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Les Braves is a war memorial that is located on the shores of Omaha Beach in the village of St. Laurent-sur-Mer in Normandy, France and commemorates the fallen American soldiers, of World War ll who have lost their lives on the beaches of Normandy, June 6th 1944.

 

The memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. French sculptor Anilore Banon, created the monument in 2004, commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy. In the center, there are seven stainless steel columns and a group of five columns that curve upwards, two columns stand upright, with the tallest reaching 30 feet. Stainless steel wings gracefully stand on both sides.

 

Intended only as a temporary art piece, the sculpture still stands on the shores of Omaha Beach widely due to public interest and petition. The sculpture has been described as a blend of art and nature and has been able to withstand the forces of nature surprisingly well.

Source: Rotblattamrany

  

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The memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. French sculptor Anilore Banon, created the monument in 2004, commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy. In the centre, there are seven stainless steel columns and a group of five columns that curve upwards, two columns stand upright, with the tallest reaching 30 feet. Stainless steel wings gracefully stand on both sides.

 

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Les Braves is a war memorial that is located on the shores of Omaha Beach in the village of St. Laurent-sur-Mer in Normandy, France and commemorates the fallen American soldiers, of World War ll who have lost their lives on the beaches of Normandy, June 6th 1944.

  

The memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. French sculptor Anilore Banon, created the monument in 2004, commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy. In the center, there are seven stainless steel columns and a group of five columns that curve upwards, two columns stand upright, with the tallest reaching 30 feet. Stainless steel wings gracefully stand on both sides.

  

Intended only as a temporary art piece, the sculpture still stands on the shores of Omaha Beach widely due to public interest and petition. The sculpture has been described as a blend of art and nature and has been able to withstand the forces of nature surprisingly well.

 

Source: Rotblattamrany

 

Omaha Beach is a landing area in Normandy, northern France, used by Allied forces in the WWII D-Day invasion. Today, the beach is dotted with the remains of German bunkers. On the shore, the stainless-steel sculpture Les Braves commemorates American soldiers.

 

The memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. French sculptor Anilore Banon, created the monument in 2004, commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy.

Monument by Anilore Banon at Omaha Beach, Normandy, France.

This is a memorial to the American forces, consisting of three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings of Fraternity.

 

This memorial stands on the beach known as Omaha Beach in the village St. Laurent-sur-Mer in Normandy, France and commemorates the soldiers that fell on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day, June6, 1944. The memorial was dedicated on June 5 2004, for the 60th anniversary of the invasion.

   

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Les Braves is a war memorial that is located on the shores of Omaha Beach in the village of St. Laurent-sur-Mer in Normandy, France and commemorates the fallen American soldiers, of World War ll who have lost their lives on the beaches of Normandy, June 6th 1944.

 

The memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. French sculptor Anilore Banon, created the monument in 2004, commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy. In the center, there are seven stainless steel columns and a group of five columns that curve upwards, two columns stand upright, with the tallest reaching 30 feet. Stainless steel wings gracefully stand on both sides.

 

Intended only as a temporary art piece, the sculpture still stands on the shores of Omaha Beach widely due to public interest and petition. The sculpture has been described as a blend of art and nature and has been able to withstand the forces of nature surprisingly well.

Les Braves by French sculptor Anilore Banon at Omaha Beach, Les Moulins. Commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy in 2004, the stainless steel memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. "I created this sculpture to honour the courage of these men: Sons, husbands and fathers, who endangered and often sacrificed their lives in the hope of freeing the French people." Anilore Banon

 

Omaha Beach was one of the five D-Day landing beaches on 6th June 1944. On D-Day, the 29th Infantry Division and nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers (redirected from Pointe du Hoc) were to assault the western half of the beach. The more experienced 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing American troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles, later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Only 100 of the 2,400 tons of supplies scheduled to be landed on D-Day were landed. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

 

An accurate figure for allied casualties at Omaha Beach on 6 June is not known, sources vary between 2,000 and 4,700 killed, wounded, and missing with the heaviest losses incurred by the infantry, tanks and engineers in the first landings. The German 352nd division suffered 1,200 killed, wounded and missing - about 20% of its strength. The landings at Omaha Beach were portrayed in the opening Act of the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Hanks. Many veterans consider it to be the most accurate representation of the Normandy Landings ever commited to film.

 

Once the beachhead had been secured, Omaha Beach became the location of one of the two "Mulberry" harbours, prefabricated artificial harbors towed in pieces across the English Channel and assembled just off shore (the second was at Arromanches, at Gold Beach, built by the British troops). Construction of Mulberry A at Omaha began the day after D-Day with the scuttling of ships to form a breakwater. Ten days later harbour became operational when the first pier was completed, however three days the area was hit by worst storm to hit Normandy in 40 years and the harbour was so badly damaged that the decision was taken not to repair it.

Les Braves by French sculptor Anilore Banon at Omaha Beach, Les Moulins. Commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy in 2004, the stainless steel memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. "I created this sculpture to honour the courage of these men: Sons, husbands and fathers, who endangered and often sacrificed their lives in the hope of freeing the French people." Anilore Banon

 

Omaha Beach was one of the five D-Day landing beaches on 6th June 1944. On D-Day, the 29th Infantry Division and nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers (redirected from Pointe du Hoc) were to assault the western half of the beach. The more experienced 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing American troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles, later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Only 100 of the 2,400 tons of supplies scheduled to be landed on D-Day were landed. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

 

An accurate figure for allied casualties at Omaha Beach on 6 June is not known, sources vary between 2,000 and 4,700 killed, wounded, and missing with the heaviest losses incurred by the infantry, tanks and engineers in the first landings. The German 352nd division suffered 1,200 killed, wounded and missing - about 20% of its strength. The landings at Omaha Beach were portrayed in the opening Act of the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Hanks. Many veterans consider it to be the most accurate representation of the Normandy Landings ever commited to film.

 

Once the beachhead had been secured, Omaha Beach became the location of one of the two "Mulberry" harbours, prefabricated artificial harbors towed in pieces across the English Channel and assembled just off shore (the second was at Arromanches, at Gold Beach, built by the British troops). Construction of Mulberry A at Omaha began the day after D-Day with the scuttling of ships to form a breakwater. Ten days later harbour became operational when the first pier was completed, however three days the area was hit by worst storm to hit Normandy in 40 years and the harbour was so badly damaged that the decision was taken not to repair it.

Les Braves by French sculptor Anilore Banon at Omaha Beach, Les Moulins. Commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy in 2004, the stainless steel memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. "I created this sculpture to honour the courage of these men: Sons, husbands and fathers, who endangered and often sacrificed their lives in the hope of freeing the French people." Anilore Banon

 

Omaha Beach was one of the five D-Day landing beaches on 6th June 1944. On D-Day, the 29th Infantry Division and nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers (redirected from Pointe du Hoc) were to assault the western half of the beach. The more experienced 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing American troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles, later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Only 100 of the 2,400 tons of supplies scheduled to be landed on D-Day were landed. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

 

An accurate figure for allied casualties at Omaha Beach on 6 June is not known, sources vary between 2,000 and 4,700 killed, wounded, and missing with the heaviest losses incurred by the infantry, tanks and engineers in the first landings. The German 352nd division suffered 1,200 killed, wounded and missing - about 20% of its strength. The landings at Omaha Beach were portrayed in the opening Act of the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Hanks. Many veterans consider it to be the most accurate representation of the Normandy Landings ever commited to film.

 

Once the beachhead had been secured, Omaha Beach became the location of one of the two "Mulberry" harbours, prefabricated artificial harbors towed in pieces across the English Channel and assembled just off shore (the second was at Arromanches, at Gold Beach, built by the British troops). Construction of Mulberry A at Omaha began the day after D-Day with the scuttling of ships to form a breakwater. Ten days later harbour became operational when the first pier was completed, however three days the area was hit by worst storm to hit Normandy in 40 years and the harbour was so badly damaged that the decision was taken not to repair it.

Les Braves by French sculptor Anilore Banon at Omaha Beach, Les Moulins. Commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy in 2004, the stainless steel memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. "I created this sculpture to honour the courage of these men: Sons, husbands and fathers, who endangered and often sacrificed their lives in the hope of freeing the French people." Anilore Banon

 

Omaha Beach was one of the five D-Day landing beaches on 6th June 1944. On D-Day, the 29th Infantry Division and nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers (redirected from Pointe du Hoc) were to assault the western half of the beach. The more experienced 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing American troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles, later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Only 100 of the 2,400 tons of supplies scheduled to be landed on D-Day were landed. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

 

An accurate figure for allied casualties at Omaha Beach on 6 June is not known, sources vary between 2,000 and 4,700 killed, wounded, and missing with the heaviest losses incurred by the infantry, tanks and engineers in the first landings. The German 352nd division suffered 1,200 killed, wounded and missing - about 20% of its strength. The landings at Omaha Beach were portrayed in the opening Act of the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Hanks. Many veterans consider it to be the most accurate representation of the Normandy Landings ever commited to film.

 

Once the beachhead had been secured, Omaha Beach became the location of one of the two "Mulberry" harbours, prefabricated artificial harbors towed in pieces across the English Channel and assembled just off shore (the second was at Arromanches, at Gold Beach, built by the British troops). Construction of Mulberry A at Omaha began the day after D-Day with the scuttling of ships to form a breakwater. Ten days later harbour became operational when the first pier was completed, however three days the area was hit by worst storm to hit Normandy in 40 years and the harbour was so badly damaged that the decision was taken not to repair it.

Les Braves by French sculptor Anilore Banon at Omaha Beach, Les Moulins. Commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy in 2004, the stainless steel memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. "I created this sculpture to honour the courage of these men: Sons, husbands and fathers, who endangered and often sacrificed their lives in the hope of freeing the French people." Anilore Banon

 

Omaha Beach was one of the five D-Day landing beaches on 6th June 1944. On D-Day, the 29th Infantry Division and nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers (redirected from Pointe du Hoc) were to assault the western half of the beach. The more experienced 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing American troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles, later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Only 100 of the 2,400 tons of supplies scheduled to be landed on D-Day were landed. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

 

An accurate figure for allied casualties at Omaha Beach on 6 June is not known, sources vary between 2,000 and 4,700 killed, wounded, and missing with the heaviest losses incurred by the infantry, tanks and engineers in the first landings. The German 352nd division suffered 1,200 killed, wounded and missing - about 20% of its strength. The landings at Omaha Beach were portrayed in the opening Act of the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Hanks. Many veterans consider it to be the most accurate representation of the Normandy Landings ever commited to film.

 

Once the beachhead had been secured, Omaha Beach became the location of one of the two "Mulberry" harbours, prefabricated artificial harbors towed in pieces across the English Channel and assembled just off shore (the second was at Arromanches, at Gold Beach, built by the British troops). Construction of Mulberry A at Omaha began the day after D-Day with the scuttling of ships to form a breakwater. Ten days later harbour became operational when the first pier was completed, however three days the area was hit by worst storm to hit Normandy in 40 years and the harbour was so badly damaged that the decision was taken not to repair it.

Les Braves by French sculptor Anilore Banon at Omaha Beach, Les Moulins. Commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy in 2004, the stainless steel memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. "I created this sculpture to honour the courage of these men: Sons, husbands and fathers, who endangered and often sacrificed their lives in the hope of freeing the French people." Anilore Banon

 

Omaha Beach was one of the five D-Day landing beaches on 6th June 1944. On D-Day, the 29th Infantry Division and nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers (redirected from Pointe du Hoc) were to assault the western half of the beach. The more experienced 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing American troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles, later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Only 100 of the 2,400 tons of supplies scheduled to be landed on D-Day were landed. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

 

An accurate figure for allied casualties at Omaha Beach on 6 June is not known, sources vary between 2,000 and 4,700 killed, wounded, and missing with the heaviest losses incurred by the infantry, tanks and engineers in the first landings. The German 352nd division suffered 1,200 killed, wounded and missing - about 20% of its strength. The landings at Omaha Beach were portrayed in the opening Act of the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Hanks. Many veterans consider it to be the most accurate representation of the Normandy Landings ever commited to film.

 

Once the beachhead had been secured, Omaha Beach became the location of one of the two "Mulberry" harbours, prefabricated artificial harbors towed in pieces across the English Channel and assembled just off shore (the second was at Arromanches, at Gold Beach, built by the British troops). Construction of Mulberry A at Omaha began the day after D-Day with the scuttling of ships to form a breakwater. Ten days later harbour became operational when the first pier was completed, however three days the area was hit by worst storm to hit Normandy in 40 years and the harbour was so badly damaged that the decision was taken not to repair it.

Les Braves by French sculptor Anilore Banon at Omaha Beach, Les Moulins. Commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy in 2004, the stainless steel memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. "I created this sculpture to honour the courage of these men: Sons, husbands and fathers, who endangered and often sacrificed their lives in the hope of freeing the French people." Anilore Banon

 

Omaha Beach was one of the five D-Day landing beaches on 6th June 1944. On D-Day, the 29th Infantry Division and nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers (redirected from Pointe du Hoc) were to assault the western half of the beach. The more experienced 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing American troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles, later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Only 100 of the 2,400 tons of supplies scheduled to be landed on D-Day were landed. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

 

An accurate figure for allied casualties at Omaha Beach on 6 June is not known, sources vary between 2,000 and 4,700 killed, wounded, and missing with the heaviest losses incurred by the infantry, tanks and engineers in the first landings. The German 352nd division suffered 1,200 killed, wounded and missing - about 20% of its strength. The landings at Omaha Beach were portrayed in the opening Act of the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Hanks. Many veterans consider it to be the most accurate representation of the Normandy Landings ever commited to film.

 

Once the beachhead had been secured, Omaha Beach became the location of one of the two "Mulberry" harbours, prefabricated artificial harbors towed in pieces across the English Channel and assembled just off shore (the second was at Arromanches, at Gold Beach, built by the British troops). Construction of Mulberry A at Omaha began the day after D-Day with the scuttling of ships to form a breakwater. Ten days later harbour became operational when the first pier was completed, however three days the area was hit by worst storm to hit Normandy in 40 years and the harbour was so badly damaged that the decision was taken not to repair it.

Les Braves by French sculptor Anilore Banon at Omaha Beach, Les Moulins. Commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy in 2004, the stainless steel memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. "I created this sculpture to honour the courage of these men: Sons, husbands and fathers, who endangered and often sacrificed their lives in the hope of freeing the French people." Anilore Banon

 

Omaha Beach was one of the five D-Day landing beaches on 6th June 1944. On D-Day, the 29th Infantry Division and nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers (redirected from Pointe du Hoc) were to assault the western half of the beach. The more experienced 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing American troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles, later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Only 100 of the 2,400 tons of supplies scheduled to be landed on D-Day were landed. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

 

An accurate figure for allied casualties at Omaha Beach on 6 June is not known, sources vary between 2,000 and 4,700 killed, wounded, and missing with the heaviest losses incurred by the infantry, tanks and engineers in the first landings. The German 352nd division suffered 1,200 killed, wounded and missing - about 20% of its strength. The landings at Omaha Beach were portrayed in the opening Act of the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Hanks. Many veterans consider it to be the most accurate representation of the Normandy Landings ever commited to film.

 

Once the beachhead had been secured, Omaha Beach became the location of one of the two "Mulberry" harbours, prefabricated artificial harbors towed in pieces across the English Channel and assembled just off shore (the second was at Arromanches, at Gold Beach, built by the British troops). Construction of Mulberry A at Omaha began the day after D-Day with the scuttling of ships to form a breakwater. Ten days later harbour became operational when the first pier was completed, however three days the area was hit by worst storm to hit Normandy in 40 years and the harbour was so badly damaged that the decision was taken not to repair it.

Les Braves by French sculptor Anilore Banon at Omaha Beach, Les Moulins. Commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy in 2004, the stainless steel memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. "I created this sculpture to honour the courage of these men: Sons, husbands and fathers, who endangered and often sacrificed their lives in the hope of freeing the French people." Anilore Banon

 

Omaha Beach was one of the five D-Day landing beaches on 6th June 1944. On D-Day, the 29th Infantry Division and nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers (redirected from Pointe du Hoc) were to assault the western half of the beach. The more experienced 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing American troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles, later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Only 100 of the 2,400 tons of supplies scheduled to be landed on D-Day were landed. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

 

An accurate figure for allied casualties at Omaha Beach on 6 June is not known, sources vary between 2,000 and 4,700 killed, wounded, and missing with the heaviest losses incurred by the infantry, tanks and engineers in the first landings. The German 352nd division suffered 1,200 killed, wounded and missing - about 20% of its strength. The landings at Omaha Beach were portrayed in the opening Act of the 1998 film Saving Private Ryan, directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Tom Hanks. Many veterans consider it to be the most accurate representation of the Normandy Landings ever commited to film.

 

Once the beachhead had been secured, Omaha Beach became the location of one of the two "Mulberry" harbours, prefabricated artificial harbors towed in pieces across the English Channel and assembled just off shore (the second was at Arromanches, at Gold Beach, built by the British troops). Construction of Mulberry A at Omaha began the day after D-Day with the scuttling of ships to form a breakwater. Ten days later harbour became operational when the first pier was completed, however three days the area was hit by worst storm to hit Normandy in 40 years and the harbour was so badly damaged that the decision was taken not to repair it.

This memorial is located on the edge of Omaha Beach in the village of St. Laurent-sur-Mer and commemorates the US soldiers killed on these beaches on 6 June 1944.

 

French sculptor Anilore Banon created the monument in 2004, commissioned by the French Government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of D-Day.

 

The memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. In the centre are seven stainless steel columns and a group of five columns that curve upwards. Two columns stand upright, with the tallest reaching 30 feet. Stainless steel wings gracefully stand on both sides. Originally intended only as a temporary art piece, the sculpture still stands due to public interest and petition.

Les Braves is a war memorial that is located on the shores of Omaha Beach in the village of St. Laurent-sur-Mer in Normandy, France and commemorates the fallen American soldiers, of World War ll who have lost their lives on the beaches of Normandy, June 6th 1944.

 

The memorial represents three elements: The Wings of Hope, Rise Freedom, and the Wings Of Fraternity. French sculptor Anilore Banon, created the monument in 2004, commissioned by the French government to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the D-Day Invasion Of Normandy. In the center, there are seven stainless steel columns and a group of five columns that curve upwards, two columns stand upright, with the tallest reaching 30 feet. Stainless steel wings gracefully stand on both sides.