wares door to door photographing children, pets and funerals. Realizing the need for formal training, in 1908 Weston returned east and attended the Illinois College of Photography in Effingham, Illinois. He completed the 12-month course in six months and returned to California. In Los Angeles, he was employed as a retoucher at the George Steckel Portrait Studio. In 1909, Weston moved on to the Louis A. Mojoiner Portrait Studio as a photographer and demonstrated outstanding abilities with lighting and posing.) Weston married his first wife, Flora Chandler in 1909. He had four children with Flora; Edward Chandler (1910), Theodore Brett (1911), Laurence Neil (1916) and Cole (1919). In 1911, Weston opened his own portrait studio in Tropico, California. This would be his base of operation for the next two decades. Weston became successful working in soft-focus, pictorial style; winning many salons and professional awards. Weston gained an international reputation for his high key portraits and modern dance studies. Articles about his work were published in magazines such as American Photography, Photo Era and Photo Miniature. Weston also authored many articles himself for many of these publications. In 1912, Weston met photographer Margrethe Mather in his Tropico studio. Mather becomes his studio assistant and most frequent model for the next decade. Mather had a very strong influence on Weston. He would later call her, “the first important woman in my life.” Weston began keeping journals in 1915 that came to be known as his "Daybooks." They would chronicle his life and photographic development into the 1930’s.

 

In 1922 Weston visited the ARMCO Steel Plant in Middletown, Ohio. The photographs taken here marked a turning point in Weston’s career. During this period, Weston renounced his Pictorialism style with a new emphasis on abstract form and sharper resolution of detail. The industrial photographs were true straight images: unpretentious, and true to reality. Weston later wrote, “The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Weston also traveled to New York City this same year, where he met Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

In 1923 Weston moved to Mexico City where he opened a photographic studio with his apprentice and lover Tina Modotti. Many important portraits and nudes were taken during his time in Mexico. It was also here that famous artists; Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco hailed Weston as the master of 20th century art.

 

After moving back to California in 1926, Weston began his work for which he is most deservedly famous: natural forms, close-ups, nudes, and landscapes. Between 1927 and 1930, Weston made a series of monumental close-ups of seashells, peppers, and halved cabbages, bringing out the rich textures of their sculpture-like forms. Weston moved to Carmel, California in 1929 and shot the first of many photographs of rocks and trees at Point Lobos, California. Weston became one of the founding members of Group f/64 in 1932 with Ansel Adams, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and Sonya Noskowiak. The group chose this optical term because they habitually set their lenses to that aperture to secure maximum image sharpness of both foreground and distance. 1936 marked the start of Weston’s series of nudes and sand dunes in Oceano, California, which are often considered some of his finest work. Weston became the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for experimental work in 1936. Following the receipt of this fellowship Weston spent the next two years taking photographs in the West and Southwest United States with assistant and future wife Charis Wilson. Later, in 1941 using photographs of the East and South Weston provided illustrations for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

 

Weston began experiencing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in 1946 and in 1948 shot his last photograph of Point Lobos. In 1946 the Museum of Modern Art, New York featured a major retrospective of 300 prints of Weston’s work. Over the next 10 years of progressively incapacitating illness, Weston supervised the printing of his prints by his sons, Brett and Cole. His 50th Anniversary Portfolio was published in 1952 with photographs printed by Brett. An even larger printing project took place between1952 and 1955. Brett printed what was known as the Project Prints. A series of 8 -10 prints from 832 negatives considered Edward's lifetime best. The Smithsonian Institution held

the show, “The World of Edward Weston” in 1956 paying tribute to his remarkable accomplishments in American photography. Edward Weston died on January 1, 1958 at his home, Wildcat Hill, in Carmel, California. Weston's ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean at Pebbly Beach at Point Lobos.

www.edward-weston.com/edward_weston_biography.htm

Edward Henry Weston was born March 24, 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois. He spent the majority of his childhood in Chicago where he attended Oakland Grammar School. He began photographing at the age of sixteen after receiving a Bull’s Eye #2 camera from his father. Weston’s first photographs captured the parks of Chicago and his aunt’s farm. In 1906, following the publication of his first photograph in Camera and Darkroom, Weston moved to California. After working briefly as a surveyor for San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, he began working as an itinerant photographer. He peddled his wares door to door photographing children, pets and funerals. Realizing the need for formal training, in 1908 Weston returned east and attended the Illinois College of Photography in Effingham, Illinois. He completed the 12-month course in six months and returned to California. In Los Angeles, he was employed as a retoucher at the George Steckel Portrait Studio. In 1909, Weston moved on to the Louis A. Mojoiner Portrait Studio as a photographer and demonstrated outstanding abilities with lighting and posing.) Weston married his first wife, Flora Chandler in 1909. He had four children with Flora; Edward Chandler (1910), Theodore Brett (1911), Laurence Neil (1916) and Cole (1919). In 1911, Weston opened his own portrait studio in Tropico, California. This would be his base of operation for the next two decades. Weston became successful working in soft-focus, pictorial style; winning many salons and professional awards. Weston gained an international reputation for his high key portraits and modern dance studies. Articles about his work were published in magazines such as American Photography, Photo Era and Photo Miniature. Weston also authored many articles himself for many of these publications. In 1912, Weston met photographer Margrethe Mather in his Tropico studio. Mather becomes his studio assistant and most frequent model for the next decade. Mather had a very strong influence on Weston. He would later call her, “the first important woman in my life.” Weston began keeping journals in 1915 that came to be known as his "Daybooks." They would chronicle his life and photographic development into the 1930’s.

 

In 1922 Weston visited the ARMCO Steel Plant in Middletown, Ohio. The photographs taken here marked a turning point in Weston’s career. During this period, Weston renounced his Pictorialism style with a new emphasis on abstract form and sharper resolution of detail. The industrial photographs were true straight images: unpretentious, and true to reality. Weston later wrote, “The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Weston also traveled to New York City this same year, where he met Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

In 1923 Weston moved to Mexico City where he opened a photographic studio with his apprentice and lover Tina Modotti. Many important portraits and nudes were taken during his time in Mexico. It was also here that famous artists; Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco hailed Weston as the master of 20th century art.

 

After moving back to California in 1926, Weston began his work for which he is most deservedly famous: natural forms, close-ups, nudes, and landscapes. Between 1927 and 1930, Weston made a series of monumental close-ups of seashells, peppers, and halved cabbages, bringing out the rich textures of their sculpture-like forms. Weston moved to Carmel, California in 1929 and shot the first of many photographs of rocks and trees at Point Lobos, California. Weston became one of the founding members of Group f/64 in 1932 with Ansel Adams, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and Sonya Noskowiak. The group chose this optical term because they habitually set their lenses to that aperture to secure maximum image sharpness of both foreground and distance. 1936 marked the start of Weston’s series of nudes and sand dunes in Oceano, California, which are often considered some of his finest work. Weston became the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for experimental work in 1936. Following the receipt of this fellowship Weston spent the next two years taking photographs in the West and Southwest United States with assistant and future wife Charis Wilson. Later, in 1941 using photographs of the East and South Weston provided illustrations for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

 

Weston began experiencing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in 1946 and in 1948 shot his last photograph of Point Lobos. In 1946 the Museum of Modern Art, New York featured a major retrospective of 300 prints of Weston’s work. Over the next 10 years of progressively incapacitating illness, Weston supervised the printing of his prints by his sons, Brett and Cole. His 50th Anniversary Portfolio was published in 1952 with photographs printed by Brett. An even larger printing project took place between1952 and 1955. Brett printed what was known as the Project Prints. A series of 8 -10 prints from 832 negatives considered Edward's lifetime best. The Smithsonian Institution held

the show, “The World of Edward Weston” in 1956 paying tribute to his remarkable accomplishments in American photography. Edward Weston died on January 1, 1958 at his home, Wildcat Hill, in Carmel, California. Weston's ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean at Pebbly Beach at Point Lobos.

www.edward-weston.com/edward_weston_biography.htm

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Not a single week seems to go by these days without me getting at least a couple of emails or Direct Messages from people who are thinking about studying to become, or who are in the process of qualifying as a Personal Trainer asking my advice about starting in the industry. Firstly, I am flattered that anyone would want to ask my advice and am always happy to offer it, and secondly, it is amazing that so many people are now interested in careers in the fitness industry. I’m well aware I post often about how much I love my job and my clients and how I genuinely feel blessed to live the life I do, but as with any job, not everything in the life of a Personal Trainer is shiny new Nikes and super happy clients. Whilst I believe it is one of the most rewarding jobs in the world, it can also be hugely demanding at times, so in the interest of balance and honesty I wanted to share with you the Secrets of a Personal Trainer that no one else will tell you….

 

Photo by Anna Rachel Photography: ift.tt/2mze9GT

 

Last year my post on the Secret Life of a Fitness Instructor was one of my most popular ever Blog posts, and honestly, it felt cathartic to be able to share with you guys the other side of the sweat and smile that you see at the front of your classes week after week. I wanted to do the same for the role that makes up the majority of my working week – that of a Personal Trainer. My advice to anyone thinking of starting a career as a PT is, in the words of Nike, to just do it – and I would genuinely never say anything other than I love my job (because I do), but it isn’t without its challenges and I honestly think that anyone who is thinking of becoming a PT needs to consider aspects of the job they’ve probably never thought of. With Level 3 certificates being handed out left, right and centre these days becoming a PT honestly isn’t that hard. A quick scroll through Instagram will show you that anyone who’s ever done a handful of gym classes or taken an ab selfie considers themselves a Personal Trainer or Coach (some might even go so far as to release an online guide, or take on virtual clients, but that’s a whole other can of worms… and potential Blog post..!) – but are they a good or successful PT? I’ll let you answer that for yourself. Whilst pretty much anyone can become a Personal Trainer, becoming a good Personal Trainer is a very different story. What makes a good Personal Trainer? One who takes the rough with the smooth, who knows there will be good days and bad, great clients and nightmare ones, that you never stop learning and a lot of the time you never stop working (in some form or another) – one who isn’t in this for the social media fame or protein discount codes. So if that is the side you see, what is the side that you don’t? I can’t speak for every PT, but having been doing this full time now for over 4 years (and part time for 2 years before that) I can share with you some of the lessons I’ve learned over the years.

 

The Hours

 

This may seem obvious, but it always amazes me when I meet new PTs who think that they can “fit” clients into their schedule, or be a part- time Personal Trainer. I’m not saying you categorically can’t, but when you’re starting out and want to establish a client base and indeed your reputation, you really need to put in the hours to do so. And any PT worth their salt will have done it. In the early stages of Wildcat Fitness I was regularly working 14 or 15 hour days, and I am now in the fortunate position to not have to do those kind of hours any more on a regular basis – but it does still happen. If you’re going to be a PT and train clients in person then you have to put in the hours. Most people work 9-5 (ish) and so will want to train with their PT around these hours – so you’ll probably find you get a lot of clients who want to train between 6am and 9am, and then again from 530pm onwards. Which means that sometimes you might not get in from work til gone 9pm, and still have to set your alarm for 530am the next day. It may not always be like this, but unless you have a ready made client base, or you’re fortunate enough to have clients who can train in the daytime or who are happy to take time out of their working day to see you then when you first start working as a PT you’ll have to do some pretty unsociable shifts. For me personally, I took on as many clients as I could when I first started out, hence the incredibly long days, 6 days a week. As time has gone on and I gained the trust of my clients and built a loyal working relationship with them, not to mention a good reputation, then I have been more able to set my own hours as clients feel more inclined to take availability with me when my schedule permits, rather than the other way around. If you think you only want to do or only have time for a few hours of PT a week then you’re already limiting yourself – and clients won’t come back to a PT who is never free at a time convenient to them, especially one who has only been in business a few weeks.

 

The clients

 

I can genuinely say that I have been blessed over the years to train some absolutely incredible people, some of whom have become great friends of mine. I genuinely look forward to seeing every single one of my current client base and pride myself on having a great working relationship with all of them. I’ve trained musicians, actors, company directors and even royalty, but more important than all of that I’ve watched people go from shy, uncomfortable and unhappy to strong, confident and glowing and been utterly honoured to be a part of not only a body but a life transformation for some of my clients.

 

And I’ve also trained people who are a huge pain in the butt.

 

Again, when you first start out as a PT, generally speaking if you have the availability, and someone wants to train with you, then you take them on as a client. I meet everyone before I start training with them – whether for a consultation or trial session, and in the beginning even though I may have had a doubt in my mind over how well we would work together, and indeed how much they really did want my help, I’d tend to ignore it and hope for the best. If you’re a potential PT then let me tell you now – if you’re not comfortable with your client or vice versa, then an hour just one on one with them in very close physical contact will feel like hell. For both of you. So if you doubt someone and whether you can work closely with them – don’t ignore that instinct. Listen to the reasons people give when you ask them why they want a PT – if they think you’re going to wave a magic wand over their life in just an hour a week then beware – some people think the mere act of hiring a PT will be enough to help them lose weight, and will take it out on you when they don’t. You want to be a part of a clients journey, not their driver 24/7. I learned this from experience, taking on clients who wanted to lose weight, training them according to weight loss protocols and giving them dietary advice which they didn’t listen to. They didn’t understand they had to want it and indeed work for it too in my absence and 12 weeks down the line when they hadn’t lost any weight (inactivity and takeaways 4 nights a week will do that for you) started to question my professional ability. Beware the client who comes to you full of excuses, or even worse, one who refuses to listen – because their lack of results will end up being your fault.

 

Of course it is up to us as trainers to set realistic and achievable goals with our clients, but you’d be amazed by some of the things that people have said they want to achieve through a couple of sessions a week for a few weeks. Be honest with your clients – and those that push back and say they will be the ones to break the mould or achieve the impossible are the ones who should really set your alarm bells ringing. We’re PTs not miracle workers – and honestly some clients can’t tell the difference sometimes!

 

The location

 

Where are you going to train your clients? Uhhh the gym! Okay, which one? I am still amazed to this day by the number of people who think they can rock up to their local Virgin Active, David Lloyd or Fitness First, client in tow, and train them there. All of these commercial gyms have their own in-house team of PTs who work for the club and indeed make them money (either through rent or taking a cut of their sessions) so why on earth are they going to let you waltz in for free and make a tasty profit from your freelance clients who have nothing to do with their gym? Much as you wouldn’t take a table in a restaurant but eat your own food, so you can’t train your freelance clients right under the nose of an in-house PT at their gym. Of course you may want to go and work in-house at a commercial gym yourself – I discussed the advantage and disadvantages of doing so at length in my So You Want To Be A Personal Trainer YouTube video here – so I won’t go into those details in this post.

 

Okay so if you can’t train your clients at your local gym then what about the park? Great idea – and one that works really well for many PTs – but one that also has a lot of factors people don’t necessarily consider. Firstly, most London parks require you to have a licence to train clients there, and in many cases you have to pay for this. You also need a licence for each park you plan on training clients in – so if you wanted to split your time between Hyde, Green and Regents Park you would need a licence for each one – and let me tell you – they’re not cheap. Let me also tell you that clients LOVE the idea of training outdoors, and if we lived somewhere with a year round dry and mild climate so would I, but the UK is neither dry nor mild an awful lot of the time. A couple of years ago I had a client who, after a couple of sessions in the gym with me, decided they couldn’t stand indoor training and only wanted to workout outside, so we scheduled the rest of our sessions in a local park. Things were going great until heavy rain set in on the day of their next session, and half an hour before we were due to start training I received a text – “I won’t be coming today as it’s raining” – which I acknowledged and advised that due to the late cancellation I would still be charging for the session. I then received another message – “that doesn’t seem fair as you can’t expect me to train in the rain” – well yes I can and I do, because if you sign up for outdoor training you can’t flake out every time the temperature drops below 20 degrees or there’s a slight breeze. I’d love to cite this as a one off, but due to regular (and late) cancellations of park sessions due to bad weather I now no longer train clients outdoors as it isn’t worth it for me personally.

 

Okay so no commercial gym and no park, then where? As you probably know, I train my clients in a private PT studio, and for the most part this works brilliantly for me personally. I pay rent on a per session basis (i.e. I am not paying for the time I am not there) and I am also not responsible for maintenance and upkeep of the premises, not to mention paying business rates. Is the studio designed exactly as I would like with all the equipment I would ideally like to train my clients? No, but it isn’t my space so I don’t get a say. My current location for the majority of my work is actually pretty perfect for me and my clients needs, but just keep in mind that if you too rent space at a private PT studio it may not be exactly what you want. Whilst nowhere near as large or busy as a commercial gym floor, these studios are more often than not shared spaces, so whilst there may only be 2 or 3 other trainers and their clients around when you are there working, you all need to be able to work together but at the same time be respectful of each other. Sounds basic I know, but you’d be amazed how some other trainers can lack basic etiquette when it comes to everything from tidiness to bad language to lack of spacial awareness. More on that later. The point I am making is that you just need to be mindful of who you are sharing a space with – you may have the most awesome bunch of colleagues who create a great atmosphere for both you and your clients to train in, or you may be lucky enough to rent a studio that hardly anyone else ever uses so you really can offer your clients a 1:1 private service, but you may also work with a bunch of noisy, messy, ill-mannered equipment hogs, so just do a bit of research before you choose to base yourself somewhere.

 

Other PTs

 

This brings me neatly onto my last point – your peers and colleagues. Even if you are a freelance self-employed PT who works alone, you will come into contact with other trainers at some point – probably within a studio environment if you use a PT studio or rent space in a commercial gym – there will be other PTs operating here and whilst you may never have seen them before in your life, you are still sharing a space with them and therefore associated with them to some degree. Even if you really are a lone wolf, operating only in clients houses and the park then you are still part of the Personal Training community (by association only, granted) – whether online or in real life – and one thing you will most definitely learn over time is that there are some really, really terrible Personal Trainers out there. The same I know can be said of any profession (I’m painfully aware there are idiots in all walks of life) but Personal Training is a tricky one, as certainly in the UK it is a totally unregulated industry, and as I said at the start of this post, more and more these days Level 3 certificates are being handed out like confetti at a wedding and after a few hours study and a brief practical assessment almost anyone can call themselves a Personal Trainer. Even more worrying is the advent of so much advice (and even guides you actually have to pay for) on exercise, fitness and diet from people who have no qualifications whatsoever. All of this combined sadly means there are some extremely dubious and indeed inexperienced and uneducated “Personal Trainers” out there and like it or not you will get tarred with the same brush as them from time to time. Many of my clients have had other Personal Trainers before me and I have been shocked at some of the things they’ve told me about them. One that particularly sticks in my mind is of a long-standing client of mine who had another trainer for around two years – towards the end of their time together apparently the trainer would say “you should know what you’re doing by now, I’ll leave you to it and come back in 45 minutes”….! I mean that’s a new business model even on me – getting paid to do something and not actually doing it. We’ve all been on a gym floor and seen PTs on their phones whilst training clients, I’ve even seen some take calls mid-session. This all ties in to the above point – if you’re sharing space with, or are part of a team of other PTs then just make sure they match your work ethic and level of professionalism – because you could be the best trainer in the world, but if your colleagues are leaving weights all over the floor, sharing intimate details of their weekend Tindr hook ups loud enough for the entire gym to hear, or letting their clients struggle with exercise they clearly can’t do as they’re too busy What’s Apping their mates – then your clients will notice, and it will make them as uncomfortable as it makes you. Similarly people will judge you due to their or their friends/colleagues/neighbours experiences of using a PT and if they’ve been unlucky enough to be trained by one of the goons I’ve mentioned above them chances are they may take a dim view of PTs generally. And as someone who has not only been in the industry for many years, but who works to continually improve my knowledge, skills and education, and also prides myself on my high level of professionalism with all my clients – it is both upsetting and hurtful to see people 15 years younger than me with a piece of paper they got from a few hours online study calling themselves a Personal Trainer, and even more worrying when they start dishing out dubious advice to their social media followers, or even worse charging people for plans or training sessions they really aren’t in a position to be delivering.

 

But – the Personal Training community can also be an amazing thing, and there are some truly brilliant trainers out there – and if you can surround yourself with people like this it will be one of the best things you ever do for your career. I love learning from my peers and colleagues and even training with them from time to time – believe it or not PTing can be quite a lonely existence at times, especially if you are self employed, so if you can be part of a great community either online or at a gym or your client studio then it can be one of the most rewarding things about your job. Similarly clients will feel confident and impressed by the company you keep and those around them during their training – win win for everyone.

 

Every job has its downsides, just as life itself is never perfect. And despite all of the things I’ve listed above I still wouldn’t trade my life as a Personal Trainer for anything else. Even after the crazy hours, and even crazier clients sometimes, I still genuinely love what I do and get such satisfaction from my job. I just wanted to be honest and share some of the things about being a Personal Trainer that you don’t see on social media or other fitness blogs – because I genuinely have been there, seen it and done it. And it just inspires me even more to be the very best Personal Trainer I can be as I truly believe that my clients don’t deserve anything less.

 

The post Secrets of a Personal Trainer appeared first on Wildcat Fitness.

Edward Henry Weston was born March 24, 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois. He spent the majority of his childhood in Chicago where he attended Oakland Grammar School. He began photographing at the age of sixteen after receiving a Bull’s Eye #2 camera from his father. Weston’s first photographs captured the parks of Chicago and his aunt’s farm. In 1906, following the publication of his first photograph in Camera and Darkroom, Weston moved to California. After working briefly as a surveyor for San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, he began working as an itinerant photographer. He peddled his wares door to door photographing children, pets and funerals. Realizing the need for formal training, in 1908 Weston returned east and attended the Illinois College of Photography in Effingham, Illinois. He completed the 12-month course in six months and returned to California. In Los Angeles, he was employed as a retoucher at the George Steckel Portrait Studio. In 1909, Weston moved on to the Louis A. Mojoiner Portrait Studio as a photographer and demonstrated outstanding abilities with lighting and posing.) Weston married his first wife, Flora Chandler in 1909. He had four children with Flora; Edward Chandler (1910), Theodore Brett (1911), Laurence Neil (1916) and Cole (1919). In 1911, Weston opened his own portrait studio in Tropico, California. This would be his base of operation for the next two decades. Weston became successful working in soft-focus, pictorial style; winning many salons and professional awards. Weston gained an international reputation for his high key portraits and modern dance studies. Articles about his work were published in magazines such as American Photography, Photo Era and Photo Miniature. Weston also authored many articles himself for many of these publications. In 1912, Weston met photographer Margrethe Mather in his Tropico studio. Mather becomes his studio assistant and most frequent model for the next decade. Mather had a very strong influence on Weston. He would later call her, “the first important woman in my life.” Weston began keeping journals in 1915 that came to be known as his "Daybooks." They would chronicle his life and photographic development into the 1930’s.

 

In 1922 Weston visited the ARMCO Steel Plant in Middletown, Ohio. The photographs taken here marked a turning point in Weston’s career. During this period, Weston renounced his Pictorialism style with a new emphasis on abstract form and sharper resolution of detail. The industrial photographs were true straight images: unpretentious, and true to reality. Weston later wrote, “The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Weston also traveled to New York City this same year, where he met Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

In 1923 Weston moved to Mexico City where he opened a photographic studio with his apprentice and lover Tina Modotti. Many important portraits and nudes were taken during his time in Mexico. It was also here that famous artists; Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco hailed Weston as the master of 20th century art.

 

After moving back to California in 1926, Weston began his work for which he is most deservedly famous: natural forms, close-ups, nudes, and landscapes. Between 1927 and 1930, Weston made a series of monumental close-ups of seashells, peppers, and halved cabbages, bringing out the rich textures of their sculpture-like forms. Weston moved to Carmel, California in 1929 and shot the first of many photographs of rocks and trees at Point Lobos, California. Weston became one of the founding members of Group f/64 in 1932 with Ansel Adams, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and Sonya Noskowiak. The group chose this optical term because they habitually set their lenses to that aperture to secure maximum image sharpness of both foreground and distance. 1936 marked the start of Weston’s series of nudes and sand dunes in Oceano, California, which are often considered some of his finest work. Weston became the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for experimental work in 1936. Following the receipt of this fellowship Weston spent the next two years taking photographs in the West and Southwest United States with assistant and future wife Charis Wilson. Later, in 1941 using photographs of the East and South Weston provided illustrations for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

 

Weston began experiencing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in 1946 and in 1948 shot his last photograph of Point Lobos. In 1946 the Museum of Modern Art, New York featured a major retrospective of 300 prints of Weston’s work. Over the next 10 years of progressively incapacitating illness, Weston supervised the printing of his prints by his sons, Brett and Cole. His 50th Anniversary Portfolio was published in 1952 with photographs printed by Brett. An even larger printing project took place between1952 and 1955. Brett printed what was known as the Project Prints. A series of 8 -10 prints from 832 negatives considered Edward's lifetime best. The Smithsonian Institution held

the show, “The World of Edward Weston” in 1956 paying tribute to his remarkable accomplishments in American photography. Edward Weston died on January 1, 1958 at his home, Wildcat Hill, in Carmel, California. Weston's ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean at Pebbly Beach at Point Lobos.

www.edward-weston.com/edward_weston_biography.htm

Edward Henry Weston was born March 24, 1886, in Highland Park, Illinois. He spent the majority of his childhood in Chicago where he attended Oakland Grammar School. He began photographing at the age of sixteen after receiving a Bull’s Eye #2 camera from his father. Weston’s first photographs captured the parks of Chicago and his aunt’s farm. In 1906, following the publication of his first photograph in Camera and Darkroom, Weston moved to California. After working briefly as a surveyor for San Pedro, Los Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad, he began working as an itinerant photographer. He peddled his wares door to door photographing children, pets and funerals. Realizing the need for formal training, in 1908 Weston returned east and attended the Illinois College of Photography in Effingham, Illinois. He completed the 12-month course in six months and returned to California. In Los Angeles, he was employed as a retoucher at the George Steckel Portrait Studio. In 1909, Weston moved on to the Louis A. Mojoiner Portrait Studio as a photographer and demonstrated outstanding abilities with lighting and posing.) Weston married his first wife, Flora Chandler in 1909. He had four children with Flora; Edward Chandler (1910), Theodore Brett (1911), Laurence Neil (1916) and Cole (1919). In 1911, Weston opened his own portrait studio in Tropico, California. This would be his base of operation for the next two decades. Weston became successful working in soft-focus, pictorial style; winning many salons and professional awards. Weston gained an international reputation for his high key portraits and modern dance studies. Articles about his work were published in magazines such as American Photography, Photo Era and Photo Miniature. Weston also authored many articles himself for many of these publications. In 1912, Weston met photographer Margrethe Mather in his Tropico studio. Mather becomes his studio assistant and most frequent model for the next decade. Mather had a very strong influence on Weston. He would later call her, “the first important woman in my life.” Weston began keeping journals in 1915 that came to be known as his "Daybooks." They would chronicle his life and photographic development into the 1930’s.

 

In 1922 Weston visited the ARMCO Steel Plant in Middletown, Ohio. The photographs taken here marked a turning point in Weston’s career. During this period, Weston renounced his Pictorialism style with a new emphasis on abstract form and sharper resolution of detail. The industrial photographs were true straight images: unpretentious, and true to reality. Weston later wrote, “The camera should be used for a recording of life, for rendering the very substance and quintessence of the thing itself, whether it be polished steel or palpitating flesh.” Weston also traveled to New York City this same year, where he met Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Charles Sheeler and Georgia O’Keeffe.

 

In 1923 Weston moved to Mexico City where he opened a photographic studio with his apprentice and lover Tina Modotti. Many important portraits and nudes were taken during his time in Mexico. It was also here that famous artists; Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Jose Orozco hailed Weston as the master of 20th century art.

 

After moving back to California in 1926, Weston began his work for which he is most deservedly famous: natural forms, close-ups, nudes, and landscapes. Between 1927 and 1930, Weston made a series of monumental close-ups of seashells, peppers, and halved cabbages, bringing out the rich textures of their sculpture-like forms. Weston moved to Carmel, California in 1929 and shot the first of many photographs of rocks and trees at Point Lobos, California. Weston became one of the founding members of Group f/64 in 1932 with Ansel Adams, Willard Van Dyke, Imogen Cunningham and Sonya Noskowiak. The group chose this optical term because they habitually set their lenses to that aperture to secure maximum image sharpness of both foreground and distance. 1936 marked the start of Weston’s series of nudes and sand dunes in Oceano, California, which are often considered some of his finest work. Weston became the first photographer to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship for experimental work in 1936. Following the receipt of this fellowship Weston spent the next two years taking photographs in the West and Southwest United States with assistant and future wife Charis Wilson. Later, in 1941 using photographs of the East and South Weston provided illustrations for a new edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass.

 

Weston began experiencing symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in 1946 and in 1948 shot his last photograph of Point Lobos. In 1946 the Museum of Modern Art, New York featured a major retrospective of 300 prints of Weston’s work. Over the next 10 years of progressively incapacitating illness, Weston supervised the printing of his prints by his sons, Brett and Cole. His 50th Anniversary Portfolio was published in 1952 with photographs printed by Brett. An even larger printing project took place between1952 and 1955. Brett printed what was known as the Project Prints. A series of 8 -10 prints from 832 negatives considered Edward's lifetime best. The Smithsonian Institution held

the show, “The World of Edward Weston” in 1956 paying tribute to his remarkable accomplishments in American photography. Edward Weston died on January 1, 1958 at his home, Wildcat Hill, in Carmel, California. Weston's ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean at Pebbly Beach at Point Lobos.

www.edward-weston.com/edward_weston_biography.htm

I liked this shoot from the moment I saw the RAW. She posed really fine here, didn't she?

The cat (Felis catus), also known as the domestic cat or housecatto distinguish it from other felines and felids, is a small carnivorous mammal that is valued by humans for its companionship and its ability to hunt vermin and household pests. It has been associated with humans for at least 9,500 yearsand is currently the most popular pet in the world.

A skilled predator, the cat is known to hunt over 1,000 species for food. It can be trained to obey simple commands. Individual cats have also been known to learn on their own to manipulate simple mechanisms, such as doorknobs and toilet handles.Cats use a variety of vocalizations and types of body language for communication, including meowing, purring, trilling, hissing, growling, squeaking, chirping, clicking, and grunting.They are also bred and shown as registered pedigree pets. This hobby is known as cat fancy.

Until recently the cat was commonly believed to have been domesticated in ancient Egypt, where it was a cult animal. A study in 2007 found that the lines of descent of all house cats probably run through as few as five self-domesticating African Wildcats (Felis silvestris lybica) circa 8000 BC, in the Near East. The earliest direct evidence of cat domestication is a kitten that was buried with its owner 9,500 years ago in Cyprus.

 

Il gatto domestico (Felis silvestris catus) è un mammifero carnivoro di piccola taglia della famiglia dei felidi (genere Felis). Tradizionalmente l'antico Egitto e Mesopotamia viene indicato come luogo di origine, dove era considerato un animale sacro e, in alcuni casi, mummificato e messo nei sarcofagi delle famiglie più ricche. Un recente studio, pubblicato sulla rivista Science, ha evidenziato, attraverso studi genetici, che tale luogo andrebbe individuato nel Medio Oriente; precisamente nella mezzaluna fertile. Tutto ciò in coincidenza con lo sviluppo delle prime forme di agricoltura. Fu l'uomo, si presume nello studio, a favorire la diffusione del felino portandolo con lui nelle migrazioni. Si può trovare allo stato selvatico (ne esistono ancora diverse specie), ma prevalentemente vive nell'ambito domestico e spesso ha ruolo di animale da affezione. La sua temperatura corporea oscilla fra i 38° e i 38,5 °C; la frequenza respiratoria normale è di 10/20 respiri al minuto e quella cardiaca di 110/140 battiti al minuto. Il suo corpo è agile, flessibile e massiccio, tale da consentirgli di camminare in modo silenziosissimo e di spiccare grandi salti; le sue unghie retrattili (più precisamente protrattili, dato che nella condizione ordinaria di riposo si trovano nascoste e sono estratte solo all'occorrenza) gli permettono di arrampicarsi con grande agilità.

 

Fonte : Wikipedia

 

www.flickr.com/photos/luigistrano/2607910897/

Aubrey Drake Graham (born October 24, 1986), who records under the mononym Drake, is a Canadian recording artist and actor. He originally became known for playing character Jimmy Brooks on the television series Degrassi: The Next Generation. Graham continued to recognize a close affiliation with Lil Wayne's Young Money Entertainment,[1] before officially signing with the record label in June 2009.[2] In November 2009, Lil Wayne released a statement announcing that Drake's first studio album, Thank Me Later, had been completed; the album was released on June 15, 2010 and debuted at number one on the Billboard 200.[3]

 

Graham has worked with several other hip-hop artist such as Lil Wayne, Jeezy, Kanye West, Eminem, and Jay-Z. With the success of his mixtape turned EP So Far Gone, Graham has been nominated for several awards including the Grammys; even being selected to perform at the 2010 Grammy awards. Graham also won several awards, including two Juno Awards in 2010 for Best New Artist, and Rap Recording of the Year.

 

Personal life

 

Graham is good friends with many of his Degrassi cast-mates, particularly Shane Kippel, who played his best friend Spinner Mason on the show.

 

In 2008, Graham spoke about his past relationships on a song called "Deceiving" using each verse to address different women. In Verse 1, he spoke about video-girl Dia Edwards. In Verse 3, he spoke about classmate Alisha Phillips.

 

He then spoke about his past relationship with Keshia Chanté on the Verse 2 of his song "Deceiving", referencing Chanté's mother, Tessa,[35] stating "when I say I'm serious, you claim you're only teasing" and "What up Tessa? I love you like my own mama, and your daughters getting grown mama, and me, I'm just here working, waiting, patient for her to be ready for love and leave alone drama"[35]

 

In May 2009, Graham finally spoke with MuchMusic about his song "Deceiving" and addressed speculation of his past relationship with Chanté, "Would I call Keshia Chante an ex? I'd be proud to say she is an ex. I'm proud to say we had our time, when we were, like 16 years old. She's great. She's one of the first people in the industry that I met, we just connected."[36]

 

In June 2009, Graham did two remixes to Chante's song "Fallen" where he addresses his love for her; on Version 1 he raps "Keshia, Keshia, do you remember the old us? They said we'd never be together that's what they told us. Immature kids, to entrepreneur kids." On Version 2, he raps "you just hold it down for your boy until the plaques arrive, that's why I love you."

 

MuchMusic later asked Chanté on how she felt about Graham. She kept mum, later saying, "I will love that man unconditionally for the rest of my life. He knows what it is. We have history. I've known him since I was a little girl. We just have a love/hate relationship, so I prefer to love him from afar."

 

Online rumors swirled stating that Graham was in a relationship with Rihanna. Both parties denied that claim, with Graham stating "we're just good friends."[37]

 

Graham is a fan of the Kentucky Wildcats and a friend to head coach John Calipari. On October 16, 2009, Graham made an appearance at the University of Kentucky men's basketball event, "Big Blue Madness" at Rupp Arena. On January 2, 2009, Graham also attended Kentucky's game against the University of Louisville and accompanied Calipari to his post game radio show.[38] Graham returned to the University of Kentucky on April 27, 2010, to perform a concert.

 

He is featured on Complex Magazine first issue of 2010. In the February-March issue he discusses his relationship with Lil Wayne, competition with new coming artist, getting inspired by ex-girlfriends, and the details on his debut studio album, Thank Me Later.

 

In July 2010, Drake postponed his entire European tour due to his mother's illness.

 

www.myspace.com/thisisdrake

The cat (Felis catus), also known as the domestic cat or housecatto distinguish it from other felines and felids, is a small carnivorous mammal that is valued by humans for its companionship and its ability to hunt vermin and household pests. It has been associated with humans for at least 9,500 yearsand is currently the most popular pet in the world.

A skilled predator, the cat is known to hunt over 1,000 species for food. It can be trained to obey simple commands. Individual cats have also been known to learn on their own to manipulate simple mechanisms, such as doorknobs and toilet handles.Cats use a variety of vocalizations and types of body language for communication, including meowing, purring, trilling, hissing, growling, squeaking, chirping, clicking, and grunting.They are also bred and shown as registered pedigree pets. This hobby is known as cat fancy.

Until recently the cat was commonly believed to have been domesticated in ancient Egypt, where it was a cult animal. A study in 2007 found that the lines of descent of all house cats probably run through as few as five self-domesticating African Wildcats (Felis silvestris lybica) circa 8000 BC, in the Near East. The earliest direct evidence of cat domestication is a kitten that was buried with its owner 9,500 years ago in Cyprus.

 

Il gatto domestico (Felis silvestris catus) è un mammifero carnivoro di piccola taglia della famiglia dei felidi (genere Felis). Tradizionalmente l'antico Egitto e Mesopotamia viene indicato come luogo di origine, dove era considerato un animale sacro e, in alcuni casi, mummificato e messo nei sarcofagi delle famiglie più ricche. Un recente studio, pubblicato sulla rivista Science, ha evidenziato, attraverso studi genetici, che tale luogo andrebbe individuato nel Medio Oriente; precisamente nella mezzaluna fertile. Tutto ciò in coincidenza con lo sviluppo delle prime forme di agricoltura. Fu l'uomo, si presume nello studio, a favorire la diffusione del felino portandolo con lui nelle migrazioni. Si può trovare allo stato selvatico (ne esistono ancora diverse specie), ma prevalentemente vive nell'ambito domestico e spesso ha ruolo di animale da affezione. La sua temperatura corporea oscilla fra i 38° e i 38,5 °C; la frequenza respiratoria normale è di 10/20 respiri al minuto e quella cardiaca di 110/140 battiti al minuto. Il suo corpo è agile, flessibile e massiccio, tale da consentirgli di camminare in modo silenziosissimo e di spiccare grandi salti; le sue unghie retrattili (più precisamente protrattili, dato che nella condizione ordinaria di riposo si trovano nascoste e sono estratte solo all'occorrenza) gli permettono di arrampicarsi con grande agilità.

 

Fonte : Wikipedia

  

The cat (Felis catus), also known as the domestic cat or housecatto distinguish it from other felines and felids, is a small carnivorous mammal that is valued by humans for its companionship and its ability to hunt vermin and household pests. It has been associated with humans for at least 9,500 yearsand is currently the most popular pet in the world.

A skilled predator, the cat is known to hunt over 1,000 species for food. It can be trained to obey simple commands. Individual cats have also been known to learn on their own to manipulate simple mechanisms, such as doorknobs and toilet handles.Cats use a variety of vocalizations and types of body language for communication, including meowing, purring, trilling, hissing, growling, squeaking, chirping, clicking, and grunting.They are also bred and shown as registered pedigree pets. This hobby is known as cat fancy.

Until recently the cat was commonly believed to have been domesticated in ancient Egypt, where it was a cult animal. A study in 2007 found that the lines of descent of all house cats probably run through as few as five self-domesticating African Wildcats (Felis silvestris lybica) circa 8000 BC, in the Near East. The earliest direct evidence of cat domestication is a kitten that was buried with its owner 9,500 years ago in Cyprus.

 

Il gatto domestico (Felis silvestris catus) è un mammifero carnivoro di piccola taglia della famiglia dei felidi (genere Felis). Tradizionalmente l'antico Egitto e Mesopotamia viene indicato come luogo di origine, dove era considerato un animale sacro e, in alcuni casi, mummificato e messo nei sarcofagi delle famiglie più ricche. Un recente studio, pubblicato sulla rivista Science, ha evidenziato, attraverso studi genetici, che tale luogo andrebbe individuato nel Medio Oriente; precisamente nella mezzaluna fertile. Tutto ciò in coincidenza con lo sviluppo delle prime forme di agricoltura. Fu l'uomo, si presume nello studio, a favorire la diffusione del felino portandolo con lui nelle migrazioni. Si può trovare allo stato selvatico (ne esistono ancora diverse specie), ma prevalentemente vive nell'ambito domestico e spesso ha ruolo di animale da affezione. La sua temperatura corporea oscilla fra i 38° e i 38,5 °C; la frequenza respiratoria normale è di 10/20 respiri al minuto e quella cardiaca di 110/140 battiti al minuto. Il suo corpo è agile, flessibile e massiccio, tale da consentirgli di camminare in modo silenziosissimo e di spiccare grandi salti; le sue unghie retrattili (più precisamente protrattili, dato che nella condizione ordinaria di riposo si trovano nascoste e sono estratte solo all'occorrenza) gli permettono di arrampicarsi con grande agilità.

 

Fonte : Wikipedia

  

All Wildcats please report to the Multi-Puurrrpose Room. This lovely work of art created by Suzanne Gayle of Star Arts Studio includes multiple different species of wildcats found around the world.

 

To see more of Suzanne Gayle's work click on the link below.

www.starartsstudio.com/

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