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Viburnum lantanoides - hobble-bush

Dalai Lama.

 

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Hobblebush, Viburnum lantanoides

The leaves have lovely texture, especially when backlit. Unfortunately that means lying on one's back to get the shot!

We had this species the same location we had the female B1ackburnian in my earlier post. We saw this small flowering tree nearby and thought it would be a nice setting to attempt to photograph the Parula. Both the male and the female Parula foraged at some length in this tree, working the blooms for small insects.

Title: Cyclopedia of American horticulture, comprising suggestions for cultivation of horticultural plants, descriptions of the species of fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamental plants sold in the United States and Canada, together with geographical and biographical sketches, and a synopsis of the vegetable kingdom

Identifier: cyclopediaofamer03bail

Year: 1906 (1900s)

Authors: Bailey, L. H. (Liberty Hyde), 1858-1954, ed; Miller, Wilhelm, 1869- joint ed

Subjects: Gardening -- Dictionaries; Plants -- North America encyclopedias

Publisher: New York, Doubleday, Page & Company

Contributing Library: UMass Amherst Libraries

Digitizing Sponsor: UMass Amherst Libraries

  

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HIPPEASTRUM HOFFMANNIA 751 Distinct, and one of the best. Apparently not in the Amer. trade, but it has been used in hybridizing. 11. prdcerum, Lem. {AmarifUis Rcii/ueri, Hook. f.). Bulb ovoid, with a neck 10-12 in. long, on the apex of which —as on a trunk —the drooping, curling, bulf-edged Ivs. are borne (the Ivs. 16-20 in. long): scape 12-18 in. high, 2-edged, green, bearing 2-3 horizontal pale lilac fis. 4-5 in. across : segments oblauceolate, acute, not 1 in. broad ; throat without a star ; stamens much shorter than the perianth ; stigma capitate. Brazil. J.H. 11:408. F.S. 20:2077-8. B.M. 5883. Gn. 45:959.- One of the most distinct of the genus. In the Amer. trade. Sometimes called "Blue Amaryllis" and "Em- press of Brazil." Plant out for late summer or fall bloom, in a warm, sunny place. Keep bulb dry until late spring. cc. Stigma markedly 3-parted. 12. nitilum, Herb. Bulb nearly globular, 2-3 in. in diam.. stuloniferous, with short neck: Ivs. 6-8, elongat- ing after flowering, bright green, 1 ft. long and an inch or more wide: scape as long as the Ivs., somewhat com- pressed, glaucous, bearing 2-4 red fls.: perianth tube % in. long, green, with a minute crown in the throat; segments oblong, acute, crimson and green keeled ; stamens shorter than the perianth, the filaments red. Braz. B.R. 1:23. L.B.O. 15:1449.-Incultivation chiefly known in the var. fulgldum, Baker (ff. fiilgidum, Herb.), which is in all parts larger, deep crimson, the fi.-segments 3-5 in. long. B.R. ::{:22(;. B.iAl. 1943, as Amiirfflh's tnhn'tKa: 2475 as JI. snhhnHnif/im. Var. croc&tum, Baker, is as large as var. fulifldittn, except in its Hs., which are smaller, with undulate segments, saf- fron-colored. B.R. 1:38. Var. citrlnum. Baker, has bright yellow fls. Var. acuminatum, Roem. (A. and H. puiverult^-nfn). Fis. pink and segments acute. B.R. 7:534; 14:1188. L.B.C. 5:484. B.M. 2273. 13. vitt^tum, Herb. Fig. 10C9. Bulb globular, 3 in. in diam.: Ivs. ii-St usually appearing after the fls., bright green, 2 ft. long: scape often 3 ft. high, bearing 3-6 horizontal or declined striped white-edged fls. 4-5-in. across: tube about 1 in. long, with an obscure crown or crest at the throat; segments obovate-oblong and acute, 1% in. or less broad, the under color whitish but over- laid with red stripes, the keel white; stamens shorter than the limb. Peru; but once thought to be S. African. B.M. 129. G.C. III. 24:119.-The commonest species- type in Amer. gardens, now cult, in many forms. It seems to have entered freely into hybrids, and some of the forms now passing as H. vittatum are perhaps mon- grels. The double red feathery stripes on each side of the more or less irregular-edged segments distinguish this species from its congeners.

 

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1070. Hippeastrum Johnsoni (X K)- 14. H. J6hnsoni, Bury. Fig. 1070. Fls, deep dull red, each segment with a white stripe down the keel. A very profuse bloomer, and withstands much abuse. It is the most popular single Amaryllid in this country, and is particularly prized for window-gardens. It is the oldest hybrid, having been raised by one Johnson, an English watchmaker, who, in 1799, crossed H. Hegince with ff. vittatum. The three following Hlppeastr 48 offered in Dutch- Ameriean lists: H. ddvenum, Herb. Belongs to the narrow* Ivd. section of the genus: Ivs. linear, glaucous: fls. 2-6, about 2 in. long, yellow or red, on slender pedicels, the segments ob- long-linear and acute; stigma 3-parted. Chile. B.M. 1125. B.R. 10:849. Aform with pale yellow fls. is var. pallidus, Herb. L.B.C. 18:1760.—if. pra^cnse. Baker. Also liuear-lvd.: fls. 2-4. briglit scurlet, the veiy short tube with small scales in the throat, the segments 2/^ in. long; stigma capitate. Chile. B.R. 28:35.—S. rdseum, Baker. Lvs. narrow-linear, glaucous, 1 ft. long, with the fls.: scape 6 in. high, bearing 1 or 2 small bright red fls.: stigma 3-parted. Chile. Latin-form trade names to be accounted for: atrosanguin- eum, cardinAlis. crdcea, delicdta. formdsa (hybrid), Gravlnce (Craveana, Gravesiana, Graveana), Lindeni, macrdntha, re- fiilgens, riXhis (hybrid), rubra striata, Williamsii. ]j_ jj^ g^ HIPP6PHAE {Greek, horse-killing ; alluding to the berries, which are somewhat poisonous). JfJleugndvece. This includes the Sea Buckthorn, a hardy European and mid-Asian shrub valued for its clusters of bright orange-red berries about the size of a pea, which per- sist all fall and winter. It also has the silvery or gray foliage which makes several members of this family useful in fiue landscape effects. This family has only 2 other genera, Elseagnus and Shepherdia (including the Buffalo Berry). Hippophae and Elaeagnus have alter- nate lvs. and 4 stamens, but the former has unisexual and mostly dioecious fls., while the latter has hermaph- rodite fls. Shepherdia has opposite lvs., 8 stamens and dioecious fls. Hippophae has 2 species of shrubs or small trees: branches often spiny, covered with minute stellate hairs, as are all the young parts: fls. borne at the base of small lateral branches; staminate ones iu catkins, sessile in the axils of 2 deciduous bracts; fila- ments none; pistillate fls. pedicelled, solitary in the axils of Ivs.; perianth top-shaped, in 2 divisions: ovary 1-celled, ]-ovuled: style large, club-shaped. In order to secure a good setting of berries, one or two staminate plants should be placed near every group of a dozen pistillate ones. When the shrubs are without berries the expert nurseryman can distinguish the two sexes by the more upright growth of the staminate and the more twiggy growth of the pistillate plants. The redder the berries the better for ornamental purposes. The berries are somewhat poisonous, but are eaten by birds. Though essentially a seashore plant, it is easily cult, inland in common garden soil, and thrives even in barren, sandy lands. It inhabits cool moving sands and the alluvium of torrents. When grown abroad to hold shifting sands it makes a straggling, stunted bush 2 ft. or more high. Under favorable conditions it may be grown into a tree 20 ft. high. The suckers may become so numerous as to be troublesome. The numerous spines which terminate the branches and the interlacibg stems suggest its use for hedges. It is propagated by layers, suckers, root-cuttings and seeds. rhamnoides, Linn. Sea Buckthorn. Swallow Thorn, Lvs. appearing before the fls., grayish green above, silvery green below and scattered with reddish scales below: fls. yellowish, borne in clusters of 2-3 in May : fr. berry-like, orange-yellow, acid, maturing in Sept. G.M. 37:791. Gn. 49:1050 (with a fine colored plate and thorough appreciation by W. Goldring), and 54, p. 396. H. salicifdlia, D.Don, has larger lvs., less densely coated with silvery scales. Nepal. Not cult. j^^ p^ Wyman. HOBBLEBUSH. Viburnum lantanoides. HOES. See Tools. HOFFMANNIA (Georg Franz Hoffmann, 1760-1826, professor of botany at Gottingen). Including Campy- lobotrys and Higginsia. RubiAcea'. About 15 tropical American herbs or shrubs, with opposite or verticillate lvs. and small white, yellow or red fls., cult, for the very showy foliage. Corolla tubular, with 4 (rarely 5) oblong or linear obtuse lobes; stamens 4: ring-like disk about the 2-3-loculed ovary: style filiform, the stigma 2-lobed. The Hoffmannias require warm temperature, although they may be plunged in the open in the summer. Well grown specimens are also adapted to the decoration of window-gardens and living rooms. Propagated by cut- tings. Hoffmannias are very showy foliage plants.

  

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Identifier: illustratedflor03brit

Title: An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British possessions : from Newfoundland to the parallel of the southern boundary of Virginia and from the Atlantic Ocean westward to the 102nd meridian

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: Britton, Nathaniel Lord, 1859-1934 Brown, Addison, 1830-1913

Subjects: Botany

Publisher: New York : Scribner

Contributing Library: Robarts - University of Toronto

Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

  

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m Marsh. Arb. Am. 102. 1785.Viburnum lantanoides Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. I : 179. 1803. A shrub, with smooth purplish bark,sometimes reaching a height of 10°,widely and irregularly branching, thebranches often procumbent and root-ing, the youngest twigs scurfy. Leavesorbicular, or very broadly ovate,strongly pinnately veined, short-acuminate or acute at the apex,usually cordate at the base, finelystellate-pubescent, or at length gla-brous above, scurfy with stellate pu-bescence on the veins beneath, finelyserrate all around, 3-8 broad; peti-oles i-ii long; cymes sessile, 3-5broad, the e.xterior flowers usuallyradiant and neutral, about i broad;drupes red, becoming purple, ovoid-oblong, 5-6 long; stone 3-groovedon one side, i-grboved on the other. In low woods, New Brunswick toNorth Carolina, Ontario, Tennessee!and Michigan. Leaves of shoots from!cut stumps thin, ovate, corsely toothed.May-June. Tangle-legs or -foot. Dog-wood. Dogberry. Trip-toe. Witch-hoppleor -hobble. Winter-buds naked.

 

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270 CAPRI FOLIACEAE. Vol. III.

  

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Viburnum lantanoides (also called Hobblebush, Witch-hobble, and Moosewood) is a perennial shrub of the family Caprifoliaceae growing 2–4 meters (6–12 ft) high with pendulous branches that take root where they touch the ground. These rooted branches form obstacles which easily trip (or hobble) walkers – hence the common name.

 

The shrub forms large clusters of white to pink flowers in May–June. The flowers on the outer edge of the clusters are much larger (3–5 cm across). The whole cluster is typically 10 cm across. It has large, cardioid leaves which are serrate, 10–20 cm long. The bark is gray-brown and warty and the fruit is a drupe which is red, turning to black when ripened.

 

The flowers provide nectar for the Celastrina ladon (Spring Azure) butterfly. Mammals and birds feed on its fruit, twigs, and leaves. The large showy flowers along the edge of the cluster are sterile, while the small inner flowers have both male and female parts.

 

[from: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viburnum_lantanoides]

Title: An illustrated flora of the northern United States, Canada and the British possessions, from Newfoundland to the parallel of the southern boundary of Virginia, and from the Atlantic Ocean westward to the 102d meridian

Identifier: cu31924024548533

Year: 1913 (1910s)

Authors: Britton, Nathaniel Lord, 1859-1934; Brown, Addison, 1830-1913

Subjects: Botany; Botany

Publisher: New York, Scribner

Contributing Library: Cornell University Library

Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

  

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Genus 2. HONEYSUCKLE FAMILY. 269 V. alnifolium. V. Opulus. 2. VIBURNUM [Tourn.] L. Sp. PL 267. 1753. Shrubs or trees, with entire dentate or lobed, sometimes, stipulate leaves, and white or rarely pink flowers in compound cymes, the outer flowers sometimes radiant and neutral. Calyx-tube ovoid or turbinate, its limb short, 5-toothed. Corolla rotate or short-campanulate in our species, regular, 5-lobed. Stamens 5, inserted on the tube of the corolla; anthers oblong, exserted. Ovary 1-3-celled; style short, 3-lobed or 3-parted; ovules solitary in each cavity, pendulous. Drupe ovoid or globose, sometimes flattened, i-seeded. Seed compressed; endosperm fleshy; embryo minute. [The ancient Latin name.] About 100 species, of wide geographic distribution. Besides the following, about 5 others occur in the southern and western parts of North America. Type species: Viburnum Tlnus L. * Outer flowers of the cyme large, radiant; drupe red. Leaves doubly serrate, pinnately veined. , Leaves 3-lobed, palmately veined. ** None of the flowers radiant; drupe blue or black (red in no, 1. Leaves palmately veined, or 3-ribbed. Cymes yi'-i' broad, the rays short; drupe red. 3. Cymes lyi'-zj/i' broad, the rays slender; drupe nearly black. 4. 2. Leaves pinnately veined. a. Leaves coarsely dentate, the veins mostly prominent beneath. Leaves very short-petioled, pubescent. 5. Petioles 3"-2o" long. Leaves glabrous, or with tufts of hairs in the axils beneath. 6. Leaves pubescent beneath, the pubescence more or less stellate. Drupe globose-ovoid; eastern and southern. Veins of the leaves not very prominent. 7. Veins very prominent on the under sides of the leaves. 8. Drupe oblong, twice as long as thick; western. 9. b. Leaves entire, crenulate, or serrulate, the veins not prominent. Native shrubs; drupes blue or black. Cymes manifestly peduncled. Peduncles shorter than the cyme; leaves crenulate. Peduncle equalling or longer than the cyme; leaves mostly entire. Cymes sessile, or nearly so. Leaves prominently acuminate. Leaves obtuse, or merely acute. Leaves and scarcely winged petioles glabrous, or nearly so. 13. Veins of lower leaf-surfaces and winged petioles tomentose. 14. European shrub, or small tree, escaped from cultivation; drupes red. 15. 3). V. pauciflorum. V. acerifolium. V. pubescens. V. dentatum. V. scabrellum. V. venosum. V. molle. 10. V. cassinoides. 11. V. nudum. V. Lentago. V, prunifolium. V. rufidulum. V. Lantana. i. Viburnum alnifolium Marsh. Hobble-bush. American Wayfaring Tree. Moose-bush or -berry. Fig. 3957. V. alnifolium Marsh. Arb. Am. 102. 1785. Viburnum lantanoides Michx. Fl. Bor. Am. 1: 179. 1803. A shrub, with smooth purplish bark, sometimes reaching a height of io°, widely and irregularly branching, the branches often procumbent and root- ing, the youngest twigs scurfy. Leaves orbicular, or very broadly ovate, strongly pinnately veined, short- acuminate or acute at the apex, usually cordate at the base, finely stellate-pubescent, or at length gla- brous above, scurfy with stellate pu- bescence on the veins beneath, finely serrate all around, 3'S' broad; peti- oles i'-ij' long; cymes sessile, 3'-S' broad, the exterior flowers usually radiant and neutral, about 1' broad; drupes red, becoming purple, ovoid- oblong, s"-6" long; stone 3-grooved on one side, i-grooved on the other. In low woods, New Brunswick to' North Carolina, Ontario, Tennessee and Michigan. Leaves of shoots from cut stumps thin, ovate, corsely toothed. May-June. Tangle-legs or -foot. Dog- wood. Dogberry. Trip-toe. Witch-hopple or -hobble. Winter-buds naked.

 

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Ellen Burstyn

 

Texture with thanks to Cris Buscaglia Lenz

 

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Viburnum lantanoides - Hobblebush - Adoxaceae

 

Undergrowth in a forest near Algonquin, Canada. The colors are "as is".

Taken during the 65th annual Great Smoky Mountains National Park Spring Wildflower Pilgrimage (April 21-25, 2015).

 

"Legend has it that this plant will keep witches away, hence the name..... particularly abundant in the moist, rich, shaded spruce-fir forests.....one of ten viburnum species in the park."

 

from Campbell, Hudson & Sharp's Guidebook

Another one of many Warblers Gene and I photographed along the Blue Ridge Parkway. Would have loved for him to sing on this branch--but it just didn't happen---- Amazing little bird at

4 1/2" !!!

Aristotle

 

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Viburnum lantanoides - Hobblebush - Adoxaceae - Wildflower

  

I took the time to hike the short loop trail to Richland Balsam. At 6400 feet, the Viburnum lantanoides may be the best hope for fall color at that elevation. This trail-side branch was backlit by mid-day sunlight breaking through the "she-balsam" and "he-balsam". I did notice scattered bright red fruits of American Mountain Ash on the forest floor.

Viburnum lantanoides. The large white flowers surrounding this cluster are sterile and used by the Viburnum only for the purpose of attracting pollinators.

leaf of Viburnum lantanoides

Viburnum lantanoides

Arboretum "Het Leen" - Eeklo - Belgium

Hobblebush, Spruce Fir Forest Trail, Swain County, North Carolina, August 2016

bunches of bright red berries on a medium-sized shrub

Viburnum lantanoides HOBBLEBUSH or WITCH-HOBBLE Caprifoliaceae

Title: H. H. Berger & Co.'s price list

Identifier: CAT31284074

Year: 1900 (1900s)

Authors: H. H. Berger & Co; Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Nurseries (Horticulture), California, Catalogs; Flowers, Seeds, Catalogs; Bulbs (Plants), Catalogs

Publisher: San Francisco, Calif. : H . H. Berger & Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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WHOLESALE CATALOGUE OF BULBS, SEEDS AND PLANTS. 15

 

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AMERICAN AND JAPAN TREE AND SHRUB SEEDS. ACER circinatum (Oregon Oz. Lb. A. Ja pomcum A. palmatum A. Pennsylvanicum {A. stri- atum) A. saccharinum (Sugar Maple) AILANTHUS glandulosus AMPELOPSIS Veitchi A. quinquefolia ANDROMEDA japonica .... BETULAS, in sorts: alba, lenta, lutea, populi- I folia, papyrifera, nigra. CAMPHORA officinalis C. laurei (Cinnamon Tree) . CALYCANTHUS floridus ... CRINUS florida (White Dogwood) FAGUS Americana F. ferruginea 1 F. sylvatica (Japan Beech). HELESIA tetraptera (Snow- HAMAMELIS Virginiana ... ILEX decidua I. opaca I. verticillata I. integra LAURUS Benzoin (Spice- wood) LI RIODEN DRON tulipif- erum : 20 «>L Du 15 I 25 15 I 25 25 1 5° 10 75 10 50 25 2 00 10 75 20 I 00 25 2 00 20 I 50 10 I 00 25 2 50 10 60 40 10 50 25 I 50 15 75 20 I 75 20 2 00 10 75 10 75 2 00 20 2 00 10 85 10 50 Oz. MAGNOLIA acuminata $0 10 M. glauca 10 M. grandiflora 25 M. hypoleuca (Japan) 15 M. tripetata 15 , Lb. PRUNUS serotina (Wild Black Cherry) $0 40 P. Virginiana 40 QUERCUS alba 20 Q. rubra 10 Q. coccinea 20 Q. tinctoria . 20 Q. palustris 15 Oz. RHAMNUS alnifolius $0 15 RHUS glabra 10 R. copallina (Dwarf Sumac) 10 R. succedanea (Japan Wax Tree) ... 10 R. vernicifera (Japan Lac- quer Tree) 10 SPIR/EA ariaefolia (Tall beautiful California Spiraea) 40 S. Douglasi (Rose-colored Spiraea) 40 THEA Sinensis (Japan Tea Plant) 15 TILIA Americana (Linden). 10 T. Migueliana (Japan) 20 ULMUS montana laciniata (Beautiful Japan Cut- leaf Elm VIBURNUM lantanoides... V. prunifolium (Black Haw) ZELKOWA Kiaki (Japan Cut- leaf Tree , 30 Lb. $0 50 1 00 1 50 1 00 1 50 100 lbs. $15 00 5 00 15 00 15 00 10 00 Lb. $1 OO 75 50 1 00 4 00 4 00 40 15 60 50 2 00 4 00 1 5o 75- 3 00

  

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Pfaf Edible parts of Hobbleberry: Fruit - raw or cooked. Sweet and palatable, tasting somewhat like raisins or dates. The fruits have a large seed and a thin flesh. The taste is best after a frost. The ovoid fruit is about 15mm long and contains a single large seed.

 

Wikipedia Viburnum lantanoides (also called Hobblebush, Witch-hobble, and Moosewood) is a perennial shrub of the family Caprifoliaceae growing 2–4 meters (6–12 ft) high with pendulous branches that take root where they touch the ground. These rooted branches form obstacles which easily trip (or hobble) walkers – hence the common name.

 

The shrub forms large clusters of white to pink flowers in May–June. The flowers on the outer edge of the clusters are much larger (3–5 cm across). The whole cluster is typically 10 cm across. It has large, cardioid leaves which are serrate, 10–20 cm long. The bark is gray-brown and warty and the fruit is a drupe which is red, turning to black when ripened.

 

The flowers provide nectar for the Celastrina ladon (Spring Azure) butterfly. Mammals and birds feed on its fruit, twigs, and leaves. The large showy flowers along the edge of the cluster are sterile, while the small inner flowers have both male and female parts.[1]

  

Viburnum lantanoides in mixed northern forest of Picea rubens (red spruce) and Betula alleghaniensis (yellow birch). Fundy National Park, New Brunswick, Canada.

Distribution

 

Viburnum lantanoides is found in the eastern U.S. and Canada from Georgia to the Canadian Maritimes. It grows in rich, moist acidic woods, stream banks, and swamps.

 

Hobblebush (possibly Viburnum lantanoides), Clinton County, within the Mount Logan Natural Area of Bald Eagle State Forest.

A splash of red caught my eye as I drove along Heintooga Ridge Road south of Maggie Valley, NC

Viburnum lantanoides, Snyder County, within the Snyder-Middleswarth Natural Area of Bald Eagle State Forest.

  

Identifier: illustrateddescr1875gene

Title: Illustrated descriptive catalogue of ornamental trees, shrubs, roses, flowering plants, bulbs, etc. / cultivated and for sale at the Genesee Valley Nurseries.

Year: 1875 (1870s)

Authors: Genesee Valley Nurseries Frost & Co Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Nurseries (Horticulture) New York (State) Catalogs Ornamental trees New York (State) Catalogs Ornamental shrubs New York (State) Catalogs Flowers New York (State) Catalogs

Publisher: Rochester, N.Y. : Frost & Co.

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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pike of flowers but color. Exterior lilac, and interior violet; distinct. $1.James Booth.—Entirely new and rare. $1.Triomphe DOrleans.—Entirely new and rare. $1.The varieties ot the Lilac have been greatly multiplied and improved of late, so thatnow they embrace every shade, from pure white to a brilliant purple. Their heavy, deepgreen foliage, fragrant and abundant flowers, and perfect hardiness, render them worthya place in the smallest collection. Bloom in May and J une. TAMARIX (The Tamarix). africana, African.—Fine, glossy, light green foliage, with delicate pink flowers. de Narbonne.—Foliage of a bluish color. gallica, French.—Fine light green foliage. germanica, German.—A very fine variety. indica, Indian.—Beautiful grass green foliage.The Tamarix are charming shrubs, of delicate, slender growth, and very picturesqueappearance. The leaves are small and somewhat resemble the foliage of a delicate Jun-iper or Cvpress. They produce an abundance of small pink flowers.

 

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OF ORXAMEXTAL TREES, SHRUBS, ROSES, &C. 23 VIBURNUM (The Viburnum). lantanoides, Laniana like.—A vigorous growing shrub, with broad, woolly leaves, producing in May flowers in large trusses.Nepalensis, Nepals.—A strong grower, with dark green, glossy foliage.Opulus, The Snow Ball.—An old and lavoritetall growing shrub, or small tree. with very showy, white flowers, produced in masses or balls.Oxycoccos, Tree Cranberry.—Its scarlet fruit renders it very ornamental in the early part ol winter. 3oc. WEIGELIA (The Weigelia). amabilis, Agreeable.—An exquisite strong growing shrub, with beautiful pink blossoms, whicli it produces continually through the whole summer ; grown as a small tree it is very handsome,alba, White.—A sport of the preceding, with white flowers, but not so strong a grower.Amelia.—White, changing to blush. arborea grandiflora.—A variety of vigorous habit and erect growth, foliagelarge ; flowers sulphur white, or pale yellow, changing to a pale rose.

  

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Scientific name: Viburnum lantanoides

Common name: Viburnum

Family: ADOXACEAE

Image by Tim Savas (2015)

 

From more than two dozen different species of trees and shrubs, researchers in the Wolkovich Lab gathered hundreds of cuttings in Massachusetts and Quebec and grew them in Arnold Arboretum growth chambers. Manipulating controlled conditions they can examine and compare the response of species from different latitudes to varying levels of temperature and light. Read more in the Harvard Gazette.

 

Tim Savas is a research technician in the Wolkovich Lab. When he isn't performing experiments on cuttings, he is experimenting with different visualization methods including macro photos and time lapse photography.

Blue Ridge Parkway, milepost 359, Walter Knob overlook, overlook, Yancey County, North Carolina

Flowering hobblebush (Viburnum species; possibly Viburnum lantanoides), Lackawanna County, within State Game Land 312.

Hobblebush (Viburnum species; possibly Viburnum lantanoides), Lackawanna County, within State Game Land 312.

Parc de la rivière Godefroy, Bécancour, Centre-du-Québec.

Last year I found this Viburnum along the Price Lake loop near Blowing Rock on the Blue Ridge Parkway. Yesterday I was looking for Lycopodium and Trillium undulatum and found the same shrub just beginning to leaf out with distinctive paired leaves.

And I love all hobblebush at any stage (even white flowers in early spring, the only stage not highlighted in these 10 shots uploaded today from Oct. 7th) I found this online as a comment at a link I've posted in the Hobblebush album:"There are no poisonous species in the genus Viburnum. While several of the viburnum species native to the Northern Woodlands, (like maple-leaved viburnum, Viburnum acerifolium, and smooth arrowwood, Viburnum dentatum, produce fruits that are inedible, i.e., they don’t taste good, there are at least five Viburnum species native to to the region that produce palatable fruit. These can be separated into two categories: those with prune-like fruit, and those with cranberry-like fruit.

 

Into the prune-like fruit category go the species wild raisin (V. nudum), nannyberry (V. lentago) and hobblebush (V. lantanoides, formerly V. alnifolium). All of these species start out with white flowers in flat-topped or rounded clusters (characteristic of the genus), followed by berries that start out green, and redden as they ripen, but are not fully ripe until they turn a bluish-purple or darker color, and are soft to the touch. The ripe fruit of all of these species have a prune-like consistency and flavor. Also characteristic of the genus, the fruits of these species have large, flat, cherry pit-like seeds in their centers, these are easily separated from the fruit in your mouth and spit out (on the ground, or into a bag for saving and propagating elsewhere). In my opinion, the fruit of the hobblebush is the best of the three, having a clove-like, spicy flavor. "

Witch-Hobble www.adirondackvic.org/Adirondack-Shrubs-Hobblebush-Viburn... "Actually, the “witch” in witch-hobble doesn’t refer to supernatural beings. It’s a word descended from the Middle English word “withy,” which means a strong, flexible switch-like branch. It’s the same “witch” as in “witch hazel,” another withy or switch-like shrub." northernwoodlands.org/outside_story/article/the-humble-ye...

Title: Catalogue of Pomona Nurseries

Identifier: CAT31284824

Year: 1900 (1900s)

Authors: Pomona Nurseries; Steele, T. E; T. E. Steele (Firm); Henry G. Gilbert Nursery and Seed Trade Catalog Collection

Subjects: Nurseries (Horticulture) New Jersey Catalogs; Fruit trees Seedlings Catalogs; Fruit Catalogs; Plants, Ornamental Catalogs; Trees Seedlings Catalogs; Shrubs Catalogs

Publisher: Palmyra, N. J. : T. E. Steele

Contributing Library: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

Digitizing Sponsor: U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library

  

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Text Appearing Before Image:

POMONA NURSERIES, PALMYRA, NEW JERSEY. 21 25 or 30 feet, with a stem 12 inches in diame- ter. Leaves lar^e, deep glossy green; large clusters of elegant fragrant flowers appear late in the season. Quite hardy here. 50c. each. SYRINGA, Josikea (Josika's, or Chionanthus- leaved Lilac)—A fine, distinct species, of tree- like growth, with dark, shining leaves and purple flowers in June, after the other lilacs have done flowering. Esteemed particularly for its fine habit and foliage. 35c. each. persica (Persian Lilac, Purple)—A profuse and early blooming sort, bearing light purple flowers. Valuable. 35c. each, $2.50 per 10 persica alba—Same habit and form as the pre- ceding, but almost white flowers. 85c. eath, |2 50 per 10. vulg"aris (Common Lilac) — The commonest purple species, and one of the best. A good grower. Flowers and young leaves fragrant. 25c. each. TAMARIX (Tamarisk)—Strong, slender-growing, irregular shrubs, delicate, feathery foliage ; small, fringing, delicate flowers. Should be planted within the mass of other shrubs on account of a tendency to grow naked at the base. When pruned to a single straight stem it makes a small tree of great beauty. Africana (African Tamarisk)—Pink flowers in June. Should be cut back and formed im- mediately after it blooms to obtain flowers another year. 35c. each. Indica (Indian Tamarisk)—Blooms in August. Very strong-growing, feathery and waving in aspect. 35c. each. VIBURNUM, lantanoides (Wayfaring Tree)—A tall shrub, bearing red and black fruit in late summer before other autumn fruiting plants have become conspicuous. The white flow- ers are borne in large clusters in May, and the large, soft, heavy leaves hang on very late. 35c. each. WEIGELA, amabilis, or splendens — Of robust habit, large foliage and pink flowers ; blooms freely in the autumn; distinct and beauti- ful. 35c. each. Candida—This is the best of all the white-flow- ering Weigelas. A strong, upright, erect grower ; flowers pure white and produced in great profusion in June and continues to bloom through the entire summer. 35c. each. rose-colored (Rosea)—An elegant shrub, with fine rose-colored flowers, introduced from China by Mr. Fortune, and considered one of the finest plants he has discovered. Blos- soms in May. 35c. each.

 

Text Appearing After Image:

Yucca Filamentosa. YUCCA, filamentosa (Adam's Needle) — Stem, short and leafy, with green or glaucous, long-linear leaves, having numerous thread- like filaments along the margins. The tall flower-stem lifts a panicle of creamy-white flowers. It is very hardy and fine. 35c. each. TREES FOR THE LAW, PARK OR STREET. ASH, European Mt. (Pyrus aucuparia)—A hand- some native tree, thriving in a great variety of soils and conditions ; beautiful when in fruit or flower. In autumn and early winter the tree is clothed with large clusters of red berries, rendering it very conspicuous. 5 to 6 feet, 75c.; 6 to 8 feet, $1.00. Flowering" (Fraxinus ornus)—Medium or low growth; foliage like, that of the Ameri- can Ash. Flowers in May or June, fringe- like, in large drooping clusters at the ends of the branches. An attractive and valuable ornamental tree. 5 to 6 feet, 75c.; 6 to 8 feet, $1.00. BEECH, Purple (Fagus purpurea)^One of the handsomest lawn trees, of graceful habit, attaining a height of forty to sixty feet. The foliage in spring is a deep purple, changing later in the season to green. A desirable and beautiful tree, seldom attacked by insects. Should be closely pruned when transplanted. 3' to 4 foet, $1.00. American (Fagus ferruginea)—One of the finest American trees, thriving best in a cool, moist soil. The leaves hold on until very late in winter, the light brown foliage producing a pleasing effect when grouped) among evergreens. 5- to 6'feet, $1.50.

  

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blooming all along the Thumbs Down trail at The Harris Center

Viburnum lantanoides (Hobblebush, Mooseberry, Witch-withy, Witch-hobble, Witch-tangle, Tangle-legs)

The leaf of a native shrub, Hobblebush (Viburnum lantanoides), lit from the back by early morning light. It can be found in the the eastern U.S. and Canada from Georgia to the Canadian Maritimes, growing in rich, moist acidic woods, stream banks, and swamps. Learn more at:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viburnum_lantanoides

 

www.distanthill.org

A guide to the wild flowers..

New York,F. A. Stokes[1899].

biodiversitylibrary.org/page/40764699

Box 9

Portfolio 2, Folder 5:

Specimen 8: Vib. lantanoides Brattleboro, Mrs. Brown; Brattleboro [GH872647]

Viburnum lantanoides (Hobblebush, Mooseberry, Witch-withy, Witch-hobble, Witch-tangle, Tangle-legs)

Viburnum lantanoides (Hobblebush, Mooseberry, Witch-withy, Witch-hobble, Witch-tangle, Tangle-legs)

A cluster of berries on a Witch-hobble along the summit trail on Elk Knob.

Leaves are still slim here in the frozen north. But, Hobble-berry (Witch's Hobble - viburnum lantanoides) is blooming! Mordant #1.

These buds are very characteristic.

Viburnum lantanoides (Hobblebush, Mooseberry, Witch-withy, Witch-hobble, Witch-tangle, Tangle-legs)

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