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A snap from down the beach of thousands of starlings(?) chasing the fast ferry off out of the river Mersey.

 

I've wanted to capture these things for a long time, but the lighting has never been right. So many birds making shapes in the sky, appearing and disapearing as they turn on mass, quite a sight.

 

In shot are a small portion of these, quite hard to appriciate the scale of these things, but if you were wondering what the black dots are, then now you know.

  

Thanks for your kind words yesterday.

 

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I heard a horror story about such an area on such a gloomy day. A married couple suddenly ran out of petrol. And the man decided to go back to the service station. So he left his wife and promised to come back soon, while she was waiting in the car in the forest. She didn’t know what to do and turned the radio on to hear a bit of music. Outside it was getting darker and darker and she got an eerie feeling as she sat there waiting for her husband. On the radio they brought an announcement: A dangerous madman escaped from the mental hospital and please don’t leave your houses! Well, she was very tired and so she decided to turn off the radio and fell asleep.

 

Hours later she was awakened because she heard a muted sound on the roof of the car. But thank God a police car stopped just behind her. The police officer went out of his car and cried: „Is everything OK with you? Now you do exactly what I tell you!!! When I say one … you open the door of the car … when I say two … you jump out of the car … and when I say three … you run as fast as possible in my direction! Well, such said such done! And when the woman reached the officer they both saw a man sitting on the roof of the car playing around with the head of the woman’s husband.

 

I want to thank all very much for your "views", "Comments" and "Favourites" :-) The only thing that matters is that you have joy in this photo. Again, thank you :-)

I’m not sure what it is…maybe I’m a glutton for punishment…or perhaps I really do enjoy driving at night, like I tell myself…but it seems that whenever I’m going to photograph I leave early.

 

This past weekend I took my youngest son Aiden, and one of our dogs, Callie for an overnight trip to Redwoods National Park. This trip served to accomplish several goals.

 

1) Separate my kids for one day. They’ve been fighting so much lately we needed an intervention, even if it was just for 24 hours…they could regain normal kid form, and give us ’normal’ parent form again…even if for just 24 hours.

 

2) Last year during this time of year I took Brenden, my oldest son to the Redwoods for a day. I was nearly mauled by an elk…we drove through the worst of the Nor-Cal forest fires…The photography sucked, and I ate way too much fried food for my own good. My son had a good time though, and his bragging led his little brother demanding a trip of his own in the future.

 

That day came this weekend.

 

3) I wanted good photos of the Redwoods. I’ve been there 3 or 4 times in the past two years, and NEVER gotten images I even remotely liked. I live in California. What kind of portfolio can I build without Redwoods NP shots?

  

2AM- I woke up my son, who was mumbling incoherently about doughnuts and our trip. “Time to go…”

 

I know, you’re thinking;

 

“You sick man…what kind of dad-tard wakes his 5-year old up at 2am to torture him…just so he can get someplace for sunrise photography?”

 

Me. That’s the short answer…but in actuality, it was Aiden’s fault as well…he wanted to “get up before anyone else and leave while mom and Brennie were sleeping.” He may not have specified 2am…but we left while everyone else was sleeping, so he got his wish.

 

The drive to the coast was slower than usual due to fog, darkness, old eyes, and deer. We saw at least 7 deer on the drive. There’s no place to get coffee at that time either. Maybe leaving early ISN’T awesome.

 

I planned to shoot Luffenholtz Beach for sunrise…because, really, it’s the best spot in that area for photographing the Ocean. It’s close to Houda Point and Moonstone Beach and has every type of scenario one with a camera would want; Sea Stacks…big crashing waves…slow meandering waves….surfers….dogs…whatever your beach photographing desire is…it‘s there.

 

AND best of all..

 

It’s wiener free.

 

We rolled into one of the parking areas of that region about 5:15am. The sun hadn’t risen yet…but I could tell there was NOTHING in the way of good sunrise photography.

Gray-ball city.

Flat…uninteresting clouds…monochrome wasn’t even a real option.

 

The only thing left to do was nap.

 

Like my kids, my dogs all have very different personalities. Callie is the watch dog of the pack. She barks at each and every noise…no matter who it is….or what it is. She’s ready to protect. This is a reassuring trait…at home…where nighttime noise is minimal.

 

Trying to nap in a parking lot that is rapidly filling with surfers and beach combers-trying to catch the low tide…is really difficult with Callie standing guard.

 

Here a bark the a bark every five minutes a bark bark.

 

Callie. SHUT THE HECK UP!!!

 

Here a growl there a growl everywhere a growl growl

 

Stupid dog. SHUT UP.

 

Somehow…we slept…We reallllly slept. We woke after 9am

 

9am was no different than 5am as far as weather was concerned…..still dull and gray. I think being a weatherman on the northern coast HAS to be the simplest job ever. Just guess…you’ll be wrong 75% of the time but nobody will care…because it’s the coast, and you can hide behind the ‘well…hehe this coastal fog is sure unpredictable isn’t it…should burn off at some point…hehe.”

 

The forecast was supposed to be SUN and partly cloudy.

  

If there is a silver lining to the boring gray skies…it’s that there is a better than average chance that the Redwood regions will be covered with fog…which IS great for photography.

 

Del Norte State Park…here we come.

 

I have to apologize to Oregon…whoever is responsible for Northern California’s coast park regions must have defected from Oregon….because there is far too many State Parks in this region as well. I guess California is guilty of over-park-syndrome as well.

 

I’m not familiar with all the ins and outs of the Redwoods National and State Parks region. It’s vast, and there’s a billion places to turn off and get lost in big trees. Big trees are intimidating to photograph. Photographically, I’ve heard people go nuts for the ‘Rhodies’ which is photo-slang for Rhododendron. I was happy just calling them pink flowers….but it’s not hip to ask another photographer,

 

“Yo…where’s a good spot for some pink flowers?”

 

You have to be photo-jargon-savvy….and say something like,

 

“How’s it going? What trails you tried so far? How the Rhodies?”

 

Then they know you’re IN and give you the 4-1-1 on where the Rhodies are poppin’

 

Damnation Creek trail. Rhodies be poppin. According to a photo source I saw while shooting along the road.

 

Aiden and I parked at the trailhead to Damnation Creek and set off. This trail is a 2.1 mile trek from Highway 101 all the way to the sea. It loses over 1000 feet in elevation as it drops to the beach. The parks service lists it as ‘Very Strenuous’ and ‘Steep’ I figured, being as I had my 5-year old…we wouldn’t go down too far…just enough to shoot some trees, and maybe a ‘Rhodie’ or two…then back up we’d go.

 

.6 miles into the trail…sits another sign warning hikers of the extreme elevation change, and sucktitude of the remaining portion of the hike. I figured this was a good spot to turn around.

 

“Where’s that trail go dad?” Aiden asks…bent down grabbing another wormy-millipede-like bug from the dirt to add to his already heaping handful of the critters.

 

“It’s steep dude…and it goes down to the ocean…”

 

“I wanna go to the ocean…”

 

“Oh we will, we’ll go to a different ocean...with less walking.” I assured him.

 

“I wanna go to THIS ocean.” He says matter-of-factly

 

“It’s STEEP Aiden…and you’re wearing rubber boots….we can go to another beach.”

 

“I don’t care. I wanna go to this one. Let’s go!”

 

“Fine. But I’m not carrying you up on the way back…not carrying…capiche?” I said trying to catch him as he tromped off down the path.

 

“Capiche.” came a little voice from down the trail.

 

The more we hiked…the steeper it got…and the more I reminded my son about the task that would await him once we finished playing at the beach.

 

“I KNOW…why don’t you worry about something else.”

 

“Alright…I just don’t wanna hear the complaining about how steep it is on the way back…”

 

“Well….well….you’re worried about it too.”

 

“I’m not worried about the hike. I’m worried about you…and you not making it….it’s STEEP. I know you too well.”

 

“Beach.” he said, pointing down the trail.

 

“Fine.”

 

The beach was nice…not huge, but under good conditions it could be a pretty sweet place to photograph. We took some snap shots on the beach…threw rocks and sticks…and watched the waves for a bit. There was a group of foreign high-school students there as well. Everyone was looking at me like I was the worst parent in the world.

 

How dare you drag your 5 year old down here…that’s CRAZY! Was the look I was getting from more than one person.

 

Hey. He wanted to. It was HIS idea. Was what I wanted to scream…but they wouldn’t have understood me.

 

As suspected…the hike up was NOT fun for Aiden. 100-yards into the return trip he was asking to be carried.

 

I wasn’t carrying him.

 

I’ll spare you most of the agony of the hike back…but just know it was LONG, and by the end my son was shirtless, and bellyaching with me about how tired, sore, and hungry he was….2/3 of the way back we passed a group of folks heading down.

 

“You guys having fun?” one of the ladies asked, making the typical trail-passing chit chat.

 

“Yeah.” I said, answering with the typical smiling response to trail-passing chit-chat.

 

“I’m not having fun!” My son snaps at me. “She wasn’t asking ME if I was having fun…because I AM NOT having ANY fun right now!”

 

No A, you are not having any fun…that is very apparent.

 

We made it back to the car…it only took an hour and a half. I’ve never seen a child happier to get back in the car.

 

Aiden can also say he’s completed the longest hike out of my kids….and he did it in Goulashes.

 

I’ve got to say I was very proud of him. Despite the complaining he did it all himself, and was patient (or too exhausted to care) while I stopped and took photos the entire hike.

 

This shot was from the hike down. I’ve got to say, even though there aren’t any ‘Rhodies’ in this image…I think it does a good job of showing how dramatic, and moody the park is.

 

Part 2 soon…

EXPLORED! rank 359 February 25, 2009.

 

“Those things that nature denied to human sight, she revealed to the eyes of the soul.”

Ovid

 

I have heard it said that at the time of melt - that time when the world around us turns ugly - is a time to put away our cameras for a while - a time to send them off to be serviced and cleaned, because there's nothing worth photographing now until the world freshens itself. I beg to differ... and hold that beauty is where we find it, even if we have to seek it with the eyes of our souls.

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Lake Tahoe has many beautiful places along its shores, but for me Sand Harbor is at the top of the list. The way the white granite boulders merge with the beautifully clear, turquoise water is simply incredible. On this night I was shooting a sunset that started off without a bang. In fact it was so boring I began to pack up my gear to leave. But as I turned around to head back to the car, the clouds to the northeast began to light up with beautiful pink and purple hues. Tearing my camera back out of my bag I set up a composition which highlighted the clarity of the water, the white granite, and the reflection of the beautiful light show happening above the mountains in front of me. With the beauty of the scene, and a complete lack of any wind, it seemed as though Tahoe and I were both left breathless.

 

*Please visit my profile to learn more about me and my photography*

 

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Tech Notes on this Photo

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Nikon D300s

Tokina 12-24 mm

ISO100 - To help stretch out the shutter speed

f/10 - as always I started out at f/8 since that's the sharpest spot on my lens and it helps me defocus scratches, drops, and dust on my filters/lens. In this case I wanted to increase the shutter speed a little bit to help smooth out the water as much as possible. Turns out there wasn't much difference to the smoothness in the end, but this shot at f/10 had the best light.

6 sec

12 mm on a crop sensor

Lee 3-stop, 2-stop, and 1 soft GND Filters, handheld at a very slight angle to help darken the horizon on the left.

 

Post-Processing

----------------------

In Raw Converter (Nikon Capture NX2)

- Processed single raw file twice, once for the majority of the image, and another time at +0.3 ev to blend in to upper-right corner to remove some darkness there

- Global contrast for added pop

- Slightly darkened and added contrast to the sky to add oomph

- brightened and added contrast to darker rocks on left

- slightly darkened and added contrast to brighter rocks on right

- increased brightness, contrast, and saturation of foreground rock and turquoise water

- straightened horizon by 0.2°

 

In Photoshop:

- Noise reduction via Neat Image

- gradient blend of 2 tiffs to lighten upper right corner a little

- Selective sharpening of rocks and mountain ridge

- Curves layer to slightly brighten submerged rocks in foreground, mid-ground rocks, and upper right part of the sky

- Decided I didn't like the extra pinkness in the foreground rock so I used a hue/saturation layer to tone it down

 

Thanks for looking!

 

~Josh

First off, I need to give due credit were it belongs here. Originally, I was going to call this picture, "Rosie is in the House 2." Not that original, really. But then, Franz Bodmer wrote "Rosie rules!" in his comment under the sister shot of this one. So, clearly that is the perfect caption ;-) Hope it is OK, Franz?!

 

This shot was taken on my terrace a few days after Rosie staged the ultimate coup on April 4th. She stole the highly coveted nest box which Sunny the Great Tit had been spending every single night in since the beginning of October, right from under his beak just as his lovely wife Daisy was starting to clean the place in preparation for her nest there. That fated afternoon, Rosie decided to start taking out Sunny's trash, bringing in truckloads of moss after that. Technically, the nest box is made for the Great Tits. But no, only the biggest and best for this itsy-bitsy songbird with an attitude.

 

The next morning on April 5th, a MMA match ensued on the floor of my terrace between Rosie and Daisy as well as Sunny and Mr. Rosie. I actually had to intervene. After that, Daisy and Sunny gracefully accepted their defeat. Interestingly enough, Sunny was back to spending his nights in the nest box later that week as Rosie took a good two weeks to build her super comfy and fluffy deluxe abode.

 

Another tit bird couple whom I call the Dimples, then also got super interested in the nest box after Rosie had nearly finished furnishing the place. Mr. Dimples started pursuing Rosie, to the chagrin of Mr. Rosie and the super sweet Mrs. Dimples. Turns out that the little ones are often from my two males... And, sometimes a male tit will have two wives! But, as of April 18th, both couples now only have eyes for one another and the males are busy feeding their wives all day around my terrace. It is just too adorable to watch.

 

Rosie turned into the Energizer Bunny the first few days after taking over her new digs. I seriously want to move in myself as it must be the fluffiest nest ever with all the mountains of moss and white, downy feathers she was so busy schlepping in there. Rosie then calmed down more after she and Mr. Rosie were sure of being the sole owners of this luxury high-rise condo that comes with various gourmet restaurants and fabulous spa facilities as well as top-notch room service, courtesy of yours truly. Move over, Ritz-Carlton.

 

Rosie is part of the colorful entourage of the crested tit Maxine in the upcoming picture book series, "Flaushi the Buddha Jay." The series is based on my very special and completely wild Eurasian jay Flaushi and all of his friends on and around my enchanted terrace.

 

All the other songbirds assume Rosie is not so smart as she always seems to be staring off into space. But, she is actually meditating and quite the enlightened little being.

 

The real-life Rosie will spend up to 10 minutes in one spot, contemplating the world. It is the cutest thing to watch. Rosie also loves posing for me and my camera when I am outside on my enchanted terrace.

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'Not right now': McQuade picks students over politics – The Detroit News

 

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Barbara McQuade, U.S. Attorney, Eastern District of Michigan, recalls the many cases her office handled. She was appointed by President Obama and was recently ordered to resign by President Trump.Max Ortiz, The Detroit News

 

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As U.S. attorney, Barbara McQuade and her team aggressively tackled public corruption, health care fraud, violent crimes and civil rights cases across the Eastern District.(Photo: Photos by Max Ortiz / The Detroit News)Buy Photo

 

It’s a moment seared into former U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade’s memory and resonates with her more than six years later.

 

It was the fall 2010, and McQuade and 92 other lawyers were at the White House visiting President Barack Obama for the first time as a group of U.S. attorneys.

 

“The president said, ‘Your loyalty is not to me, but to the Constitution and the people of the United States. And if those roads ever diverge, stand with the Constitution and the people,’ ” McQuade said Tuesday as she looked at a photo of her and all 93 U.S. attorneys standing next to the president.

 

On Tuesday, even as McQuade packed up her office after being asked to resign by the Trump administration last week after seven years as the top federal prosecutor, the Constitution was foremost on the 52-year-old’s mind.

 

McQuade quelled speculation Tuesday that she would run for elected office in 2018 and instead announced plans to join the University of Michigan Law School. McQuade, a 1991 Michigan Law graduate, will join the faculty as a professor from practice on May 1, teaching national security, criminal law and criminal procedure.

 

“I really want to continue in public service. … The chance to teach the next generation of law students about what’s important in our legal system — to me — has never been more important,” McQuade said from her former desk at the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit. “Understanding our courts and understanding our Constitution is really important.”

 

On Tuesday, as she cleaned out her 20th-floor downtown office overlooking the Detroit River, McQuade reflected on the past several days — which included learning of her requested resignation via the media — as well as the last seven years. It is common for new presidential administrations to ask all holdover U.S. attorneys to step down.

 

McQuade, the first woman to serve as U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, said she thought she would get another four to six weeks to wrap up case meetings, fully transition all of her responsibilities to new acting U.S. Attorney Dan Lemisch, who was her first assistant U.S. attorney, and hand off some speaking engagements booked two months in advance.

 

But she didn’t. This week, her badge access to the building and computer permissions were cut off.

 

“That struck me as creating unnecessary disruption,” McQuade said.

 

From Kilpatrick to Fata

 

During her career, McQuade and her team aggressively tackled public corruption, health care fraud, violent crimes and civil rights cases across the Eastern District, which covers 34 counties and an estimated 6 million residents.

 

Her most notable case was the collar and the conviction of former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick and on public corruption charges. Kilpatrick was sentenced to 28 years in prison.

 

Her first major case in office was against Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, an al-Qaida operative, for attempting to blow up an airliner over Detroit on Christmas Day in 2009. He pleaded guilty and is serving a life sentence.

 

Under McQuade, the Justice Department brought cases against oncologist Farid Fata, who admitted to giving chemotherapy to cancer-free patients. She brought fraud cases against Volkswagen AG and Takata Corp. as well as Pittsfield Township and Sterling Heights for cases related to a religious land use law and the construction of mosques.

 

As for her legacy, McQuade said she hopes people remember her and her office for being effective.

 

“Sometimes, government gets a bad name,” McQuade said. “I hope we have demonstrated that good government can work well for people and can improve the quality of life for people. I just hope the people say that she proved government can be effective.”

 

All current and pending criminal and civil cases will continue under 115 career professional assistant U.S. attorneys, including a public corruption probe in Macomb County.

 

McQuade hopes her efforts to prosecute officials in public corruption cases — including recently 13 Detroit Public School principals and school supplier Norman Shy — have a lasting impact on how people consider whether to break the law.

 

“Someone once said ‘greed is a mighty river,’ and it’s really hard to resist. You hope people have a good moral compass and will make the right decision. … We hoped to change the equation by letting people know there is somebody looking,” she said.

 

McQuade said the job has humbled her. To see defendants charged with crimes is humbling, she said. McQuade said she sees everybody is dealing with something, from her staff to people she encounters on the job.

 

“I have lived a very privileged life, and to see the challenges other people overcome has been humbling,” she said.

 

Before her tenure

 

Before McQuade’s tenure as U.S. attorney, the Eastern District faced several challenges.

 

In 2004, U.S. District Judge Gerald Rosen presided over the Detroit Sleeper Cell case in Detroit, the first criminal trial to result from the federal 9/11 terrorism probe. Though a jury convicted three North African immigrants in the case, Rosen overturned the convictions after discovering that prosecutors had withheld evidence favorable to the defendants.

 

In 2005, federal prosecutors in Detroit did not charge any former Kmart Corp. executives — including former chairman and CEO Charles Conaway and former president Mark Schwartz — for their roles in the events leading up to the discount retailer’s 2002 bankruptcy.

 

That decision capped a multimillion-dollar, 31/2-year FBI and Justice Department probe into allegations that corporate wrongdoing caused the retail bankruptcy filing.

 

Political future?

 

Democratic political consultant T.J. Bucholz said McQuade has a “good track record that could be leveraged into a great run for a statewide race” and was surprised to hear she does not plan to run.

 

The increasing importance of political fundraising can turn off some potential candidates, Bucholz said, acknowledging he does not know if that was a factor for McQuade.

 

“I certainly don’t think she’s going to disappear into the annals of academic history at the University of Michigan,” Bucholz said. “She’s young enough, has a good profile and good visibility. There’s no reason she couldn’t step in on a future cycle for a future race.”

 

Democrats had hoped McQuade would run for public office in 2018. Her name had been floated as a possible candidate for either attorney general or governor, and a “draft McQuade” page popped up this weekend on Facebook.

 

But McQuade, who is married and a mother of four, put an end to speculation about that prospect on Tuesday in her sit-down interview with the The News.

 

“No, it’s not something I plan to pursue. Not right now. I have teenage children and other things that are important to me right now,” she said. “People like to speculate on that, but no one has ever checked with me.”

 

What she will miss the most about her life as U.S. attorney, McQuade said, other than her staff, is the ability to solve problems.

 

“I will miss the ability to identify a problem in our community and then have the power to harness the resources of the federal government to try to solve the problem,” McQuade said.

 

jchambers@detroitnews.com

 

Staff Writer Jonathan Oosting contributed.

 

McQuade’s predecessors

 

Terrence Berg, (interim) 2008-10. Currently a federal judge in Flint.

 

Stephen Murphy, 2005-08. Currently a federal judge in Detroit.

 

Jeffrey Collins, 2001-04. Currently in private practice in Detroit.

 

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Wednesday was go time. Once work ended at 3, I had the rest of the week off, with a workshop on Saturday and Sunday my only commitment. The plan was simple. Drive like crazy and end up somewhere cool in time for photography Thursday at sunrise.

 

I needed to scout the Tioga Pass area for the workshop, so it made sense that my ‘cool’ destination would end up being somewhere on highway 395. I just didn’t know where. I thought about a lot of place as I raced down highway 44, past Lassen Park, on my way to Reno; where I would have dinner, buy some groceries, make a football parlay, and top off the gas tank before ultimately finding my sleeping place a few hours later.

 

Let’s just get this out now. If it weren’t for the football Giants of NY I would be $125 richer right now. Way to go fart-knockers.

 

I stopped in Reno at the Cal-Neva, (after fueling up) to make a single $5 sports bet (and pee…it was a long drive.). I think I set a record for the shortest amount of time I’ve ever spent in a casino while in Reno. I flew in, used the restroom, dropped my bet, and was back in the saddle looking for a restaurant and grocery store all before my car seat even lost it’s warmth.

 

Oh Reno, I thought I knew ye.

 

I know ye not.

 

I couldn’t find a grocery store. None. Zip. Nada.

 

I was just driving. Looking. Mumbling. Down Virginia St. I went…casino’s turned to malls, which turned into more casinos, and then more malls…and FINALLY. FINALLY I found a grocery store.

 

If you’ve ever been to Whole Foods. You may know where I’m headed with this tale. The football Giants of NY weren’t the only ones who took my money while in Reno.

 

Wow what a store full of a bunch of food with brand names I don’t recognize. I needed food for breakfast the next day, as well as some ingredients to throw in the crock pot when I met up with Stephen on Thursday night. Where to begin!?! I saw the produce selection and was in heaven. They had every type of vegetable imaginable…and in oddly colored versions even. Purple potatoes, white Asparagus, pinky colored green beans, orange bell peppers…it was truly a site to appreciate if you like food. My recipe called for some lesser purchased pepper varieties…so I was SURE I had found the perfect spot for filling my bizarre shopping list.

 

One problem.

 

Their pepper selection sucks. They had neither of the peppers I needed in fresh, canned, or even dried form.

 

It was time to make some adjustments to the recipe.

 

I didn’t know my way around the grocery store, so this took considerable time…in one aisle…back to another, the back to the same aisle again. I was a mess. Eventually I stumbled into the dairy aisle where I came face to face with dairy bliss. I’m a sucker for aesthetics in everything…even my milk. When I saw milk in an old fashioned glass jars, there was no doubt, I was buying some…even if it set me back $5 for a quart because of ‘bottle deposit’

 

“You can get the deposit back if you bring the bottle back….” The lady behind the counter told me cheerfully.

 

I was already be taking a mortgage out on my home to buy the 15 items I’d selected in my cart…so I was half tempted to chug the milk right there in line and get back my deposit…I was saving it for breakfast, however, to drink with some nice pastries…which whole foods doesn’t sell.

 

No Hostess pies?!??! Shame on you and your no preservatives lifestyle Whole Foods!! Tree Huggers! That meant I would have to stop AGAIN to buy hostess cake...and ice…because apparently ice must have preservatives…they don’t sell it either. You won’t be getting that bottle back jackasses!!

 

I loaded my overpriced food, and set off to find some dinner.

 

I ended up at a little place called Austin’s. Not because it looked outstanding, more because I was starving, and it was right near the 395 onramp. I walked into the bar, and the lady working the counter told me to find a seat and she would be right with me. Big fat liar.

 

She proceeded to chit chat with a few of the regulars, and then struck up a conversation with a few other customers who came in after me, even going as far as getting their beverages for them, and talking about the Monday Night Football game from the past week…because, come to find out, she’s a Broncos fan….and the customer was AT the game, and bought her a t-shirt. This required some joyful celebratory distraction, followed by other conversations and shenanigans that were all adding up to not providing me with anything that would get me closer to being fed.

 

Eventually, there weren’t any other people left in the bar with whom the waitress had not shared some kind of conversation, so she was forced to bring me a menu, call me sweetie, and retreat back to the bar so she could wait for someone else to distract her from giving me decent service.

 

I’m a budget traveler, so I ALWAYS look for the best bang for the buck…and when I saw the spaghetti and meatballs platter for 8.99.…I was sold. I figured it would be average in taste at best, but nothing fill one up like spaghetti and meat fried in ball form. They had an optional side dish for 2.99.…but I wasn’t going for it. Spaghetti was it….and a beer. If baseball is on TV…I have to have a beer while I enjoy the game.

 

MY food comes and low and behold there’s a plate of broccoli with my dinner. I figure it’s probably just a courtesy to me for my patience when dealing with crap-tastic service. IT’ was also late in the evening, so I figured they had some left, and why not give it out…Like the spaghetti it too wasn’t very good…and I only picked at it.

 

When my bill finally came it was almost $20. I was charged for the broccoli…and my small beer was $5. WHAT?!?!?!? This would be a good time to say that I hate tipping at restaurants. I hate giving someone who is paid for their job, extra to do their job. I never get tips for doing my job. Their job is to bring people food, and keep their water glasses full. It’s not rocket science, or brain surgery. I DO tip the required amount, and I will even tip a pizza delivery guy quite well…because I believe there is some skill involved in bringing me my pizza in a timely fashion. There’s cops to avoid, other drivers, route finding, and the ever dwindling hotness of my meal. That takes some skill.

 

I also tip because my wife would kill me if I didn’t…and be totally embarrassed to be out with me and my cheapness. My cheap-titude.

 

My wife wasn’t there, and this lady sucked at her job…so I didn’t tip her. Her tip was the broccoli she charged me for. She can go home and pout about the house in her Monday Night Football shirt.

 

With Reno firmly in my rearview mirror, I set off down 395.…destination still unknown.

 

I really had a lot of options…Lundy Canyon and the aspen groves…Convict Lake, and the elusive epic sunrise I have yet to capture there, down to the Alabama Hills, Owens River…so many places I haven‘t explored to my satisfaction.

 

Where did I end up?

 

Mono Lake. I ALWAYS end up there…I’ve told myself I was happy with my shots from that place…I could leave it. I still end up there. My logic this time was it was that it was almost midnight…I was getting tired, and there would be no bears in that parking lot that would be interested in getting in the Prius with me and ransacking my overpriced preservative free food.

 

I ended up at Mono Lake out of pure chickendry.

 

I set up my bed in the car, and went lights out.

 

I woke up at 3am…because I was freezing. I managed to peak outside, and notice there were NO clouds in the sky….UGH. It was too late to move now. I figured I’d set my alarm for six, and check again. If the clouds were back, I’d just tough out another Mono sunrise. ..if it was still clear, I’d move south to Convict, and give that place another whilrl.

 

6’O clock came, and I shut off the alarm in favor of 30 minutes more of sleep. I’m such a grump when the alarm goes off…and it’s easy to talk myself back down for a few more ZZZZ’s if I’m already at a location.

 

6:30am. I look out the window, and low and behold the clouds came back, and the sky is starting to glow pink. I may not be a big fan of Mono Lake…but I’m no dummy…there was a sunrise a’ comin’ and if I didn’t get my happy ass up, and dressed, I was going to miss it….

  

Here’s the shot…so the next post will be kind of a let down at first…because you know the results…but it’s still a good tale. Oh yeah….I had chocodiles to eat for breakfast with the glass jug of milk.

 

It’s all the fun of Chocolate AND Crocodiles wrapped up in a tasty chocolate covered cream filled cake.

Really I can’t find out what it has to do with those reptiles…it’s just a Twinkie covered in chocolate. I guess that just sounds lame though. Chocolate-covered Twinkie. Mix it with a vicious man-eating reptile…and that will make it delicious…and kind of frightening.

 

Will the cake eat ME…or will I eat the cake?

 

Find out next time…

 

www.brianruebphotography.com

(launching VERY soon)

Portfolio & Services

 

Here's one more from Rodeo beach a couple weeks ago, and most likely my last shot for 2009. Thank you all for a wonderful year and I wish each and every one of you a safe and happy holiday season and a grand new year! I will be in Southern California for a few days and then hopefully to Death Valley. Any of you who have tips, secret (or well known) spots in either area, let me know! I'll be checking my flickr mail.

 

Onto the shot.

 

Sometimes I forget to mix things up when the light is sweet, instead getting caught up in the moment, in awe of what is unfolding before my eyes. Coastal shooting, in the action zone, requires great attention to all those 'little' details. Which shutter speed to use to get the best water action to retain details is one of them. Dealing with mist and water all over your grad filters is one of the most annoying things. It never ends! And, oh, not gettting totally wiped out by a rogue wave. Yeah, that's important, too.

 

Now, I'm about to let you in on a personality trait of mine. I don't multitask well...at all. I will forget where I'm driving, and miss turns, just by having a conversation. I misplace an item, whether it be keys, wallet, or phone, on a daily basis.

 

So as we are wrapping up this shoot, I suddenly realize I've misplaced my filter holder. I had just taken it off and it's nowhere to be found. I check all eight of my pockets, four in my jacket, four in my pants.

 

Nothing.

 

I conclude that the filter holder fell to the sand and was either swept out to sea or covered in sand by an incoming wave. Steve loans me his flashlight and I start looking. In the meantime, I am getting flustered. I just lost my $70 remote in Tahoe a couple weeks ago, I do not want to lose a $70 filter holder. I hastily set my tripod further up the beach and continue my search. But my tripod falls over and my camera hits the sand. Sand is now wedged into every button and dial on the back of my camera. Nice.

 

But I find nothing. I give up and we head to the parking lot. I sit down in my truck and instantly realize what a fool I am. I NEVER put anything in the back pocket of pants! But there it was, my filter holder.

 

Nikon D300

Nikkor 12-24mm @ 12mm

0.5sec @ f16, ISO 100

Singh-Ray 3-stop Reverse GND Filter

Lee. 6 Hard GND

In English:

If your Yahoo! ID is based in Singapore, Germany, Hong Kong or Korea, you will only be able to view safe content based on your local Terms of Service, and therefore won’t be able to turn off SafeSearch.

In other words, german users can't access photos on flickr that are not flaged "safe" ... only flowers and landscapes for the germans ...

We won't let this happen! Copy and upload this picture to your account - show flickr who we are.

 

Espanol:

No sé cuando, pero muy recientemente a las cuentas de Alemania, Hong Kong, Corea y Singapur les han prohibido ver las fotos que están en el Safe Search, las mismas en las que a nosotros nos dan la opcíón de ver o no ver. A ellos simplemente se lo prohiben. Chale no?

 

Francais:

Si votre compte Yahoo! est basé à Singapour, à Hong Kong, en Corée ou en Allemagne, vous ne pourrez voir que les photos qui n'ont pas été marquées comme ayant un contenu qui peut choquer. Toutes les autres ne vous seront pas accessibles. Vous serez donc condamnés à ne voir que des paysages et des fleurs. Il ne faut pas laisser faire ça. Envoyez cette photo sur votre compte pour montrer à Flickr que nous savons nous mobiliser contre la censure !

 

If you want partecipate you can find here the picture from above: farm2.static.flickr.com/1299/543864623_7aadef1e69_o.jpg

 

I originally wanted to do a photo with my globe as a tribute to the environment and to 'spread awareness' about the issues it faces these days, but I didn't like how they turned out, so I thought it would be best to put a photo of nature instead. This is an old photo... I love winter.

 

If you read this, thanks.

If you don't, I don't care. I'm just putting my thoughts down. You might agree with me, roll your eyes, be somewhere in the middle, or not even give a crap, but this is what is on my mind at the moment.

 

I've just been thinking.. kind of about, well.. everything. But mainly about the world. It keeps me up at night. You don't have to read this, it's more of like a journal entry to the journal I've never had.

 

... I'd been dreading and putting off reading a summer assigned book for my IB Environmental Science class, but I finally made a small dent in the material. It's pretty much all statistics so far, which I though would be extremely boring, but I found that instead of boring me, the facts shocked me. I put a star next to the ones that really got me, and will share them here. I mean we are always hearing about environment issues and how we need to do something before it's too late.. and so on.. but I feel as if a normal-minded person like myself can't possibly think of a way to save this planet. Of course recycling is do-able, and so is carpooling, or buying environment friendly things such as reusable bags, but how can small things like this save our home from all of the terrible detrimental acts we've created? It just makes me scared, not necessarily for my life, but for the future generations that we are putting these burdens on. Some eye-opening facts...

 

*It took all of human history for global population to expand by 1900 to a billion and a half people, and today we have over 6 billion.

*One calculation suggests that more energy was consumed in the last 100 years than in all of previous history.

* In 1960, 5% of Marine fisheries were either fished to capacity or over-fished; today 75% of marine fisheries are in this condition.

*A forth of the bird species are extinct and another 12% are threatened.

*25% of mammals and reptiles are threatened, and 30% of fish.

*The rate of species extinction today is estimated to be a hundred to a thousand times the normal rate at which species disappear.

*a third to a half of the world's forests are now gone.

*each year human societies are destroying about 40% of nature's net photosynthetic product.

*a fifth of the world's people lack clean drinking water, and 40% lack sanitary services.

* Over the next two decades, the average supply of water per person will drop by a third.

*In the past 20 years, global energy use is up by 40%, global meat consumption is up by 70%, and global paper use is up by 90%.

*Close to half of the world's people live on less than two dollars a day.

 

All of these facts were only in the first 20 or so pages of this book, and I'm sure there are many more horrifying ones to come, unfortunately.

 

Anyways, us humans are capable of so much, and I am a bit frustrated with what we have done to our planet. And even though I may not see the effects first-hand, I also personally feel responsible for what is happening. I can't help feeling guilty when I take 20 minute showers, when I should be conserving water, or drive in a car knowing it's bad for the environment, or sit in my nice air-conditioned house stuffing my face with dinner when there are people in third-world countries starving and dying each day from malnutrition.

 

So just putting my two cents in:

One: People need to freaking control themselves and stop having so many kids. The world is WAY too populated and we are using up all of our resources FAST. And we need to educate people in other countries like Africa to stop producing kids that they can't feed.

Two: Finding some way to stop global warming, or at least decrease it. And for those people who don't believe in global warming and say "it's just natural for the Earth's temperature to fluctuate"... I'm sorry, I find that completely mental. There has been so much damage done to the planet in the past 100 years, with the Industrial Revolution and cars, and what not, that it makes sense why the Earth is heating up, and glaciers are melting, and making Polar bears extinct.

 

Oh, and one more thing. And I'm not just saying this because I'm a vegetarian. COWS. Cows are ruining our ozone layer. SERIOUSLY. Livestock is responsible for 18% of greenhouse-gas emissions worldwide, according to the U.N. Who would have thought that cow's farting could do such damage :P And I'm not implying that we kill off all the cows in the world, it would just be sensible to stop over-breeding them. But I doubt that will ever happen, because people enjoy their steaks and hamburgers far too much..

 

I could go on, but I won't. Sorry for rambling.

Portfolio & Services

 

Panther Beach had been somewhat of an anomaly for me. There is a cove just south of Davenport that I've been to a handful of times to shoot, and I mistakenly had been calling it Panther Beach due to some photos on Flickr labeling it such, albeit incorrectly. Turns out that cove is often called Shark Fin Cove, or Shark Tooth Cove or beach. Something like that. Anyway, I had been set straight by a couple of people, and I wanted to locate the "real deal".

 

Driving home from a sunrise shoot up at Pescadero State Beach, I stopped off at a dirt pull out that I had wanted to explore. And after seeing a nice opening in the cliff, I knew I was at Panther Beach proper. This is a popular spot it turns out. You can tell by the numerous large blackened areas in the sand from campfires and the profuse amount of trash. Both times I've collected quite a bit, mostly the plastic stuff to help do my part. I am very disappointed that there are no trash cans at the top or bottom of the path, as I'm sure that would help out. Hmm, maybe I need to write a letter.

 

On to the shoot. Knowing that rain is coming for a couple days, I felt my best opportunity for some nice sunset shots would be tonight. I got up to the beach late, and quickly found a spot I liked. I really liked how the waves were crashing against the outside rock and streaming off. I also liked how the foreground rock seemed to be pointing towards the sunset. There is so much potential here, I plan on coming back for more. I'll be sure to carry a bag or two for the trash collection on the way out.

 

Update 02/05/09: Thanks to my contact, surfwax, I now stand corrected. This shot is from Hole In The Wall Beach. Panther Beach is the beach north of the hole. I guess Panther Beach eludes me again! That's ok, I'll get there eventually.

 

Nikon D300

Tokina 11-16mm @ 12mm (borrowed from my girlfriend)

0.8sec @ f11, ISO 160

B+W Polarizer

Lee .9 Soft and .6 Hard ND Grad Filters

 

First Impressions are Lasting Impressions

 

Do you dare ask my first impressions about a world famous national park?

 

I drove the Lyell Highway A10 to see a portion of Tasmania I have not seen. It rained almost non-stop from Queenstown to Cradle Mountain. Do you suppose rain slicked roads would be sufficient cause for other road users to slow down, below the speed limit or to not tailgate? No! Well how about narrow winding roads with hairpin turns with a recommended speed limit of 15 km/h (9 mph), that are slick, plus limited visibility? TasManiacs!

 

I had planned stops at Montezuma Falls and Zeehan that is supposed to have one of the best rock and mineral collections, but it was bucketing rain. I decided to continue direct to Cradle Mountain.

 

Very nearly 6 hours later, my wife and I had checked-in to our cabin. I have stayed at 4 and 5 star hotels around the world that were not as nice! They are supposedly rated 2 star, though I would rate them 4 or 5 star accommodation. Cradle Mountain Highlander-

www.cradlehighlander.com.au/

 

Raining moderately, cold, and overcast sky, upon arrival. I was eager to visit Dove Lake, but it had to wait for a break in the poor weather. The cabin had its own kitchen, so my wife prepared a lovely dinner. I was tired from the drive, so slept early and past sunrise. I was told by a German tourist the weather was too poor for a sunrise photo. We made our way to the Visitor Centre.

 

BEST ADVICE Buy a two years Parks pass at Service Tasmania and get a car registration sticker for $98.00 and avoid the queue, the poor or deliberately misleading advice and unfriendly attitudes of the Parks and Wildlife Staff at the counter. With that Pass, avoid the time wasted and time lost waiting in a line of tourists all asking the same questions. I firmly believe the Staff are sick of tourists -AND, Tasmania is reliant on tourism $$$, the "Holiday State".

 

The C132 is very narrow and one lane, mostly. The bus service there have a special rule book for them, that nobody else has read and certainly is nowhere within the pages of the Tasmania Driver Licence Handbook, that they do not have to drive at the speed limit and they have ultimate right-of-way! One tourist, in queue, ahead of me had complained about that park attraction to indifferent, almost contemptuous Staff, to absolutely no avail.

 

At Dove Lake Car Park, tourists would mostly take photos whilst standing in the car park. One mainland Chinese older female tourist had her photograph taken in the parking lot by another, she was wearing a bright pink jacket, dark Hollywood actress style thick plastic framed sunglasses (probably a copy of some famous brand label), replete with a toothpick in her mouth, and posing with a President Richard Nixon peace hand gesture. Imagine travelling all the way from mainland China, say 10.5 hours flying time from Shanghai to Sydney, fussing at the airport with Customs and Immigration, for another couple hours, transferring to a flight to Hobart, flying another 1.5 hours, plus driving 4.5 to 6 hours, by tour bus to get a once in a lifetime photograph like that!!! No shit! And, then another mainland Chinese female tourist dropped a piece of paper or tissue, in the parking lot, turned to look at it, then walked off, though a trash can was within 25 meters, at most. We can thank Communist China's President Xi, for the buggers rubbishing our state's most pristine environment. That is not the worst, I saw. Some rogue discarded her tampon near a tree at the famous Boat Shed, where millions of photos have been taken.

 

I met Canadian, English, French, German, Hong Kong and Taiwan tourists, as well as those from interstate. Those are the ones we need to lure to our state. Thinking of one word to describe them -civility.

 

My wife and I had planned this for easily two months of likely windows of opportunity for travel, with all else that is going on in our lives and around the weather. The weather during our stay was poor and very changeable. For example, I had my taken a photo with my Nikon D3x and though I would duplicate the photo with my Hasselblad 503CWD. The sky changed from postcard blue with fluffy sheep-like clouds to bucketing rain in 8 minutes! No joke. The German tourists, two older brothers and their wives, gave up an hour before I was willing to submit. After a few hours, we drove back to our cabin. Unbelievably, I had rainwater inside the leg extensions of my tripod 2 days later.

 

I have not gotten to the best part. I was introduced to a "famous Australian photographer" . . . he charges $7,000 for a guided tour of Cradle Mountain. $7,000!!! I went to get my Nikon D3x camera, though I left my wife guarding my Hasselbald mounted on the tripod, all set up for the above photo. He and his mate could not resist the temptation to spy through my Hasselblad's viewfinder. I would guess for a photographer who can lure other photographers to pay him $7,000 by spruiking how wonderful he is, he should not need to look through my viewfinder, but use his own imagination. I knew he was a "famous photographer" because he was carrying a backpack full of gear and had a camera over his shoulder with a HUGE . . . I mean HUGE telephoto lens. Like who can carry all that shit for very long, unless the famous photographer is also a body-builder.

 

It was a mental chore deciding what camera equipment and lenses I would bring. I made a list of the things I would like to bring or think I might need. I weighed each, the tripod was 3.4 kg, alone! The night before, I decided to change my list, leave my Nikon 20-70mm and 80-200mm f/2.8D lenses home, because they are heavy. I chose Prime lenses. Nikon 28mm f/1.4D, 50mm f/1.4D, 85mm f/1.4D, Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8D, Micro-Nikkor 200mm f/4.0D (did not use) and 300mm f/4.0D (did not use), plus a Nikon 1.4E Tele-converter (did not use) . . . Flash, remote release, spare batteries, 2 CF Cards, a Nikon SC-29 for off-camera flash (didn't use), ExpoDisk, Colour Temperature Meter, and Light Meter. Still, that was heavy and tried carrying it in a backpack. Unrealistic. There are walking tracks of as little as 10 minutes, to half day 6 hours, all day, and further. One does not last very long with heaps of weight strapped to there shoulders.

 

And, before I leave the topic of photographers, another photographer, came to stand right beside where I scouted and set up, to take the same photo. I asked her, "You must be Chinese?" To which she replied, "Me, Chinese?" My meaning was translated for her, then she walked off. The "mainlanders" will come and stand elbow-to-elbow or walk into my still steaming footprints to try to get the same photo. Nil imagination or just lazy-minded.

 

Where are these photographers OWN imagination?

 

By Sunday, I had enough of the gloomy weather, raining and cold 4˚C (39˚F), discounting windchill factor. I told the Receptionist, where we stayed, tat I would probably need a week, here. He replied that he has has guests stay a week and never saw the mountain once, due the changeable and often poor weather.

 

Cradle Mountain would be an awesome place to visit/camp/live, if not for all the tourists. I waited until after school holidays and end of Summer, for a reason. Still the parking lot was full of tourists snapping photos and taking iPhone selfies, when they are not doing that, they are dropping litter, and when not doing that they are walking off the specially constructed track architecture, installed to protect delicate flora.

 

I had a great time, otherwise.

 

Cradle Mountain is very beautiful, to be sure, but there are mountains in China more beautiful and significantly higher, there are the Alps, in Europe, where I saw the Matterhorn, the Rockies, the Grand Tetons, the Sierra Nevada, the Andes, most all of south island in New Zealand, mountains covered by glaciers, in Alaska, too.

 

A gentle reminder about copyright and intellectual property-

Ⓒ Cassidy Photography (All images in this Flickr portfolio)

 

cassidyphotography.net

This is another photo that I took earlier this year shooting with Tom and Alan in Western Palm Beach County off the Miami Canal. These guys just won't let you get close to them and are pretty fast flyers!! I waited for this Barn Owl to bank before taking the photo to give a nice profile of the wings. The shot does have a large 45 percent crop but it was the best I could do!!

  

Please be advised that our images are fully protected by US Copyright Law. The images may not be downloaded for personal, commercial or educational use, copied to blogs, personal websites, used as wallpaper, screensavers, or be deeplinked, etc. With NO Exceptions. If you would like to use an image, you MUST contact us to obtain written permission. Acknowledging the source of the copyrighted material does not substitute for obtaining written permission.

 

If you would like to use one of our images for commercial use or if you find a picture that you would like for framing, please contact us at klshells@mindspring.com for services we have available.

   

Grand Teton National Park - Wyoming

 

In the early 1900's, Mormon homesteaders were given ~160 acres each on which to dig their wells and live off the farm land. Originally there were about 20 homestead properties, which were sold off to a private company over time and turned over to the US Park Service. There are now only a few of these historic structures still standing - the Moulton Barns being the most famous, and the most photographed barns, so many claim. Many of the structures were allowed to decay or perish in fires, until in the 1990's, when the park service realized their historic importance. Now a couple of them are being refurbished.

 

Another way to view my images is at: www.fluidr.com/photos/63888231%40N04/interesting

It was one of those days you just know is going to be picture perfect. As I drove towards Lee Vining towards areas well known for color I spotted a bit of orange up a canyon to the West. I turned off on the next dirt road that turned out to be more of a trail than a road. Clearly I was on the wrong one but it kept heading in the right direction. I turned left on the first road I could find and it got me started back in the right direction. Then, bummer, a good size creek blocked the road and I was only driving a Toyota Sports Coup. I got out and check the water which was a little over a foot deep and a muddy bottom with a fair drop off from the rocks down into the creek. Checking the phone there was no cell service. If we got stuck it was a number of miles back to Highway 395. Throwing caution to the wind I went for it. We made it though water made it up to the doors on the car.

 

I continued on into the canyon only to find a gate blocking the road I needed to be on and the color was still a ways up the road. I threw on my backpack, grabbed the tripod and camera and began hiking up the road. Eventually it paid off and I found myself alone down in the aspens glowing yellow to deep orange. I spent about an hour taking pictures but had left the wife and dog with the car and needed to get back to them. I came to the end of the orange and the aspens suddenly turned bare so I turned back toward the car. It's too bad this area isn't left open for fall color. It was great and nice being outdoors in the mountains though I had the strangest sense that I was being watched.

 

:copyright: Darvin Atkeson

Yosemite Landscapes

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English:

If your Yahoo! ID is based in Singapore, Germany, Hong Kong or Korea you will only be able to view safe content based on your local Terms of Service so won’t be able to turn SafeSearch off.

In other words that means, that German users can not access photos on flickr that are not flagged "safe" ... only flowers and landscapes for the germans ...

We will not let this happen! Copy and upload this picture to your account - show flickr that they went too far!

 

Deutsch

flickr sperrt uns aus! Und auch dich!

Seit gestern werden für deutsche Nutzer keine Bilder mehr angezeigt, die als 'moderate' oder 'restricted' markiert sind! Es gibt keine Moeglichkeit dies umzustellen - auf welcher Basis dies geschieht, ist unklar - es ist jedenfalls ein bemerkenswerter Umstand, dass ein US-Konzern Zensur in Deutschland ausübt.

Lade dieses Bild runter und poste es in deinem Account! Lass uns das Bild überall auf flickr verteilen und es in 'Interestingness' heben!! So geht es nicht!

 

Italiano:

se il tuo ID yahoo è localizzato a Singapore, in Germania oppure ad Hong Kong o in Korea potrai vedere solo foto dal contenuto che è in accordo con il locale

accordo dei termini di servizio per cui gli utenti flickr di quelle nazioni non potranno cambiare da SafeSearch on in SafeSearch off.

 

In altre parole ciò significa che gli utenti tedeschi e delle altre nazioni citate non potranno accedere a foto su flickr che non sono flaggate "safe" e quindi solo fiori e paesaggi per i tedeschi.

 

Copia e uploada quest' immagine sul tuo account - mostra a flickr chi siamo!

  

Francais:

Si votre compte Yahoo! est basé à Singapour, à Hong Kong, en Corée ou en Allemagne, vous ne pourrez voir que les photos qui n'ont pas été marquées comme ayant un contenu qui peut choquer. Toutes les autres ne vous seront pas accessibles. Vous serez donc condamnés à ne voir que des paysages et des fleurs. Il ne faut pas laisser faire ça. Envoyez cette photo sur votre compte pour montrer à Flickr que nous savons nous mobiliser contre la censure !

  

Español:

Si tu Yahoo! ID está basada en Singapor, Alemania, Hong Kong o Corea sólamente verás contenido llamado seguro basándose en nuestros términos de servicio locales y no podrás deshabilitar el modo de búsqueda segura..

En otras palabras esto significa, que usuarios alemanes p.ej. ya no podrán acceder a fotos en flickr que hayan sido "flagged", es decir marcadas como no seguras y para todo público... solamente flores y paisajes para los alemanes ...

No permitiremos que ésto suceda! Copia y carga esta foto a tu cuenta de yahoo por favor para mostrar a flickr quienes somos!

 

Weitere Infos: Further info: Plus d'infos: Altre informazioni:

- www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/91085

- www.flickr.com/groups/404938@N23/discuss/72157600347681500/

- www.flickr.com/help/forum/en-us/42597/

flickr sperrt uns aus! Und auch dich!

Seit gestern werden für deutsche Nutzer keine Bilder mehr angezeigt, die als 'moderate' oder 'restricted' markiert sind! Es gibt keine Moeglichkeit dies umzustellen - auf welcher Basis dies geschieht, ist unklar - es ist jedenfalls ein bemerkenswerter Umstand, dass ein US-Konzern Zensur in Deutschland ausübt.

 

English:

If your Yahoo! ID is based in Singapore, Germany, Hong Kong or Korea you will only be able to view safe content based on your local Terms of Service so won’t be able to turn SafeSearch off.

In other words that means, that German users can not access photos on flickr that are not flagged "safe" ... only flowers and landscapes for the germans ...

We will not let this happen! Copy and upload this picture to your account - show flickr that they went too far!

 

Francais:

Si votre compte Yahoo! est basé à Singapour, à Hong Kong, en Corée ou en Allemagne, vous ne pourrez voir que les photos qui n'ont pas été marquées comme ayant un contenu qui peut choquer. Toutes les autres ne vous seront pas accessibles. Vous serez donc condamnés à ne voir que des paysages et des fleurs. Il ne faut pas laisser faire ça. Envoyez cette photo sur votre compte pour montrer à Flickr que nous savons nous mobiliser contre la censure !

 

Español:

Si tu Yahoo! ID está basada en Singapor, Alemania, Hong Kong o Corea sólamente verás contenido llamado seguro basándose en nuestros términos de servicio locales y no podrás deshabilitar el modo de búsqueda segura..

En otras palabras esto significa, que usuarios alemanes p.ej. ya no podrán acceder a fotos en flickr que hayan sido "flagged", es decir marcadas como no seguras y para todo público... solamente flores y paisajes para los alemanes ...

No permitiremos que ésto suceda! Copia y carga esta foto a tu cuenta de yahoo por favor para mostrar a flickr quienes somos!

 

italiano:

se il tuo ID yahoo è localizzato a Singapore, in Germania oppure ad Hong Kong o in Korea potrai vedere solo foto dal contenuto che è in accordo con il locale

accordo dei termini di servizio per cui gli utenti flickr di quelle nazioni non potranno cambiare da SafeSearch on in SafeSearch off.

In altre parole ciò significa che gli utenti tedeschi e delle altre nazioni citate non potranno accedere a foto su flickr che non sono flaggate "safe" e quindi solo fiori e paesaggi per i tedeschi.

Copia e uploada quest' immagine sul tuo account - mostra a flickr chi siamo!

 

Weitere Infos:

- www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/91085

- www.flickr.com/groups/404938@N23/discuss/72157600347681500/

- www.flickr.com/help/forum/en-us/42597/

visit my alternate account at:

www.ipernity.com/home/joe

Baby enjoying her daily dose of Cat T.V. The service is paid for with sunflower seeds.

Textures thanks to les brumes and Flypaper.

italiano:

 

se il tuo ID yahoo è localizzato a Singapore, in Germania oppure ad Hong Kong o in Korea potrai vedere solo foto dal contenuto che è in accordo con il locale

accordo dei termini di servizio per cui gli utenti flickr di quelle nazioni non potranno cambiare da SafeSearch on in SafeSearch off.

 

In altre parole ciò significa che gli utenti tedeschi e delle altre nazioni citate non potranno accedere a foto su flickr che non sono flaggate "safe" e quindi solo fiori e paesaggi per i tedeschi.

 

Copia e uploada quest' immagine sul tuo account - mostra a flickr chi siamo! Faviamo anche le foto di coloro che riportano questo proclama cosi' li facciamo impazzire a farle cancellare da explore. Aggiungiamo anche il tag: thinkflickrthink come fanno gli amici tedeschi

  

english:

If your Yahoo! ID is based in Singapore, Germany, Hong Kong or Korea you will only be able to view safe content based on your local Terms of Service so won’t be able to turn SafeSearch off. In other words that means, that german users can not access photos on flickr that are not flagged "safe" ... only flowers and landscapes for germans ...Copy and upload this picture to your account - show flickr who we are!

 

Česky:

Je-li tvé Yahoo! ID vedené pod Singapurem, Německem, Hong Kongem nebo Koreou, uvidíš jen "bezpečný obsah" opírající se o lokální Podmínky používání služby, a tudíž nebudeš moci vypnout funkci SafeSearch.

Jinými slovy, němečtí a jiní uživatelé neuvidí fotografie které nemají označení "safe".

Pro Němce - jen kytičky a krajinky!

Nechceme aby se to stalo!!!

Zkopíruj si a uploadni tento obrázek do svého streamu: ukažme Flickru, kdo jsme!

Kdo bude další...?!?!?!?!?!?!?

flickr sperrt uns aus! Und auch dich!

Seit gestern werden für deutsche Nutzer keine Bilder mehr angezeigt, die als 'moderate' oder 'restricted' markiert sind! Es gibt keine Moeglichkeit das umzustellen - das ist eine grobe Unverschämtheit und Frechheit von flickr!

 

Lade dieses Bild runter und poste es in deinem Account! Lass uns das Bild überall auf flickr verteilen und es in 'Interestingness' heben!! So geht es nicht!

 

Weitere Infos:

www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/91085

www.flickr.com/groups/404938@N23/discuss/72157600347681500/

www.flickr.com/help/forum/en-us/42597/

The iconic but dilapidated Domino Sugar Refinery on the banks of the East River adjacent to the Williamsburg Bridge (visible in the top right corner) in Williamsburg Brooklyn taken on a Circleline cruise in the Fall of 2012. The refinery at this location dates back to 1857, when Frederick C. Havemeyer Jr established a factory here on the Williamsburg waterfront after they had outgrown their original sugar refinery established at the turn of the 19th century on Vandam Street in Manhattan. Of significant note, at the termination of the Civil War in this country, this refinery became the largest sugar refinery in the world with over 4,000 employees processing over 3,000,000 pounds of sugar daily more than half the sugar consumed in the United States. When Dow Jones Industrial Average was established back in 1896, this company then known as American Sugar was one of the twelve original companies included in the average. A fire in 1882 destroyed much of the original structures and the current 10 story brick structures seen in this image were built back then in 1882. Fredrick’s son Henry Havemeyer named the company Domino’s Sugar at the turn of the 20th century. The plant shut down in 2004 after 148 years of service, laying off its remaining workforce. This was the last of the many great sugar refineries in Brooklyn to close its doors. Sugar refining was New York City’s most profitable industry until the end of World War I.

Since then, 10 years of redevelopment proposals, landmark battles and political controversy, this past year the second redevelopment company with proposals, began in earnest the demolition the buildings on the 13 acre property. The only building that will remain is the 10 story brick structure as it was the only building granted landmark status. When I drove by the location a month ago, it appears it is the only building of the 90,000 square foot complex left at this point. The glass tower with the iconic Domino’s Sugar sign which was a landmark structure for so long in the Brooklyn skyline is no more. I will be taking cruise in the next couple of months and capture some shots from the East River at that time as construction will be started by then.

 

flickr sperrt uns aus! Und auch dich!

Seit gestern werden für deutsche Nutzer keine Bilder mehr angezeigt, die als 'moderate' oder 'restricted' markiert sind! Es gibt keine Moeglichkeit das umzustellen - das ist eine grobe Unverschämtheit und Frechheit von flickr!

 

In English:

If your Yahoo! ID is based in Singapore, Germany, Hong Kong or Korea you will only be able to view safe content based on your local Terms of Service so won’t be able to turn SafeSearch off.

In other words that means, that german users can not access photos on flickr that are not flaged "safe" ... only flowers and landscapes for the germans ...

We will not let this happen! Copy and upload this picture to your account - show flickr who we are!

 

Lade dieses Bild runter und poste es in deinem Account! Lass uns das Bild überall auf flickr verteilen und es in 'Interestingness' heben!! So geht es nicht!

Original Version: farm2.static.flickr.com/1299/543864623_7aadef1e69_o.jpg

 

Weitere Infos:

 

- www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/91085

- www.flickr.com/groups/404938@N23/discuss/72157600347681500

- www.flickr.com/help/forum/en-us/42597/

 

Ein Beispiel

flickr sperrt uns aus! Und auch dich!

Seit gestern werden für deutsche Nutzer keine Bilder mehr angezeigt, die als 'moderate' oder 'restricted' markiert sind! Es gibt keine Moeglichkeit das umzustellen - das ist eine grobe Unverschämtheit und Frechheit von flickr!

 

We are the users - don't forget that flickr!

 

Deswegen treten wir gemeinsam in Aktion und zeigen allen, das uns das nicht gefällt was flickr mit uns macht! Füge das Bild zu deinen Favoriten hinzu und poste es!

 

In English:

If your Yahoo! ID is based in Singapore, Germany, Hong Kong or Korea, you will only be able to view safe content based on your local Terms of Service, and therefore won’t be able to turn off SafeSearch.

In other words, german users can't access photos on flickr that are not flaged "safe" ... only flowers and landscapes for the germans ...

We won't let this happen! Copy and upload this picture to your account - show flickr who we are.

 

Espanol:

No sé cuando, pero muy recientemente a las cuentas de Alemania, Hong Kong, Corea y Singapur les han prohibido ver las fotos que están en el Safe Search, las mismas en las que a nosotros nos dan la opcíón de ver o no ver. A ellos simplemente se lo prohiben. Chale no?

 

Francais:

Si votre compte Yahoo! est basé à Singapour, à Hong Kong, en Corée ou en Allemagne, vous ne pourrez voir que les photos qui n'ont pas été marquées comme ayant un contenu qui peut choquer. Toutes les autres ne vous seront pas accessibles. Vous serez donc condamnés à ne voir que des paysages et des fleurs. Il ne faut pas laisser faire ça. Envoyez cette photo sur votre compte pour montrer à Flickr que nous savons nous mobiliser contre la censure !

 

Spread the image!

 

Lade dieses Bild runter und poste es in deinem Account! Lass uns das Bild überall auf flickr verteilen und es in 'Interestingness' heben!! So geht es nicht!

 

Link to the original Thread here: flickr.com/photos/atomtigerzoo/543864623/

 

Weitere Infos:

- www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/91085

- www.flickr.com/groups/404938@N23/discuss/72157600347681500/

- www.flickr.com/help/forum/en-us/42597/

 

Wer einen Blog besitzt oder Kontakte zu den Medien hat: Weiterleiten!

 

From www.flickr.com/help/filters/:

Note: If your Yahoo! ID is based in Singapore, Germany, Hong Kong or Korea you will only be able to view safe content based on your local Terms of Service.

 

Please help us getting this protests on Explore so everyone can see it!

Portfolio & Services

 

The past week, California has seen some pretty big storms rip through the area. Rain, wind, and heavy surf have wreaked havoc on a lot of people. I am probably not alone, but the storms have wreaked havoc on my photography as well.

 

I have been chasing the sunsets up and down the coast, only to be turned away by the pounding sea and the incessant wind. I've been relegated to "tourist" status as I take hand held snapshots of the storm from the safety of my car or from bluffs well above sea level. It has been a spectacle to behold, just difficult to photograph.

 

Last night, I decided to jump into the mix. After driving up the coast 7-8 miles, I verified that the break I saw on the radar was indeed coming towards land. However, few beaches remained as the storm waves engulfed everything.

 

I high tailed it back into town for a little more protection and stopped at Twin Lakes State Beach.

 

Two years ago, these old pier pilings were exposed. Kendra dragged me down to take some photos, one of my first real attempts at seascape photography. A week later, the pilings were covered up. Last winter, they remained covered. But with the recent storms, more pilings are exposed than I've ever seen before.

 

And yes, 50% body immersion was required for this shot.

 

Nikon D300

Tokina 11-16mm @ 15mm

0.4 sec @ f11, ISO 100

Singh-Ray 3-stop Reverse GND Filter

My Website - Aaron Yeoman Photography & Image Prints for Sale

Also Follow Me at 500px * Getty Images * Twitter * Facebook * Google+

 

More London Estate, London, England

 

Wow what a busy few days. I have just returned from London after going down for a friends surprise birthday party which was great fun. Had a little time to get some photos too and this was one of them.

 

This is some of the buildings of the 'More London' estate. I didn't originally intend to go here to take this image but another of the building you see on the right of this picture, not 100% sure of the official name but its referred by a lot of people as the 'Batman' building because as you look up it looks like a bat. I got all setup with the tripod and you guessed it, Mr Security man came out and told me I couldn't take photos at a weekend here and that I had to have permission. I asked if I could gain permission and he said no and come back Monday. I was short of time so moved on and took this image but I have heard from many other photographers that normally that building is fine.

 

Anyway, this is a 16 stop image of the other buildings of 'More London'. The light was quite harsh but I think I managed to pull it off and get a photo I am happy with. Something that I experimenting with is turning off my in camera long exposure noise reduction. This allows me to save time when taking long exposures as it doesn't have to take a black frame image therefore doubling the exposure time per image. I thought this was great but when getting the image back on the computer I found it to be full of 'Hot Pixels', loads and loads of them. They have been a right pain to remove and edit out. I think there is a link between bright harsh light that creates more of these then diffused light although I am not sure. Any one else get this issue and any work arounds?

 

Hope you all have a great day!

 

Photo Details

Sony Alpha SLT-A99 / ISO100 / f/14 / 481s / Sony Carl Zeiss 16-35mm F2.8 ZA SSM @ 16mm

 

Software Used

Lightroom 5

 

Location Information

More London is a development on the south bank of the River Thames, immediately south-west of Tower Bridge in London. The southern exit is on Tooley Street.

 

It includes the City Hall, a sunken amphitheatre called The Scoop, office blocks, shops, restaurants, cafes, and a pedestrianized area containing open-air sculptures and water features, including fountains lit by coloured lights. The Hilton London Tower Bridge hotel opened in September 2006.

 

More London is 13 acres (53,000 m2) in size and has planning consent for 3,000,000 square feet (280,000 m2) of mixed use space, of which up to two million square feet will be offices, accommodating up to 20,000 people. The buildings were designed by Foster and Partners architects and some are still under construction. The buildings are known as 1 & 6 More London Place, and 2, 3, 4 and 7 More London Riverside. The public realm, which includes The Scoop, water features and planting areas were designed by Townshend Landscape Architects.

 

The area contains many professional services and financial services firms, including Ernst & Young whose headquarters is 1 More London Place, PricewaterhouseCoopers at 7 More London Riverside, Wragge Lawrence Graham & Co., Norton Rose Fulbright, Markit Group Limited, Terra Firma Capital Partners, Cargill Investor Services, Hewitt Associates whose European headquarters is 6 More London Place, HgCapital, Actis, Aureos Advisers and TNS Research International. Other types of firms in the buildings include Teach First, Truphone, Visit London, Globeleq, the restaurants Strada, Gaucho and DIM T, and the Unicorn Theatre for Children.

 

There are frequently outdoor exhibitions and cultural events in More London, usually associated with City Hall. For most of 2005 there was a popular open-air exhibition of large environmental photographs called Earth from the Air.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/More_London

foto scattata con: Canon EOS 350D, obiettivo 50mm.

   

flickr sperrt uns aus! Und auch dich!

Seit gestern werden für deutsche Nutzer keine Bilder mehr angezeigt, die als 'moderate' oder 'restricted' markiert sind! Es gibt keine Moeglichkeit dies umzustellen - auf welcher Basis dies geschieht, ist unklar - es ist jedenfalls ein bemerkenswerter Umstand, dass ein US-Konzern Zensur in Deutschland ausübt.

Lade dieses Bild runter und poste es in deinem Account! Lass uns das Bild überall auf flickr verteilen und es in 'Interestingness' heben!! So geht es nicht!

 

Italiano:

se il tuo ID yahoo è localizzato a Singapore, in Germania oppure ad Hong Kong o in Korea potrai vedere solo foto dal contenuto che è in accordo con il locale

accordo dei termini di servizio per cui gli utenti flickr di quelle nazioni non potranno cambiare da SafeSearch on in SafeSearch off.

 

In altre parole ciò significa che gli utenti tedeschi e delle altre nazioni citate non potranno accedere a foto su flickr che non sono flaggate "safe" e quindi solo fiori e paesaggi per i tedeschi.

 

Copia e uploada quest' immagine sul tuo account - mostra a flickr chi siamo!

  

English:

If your Yahoo! ID is based in Singapore, Germany, Hong Kong or Korea you will only be able to view safe content based on your local Terms of Service so won’t be able to turn SafeSearch off.

In other words that means, that German users can not access photos on flickr that are not flagged "safe" ... only flowers and landscapes for the germans ...

We will not let this happen! Copy and upload this picture to your account - show flickr that they went too far!

  

Francais:

Si votre compte Yahoo! est basé à Singapour, à Hong Kong, en Corée ou en Allemagne, vous ne pourrez voir que les photos qui n'ont pas été marquées comme ayant un contenu qui peut choquer. Toutes les autres ne vous seront pas accessibles. Vous serez donc condamnés à ne voir que des paysages et des fleurs. Il ne faut pas laisser faire ça. Envoyez cette photo sur votre compte pour montrer à Flickr que nous savons nous mobiliser contre la censure !

  

Español:

Si tu Yahoo! ID está basada en Singapor, Alemania, Hong Kong o Corea sólamente verás contenido llamado seguro basándose en nuestros términos de servicio locales y no podrás deshabilitar el modo de búsqueda segura..

En otras palabras esto significa, que usuarios alemanes p.ej. ya no podrán acceder a fotos en flickr que hayan sido "flagged", es decir marcadas como no seguras y para todo público... solamente flores y paisajes para los alemanes ...

No permitiremos que ésto suceda! Copia y carga esta foto a tu cuenta de yahoo por favor para mostrar a flickr quienes somos!

  

Introduced into service with the Irish Army as a replacement for the Steyr AUG. H&K capitalised on the unused design of the XM8 from a failed project in the States and produced the M8 rifle for the Irish forces. It has been brought into the 21st century with full AR compatibility in terms of stock, pistol grip and magazine, featuring a modular railed interface for the use of non-proprietary accessories and outfitted with impossi-jam internals. When optics are mounted the removable foresight has to be taken off to allow for a clearer cowitness, but the rear sight may remain in-place. The rifle turned out to be very accurate thanks to a long barrel and the fairly gentle round used, the internals performed flawlessly and the Irish were very content with their rifle. The M8 is due to see a slow integration into the Irish Army as financial restraints don't allow for a more immediate introduction, due in part to the rifle's price as well.

 

MAY be revisited

Well yesterday, I decided to go out and get a few snowy pics. After just a few shots though my camera LCD screen read "err 006 Sensor Cleaning cannot be performed, turn your camera off and then on again." I did that many times but the same message just occurred and some extreme frustration set in for me. So, my camera is on its way back to the service center and I'm without a camera again. :^(

 

This is one of the few shots I got before my camera went haywire again.

 

This is a three exposure HDR.

 

I hope everyone enjoys this image! :^)

Built originally in 1943 - Spitfire RR232 finally made it back to Britain in 1986 when purchased by Charles Church, who in turn sold the airframe to Jim Pearce of Sussex Spraying Services. But it was not until 2001 that current owner Martin Phillips bought the aircraft and began in earnest a full restoration to airworthy condition that would take nearly 13 years, having been challenged by friends on his 40th birthday to produce a Spitfire from the single rivet with which they presented him!

With parts having been sourced from myriad locations around the world, this Spitfire is a story in itself of an epic restoration project that saw parts contributed, sold and scavenged from across the globe, and one man's dogged determination to return an iconic fighter to the skies above Britain. Some parts were found very close to home however; one of the wings for example being salvaged from a hedge outside a pub near Exeter. With a fully rebuilt Merlin engine installed and the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) happy that all had been done to the highest standards, in December 2012 Spitfire RR232 took to the skies again, becoming the last aircraft to be assembled at Filton Aerodrome (home of Concorde) before its closure for redevelopment.

She is now known as the 'City of Exeter' in honour of a presentation Spitfire donated to the war effort as a result of local fundraising. That aircraft was presented to the Royal Air Force at RAF Westhampnett almost 75 years to the day before RR232 arrived at its present operating base where she flies off the very same grass runways, now known as Goodwood Aerodrome.

Italiano:

se il tuo ID yahoo è localizzato a Singapore, in Germania oppure ad Hong Kong o in Korea potrai vedere solo foto dal contenuto che è in accordo con il locale

accordo dei termini di servizio per cui gli utenti flickr di quelle nazioni non potranno cambiare da SafeSearch on in SafeSearch off.

 

In altre parole ciò significa che gli utenti tedeschi e delle altre nazioni citate non potranno accedere a foto su flickr che non sono flaggate "safe" e quindi solo fiori e paesaggi per i tedeschi.

 

Copia e uploada quest' immagine sul tuo account - mostra a flickr chi siamo! Faviamo anche le foto di coloro che riportano questo proclama cosi' li facciamo impazzire a farle cancellare da explore. Aggiungiamo anche il tag: thinkflickrthink come fanno gli amici tedeschi

  

english:

If your Yahoo! ID is based in Singapore, Germany, Hong Kong or Korea you will only be able to view safe content based on your local Terms of Service so won’t be able to turn SafeSearch off. In other words that means, that german users can not access photos on flickr that are not flagged "safe" ... only flowers and landscapes for germans ...Copy and upload this picture to your account - show flickr who we are!

Please add also the tag: thinkflickrthink as our deutsche friends do!

  

Info:

www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/91085

www.flickr.com/groups/404938@N23/discuss/72157600347681500/

www.flickr.com/help/forum/en-us/42597/

 

Photo taken by Malaussene

Improving one's home through new projects can be a wonderful plan to start, even if you don't have the necessary skills to obtain it done. Don't let DIY TV shows trick you. Not all home improvement jobs are massive and entail hiring expensive crews. Read these tips so you can have fun while improving your home.

 

You can make your ceiling seem higher than it actually is by using two simple methods. Add a funky lamp to your room or paint your walls in more than one color. Adding this to your rooms will create an optical illusion for your eye to follow. Your eyes naturally focus on following lines, making ceilings appear higher.

 

As you make improvements to your residence, consider the neighborhood's character and style. A house that has a style completely different from those surrounding it may be problematic. Your resale value may be affected if the renovation is not in line with the surrounding homes.

 

You can make a room in your home feel fresh and new by updating the floor covering. You can do the work yourself by visiting a DIY store in your area. Otherwise, the work can be completed in 24 hours or less if you find a reliable flooring company that specializes in carpet, tile, laminate and hardwood.

 

It is important to turn the breaker off when doing any electrical work. It is dangerous and can even be fatal to touch live electrical wires.

 

Today's solar panels are more efficient than ever and simpler to install. Though the initial outlay may be high, the more term savings may be great. Doing this will cut down your electric bills, as you'll be able to get much of your energy from the energy your panels are storing. In addition, this is a green option that benefits Mother Nature!

 

Can't afford a designer? Start researching. Look to the net and magazines for inspiration. That magazine layout could possibly become the perfect total inspiration for your home. Literature can also provide you with the information you need to get your project done.

 

You can have a great time doing improvements to your property. With some knowledge of the basics, you can take on the projects you once would have left to the pros. Just remember these tips so you can being on your home improvement project! boulderwindowandguttercleaning.com/find-best-window-clean...

Portfolio & Services

 

One of the aspects I enjoy immensely about SCUBA diving is the chance encounters with the "locals".

 

Along the central California coast, harbor seals and sea lions often times come in close to get a better look, and in some cases, a friendly nibble. Imagine if coyotes, wolves, and bears were this friendly!

 

There you are, walking along a trail in the forest, and out of nowhere, a bear taps you on the shoulder. You turn to face it and it gives you a hug. Highly unlikely, but not with harbor seals.

 

I have had an underwater encounter just like the scenario I described with the bear. I was leading a couple divers on their final Advanced Class dive, and I felt a nudge behind me. As I turned to investigate, a chubby face full of whiskers greeted me. This friendly seal proceeded to put its front flippers on each of my shoulders. At first I was a bit perplexed, but had heard once that seals like their chests scratched. I slowly reached out and started scratching the seal's chest, all at 50 feet underwater and with my two students witnessing the entire thing.

 

My scratching must not have been up to "standard" because the seal squirmed a little, appeared disappointed, and swam off.

 

Fast forward six years and I am swimming out to do a dive at Point Lobos, one of the most spectacular places to dive in the world, and it's pupping season for the harbor seals. I had my camera set up for macro, but as this harbor seal surfaced a few feet away, I lifted my 15 lbs of camera, housing, and strobes out of the water. Lifting this much weight out of the water does have the effect of pushing me underwater at the same time. I prayed the auto focus would find the right thing, and of the three shots I took before the seal dropped below the surface, it found the proper focus once...this shot.

 

Truly a chance encounter.

 

Nikon D200

Nikkor 105mm AF-D

1/250sec @ f7.1, ISO 100

Aquatica Housing with Flat Port

'8 Minutes 11 seconds' On Black

 

5:01 BEEP...BEEP...BEEP...BEEP...BAM (as the snooze button is slammed down)

 

5:06 Arghhh...alright, I'll get my lazy arse up. But there better be some stars damnit, past two mornings I've woken up at 5am, rushed out in the cold and dark, and been hosed by overcast and cloudy conditions. Bill...Bill...stop snoring and wake your ass up, let's go.

 

5:10 Nothing like a can of cold espresso and cream when it's 40 degrees outside! How did photographers survive before canned coffee? Just part of the Starbucks plan to rule the world I'm sure.

 

5:15 Ok, batteries charged. Check. Memory cards cleaned. Check. Lenses cleaned. Check. 24-105 on the 5d, yep, 70-200 on the 10d...yep. Oh wait, I'm supposed to say check. Cooler is in the car, camera bags, tripod. Should I put on the long johns? No, it should warm up. Real boots instead of those fakes ones. Yup. Great...should have packed another pair of socks...ewwww...these are ripe. Bill, you ready? Great. Let's hit the road.

 

5:20 On the road again! Hey, look at that Bill, stars! Never been so damn excited to see stars in my life. (A weekends photo trip washed out by overcast conditions will do that to you).

 

5:25 Uh oh...are those clouds rolling in. Quick, put on Hallelujah....we need divine intervention. No, I don't care if that makes me a nut job, it got us an hour of sun yesterday...put it on!

 

5:27 Hallelujah...does it say she broke your throat and cut your hair? I don't think so, but maybe this isn't the divine intervention we need after all. (note...it's throne not throat!)

 

5:45 Ok, this looks as good a place as any to park, probably should have scouted better last night. Tough to pick out where you are going to trudge a mile through the sand when it's a moonless night and the sun isn't up.

 

5:50 Flashlight. Check. Camera bag. Check. Tripod. Check. Water...grab plenty of water, don't want to go the way of Sue and John. Damn...it's cold, should have put on those long johns. And a second shirt. Too late now, let's go.

 

5:55 Bill...turn off that headlamp, you look like a dork! How are my eyes supposed to adjust to the low light anyways.

 

5:58 Cool...are those snake tracks? That beanie cap and gloves were a good call.

 

6:01 You know how you can tell someone has never lived at the beach? They think it's cool to walk on the beach. Walking in sand sucks.

 

6:10 Probably should have thought about hitting the restroom before heading out here.

 

6:14 I wonder how I'd look with a beard...do the femmes go for the grizzly adams look nowadays?

 

6:20 Well, we aren't going to make it to those big dunes, geez, they just keep getting farther away the more we walk. Time to make a stand.

 

6:25 Alright, this looks like the spot. Come on clouds...don't...let the sun come out....pleeeeeeease. Stay away...stop drifting towards the sun.

 

6:30 (watching the clouds move ever closer to where the sun is going to rise)

 

6:35 Tripod setup, scan the dunes...really could have used those long johns right about now. And really, you should think about getting better gloves, tough to do anything wearing ski gloves when working a camera.

 

6:37 Various shots of the pre sunrise dunes while warily watching the clouds drift closer and closer to where the sun is going to come up.

 

6:39 Oh look, wind is kicking up a little. (watches a "wave" of sand blow in the wind). You can really see how the dunes are reformed every night. Ahhh...(spits sand out of mouth and wipes off face). Yeah, that wasn't all that smart.

 

6:45 Ok, 7 minutes until go time...stay away clouds. This was the single number one reason for coming out to Death Valley...sand dune shots at sunrise! Of course, maybe we shouldn't have waited until the end of the trip, but hey...this sand is going to put some serious bad mojo on these cameras, Canon Factory service center...here I come.

 

6:48 Sunriiiise..sunset...geez, nice ear worm. That one backfired, but it will all be worth it if it's stuck in Bill's head for the rest of the week.

 

6:52 Ok, so I should have looked at the exact time the sun was going to rise. But this works, some great soft light on the dunes.

 

6:59 We have sun on the mountains!

 

7:02 Closer...closer...light bathing the valley floor...stay away clouds. Don't shoot until you see the whites of their eyes!

 

7:07:20 Fire...fire...snap snap snap...sun! Stay away clouds.

 

Snap...snap...over there...oh...look at that. Move up the dune a little...Crap...(foot slides down the face of the dune in the soft sand)...can you really pull your groin taking pictures?

 

Snap...snap...slow down sparky. Look...compose. Where's the ND, oops, no time for that. Bracket and worry about the details later. Stay away clouds...noooooooooooo.

 

7:15:31...snap...fade to shadow...sigh...and there it goes.

 

8 minutes 11 seconds, sometimes that's all you get.

 

Death Valley Dunes

Stove Pipe Wells, CA

December 2006

The most recognizable church on Anglesey, St. Cwyfan's, is popularly known as the Church in the Sea (or eglwys bach y mor in Welsh). Perched on a tiny island called Cribinau, encircled by a sea wall, this simple medieval church dates to the 12th century. It is thought to be dedicated to the Irish St. Kevin, who founded the monastery across the sea at Glendalough in Co Wicklow, Ireland.

It may seem an odd and perilous place to build a church, but it originally stood at the end of a peninsula between two bays, Porth Cwyfan and Porth China, as shown on John Speed's map of Anglesey from 1636 (shown left). In the decades after this the sea slowly eroded the coast in the two bays enough that the peninsula was cut off, turning it into an island.

A causeway was built to the island to allow parishioners to get to the island. Its remains are visible in the picture below. However, even with the causeway, sometimes high tides prevented access. At those times services were held in a room in the nearby house, Plas Llangwyfan, which was specially consecrated for the purpose.

The waves continued to eat away at the island until, in the late 19th century, some of the graves surrounding the church began to fall into the sea. At this time the church was also disused and roofless, having been replaced by a new church further inland. However, in 1893 local architect Harold Hughes, concerned for the fate of this evocative old church, raised money to save it by constructing a seawall around the island and restoring the building.

Although the church was initially built in the 12th century, only a small portion of the south wall dates from this period. Most of the walls were rebuilt during a 14th century reconstruction. In the early 16th century an aisle was added to the north side, accessed through an arcade of three arches, but it was demolished in the early 19th century as the cliff edge eroded ever closer. The infilled arches can now be seen in the outer wall, after the old cement mortar was removed during refurbishment in 2006. This refurbishment also involved limewashing the walls, making them very white, to the consternation of some locals who were used to the old grey appearance.

This tiny church was at the centre of a big controversy in the 18th century. In 1766 the Bishop of Bangor appointed Dr Thomas Bowles as the parish priest of Trefdraeth, which included St. Cwyfan's as a chapelry. Unfortunately Dr Bowles spoke no Welsh, and only five of the 500 parishioners understood English. They protested against his appointment and eventually the case was heard in the ecclesiastical court in 1773. The judge ruled that Bowles should not have been appointed, as Welsh speaking priests should be sent to primarily Welsh speaking parishes. However, once a priest has been granted ecclesiastical freehold of a parish it is very difficult to remove them, so the judge ruled that he should be allowed to stay in his post, which he did until his death later that year.

Each one of us is responsible for her/his choices.

It's up to us to decide what's " good " or " bad " for our eyes.

 

Plus:

 

www.flickr.com/photos/berenike/548541629/

  

If your Yahoo! ID is based in Singapore, Germany, Hong Kong or Korea you will only be able to view safe content based on your local Terms of Service so won’t be able to turn SafeSearch off.

In other words that means, that German users can not access photos on flickr that are not flagged "safe" ... only flowers and landscapes for the germans ...

We will not let this happen! Copy and upload this picture to your account - show flickr who we are!

 

Infos:

- www.heise.de/newsticker/meldung/91085

- www.flickr.com/groups/404938@N23/discuss/72157600347681500/

- www.flickr.com/help/forum/en-us/42597/

Today was a wet and chilly mid-March day in Toronto and the city is growing weary of winter. Conversations everywhere are turning to spring and the anticipation of budding trees and spring bulbs breaking free of the ground. Mind you, neither of these things is happening, but we’ve got our fantasies.

 

After leaving my class downtown I’d had the good fortune to happen across Laticia (my Stranger #386) almost immediately. Following that stroke of good luck I decided to swing past Allan Gardens and walk through the Conservatory to remind myself what flowers and greenery look like. Allan Gardens is in the heart of downtown and the Conservatory is a large public greenhouse. (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allan_Gardens0

 

The Conservatory was filled with school children on field trips, being herded along by their teachers who looked like they were trying to keep track of their charges and their wits as children explored in all directions. As I threaded my way through the hubbub of children I came to a placid pond with goldfish, surrounded by greenery and with a classical Greek statue. I suddenly noticed this interesting man standing nearby. He was also enjoying the pond and the warm tropical air of the Conservatory. “I’m sure glad I stopped by” I said. “This taste of the tropics just might get me through this long, harsh winter.” His eyes smiled and behind his beard I’m sure his mouth did too. “No kidding” he replied. “This winter just doesn’t quit does it?” We moved on from weather talk and he said he hadn’t been down here in a while but his reason for coming today was the same as mine. He said he was glad to see the goldfish are still in the pond. We shook hands. Meet Ross.

 

Ross was a very warm and friendly man and our conversation just seemed to flow from the start. I learned that his background is Jamaican (that makes two for two today) but that he grew up in New York (near Central Park) but traveled back and forth to Jamaica numerous times through the years, finally ending up in Canada. We compared notes on when we came to Toronto and how it has changed - some for the better and some for the worse – since then. When I asked his age to make sense of the chronology of his story his eyes twinkled and he said “I’m 63 years young, man.”

 

Ross is a musician and plays mostly blues and R&B and is in the process of making an electric guitar. My brother has made musical instruments so we had another common connection. Then we touched on the trends in the U.S. when we moved to Canada and this led to talk about the “old days” when many of us were preoccupied with the threat of being drafted into the army and sent to a war in Viet Nam that we opposed. That experience seems to form a particularly strong sense of brotherhood between men who lived in that time and and Ross and I were having a major trip down memory lane. I found out he did not get drafted because he was a sole surviving son of a veteran. I, on the other hand, turned too old (26). It’s somewhat ironic that we both ended up moving to Canada, not to avoid the army but for other personal reasons.

 

When I introduced my photo project Ross was an attentive listener and did not immediately agree or decline. I made my pitch and said I thought he would make a great subject. I learned that he doesn’t know Flickr “I’m not a computer person” and is rather suspicious of the internet. I said I didn’t want to twist his arm but I would sure like to be able to photograph him but I would need his consent. He told me “Hey man, I’m not crazy about being photographed and especially the internet thing, but I can tell you’re an honest guy and I trust you. Let’s do it but soon I have to get going.”

 

I quickly faced him south against the greenery and took the photos, pausing a couple of times to let visitors pass between us on the narrow path through the vegetation. “Come on through” he said at one point to a couple who were politely waiting. “This isn’t Hollywood or anything. We’re just taking a couple of photos.” I have found taking portraits in indoor, glassed in atriums and the like to be a challenge. The glass tends to produce a "cool" cast to the light that's difficult for me to compensate for in post-processing. I would have preferred it if I could have achieved a somewhat softer effect but to overcome "flatness' I had to put up with a bit of harsh effect. Still, I'm very happy with the photo and feel it captures a nice glimpse into his character.

 

When I found out Ross didn’t use a computer we puzzled a bit over how I might get a couple of prints to him. He hit on a solution: I could drop off photos at a social club he said he spends a lot of time at. “If I’m not there, just tell them they’re for ‘Dreads’.” He added as an afterthought “Stop in there and visit. It’s a cool place and there’s lots of youngsters like you and me.” As it turned out, I did drop by the place with prints a week later and discovered it was a social service organization providing a variety of services to a population of (largely) homeless men, It was a very interesting tour and although Ross wasn't there, the fellow who showed me around recognized him from the photo and said he would make sure Ross got the photos next time he saw him.

 

I really enjoyed meeting you Ross. Thank you for the fun conversation and for trusting me enough to participate in 100 Strangers. You are Stranger #387 in Round 4 of my project.

 

Find out more about the project and see pictures taken by other photographers at the 100 Strangers Flickr Group page

 

To browse Round 1 of my 100 Strangers project click here: www.flickr.com/photos/jeffcbowen/sets/72157633145986224/

To browse Round 2 of my 100 Strangers project click here:www.flickr.com/photos/jeffcbowen/sets/72157634422850489/

To browse Round 3 of my 100 Strangers project click here: www.flickr.com/photos/jeffcbowen/sets/72157635541434065/

And it doesn't matter

how you feel now, anything at all

Seems to be your only way, so vicious

Heavenly apart

 

When your envy is on a piece of paper

Let me sweetly smile

You're devouring all the crumbs

I'm living caught up in your lies

 

You're on any other side

 

Clawing up my eyes

I'm feeling your arms around me

On the other side

It's time to go

I'm hearing your voice

without words

On the other side

 

But it doesn't matter

how I feel now, anything at all

Since I've left you with the wrong

impression while I'm still the same

 

When I turn around and look

at my life, shadows in disguise

but I'm working on

an interruption of hypocrisy

 

You're an any other side

 

Clawing up my eyes

I'm feeling your arms around me

On the other side, it's time to go

I'm hearing your voice without words

On the other side

 

Clawing up my eyes

I'm feeling your arms around me

On the other side, it's time to go

I'm hearing your voice without words

On the other side

 

Any other side

 

- Lacuna Coil

   

View On Black hopefully you will because it looks better there.

   

This was not supposed to be my photo, it was just a random testing shot but everything else failed today so I edited it for fun.

I've beens sick for the whole week.

It started off as a high fever about 39 degrees, the fever died down but then I lost my voice.

Completely.

I was like a mute child.

It was a strange experience, using my phone's text messaging mode to tell service staff what I wanted. I also had two model agency scouts approach me that day (at different timings), I pointed to my throat and shook my head. I meant to tell them that I had lost my voice but they assumed I was mute.

   

I hope I get better soon, I've been having a lot of creative blocks lately, nothing seems to be coming out the way I want and I often blank out =/

   

Oh yes, tomorrow's Singapore's National Day!!!

I can't actually remember how old my country is supposed to be though, 45.. 46? or so I guess. I'm watching fireworks, but I don't think I will be shooting them, not really my kind of thing.

 

Glacier Point, Yosemite National Park, CA

 

Drove to Glacier point this Saturday night to capture the peak activity of Perseid Meteor Shower. The sky wasnt as clear as predicted, with occasional clouds moving in and out, so decided to include the clouds in my shot here to give a honest idea of how it was that night in Yosemite.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perseids

 

Technical details:

Stack of pictures clicked from Glacier Point from 1.30AM for about 2 hrs each exposed for 30sec.

 

Other details: f/2.8, ISO 1600 with Canon 16-35, 5d Mark II, NR turned off

  

Follow my work : Sankar Salvady Photography

Empenage of a Boeing B-52E Stratofortress, on the disused Photo Resolution Range at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert of Southern California.

 

The particular airframe, built in 1957 under serial # 0-70119, had been loaned by the USAF to General Electric in the 1960's for testing of the massive TF-39 turbofan engine, which was being developed for eventual use on the Lockheed C-5A Galaxy, one of the largest military transports in the world. Both the C-5 and TF-39 are still in service to this day.

 

Upon return from GE, 70119 was decommissioned and relegated to the Photo Resolution Range on the south edge of Edwards AFB, but that doesn't explain why her tail section - and for that matter all of her components - are cut off and spread around the area.

 

it turns out that in 1991, 70019 fell victim to the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) between the US and Russia, and her fuselage was blown up by a demolitions team for compliance purposes, with the rest of the airframe components detached and segregated from the fuselage such that Russian Intelligence was satisfied from their satellite imagery that the bomber was no longer operational.

 

The desert B-52 site sits right at the very edge of Rogers Dry Lake Bed, the surface from which many well-known and historically important experimental aircraft were flown by some of the most famous test pilots in history, including General Chuck Yeager. Later, the lake bed was used as the first alternate landing site for the Space Shuttle, whenever the primary landing facility at Cape Canaveral was unavailable. The edge of the lake bed can be discerned in this photo by where the terrain turns from off-white to tan, in the background.

 

Night, full moon, CTO-gelled X-2000 flashlight from inside the tail section, with the ambient glow over the left horizontal stabilizer of the central area of Edwards AFB.

KLM 747-400 at Houston (IAH). The Crew checks all Systems it's time to go home.

 

PH-BFV

 

:copyright: WorldPixels- All Rights Reserved

When Mike arrived at the Havasu Hilltop, he was not pleased.

 

As the crow flies, Havasu Falls is about 55 miles from the south entrance to the Grand Canyon…(where he was staying. ) If you look on a map, it would appear one could take a series of dirt and back country roads, getting you easily from point A (Grand Canyon) to point B (Havasu Hilltop)

 

This only appears to be possible.

 

According to the park rangers he asked, that series of roads either ends at a locked gate, mere feet from where you want to be…or they just branch off into numerous other roads….most of which lead to more branches, or end abruptly in a field of cows. The only way to get to Havasu Hilltop from the Grand Canyon is to drive down one road about 60 miles…then drive across another for nearly the same distance…and, finally up another 60 to the hilltop, making a giant ‘U’

 

This process turned what Mike thought would be an hour drive into nearly 3 and ½.

 

Luckily, he came prepared with steaks and potatoes to calm his situation…and threw quite a BBQ. The steaks were much better than the McDonalds value meal I had supplied myself with prior to leaving Kingman. Bellies full, we sat up for a while and discussed the plans for the following morning.

 

The “plan” was, wake up early, meet a contact that Mike’s company had supplied. She had arranged our helicopter flight from the hilltop into the Supai village…8 miles into the canyon village, from the village we would hike the remaining 2 miles into the campgrounds. His contact would also serve as our guide for the duration, showing us what to see, and when to see it. This plan seemed good.

 

It was getting late, and cold so we decided to retreat to our respective vehicles to get some sleep. Tomorrow we would see a place that to us had previously only existed in other people’s photographs.

 

People assume that Arizona is a hot place (“ooooh you‘re going to Arizona…it‘s going to be SO hot.”)…They’re right, partly. Arizona IS hot, when the sun is out, and in the summer. When it is NOT summer…and you’re in northern Arizona at about 6,000 ft elevation…at night, with 50 mph winds blowing…it’s cold. REALLY cold. One of the coldest nights I have ever spent in my life cold. I have a 25-degree sleeping bag, a blanket…and was inside a vehicle…I still froze.

 

I woke up close to 6am, the sun was already peeking over the canyon walls. Mike was up as well, and heading off towards the heli-pad to see if his contact had arrived. Apparently, his contact information was vague at best. “Meet ------- at the helicopter pad in the morning.” There was no description. There was no time. That’s what he had to go with.

 

Mike checked several times, and there was no contact…in fact, there wasn’t even a helicopter for the first two hours…it was just us, milling about the hilltop, watching the first waves of hikers returning to their cars after their days in the canyon. I remember thinking…those people look extremely relieved to be done with that hike.

 

9:30am: The copter starts arriving for its day of shuttling…and we hurry over, to look at the chopper, and for our contact.

 

The copter service in Havasu Hilltop operates on a first come, first serve basis…First the Indians come, then they’re first to get service. When the locals are done…the non-Supai are taken in. We still don’t see a contact…so we add our name to the list of outsiders that need shuttled into the village, and sit down to wait.

 

We’re the first one on the list, which is a good thing… at this time, there is only one truck load of Native Americans and their stuff waiting to be taken to their home in the canyon. Everything that goes into the Supai village goes in by horse, copter, or foot…It’s not uncommon for you to see someone sitting at the hilltop with their new hot water heater, some groceries, a new bike, and suitcases…all waiting to be taken home.

 

I think one of us made the comment, “This shouldn’t take long…it’s just us and them, and we’re first on the list…I bet we get on the 2nd copter.”

 

The Indians KNOW when the copter is coming, and believe me, they arrive in droves shortly thereafter…truck after truck after truck packed to the rails with people and stuff arrive. We saw lots of bikes, groceries, appliances, medical supplies for the clinic, strollers, etc, etc…there suddenly were a lot of people, and stuff to get into that canyon…and that meant our chances of getting to the village in a timely manor was slim. Maybe we should’ve walked…

 

Time passed, and Mike went to check when we might be able to get a ride into the village. Luckily…passengers are taken before cargo…and the ground crew says we’ll probably get on the next copter. He was right. I was shocked…I thought he was just trying to get us to stop asking.

 

Even though it was only 3 minutes in length, the helicopter ride was awesome. There’s nothing quite like being on a big piece of metal that hangs a hard right, and drops like a rock, 400 feet into a valley with cliffs, many thousands of feet high on either side….think best rollercoaster drop ever, and multiply it by a couple and you have an idea…I think I said ‘Whee’ a couple times.

 

While we flew I could see people hiking on the trail below….I thought to myself…that doesn’t look so bad after all.

 

We landed, gathered our gear and headed for the village…to try and find our contact…and get to the campground.

 

Our contact found us…using only a flickr picture of Mike she had been given. When we met her she had already grabbed our hiking permits, and campground reservations…we were all set. We made a pit stop at the local store for some water, and we were off on our two mile trek to the camping area. The store, was well stocked with about anything you might need in order to make your visit a little more tolerable. They had soda, candy, chips, water, canned goods, etc. The prices were far more reasonable than I expected. I bought a large bottle of water for less than $2.

 

The hike to the falls was hot, but easy…it went quick…only ½ mile outside the village you’re treated to your first glimpses of the famous bright blue-green water the Havasupai people are named after. No matter how many photos you see of it, words can’t really do it justice…it’s like the bluest swimming pool you’ve ever seen, only it’s flowing in a creek…in the middle of a desert. Unreal. I expected to look behind a tree and see an Indian bent over, squirting food coloring into the stream.

 

The campground is situated along a very pretty stretch of creek, Cottonwood trees and greenery help shade the entire area, and the proximity to the water makes it quite literally…a desert oasis.

 

We had glimpsed 2 of the 3 waterfalls on our way to the campground…and even in those brief views we were very much ready to get camp set up, and get out to explore each of them.

  

Moscow. Kubinka Tank Museum.

 

The M3 Stuart, formally Light Tank M3 was an American light tank of World War II. It was used by British and Commonwealth forces prior to the entry of the USA into the war, and thereafter by US and Allied forces until the end of the war. The name General Stuart or Stuart given by the British comes from the American Civil War General J.E.B. Stuart and was used for both the M3 and M5 Light Tank; in British service it also had the unofficial nickname of Honey. To the United States Army the tanks were officially known only as Light Tank M3 and Light Tank M5.

History

Observing events in Europe, American tank designers realized that the Light Tank M2 was becoming obsolete and set about improving it. The upgraded design, with thicker armor, modified suspension and new gun recoil system was called "Light Tank M3". Production of the vehicle started in March 1941 and continued until October 1943. Like its direct predecessor, the M2A4, the M3 was armed with a 37 mm M5 gun and 5 .30-06 Browning M1919A4 machine guns: coaxial with the gun, on top of the turret in an M20 AA mount, in a ball mount in right bow, in the right and left hull sponsons.

 

To relieve the demand for the radial aero-engines used in the M3, a new version was developed using twin Cadillac V-8 automobile engines. The new model (initially called M4 but redesignated M5 to avoid confusion with the M4 Sherman) also featured a redesigned hull with sloped glacis plate and driver's hatches moved to the top. Although the main criticism from the using units was that the Stuarts lacked firepower, the improved M5 series kept the same 37 mm gun. The M5 gradually replaced the M3 in production from 1942 and was in turn succeeded by the Light Tank M24 in 1944.

 

Combat history

 

Light Tank M5A1 passes through the wrecked streets of Coutances.

An Australian Stuart I during the final assault on Buna.

A British M3 (Stuart I) knocked out during fighting in North Africa.The British Army was the first to use the Light Tank M3 as the "General Stuart" in combat. In November 1941, some 170 Stuarts took part in Operation Crusader, with poor results. Although the high losses suffered by Stuart-equipped units during the operation had more to do with better tactics and training of the Afrika Korps than the apparent superiority of German armor in the North African campaign, the operation revealed that the M3 had several technical faults. Mentioned in the British complaints were the 37 mm M5 gun and poor internal layout. The two-man turret crew was a significant weakness, and some British units tried to fight with three-man turret crews. The Stuart also had a limited range, which was a severe problem in desert warfare as units often outpaced their supplies and were stranded when they ran out of fuel. On the positive side, crews liked its high speed and mechanical reliability, hence its unofficial nickname of Honey. The high speed and high reliability distinguished the Stuart from cruiser tanks of the period, in particular the Crusader, which composed a large portion of the British tank force in Africa up until 1942.

 

From the summer of 1942, when enough US medium tanks had been received, the British usually kept Stuarts out of tank-to-tank combat, using them primarily for reconnaissance. The turret was removed from some examples to save weight and improve speed and range. These became known as "Stuart Recce". Some others were converted to armored personnel carriers and were known as "Stuart Kangaroo", and some were converted command vehicles and known as "Stuart Command". M3s, M3A3s, and M5s continued in British service until the end of the war, but British armor units had a smaller proportion of these light tanks than US units.

 

The other major Lend-Lease recipient of the M3, the Soviet Union, was even less happy with the tank, considering it undergunned, underarmored, likely to catch fire, and too sensitive to fuel quality. The narrow tracks were highly unsuited to operation in winter conditions, as they resulted in high ground pressures that sank the tank into the snow. Also, the M3's radial aircraft engine required high-octane fuel, which complicated Soviet logistics as most of their tanks utilized diesel. However, the M3 was superior to early-war Soviet light tanks such as the T-60, which were often underpowered and possessed even lighter armament than the Stuart. In 1943, the Red Army tried out the M5 and decided that the upgraded design wasn't much better than the M3. Being less desperate than in 1941, the Soviets turned down an American offer to supply the M5. M3s continued in Red Army service at least until 1944.

 

In US Army service, the M3 first saw combat in the Philippines. Two battalions, comprising the Provisional Tank Group fought in the Bataan peninsula campaign. When the American army joined the North African Campaign in late 1942, Stuart units still formed a large part of its armor strength. After the disastrous Battle of the Kasserine Pass the US quickly followed the British in disbanding most of their light tank battalions and subordinating the Stuarts to medium tank battalions performing the traditional cavalry missions of scouting and screening. For the rest of the war, most US tank battalions had three companies of M4 Shermans and one company of M3s or M5/M5A1s.

 

In the European theater, Allied light tanks had to be given cavalry and infantry fire support roles since their main cannon armament could not compete with heavier enemy AFVs. However, the Stuart was still effective in combat in the Pacific Theater, as Japanese tanks were both relatively rare and were generally much weaker than even Allied light tanks. Japanese infantrymen were poorly equipped with anti-tank weapons and tended to attack tanks using close-assault tactics. In this environment, the Stuart was only moderately more vulnerable than medium tanks. In addition, the poor terrain and roads common to the theatre were unsuitable for the much heavier M4 medium tanks, and so initially, only light armor could be deployed. Heavier M4s were eventually brought to overcome heavily entrenched positions, though the Stuart continued to serve in a combat capacity until the end of the war.

 

Though the Stuart was to be completely replaced by the newer M24 Chaffee, the number of M3s/M5s produced was so great (over 25,000 including the 75 mm HMC M8) that the tank remained in service until the end of the war and well after. In addition to the United States, United Kingdom and Soviet Union, who were the primary users, it was also used by France, China (M3A3s and, immediately post-war, M5A1s) and Tito's partisans in Yugoslavia (M3A3s and few M3A1).

 

After the war, some countries chose to equip their armies with cheap and reliable Stuarts. The Republic of China Army, having suffered great attrition in terms of armors as a result of the ensuing civil war, rebuilt their armored forces by acquiring surplus vehicles left behind in the former PTO by the US forces, including 22 M5A1s to equip two tank companies. They would have their finest hours during the Battle of Kuningtou, for which the tank came to be known as the "Bear of Kinmen" (金門之熊). The M5 played a significant role in the First Kashmir War (1947) between India and Pakistan, including the battle of Zoji-la pass at an incredible altitude of nearly 12,000 ft. The vehicle remained in service in several South American countries at least until 1996.

 

During the 60s and 70s, the Portuguese Army also used some in the war in Angola, where its all terrain capability (compared to wheeled vehicles) was greatly appreciated.

 

Production history

Produced 1941-1943

Specifications

Weight 14.7 tonnes (32,400 lb)

Length 4.5 m (14.8 ft)

Width 2.46 m (8.1 ft)

Height 2.3 m (7.5 ft)

Crew 4 (Commander, gunner, driver, co-driver)

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Armor 13 - 51 mm

Primary

armament 37 mm M6 in M44 mount

174 rounds

Secondary

armament 3 x .30-06 Browning M1919A4 MG

7,500 rounds

 

Engine Continental W-670-9A, 7 Cylinder air-cooled radial

250 hp (186 kW)

Power/weight 17.82 hp/tonne

Suspension Vertical volute spring

Operational

range 120 km (74 mi)

Speed 58 km/h (36 mph) (road)

30 km/h (18 mph) (off-road)

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M3_Stuart

   

Portfolio & Services

 

I did a few black and white images from my Eastern Sierra trip. As I was packing up after sunset, these clouds finally made their way over the landscape. The wind was blowing something fierce, so getting a 60 second exposure meant upping the ISO to 160 and using f8. Still, I was holding securely to the tripod. If you look close, there are a couple stars off to the right as this was during twilight. Press 'L' for the larger view or go here for the 1300 px version.

 

The sky heavy composition is something I try every once and awhile, but without a great amount of success. I like how this one turned out.

 

Thanks always for stopping by and visiting my stream. I appreciated it!

 

Nikon D300

Nikkor 12-24mm @ 24mm

60 sec, f8, ISO 160

Hitech 4 Stop soft GND handheld and moved up and down quite a bit to reduce its strength

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hook Lighthouse

 

Hook Head Lighthouse

LocationCounty Wexford, Ireland

Coordinates52°7′25.7″N 6°55′45.5″WCoordinates: 52°7′25.7″N 6°55′45.5″W

Year first constructed1245(1172?)

Automated1996

Constructionlimestone

Tower shapecylinder

Markings / patternwhite with two black bands

Height35m

Current lensthird order Fresnel lens

Range23nm

CharacteristicFlashing 3s

The Hook Lighthouse (also known as Hook Head Lighthouse) is a building situated at the tip of the Hook Peninsula in County Wexford, in Ireland. It is one of the oldest lighthouses in the world, and the oldest operating lighthouse in Ireland.[1] It is operated by the Commissioners of Irish Lights, the Irish Lighthouse Authority, it marks the eastern entrance to Waterford Harbour. The current structure has stood for almost 800 years.

Contents [hide]

1 History

2 References

3 References

4 External links

[edit]History

 

The existing tower dates from the twelfth century, though tradition states that Dubhán, a missionary to the Wexford area, established some sort of beacon as early as the fifth century. The headland is known in Irish as Rinn Dubháin, St. Dubhán's Head. According to Onomasticon Goidelicum (1910, p582) Rinn Dubáin Ailithir is mentioned in the Book of Leinster, written about 1079. However, the similar-sounding Irish word 'duán' means a fish hook, hence the English name. It is known locally as "the tower of Hook." The exact circumstance of the initial construction on the present structure are the subject of some controversy. It had been thought that the tower was constructed in 1172 by Raymond LeGros following the Norman Invasion in 1169, both to establish the lighthouse and to serve as a fortress on the approaches to Waterford. According to the Commissioners of Irish Lights, however, more recent studies have attributed construction to William Marshal in 1245.[2] However, this is impossible since Marshall died in 1219, meaing that either he was not involved in the construction, or that the date of 1245 is incorrect. In any case, this tower, in its original form, was 8m high and roughly 8.5m in diameter, with an open fire at the top serving as the beacon. The tower and its grounds was entrusted to the monks, who by then were associated with the Priory of Saint Augustine in Ross. This arrangement continued even through the dissolution of the monasteries under Henry VIII.

Maintenance of the beacon was interrupted by the English Civil War, when the monks abandoned the area. The lack of the light was felt, and in 1657 the governor of Duncannon Fort was petitioned to restore the beacon, but without success. However, in 1665 Charles II authorized Richard Reading to build six lighthouses on the Irish coast, including the rehabilitation of the light at Hook Head. By this time the tower had been enlarged; an addition incorporating a spiral staircase had been added surrounding the old tower, and the height of the whole structure raised to 24m. What Reading did in relighting the beacon is unclear, but he may have constructed an enclosed lantern to shelter the fire, as was customary at the time. The light was returned to service in 1667 and has remained active in some form ever since.

In 1704 Queen Anne transferred custody of the Irish lights to the Revenue Commissioners, but this transfer did not immediately affect Hook Head, as it was held in lease by Henry Loftus of Loftus Hall. The lease passed to his son, who threatened to extinguish the light failing renewal of the lease on his terms. In the end he got his renewal, but at terms more favorable to the crown.

By the 1790s the tower was in need of repair. At this time Thomas Rogers was contracted with to maintain this and nine other lighthouses. He replaced the Reading lantern with a new one housing the Argand lamp and reflector system typical of the period. The beacon was altered in 1812 and then replaced in 1864 with a dioptric lens housed in a new lantern, which is that used today.

Subsequent changes left the structure largely unaltered but updated the light source. Coal gas replaced oil lamps in 1871, with vaporized paraffin taking over in 1911, and electricity in 1972. A rotating third-order Fresnel lens was also installed in 1911. A variety of fog signals were installed beginning with a bell in 1838, a cannon in 1872, an explosive charge in 1905 (altered in 1938), an air horn in 1975, and an electric horn from 1995 on. Resident keeper households were replaced by a team of six keepers in 1977, and the light was automated in 1996. The light continues to operate as an active aid to navigation. An older daymark of three red bands on a white background was altered to two black bands on white in 1938.

In 2001 the light was opened to the public as a tourist attraction after construction of an attached visitors' center. In January 2011 The Hooks fog horn was heard for the last time as all the fog horns were turned off. It was felt that seeing that the technology on modern ships were so advanced that the fog horn was no longer required. In June 2011 the structure was placed first by Lonely Planet in its list of "Top 10 Flashiest Lighthouses"; the guide described Hook as "The great granddaddy of lighthouses".[3][4]

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Digging way back into the archives for this one. Two years ago I had the pleasure of volunteering for one month in the Papahanaumokuakea National Marine Sanctuary in Hawaii. I was stationed during that time on the aptly named Tern Island, where every year approximately 160,000 Sooty Terns (plus 20 other seabird species) come to lay their eggs. I loved the Sooties because of their sheer numbers, striking patterns, cheerful calls, and curious dispositions. Many times while out and about on the tiny island, I'd turn around to find a Sooty hovering a foot or less behind me head, chirruping away.

--

 

Off to teach a seascape workshop this weekend. Hope you all have a great one!

 

~Josh

 

no censura=against censorship

 

se il tuo ID yahoo è localizzato a Singapore, in Germania oppure ad Hong Kong o in Korea potrai vedere solo foto dal contenuto che è in accordo con il locale

accordo dei termini di servizio per cui gli utenti flickr di quelle nazioni non potranno cambiare da SafeSearch on in SafeSearch off.

 

In altre parole ciò significa che gli utenti tedeschi e delle altre nazioni citate non potranno accedere a foto su flickr che non sono flaggate "safe" e quindi solo fiori e paesaggi per i tedeschi.

 

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english:

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Lade dieses Bild runter und poste es in deinem Account! Lass uns das Bild überall auf flickr verteilen und es in 'Interestingness' heben!! So geht es nicht!

 

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ONE OF THE THREE ORIGINAL JEWELS

 

HIRA FALLS (Hira-Tachi) is one of my favorite waterfalls on Okinawa. This 20 meter / 65-foot beauty is found along the upper reaches of the ATTSU RIVER (Attsu-Gawa), and was one of three important Okinawa waterfalls marked on pre-1972 tourist and road maps as a recommended sight to see.

 

The other two falls, mapped and recommended to tourists, were HIJI FALLS in Kunigami, and TODOROKI FALLS in Nago City.

 

At that time, HIJI FALLS was a tough hike in and out, while TODOROKI FALLS was (and still is) a piece of cake --- as long as you stay off the boulders at the base of the falls is they happen to be wet.

 

To be placed on the map, difficulty of access was NOT a point of consideration. Only the picturesque worthiness of the waterfall itself was considered.

 

OTHER FALLS THAT WERE MAPPED, BUT MISSED

 

How can you miss a fall that's mapped ?

 

The beautiful LAKE AHA and AHA FALLS (on the Jungle Warfare Training Area) were, and still are, called TANAGAA-GUMUI on the maps. This Okinawan-language name (meaning "The Prawn Pond") acted as a miss-direct, keeping a lot of would-be tourists away.

 

Two other Nago-area falls --- SHINEGAKI and GEYA --- were mapped, but the locals fought to have them hidden. They did their best to chase tourists out, and finally got the government to fence off all access with locked gates.

 

Not mapped, but a very popular with pre-reversion Americans were the TACHIGAA FALLS and POOLS in Higashi Township.

 

TROUBLE IN THE JUNGLE

 

When the USA handed Okinawa back to Japan in 1972, HIRA FALLS was the only noted waterfall to be quietly removed from all future maps of Okinawa. To this day, it still does not appear in any guide books, nor on any Okinawa maps or atlases.

 

How could such a great waterfall simply disappear ?

 

Both politics and pollution played a part in effectively removing this once popular spot from the public eye.

 

HIRA FALLS is situated within Japanese National Forest Lands that were questionably sub-leased to the Government of the Ryukyus (Okinawa as it was prior to 1972).

 

Unfortunately, 400 acres of pristine watershed above the falls was questionably sub-leased again to certain privileged and government-connected families, who for many years used and abused the land for personal profit --- after first getting rid of the pristine forest by bulldozing it from the face of the earth.

 

For many years, pollution and soil runoff from above fouled this beautiful spot, while affecting the river's downstream eco-systems as well.

 

Even today, the cascade still turns a muddy brown on occasion, especially after days of torrential rain. This is partly due to surface runoff from former red-clay grazing lands that had been wrongly cleared of their thick jungles.

 

THE ROAD TO RECOVERY

 

Fortunately, the abuse has now ceased, high-handed corruption has been thwarted, and the land is slowly recovering.

 

Legal wrangling between the National Forest Service, the Prefecture, and relatives of the original sub-leasers (who made this mess in the first place) has been "resolved", and the land is now under the legal care and management of a new third-party entity whose goal is to see the Forests and Jungle make a comeback.

 

Interestingly, things were again put to the test when certain of the said privileged families (who caused the original problems) tried to regain use of the land in order to turn it into a huge, money-making trash dump and incinerator facility for the city of Nago (!)

 

This time, laws and legal agreements held fast, maneuvering by "old money" failed, and --- with the exception of some approved, small-scale, family-sized organic farm plots far from the Hira Falls --- the land is now locked down to slowly revert back to the jungle.

 

And along with this legal reprieve for nature, the falls have largely recovered.

 

As the jungles slowly take back the once-abused lands, the river, falls, and ponds along the way have, for the most part, become self-cleaning. Once the heavy rains have passed, the river becomes fed with filtered waters from the deeper, saturated soils of the recovering rain forest.

 

BACK ON THE MAPS ???

 

Being about twice a high (?) as the popular TAA FALLS, with a slightly larger and deeper pool, and a very picturesque downstream run, it would seem well-positioned to make a comeback on the tourist maps, just as it was over 40 years ago.

 

However, it's location on dual NATIONAL and PREFECTUAL FOREST LANDS, and the active presence of agreed-upon "third-party" management (not involving the former "privileged families"), are keeping HIRA FALLS off the tourists maps for now.

 

And for many, that is considered a very good thing.

 

In spite of these problems and current "off-the-grid" status, Hira Falls is on a government list of natural sites awaiting approval for official designation as a NATURAL CULTURAL ASSET of Okinawa.

 

NOT COMPLETELY UN-ADVERTISED

 

Hira Falls have already been depicted in a couple of nice books published by the City of NAGO, and in July 2012, the English language MAP IT OKINAWA Website became the first show the falls to those living in cyberspace. [The link is given at the bottom of this caption]

 

In any case, the 30-40 minute trail into these falls is not "off limits", but also not for the kiddies, nor casual tourists in flip-flops. It's for serious nature lovers who know how to take their time and watch their step.

 

*

 

LEVELS OF DIFFICULTY --- 1 to 5

 

AZAKA FALLS = 0

 

GENKA RIVER & FISH LADDER = 0 to 1

 

LAKE AHA / AHA FALLS = 1

 

TAA FALLS = 2

 

HIRA FALLS = 2 1/2... for some folks, maybe 3

 

AHA LOWER FALLS & POOLS = 3 to 4

 

WILD RIVER RUNS (POOLS & FALLS) such as ARA-KAWA, HANEJI-GAWA, OKU-GAWA, TAKAZATO-GAWA, ZATSUN-GAWA, and numerous other steep-run rivers that require navigating deep pools, large boulders, and "dead-end" rock walls = 4 to 5.

 

*

 

Fortunately, the jungle trek into HIRA FALLS is NOT the kind of "LEVEL FIVE" adventure provided by some of the steeper, boulder-filled, river ravines in northern Okinawa. Those who relish such obstacle courses have plenty of those to choose from.

 

Where TAA FALLS can be a great adventure for even Elementary School-aged children under parental supervision, (and some of the HIRA FALLS trail may seem similar to the rougher parts of the TAA FALLS trail), my gut feeling is that HIRA FALLS should be restricted to mature teen-agers and above --- at least at first.

 

If you are a parent with little kids, leave them home with a babysitter. You can then judge if this is a trek you want them to experience, and what ages are suitable for those of you own clan, under your parental supervision.

 

Family day trips to Okinawa waterfalls are a great thing, but there's no reason to push your 5-year-old daughter into HIRA FALLS just so you can put some hair on her chest.

 

A REAL TREK THROUGH THE JUNGLE

 

NOTE : A link to expert directions and hiking advice is given at the bottom of this caption. PLEASE READ IT !

 

The way into HIRA FALLS offers none of the wide and sandy river-bed experience provided by the HENAN RIVER, up which you trek to reach TAA FALLS.

 

Instead, you will be taking a 20-30 minute jungle hike down (and along) an un-named tributary, which will eventually join the ATTSU RIVER --- where you will turn LEFT and almost immediately see and hear HIRA FALLS in the distance.

 

This final approach to the falls, as you walk the last few yards along the river and through the trees, is quite a pretty site, rewarding you well for the sometimes rough and cautious hike in.

 

By "rough and cautious" I mean that the path from your car to the ATTSU RIVER consists of angular rocks underfoot the whole way, along a mostly narrow tributary with small pools of various depths --- usually not more than knee-deep --- alternating with some "short-cut" paths through the jungle, and several drops in elevation that will require you to use ropes (already there) at a few spots.

 

Proper dress, footwear, a pair of free hands (gloved hands are better), and due diligence is needed on your way in and out.

 

It is only when you reach HIRA FALLS itself that the clear and sandy pool (along with the nice pebbly "beach" along its pretty edge) resembles the "picnic area" atmosphere of TAA FALLS.

 

For photographic purposes, the best time to arrive at the falls is about 9:30 to 10 am on a sunny day. For those living on KAB and starting the trip via the Okinawa Turnpike, that means leaving you home about 8 am.

 

As for taking a dip in the pool, summer is of course the best time, and this is as fine and deep a swimming hole as you'll find anywhere back home in the USA.

 

As for the strength of the falls itself, my photo shows things on a "slow" day. After a few days of steady rains, or shortly after the rainy season passes, these falls are a veritable blanket of glistening, thundering white water.

 

As with any other such place on Okinawa, if you pack it in, please pack it out.

 

HOW TO GET HERE :

 

I cannot do better than the fine MAP IT OKINAWA Website, so will turn you over to those good folks for a good description of how to find these falls. READ IT CAREFULLY !!!

 

www.mapitokinawa.com/2012/07/hira-falls-nago-city.html

 

*

 

OKINAWA FLICKr ALBUMS GALORE : www.flickr.com/photos/okinawa-soba/collections/7215762919...

  

Weatherman said - 5 Brrrrrrrrrrrrr The drive here at one point we thought turn around thanks for driving Tim , but as you headed down off the open high ground it got easier , its not an easy drive up there in daylight in summer.We all most had perfection but myself and Tim are more than happy with our trek !!!

Then the snow came so we took refuge in the "Bothy " :-)

 

When we did finally climb the ridge to the top we were greeted with more snow and blizard winds full of snow :-( Brrrrrrrrrrrrrrr stood there for 15 minutes hoping for some light :-( !!!!

 

View On Black

    

The Legend of "THE LADY OF THE LAKE "

 

n the late twelfth century, a widow lived at Blaensawdde, near Llanddeusant, Carmarthenshire. Her husband had died in the wars of independence from the English. Her only son spent time looking after the livestock. Their favourite place was near the small lake called LIyn-y-Fan Fach, in the shadow of the Black Mountain.

 

One day whilst walking along the edge of the lake. To his astonishment he saw, sitting on the unruffled surface of the water, a Lady. She was one of the most beautiful creatures that mortal eyes had ever seen. The young man just stood still with his eyes staring at the woman and unconsciously offered her the barley bread and cheese which he had with him.

 

Bewildered by a feeling of love for the Lady, he continued to hold his hand out to her. She glided near to him but gently refused the offer of the food. He tried to touch her, but she eluded him saying:

 

“Cras dy fara!

“Hard baked is thy bread!

 

"Nid hawdd fy nala”

‘Tis not easy to catch me”

 

She immediately dived under the water. The love-stricken youth returned home, desolate that he had lost someone, fairer than all the maidens of Myddfai.

 

When he had told his mother what had happened, she advised him to take some unbaked dough or ‘toes’ the next time, as there must be some kind of spell connected with hard-baked bread, ‘bara cras’, which prevented him catching the Lady.

 

Next morning, before the sun had gilded with its rays the peaks of the Fans, the young man was at the lake, not to look after his cattle, but seeking the same enchanting vision he had seen the day before. But he waited in vain, the surface of the lake being only graced by the ripples caused by a stiff breeze, and a cloud hung heavily on the summit of the Fan, adding gloom to his already distracted mind.

 

Hours passed and the day became warm and sunny, when suddenly he noticed his cattle on the precipitous slope on the opposite side of the lake. As he rushed over to them, to his inexpressible delight, the Lady appeared once more, more beautiful than ever.

 

He held his hand out to her, full of unbaked bread, which he offered from his heart with vows of eternal attachment. All of which were refused by her, saying:

 

“Llaith dy fara! “

Unbaked is thy bread!

 

Ti ni fynna.”

I will not have thee.”

 

But the smile that played on her face as the Lady vanished beneath the waters raised a hope in the man which stopped him despairing at her refusal. When he returned home, his mother suggested that next time his bread should be slightly baked, as this would probably please the mysterious being with whom he had fallen in love.

 

Impelled by an irresistible feeling, the youth left the house early the next morning and ran until he came to the edge of the lake where he waited with a feverish anxiety for the reappearance of his Lady. Many hours the youth waited, his flocks of sheep and cows wandering hither and thither, but all his thoughts and attention were directed at the lake for the reappearance of the Lady.

 

Day was fast turning into night and all hope of seeing the beautiful Lady was gone. The young man cast one last look over the waters when to his astonishment he saw seven cows walking on the water. They were followed by the maiden, who seemed even lovelier than ever. She approached the land and he rushed to meet her. A smile encouraged him to hold her hand and on his offering the bread, she accepted. After some persuasion she consented to become his bride, on condition that they should live together only until she received from him three blows without cause:

 

“Fri ergyd diachos.”

“Three causeless blows.”

 

Should he ever strike three such blows she would leave him forever. But he gladly agreed. Thus the Lady of the Lake agreed to become the young man’s wife. Her father gladly consented to the marriage giving a dowry of as many sheep, cattle, goats, and horses that his daughter could count without heaving or drawing in her breath. He added, however, that should the youth prove unkind to her, and strike her three times without cause, she should return to him and bring back all the livestock.

 

And so the marriage took place. When the time came for the Lady to count the animals, she counted by fives, as many times as possible in rapid succession till her breath was exhausted. After counting the sheep, cattle, goats and horses, the full number came out of the lake when called upon by the father. They went to live at a farm called Esgair Llaethdy, about a mile from Myddfai, where they lived in prosperity and happiness for several years, bearing three beautiful Sons.

 

One day they were to go to a Christening in the neighbourhood, but the wife was reluctant to go saying the distance was too far to walk. Her husband told her to fetch a horse from the field which she said she would do if he got her gloves from the house. When he returned from the house with the gloves he found that she had not moved. Jokingly he slapped her shoulder with the gloves saying, “Go, go.” Thus he had struck her the first time without cause.

 

On another occasion at a wedding, in the midst of mirth and merriment, she burst into tears and her husband touched her on the shoulder and asked what was wrong. “Now people are entering into trouble,” she said, “and your troubles are likely to start as you have struck me a second time.”

 

Years passed and their sons grew to become clever young men. The husband was ever watchful lest he should, in some trivial incident, strike his beloved wife again. She told him, as her love was as strong as ever, to take care for the final blow would, by an unalterable destiny over which she had no power, separate them forever.

 

It happened that one day they were at a funeral, where, in the middle of great mourning and grief, the Lady was happy and laughing. This so shocked her husband that he touched her saying, “Hush! hush! Don’t laugh.” She said that she laughed because people, when they died, go out of trouble. She then went out of the house saying, “The last blow has been struck, our marriage contract is broken and at an end! Farewell!”

 

She went back to Esgair Llaethdy and began to call the sheep, cattle, goats and horses that she had brought with her as a dowry. They all obeyed her call, even a little black calf that had been killed came alive and joined the others. The four great oxen ploughing in the field left their work when they heard their mistress call:

 

“Pedwar eidion glas “

The four grey oxen

 

Sydd ar y maes

That are in the field

 

Deuwch chwithau

Come you also

 

Yn iach adre!”

Quite well home!”

 

Away they all went across the mountains towards the lake from which they had come. On reaching the lake they disappeared beneath the water without leaving a trace except the furrow made by the plough drawn by the oxen.

 

What became of the ploughman when the oxen set off, or what happened to the disconsolate and ruined husband, is not handed down in legend. But of the sons it is said that they often wandered by the lake in the hope of seeing their mother. It happened that during one of these walks near Dol Howel, at the Mountain Gate, still called ‘Llidiad y Meddygon’, the Physicians’ gate, the mother appeared to the eldest son, Rhiwallon. She told him that his mission on earth was to be a benefactor of mankind by relieving them of pain and misery through the healing of all disease. To this end she supplied him with a bag full of prescriptions and instructions for the preservation of health. She prophesied that if he and his family followed those instructions clearly they would become the most skilful physicians in the country for many generations.

 

She appeared on several occasions to her sons and once accompanied them as far as Pant-y-Meddygon’, the Dingle of the Physicians, where she pointed out to them the various plants which grew there and revealed their medical properties and virtues. The knowledge she gave to her sons, together with their unrivalled skill, soon gained for them such celebrity that none ever possessed before them. And to ensure that that knowledge should not be lost, they wrote it down, for the benefit of mankind throughout the ages.

 

£ Rhiwallon and his sons first became physicians to Lord Rhys Gryg who gave them rank, lands and privileges at Myddfai. Their fame soon spread and their services were in demand throughout the country. The descendants of this ancient family continued to practice medicine in Wales without a break until the middle of the eighteenth century, when the last lineal descendant died in 1743. The late Rice Williams, M.D., of Aberystwyth, who died in 1842, appears to have been the last of the Physicians descended from the mysterious Lady of Llyn-y-Fan Fach.

 

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No, there aren't C&O signals in this shot. Yes, he is on Main 1. Clouds are moving in at the speed of lake effect, and a train is in half a few miles up.

 

Who the hell cares. C&O is still represented with codeline stretching throughout the frame. The leader? One of two MPI/MKCX painted SD40-2's left in operation under HLCX ownership, the other being former MKCX painted 6300.

 

This wasn't supposed to happen anyway, but the day previous the FXE ACe that was coupled up to the trailing SD70AC went on the ground, which apparently was enough to take it off the point after the mishap was cleaned up. One miracle is not enough to get us here, though. The 6305 trailed CSXT 8752 on Q200 the day previous, facing West (geographically North) once it arrived at Walbridge. As usual, after yarding instructions the yardmaster needs fuel readings. After replying with less than 1500 on the 6305, the plan changed once more. Put the 6305 for fuel, take the leader around the horn to Stanley.

 

And per inside information, the 6305 was then supposed to be in local/transfer service. So you can imagine my surprise the next morning when the RL dispatcher called Q276 and asked for their unit ID. "HLCX 6305, wow who did you tick off to get that thing?" I was too far away to hear the engine radio, but the conversation continued "Well, that wasn't even showing in your consist, so now I'm wonderingggggg what else you have." "Well alright guys, start pulling down, you'll go Two to One at Lemoyne. Follow the parade."

 

I was in awe. The engine got turned, taken off original assignment, and was now nose first in early morning sunshine heading for Curtis Bay. Consider this redemption for last time(s).

 

Of course the Two to One comment was lost in the excitement to me at the time, as my blood was flowing and the Lac was in gear. After I caught up to the head end near Bradner, I processed the information and realized that the C&O signal playbook was pretty much out of the question. So here it is, in all her rent-a-wreck glory. HLCX 6305, a YN2 SD70AC, and racks with some pretty decent fall color to go along with it.

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