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This photo shows the mid-section of the plane with the twin .50 cal. machine guns mounted in the side windows. The belt feeds are above each of the guns and in the background is the access to the tail gunner position. My foot is braced against the seat back so that I could get as far back as possible in order to show most of the cabin area. And yes, that is the lens of my other camera...a D750 with the 12-24mm wide angle lens....still not quite wide enough to capture many of the sections of this unique plane.

 

The B-25 "Mitchell" medium bomber was one of the real 'workhorses' of WWII with nearly 10,000 of them built. These versatile planes saw service in every theatre of operation, however their main use was in the Pacific. It was for jungle warfare that many of them were converted to low level strafing operations with as many as 14 .50 cal. machine guns firing to the front of the plane. This B-25J was restored by the Commemorative Air Force group in Mesa, AZ and travels around the U.S. each summer providing tours, flights and a glimpse of history to many communities.

 

More than 6,000 of these rugged aircraft were built at the North American Aviation plant which was located at the Fairfax Airport in Kansas City. This particular plane saw most of its service in Corsica, flying 15 missions over Italy. After it was retired it served various missions and was finally rescued from the scrap heap, after which it was restored with 28 years of volunteer work starting in 1980. This plane was built in Kansas City and went into service in 1944. MUCH more information is available at the CAF site: www.azcaf.org/pages/aircraft_bios/TB-25N_Mitchell.html

 

Since this is a "Photo Site", I should mention that for these shots I used two Nikons, a D610 with a fish-eye lens and a D750 with a 12-24mm wide angle. The interior photos were taken with a slave flash, an SB-500, to illuminate the sometimes dark interior. The SB-500 also provided some 'fill light' in exterior shots as well. It was used in "Commander Mode" for the shots. Cropping and minor adjustments were done in PSE12.

  

How to open the canopy of an F-4 for a would-be rescuer.

  

F-4 Phantom II

Combat Air Museum

Topeka, Kansas

Neon sign at the Topeka Rescue Mission in north Topeka. But with two letters missing, "Jesus Saves" becomes "Jesus Sav".

Topeka, Kansas

Friday evening 4 January 2019

The Topeka Credit Union Foundation celebrated International Credit Union Day by hosting a Benefactor’s Breakfast for their 2010 grant recipients. The Easter Seals Capper Foundation, Family Service & Guidance Center, Let’s Help and the Topeka Rescue Mission each received a $2,000 grant from the Foundation.

This high angle shot shows the cockpit of the plane. The greenish color on part of the instrument panel comes from the overhead green skylight, part of which is covered with a reflective aluminum blanket when the plane is parked to cut down on the heat, otherwise it would quickly become an oven sitting on the tarmac.

 

The B-25 "Mitchell" medium bomber was one of the real 'workhorses' of WWII with nearly 10,000 of them built. These versatile planes saw service in every theatre of operation, however their main use was in the Pacific. It was for jungle warfare that many of them were converted to low level strafing operations with as many as 14 .50 cal. machine guns firing to the front of the plane. This B-25J was restored by the Commemorative Air Force group in Mesa, AZ and travels around the U.S. each summer providing tours, flights and a glimpse of history to many communities.

 

More than 6,000 of these rugged aircraft were built at the North American Aviation plant which was located at the Fairfax Airport in Kansas City. This particular plane saw most of its service in Corsica, flying 15 missions over Italy. After it was retired it served various missions and was finally rescued from the scrap heap, after which it was restored with 28 years of volunteer work starting in 1980. This plane was built in Kansas City and went into service in 1944. MUCH more information is available at the CAF site: www.azcaf.org/pages/aircraft_bios/TB-25N_Mitchell.html

 

Since this is a "Photo Site", I should mention that for these shots I used two Nikons, a D610 with a fish-eye lens and a D750 with a 12-24mm wide angle. The interior photos were taken with a slave flash, an SB-500, to illuminate the sometimes dark interior. The SB-500 also provided some 'fill light' in exterior shots as well. It was used in "Commander Mode" for the shots. Cropping and minor adjustments were done in PSE12.

  

Looking toward the front of the plane, this shot is from the mid-section, with the access ladder at the bottom of the photo and one of the two magazines for the .50 cal. ammo in the foreground. The grey object in the upper right corner is part of the counterweight system for the machine guns to help make them weightless for the gunners. You can see a portion of the other system at the top left of the shot.

 

The B-25 "Mitchell" medium bomber was one of the real 'workhorses' of WWII with nearly 10,000 of them built. These versatile planes saw service in every theatre of operation, however their main use was in the Pacific. It was for jungle warfare that many of them were converted to low level strafing operations with as many as 14 .50 cal. machine guns firing to the front of the plane. This B-25J was restored by the Commemorative Air Force group in Mesa, AZ and travels around the U.S. each summer providing tours, flights and a glimpse of history to many communities.

 

More than 6,000 of these rugged aircraft were built at the North American Aviation plant which was located at the Fairfax Airport in Kansas City. This particular plane saw most of its service in Corsica, flying 15 missions over Italy. After it was retired it served various missions and was finally rescued from the scrap heap, after which it was restored with 28 years of volunteer work starting in 1980. This plane was built in Kansas City and went into service in 1944. MUCH more information is available at the CAF site: www.azcaf.org/pages/aircraft_bios/TB-25N_Mitchell.html

 

Since this is a "Photo Site", I should mention that for these shots I used two Nikons, a D610 with a fish-eye lens and a D750 with a 12-24mm wide angle. The interior photos were taken with a slave flash, an SB-500, to illuminate the sometimes dark interior. The SB-500 also provided some 'fill light' in exterior shots as well. It was used in "Commander Mode" for the shots. Cropping and minor adjustments were done in PSE12.

  

"Maid in the Shade" visited Topeka the middle week of June, 2015. Note the service date of the plane in 1944 and the install date of the prop blade of 1943, making this plane 70 years old, but still looking great...! The green map behind the Bathing Beauty is the island of Corsica, where this plane saw most of its WWII service.

 

The B-25 "Mitchell" medium bomber was one of the real 'workhorses' of WWII with nearly 10,000 of them built. These versatile planes saw service in every theatre of operation, however their main use was in the Pacific. It was for jungle warfare that many of them were converted to low level strafing operations with as many as 14 .50 cal. machine guns firing to the front of the plane. This B-25J was restored by the Commemorative Air Force group in Mesa, AZ and travels around the U.S. each summer providing tours, flights and a glimpse of history to many communities.

 

More than 6,000 of these rugged aircraft were built at the North American Aviation plant which was located at the Fairfax Airport in Kansas City. This particular plane saw most of its service in Corsica, flying 15 missions over Italy. After it was retired it served various missions and was finally rescued from the scrap heap, after which it was restored with 28 years of volunteer work starting in 1980. This plane was built in Kansas City and went into service in 1944. MUCH more information is available at the CAF site: www.azcaf.org/pages/aircraft_bios/TB-25N_Mitchell.html

 

Since this is a "Photo Site", I should mention that for these shots I used two Nikons, a D610 with a fish-eye lens and a D750 with a 12-24mm wide angle. The interior photos were taken with a slave flash, an SB-500, to illuminate the sometimes dark interior. The SB-500 also provided some 'fill light' in exterior shots as well. It was used in "Commander Mode" for the shots. Cropping and minor adjustments were done in PSE12.

  

These twin .50 cal. machine guns really get the message of "Back OFF!" to any unfriendly plane following too closely!

Also visible in this view is the slight dihedral of the main wings. A change was made after the first few production models that reduced the angle of the wing, giving it the "gull wing" appearance that is obvious from this direction.

 

The B-25 "Mitchell" medium bomber was one of the real 'workhorses' of WWII with nearly 10,000 of them built. These versatile planes saw service in every theatre of operation, however their main use was in the Pacific. It was for jungle warfare that many of them were converted to low level strafing operations with as many as 14 .50 cal. machine guns firing to the front of the plane. This B-25J was restored by the Commemorative Air Force group in Mesa, AZ and travels around the U.S. each summer providing tours, flights and a glimpse of history to many communities.

 

More than 6,000 of these rugged aircraft were built at the North American Aviation plant which was located at the Fairfax Airport in Kansas City. This particular plane saw most of its service in Corsica, flying 15 missions over Italy. After it was retired it served various missions and was finally rescued from the scrap heap, after which it was restored with 28 years of volunteer work starting in 1980. This plane was built in Kansas City and went into service in 1944. MUCH more information is available at the CAF site: www.azcaf.org/pages/aircraft_bios/TB-25N_Mitchell.html

 

Since this is a "Photo Site", I should mention that for these shots I used two Nikons, a D610 with a fish-eye lens and a D750 with a 12-24mm wide angle. The interior photos were taken with a slave flash, an SB-500, to illuminate the sometimes dark interior. The SB-500 also provided some 'fill light' in exterior shots as well. It was used in "Commander Mode" for the shots. Cropping and minor adjustments were done in PSE12.

  

This narrow passageway leads to the tail gunners position. I heeded the sign and went no further...!

 

The B-25 "Mitchell" medium bomber was one of the real 'workhorses' of WWII with nearly 10,000 of them built. These versatile planes saw service in every theatre of operation, however their main use was in the Pacific. It was for jungle warfare that many of them were converted to low level strafing operations with as many as 14 .50 cal. machine guns firing to the front of the plane. This B-25J was restored by the Commemorative Air Force group in Mesa, AZ and travels around the U.S. each summer providing tours, flights and a glimpse of history to many communities.

 

More than 6,000 of these rugged aircraft were built at the North American Aviation plant which was located at the Fairfax Airport in Kansas City. This particular plane saw most of its service in Corsica, flying 15 missions over Italy. After it was retired it served various missions and was finally rescued from the scrap heap, after which it was restored with 28 years of volunteer work starting in 1980. This plane was built in Kansas City and went into service in 1944. MUCH more information is available at the CAF site: www.azcaf.org/pages/aircraft_bios/TB-25N_Mitchell.html

 

Since this is a "Photo Site", I should mention that for these shots I used two Nikons, a D610 with a fish-eye lens and a D750 with a 12-24mm wide angle. The interior photos were taken with a slave flash, an SB-500, to illuminate the sometimes dark interior. The SB-500 also provided some 'fill light' in exterior shots as well. It was used in "Commander Mode" for the shots. Cropping and minor adjustments were done in PSE12.