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I found this guy in the early morning dew on one of our garden flowers.

Monarch On Flower.

 

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Monarch :-))

 

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Monarch On Flower.

 

COMMENTS PLEASE ^_^ I return Comments. I pay no attention to Fav's.

 

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I upload a new file every 3 to 4 days, so check back often :-)

 

© All my Images are under full copyright .

© All right reserved.

© All my images are subject to international copyright laws and may not be copied, downloaded, reproduced, transferred or manipulated without my express written permission. All rights reserved.

Monarch Butterfly.

 

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Seen at 6 mile Cypress Slough Preserve.

I think that's what this is.

I found it while wandering around in our tall grass prairie.

It's such a treat to be able to see the beautiful Viceroy in the yard. I keep looking for caterpillars on the willow tree (host plant). However, so far they have eluded me. I would love to raise a bunch of these, they are easy to care for in comparison to the monarch.

 

The birds are very thorough when it comes to finding such a treat. Evidence shows they have been beating me to the caterpillars on a regular basis for the past few weeks. Hmm, the saying that the early bird gets the worm really holds true around here. The birds are out just before daylight and they can reach heights that I cannot.

 

I am persistent so perhaps I will find some to raise before butterfly season subsides for the year. I just hope the neighbors that can see into the yard don't think I'm too crazy while I stand on a step ladder as I search through the willow tree. Technically, they all know I raise butterflies so I'm sure most of them will understand. And since everyone seems to be working from home, I rarely go outside in my gown these days.

 

Have a terrific Tuesday and happy snapping.

  

Spotted this Viceroy sitting in the evening sun during a hike through Bronte Creek Provincial Park, Oakville, Ontario.(Limenitis archippus)

I spotted this Viceroy caterpillar in a tree yesterday while 3 of us were out hunting clubtails again. Hadn't seen a Viceroy cat in awhile. Not sure of the tree - they use several as their host plants. The adult Viceroys spend most of their time in the open wetlands.

 

>> Viceroy caterpillar, yesterday at the wetlands - N. Georgia

 

See recent shot of a Viceroy - similar to a Monarch in appearance.

Milkweed and morning sunshine for this Viceroy Butterfly during my hike through the Hendrie Valley Sanctuary (RBG), Burlington, Ontario.

(Limenitis archippus)

A butterfly very similar to a Monarch. It's smaller and has horizontal bars on it's wings. From a distance, one would probably think it was a Monarch.

This was taken in my back yard last summer.

LaGrange County, Indiana

 

A Viceroy Butterfly taken in the Pigeon River Fish & Wildlife Area.

(Limenitis archippus)

Downsview Park, Toronto

There is a gold cloud of goldenrod that blankets the bottom area near me that goes on and on.

A late season viceroy butterfly....

Fresh Viceroy butterfly taking nectar from a wild Coneflower.

 

Common though not so abundant this year. The Viceroy butterfly gets a measure of protection from predators by mimicking the poisonous Monarch butterfly

Viceroy Butterfly (open-winged image) on Purple Butterfly Bush - Morgan County, Alabama - 2020

Viceroy Butterfly and the Monarch butterfly have a similar look, the first main difference is coloration. The Monarch butterfly is more colorful, the size is another category of difference, Monarch butterfly is larger, their diet Milkweed while the Viceroy butterfly eats Poplar and Willow trees. Both butterflies are beautiful and love yellow flowers. This is the Viceroy Butterfly.

Viceroy butterfly

This butterfly is often confused with the Monarch along with the Viceroy butterfly. The Queen butterflies color which you can see is darker and more to the red compared to the Monarch or Viceroy. However the Viceroy’s coloration is very close to the Monarch and casual observation can lead to a misidentification. I’ve been fooled and corrected several times; however, now with kind help from others I get right about 99%. Also the difference between the Monarch and Viceroy is the Viceroy has vein that descends at an angle across the width of the hind wings.

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Found at Wabasis Lake

 

Helios 44-2 58mm Lens

 

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This Viceroy Butterfly seen feeding on Boneset in the RBG Cootes Paradise Sanctuary., Hamilton, Ontario.

(Limenitis archippus)

Viceroy butterfly taking nectar from a QueenAnne's-Lace floret.

 

Common though not so much this year.

Limenitis archippus

 

Howard County Conservancy

Mt. Pleasant

Woodstock, Maryland

The viceroys have arrived. The hosts plants in my yard are willow trees. I have five willows, three that are available to the butterflies and two in protective custody so I can use those to feed any caterpillars that I am able to collect. The red-spotted purple also hosts on the willow tree. The caterpillars of the viceroy and the red-spotted purple look nearly identical. I can't tell which is which and often raise both in the same enclosure.

 

The viceroy and the red-spotted purple prefer rotting fruit, dung and animal carcasses as a food source but they will occasionally partake in a nectar source. I provide rotting fruit for them, the racoons provide the dung but they will have to seek the carcass elsewhere :)

 

Happy Wednesday and happy snapping.

Moment captured in Franklin, Wisconsin. (USA)

This pretty Viceroy butterfly (Limenitis archippus) landed right in front of me while we were walking in the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge. I started shooting and didn't pay any attention to what the wildflower was that it was nectaring on but now I am wondering if anyone can help me identify it. How about Pearly Everlasting?

Fiddler’s Creek

Wetlands

Southern Florida

USA

 

Click On Image To Enlarge

 

This image of the Viceroy butterfly was photographed on the way back to our car. It has a lot of damage to its wings.

 

The viceroy (Limenitis archippus) is a North American butterfly that ranges through most of the contiguous United States as well as parts of Canada and Mexico. The westernmost portion of its range extends from the Northwest Territories along the eastern edges of the Cascade Range and Sierra Nevada mountains, southwards into central Mexico. Its easternmost range extends along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of North America from Nova Scotia into Texas.

 

It was long been thought to be a Batesian mimic of the monarch butterfly, but since the viceroy is also distasteful to predators, it is now considered a Müllerian mimic instead.

 

The viceroy was named the state butterfly of Kentucky in 1990.

 

Its wings feature an orange and black pattern, and over most of its range it is a Müllerian mimic with the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus). The viceroy's wingspan is between 53 and 81 mm (2.1 and 3.2 in). It can be distinguished from the monarch by its smaller size and the postmedian black line that runs across the veins on the hindwing.

 

In Florida, Georgia, and the American Southwest, viceroys share the pattern of the queen (Danaus gilippus) and in Mexico they share the pattern of the soldier (Danaus eresimus). In all three areas, the local Danaus population mimic the coloration of the viceroy species. It was originally believed that the viceroy was a Batesian mimic of the three other species, and presumed edible or only mildly unpalatable to predators, but this has since proven not to be true. In an experiment with both the monarch's and viceroy's wings removed, birds were discovered to think the viceroy was just as unpalatable as the monarchs.

The monarch butterfly or simply monarch (Danaus plexippus) is a milkweed butterfly (subfamily Danainae) in the family Nymphalidae. Other common names depending on region include milkweed, common tiger, wanderer, and black veined brown. It may be the most familiar North American butterfly, and is considered an iconic pollinator species. Its wings feature an easily recognizable black, orange, and white pattern, with a wingspan of 8.9–10.2 cm (​3 1⁄2–4 in) The viceroy butterfly is similar in color and pattern, but is markedly smaller and has an extra black stripe across each hind wing.

Wilton Wildlife Preserve

Viceroy butterfly surveying its domain.

 

Mimics the Monarch butterfly. Easy to confuse its ID. Common and can be abundant.

I had the pleasure of photographing many times this butterfly, Calmly and very slowly was stretching its wings to enjoy the sun rays, and from time to time was flying to different spots not too difficult for me to follow.

 

When I started my photography I had a hard time differentiating the Monarch from this one, the Viceroy, I guess the very similar color was the reason of my confusion.

 

Macro photography is so enjoyable, the detail we see on flora and fauna is simply amazing. Little faces, little petals, tiny feathers, they are simply wonderful.

 

If you want to know more about this and other butterflies, this is a very good place to start:

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viceroy_(butterfly)

 

Photography is really the description of what we see every time we capture something with our camera.

 

www.youtube.com/results?search_query=looking+through+your...

 

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Photography is my passion, and nature photography is my favorite.

 

I have been in Explore for more that a hundred times, and it is an awesome experience to have your photos showcased in such a special way.

 

I'm in many groups, and I only add my photos to them if they are not private.

 

I thank your for coming today, for leaving a comment, and make a favorite of yours this photo, (if that is the case) thanks again!

 

The best part of this forum is the contacts and friends that I have made over the years, that have the same passion for this art that is called photography!

 

Martha.

   

This bright orange and black viceroy looks almost identical to a monarch except for the narrow black stripe cutting across each back wing. I am not aware of any reliable way to tell males from females like we can with the monarch, but I do know this was a female because I followed her from prairie willow shrub to prairie willow shrub where she would stop to lay eggs on the willow leaves.

Crazy Tuesday Theme: Backlight

this is the first monarch in my garden this year. I saw several on the golf course Saturday as they have milkweed along the edges of the course. They seem to like my lantana.

The non poisonous like alike Viceroy butterfly has a black line through the veins. Birds leave the poisonous Monarchs alone and it is thought Viceroys evolved to be safe from birds as well by mimicking the look of the Monarchs.

Viceroy butterflies are made to mimic monarch butterflies and that association gives them good protection from predators since monarchs taste terrible. These viceroy caterpillars are meant to imitate a bird dropping left on a leaf, and I suppose bird droppings taste terrible to most caterpillar predators out there too. This one is making short work of that cottonwood leaf, and they can also be found eating willow or aspen leaves.

This is simply the side view of the same butterfly in the next image over.

 

I'm running a bit late today so I imagine my chances for collecting any caterpillars to raise off of the willow tree are slim. Nevertheless, I shall check it anyway.

 

Have a terrific Thursday and happy snapping.

Snug Harbor Botanical Gardens

Viceroy Butterfly at Peghorn Park in St. Cloud

A convincing mimic!

 

Seen at Victoria Park, located in the town of Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Viceroy Butterfly along Black Point Drive in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

This is a Viceroy Butterfly

The main visual difference between the viceroy and monarch butterfly is the black line drawn across the viceroy's hind wings, which monarch butterflies do not have.

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