new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged The+Normandy+Landings

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

The Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840.

 

The church suffered heavy damages in the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

The number of participants at the Normandy landings ;

 

Omaha beach (American)

34.250

Utah beach (American)

23.250

Gold beach (Brittain)

24.970

Juno beach (Canada)

21.400

Sword beach (Brittain)

28.845

  

The Plane has been specially painted with D-Day invasion stripes. The purpose was to increase recognition by friendly forces during and after the Normandy Landings.

For more infos pls. visit Wikipedia

AIR14, Switzerland

Dubbed "Project 47" by the Canadian military, the Skink was a Canadian built self-propelled anti-aircraft tank intended to be used with the Normandy landings. Utilizing the Grizzly 1 chassis as the base, the Canadian military designed a new cast turret that could hold 4 (Polish) Polsten 20mm autocannons.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skink_anti-aircraft_tank

 

Plans to build these, as well as conversion kits for existing Grizzly and Sherman tanks, were quickly superseded by the realization that Allied air forces had achieved air supremacy over Normandy. As a result only three vehicles and eight conversion kits were completed.

 

The single Skink that was shipped to Europe saw action outside of Nijmegen where it's guns were used on German infantry with devastating effect.

 

Reference pics:

www.wwiivehicles.com/canada/tank-medium/grizzly.asp

bcoy1cpb.pacdat.net/Skink_WWII_photos_from_DESIGN_RECORD_...

www.armorama.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=SquawkBo...

  

Key notes about this build:

 

100% Old Dark Grey

4 x Brickarms Gunmetal M1919 Machine Gun (modified to represent the Polsten autocannons)

1 x Brickarms Gunmetal M203 Grenade Launcher (used to represent the hull mounted .30 cal).

 

Part use credit to Dan Siskind (Brickmania) as much of the side skirt design is from his M3 Grant model.

 

22000 drapeaux britanniques ont été plantés sur la plage d'Asnelles (Gold beach).

1941 Historical Aircraft Group

N345AB (330652)

Douglas C-47A Skytrain

C/n 13803

Prestwick Airport

Scotland

20th May 2014

 

Performing a low fly past prior to landing

Name: SS Conte Biancamano Namesake: Humbert I, Count of Savoy Operator: 1925-1932: Lloyd Sabaudo 1932-1936: Italian Line 1936-1940: Lloyd Triestino 1940-1941: Italian Line Port of registry: Genoa, Italy Builder: William Beardmore & Co. of Glasgow, Scotland Launched: April 23, 1925 Maiden voyage: 20 November, 1925 Fate: Seized by the United States in December 1941 Career (U.S. Navy) Name: USS Hermitage (AP-54) Christened: 1942 Completed: 1942 Commissioned: 14 August 1942 Decommissioned: 20 August 1946 Fate: Returned to the Italian Line in 1947 Career (Italy) Name: SS Conte Biancamano Operator: 1947-1960: Italian Line Port of registry: Genoa, Italy Builder: Shipyards of Monfalcone Completed: 1948 Out of service: 26 March 1960 Fate: Completed as National Museum of Science and Technology named Leonardo da Vinci Status: Museum General characteristics Type: 1925-1941:Ocean liner 1941-1947: Troop transport 1947-present: Ocean liner Tonnage: 1925-1947: 23,562 gross 1947-1960: 24,416 gross Length: 203.56 m Beam: 23.24 m Height: 8.36 m Propulsion: steam turbines double reduction unit and two propellers Speed: 20 knots Capacity: 180 1st class, 220 2nd class, 390 2nd class (economy), 2660 3rd class Conte Biancamano was an Italian liner launched in 1925. The name was chosen in honor of Humbert I Biancamano, founder of the Savoy. She was built in the Scottish shipyards named William Beardmore & Co. in Dalmuir around Glasgow. She was built for the Genovese shipping company named Lloyd Sabaudo. Lloyd Sabaudo also had ordered the new two more even ships, the Conte Rosso and Conte Verde which was the SS Conte Biancamano's sister ship. The ship was the hull that had a straight bow, while the machinery equipped with two steam turbines double reduction unit and two propellers, allowing to reach a speed of 20 knots and vented in two funnels. She housed 180 passengers in first class, 220-class, 200 second class, 390 economic class and third class of 2660. First years of service Launched April 23, 1925, made her maiden voyage on 20 November 1925 from Genoa to New York, as expected sailing on direct routing of the North American continent. The ship, equipped with pomp and provided with all the amenities most innovative for its time, was intended primarily to customers of luxury. The last trip for the Lloyd Sabaudo was departing from Genoa to New York on 25 November 1932. In 1932, Lloyd Sabaudo, together with other Italian shipping companies, was merged together to form the famous Italian Line by making its ships, including the Conte Biancamano and the ship was destined to direct routes to South America, after the company had made the same routes for another six trips, the last of which began on 1 July 1932. In 1934, she was used for military purposes, carrying on behalf of the Ministry of the Navy, troops and military equipment in preparation for the war in Ethiopia. In 1936, she was transferred to Lloyd Triestino, one of the companies in the group, which took the direct route to the Middle East. In 1940, she returned to Italian Line and was used for a trip Genoa - Napoli - Panama - Valparaiso - Panama. USS Hermitage (AP-54) At the start of the Second World War, she was seized and interned in the Panamanian port of Crist?, where she was moored. In December 1941, with the entry of the United States into the war, she was seized by the United States. She was converted into a troop transport and commissioned into the United States Navy as USS Hermitage (AP-54) in 1942. The conversion work was carried out in Philadelphia and when completed the ship could accommodate up to seven thousand men. The ship was armed with one 127/38mm gun and six 76/50mm guns. On 8 November the allies began the invasion of North Africa, called Operation Torch. USS Hermitage departed from New York on November 2 carrying 5600 and transported troops that landed in Casablanca on November 10 and November 25. Later, on December 11, she returned to the United States and was then used in the Pacific during 1943. Following the Normandy Landings, she made several trips between Europe and the U.S. to transport troops and return wounded prisoners, the first of which was on 16 June 1944. She was at Le Havre on 8 May 1945, the day of Germany's surrender. After the end of hostilities, she was used for the repatriation of thousands of American veterans of war, first from Europe and then the Pacific. She was withdrawn from service on 20 August 1946. During her service with the U.S. Navy, she traveled over 230,000 miles and carried 129,695 soldiers from different nations. A return to Italy In 1947, the ship was returned to Italy and underwent refit and modernization at a shipyard in Monfalcone in 1948. Structural changes saw her bow replaced with a sleeker design, as well as an increase in length overall. Interior changes included more passenger accommodations, increasing her capacity to 252 first-class passengers, 455 in cabin class, and 893 in economy class. The refit also saw her name Conte Biancamano restored. With her structural and interior refit and modernization completed, she became the premiere ocean liner of the renewed Italian merchant fleet. Her interior refit was made possible through the collaboration of painters such as Massimo Campigli, Mario Sironi, and Roberto Crippa, as well as decorative design work by Gustavo Pulitzer and Gi?nti. Art work including sculptures made by Marcello Mascherini were placed on the ceiling of the grand hall depicting the myth of Jason and the Golden Fleece. On 14 July 1949, Conte Biancamano was placed on the Genoa - Buenos Aires route until 21 March 1950 when she was moved to the Genoa - Naples - Cannes - New York route. On 26 March 1960, she began her last voyage on the Genoa - Naples - Barcelona - Lisbon - Halifax - New York route and on her return voyage. After 364 crossings of the line, during which she had carried 353,836 passengers which were put up for disarmament, and started off the demolition , which took place in La Spezia the following year. During the demolition work, the bridge, some first-class cabins and the large hall of the festivities were dismantled and reassembled in a separate pavilion. She was completed in 1964 at the National Museum of Science and Technology named "Leonardo da Vinci" in Milan. -

Saint Aubin Sur Mer, Normandy, France, august 2011

 

This was the easternmost part of the Canadian assigned Juno Beach on June 6, 1944, codenamed "Nan Red"

 

Juno or Juno Beach was one of five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during the Second World War. The sector spanned from Saint-Aubin, a village just east of the British Gold sector, to Courseulles, just west of the British Sword sector. The Juno landings were judged necessary to provide flanking support to the British drive on Caen from Sword, as well as to capture the German airfield at Carpiquet west of Caen. Taking Juno was the responsibility of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division and commandos of the Royal Marines, with support from Naval Force J, the Juno contingent of the invasion fleet, including the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). The beach was defended by two battalions of the German 716th Infantry Division, with elements of the 21st Panzer Division held in reserve near Caen.

 

The first units of the North Shore Regiment's "A" and "B" companies touched down on Nan Red at 08:10 in chest-deep water. They were tasked with securing Saint-Aubin and clearing defences in the village. "B" Company landed to find that the Saint-Aubin strongpoint "appeared not to have been touched" by preliminary naval bombardment. The two assault companies faced a 100-yard (91 m) sprint across open beach in the face of fire from Saint-Aubin. "A" Company suffered the heaviest casualties, incurring many fatalities from beach mines.

 

"B" Company faced stronger opposition at the strongpoint, yet managed to breach the seawall and barbed wire. The strongpoint's 50 mm antitank gun was still active, and the thick concrete casemates protected it from infantry fire. By 08:10 Sherman tanks of the Fort Garry Horse and Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers (AVRE) tanks of the 80th Assault Squadron, Royal Engineers, had landed at Nan Red, and began to assist "B" Company in clearing the gun emplacement. The 50 mm gun knocked out four of the squadron's tanks, while the North Shore's machine-gun platoon flanked the position. The right section of the strongpoint was eliminated by antitank guns and combat engineers, while the central antitank gun was silenced by petard shells from the British AVREs. When the North Shore captured the strongpoint, approximately half the defenders were killed; 48 German soldiers surrendered. (source: Wikipedia)

 

For a photo of the same beach after the invasion click here

 

Nikon D70 with Tokina AT-X 124 12-24 f/4. Photo was tonemapped using four differently exposed shots (handheld).

 

A link to my other photos of the British and Canadian invasion sectors on D-Day

 

A link to my set of photo's and notes of Omaha beach, one of two American sectors during D-Day

A total of 935 locomotives of this type were built in 1943, for war service.

After being 'run in' in the UK, all 935 were shipped to mainland Europe as part of the Normandy Landings and formed an important part of the logistics chain, supplying Allied troops liberating Europe from the Nazis.

At the end of hostilities, 733 locomotives came back to the UK and were eventually numbered 90000 to 90732. The remainder were used in various countries, primarily The Netherlands until the 1960s. 90733 spent most of it's working life in Sweden and was repatriated to the UK some years ago. It is the only surviving example of this class of locomotive

American Cemetery, Normandy, France . A burial site of almost 10 thousand american soldiers who participated in the Normandy Landings on 6 June 1944 (D-Day)

The Merville Gun Battery was a coastal fortification in Normandy, France, in use as part of the Nazis' Atlantic Wall built to defend continental Europe from Allied invasion. It was a particularly heavily fortified position and one of the first places to be attacked by Allied forces during the Normandy Landings commonly known as D-Day.

 

youtu.be/3gVWMRXujGk

Kilkenny, Ireland.

Be my friend on Facebook: www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1057635838 :-)

A LINK TO MY GALLERIES WITH KILKENNY PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY.

www.pbase.com/kilkenny_photo_society/edward_d ullard

all rights reserved.

Do not use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my permission.

© All rights reserved.

Arromanches is remembered as a historic place of the Normandy landings and in particular as the place where a Mulberry harbour artificial port was installed. This artificial port allowed the disembarkation of 9,000 tons of material per day.

 

It was on the beach of Arromanches that, during the Invasion of Normandy immediately after D-Day, the Allies established an artificial temporary harbour to allow the unloading of heavy equipment without waiting for the conquest of deep water ports such as Le Havre or Cherbourg. Although at the centre of the Gold Beach landing zone, Arromanches was spared the brunt of the fighting on D-Day so the installation and operation of the port could proceed as quickly as possible without damaging the beach and destroying surrounding lines of communication. The port was commissioned on 14 June 1944.

 

This location was one of two sites chosen to establish the necessary port facilities to unload quantities of supplies and troops needed for the invasion during June 1944, the other was built further West at Omaha Beach. The British built huge floating concrete caissons which, after being towed from England, then had to be assembled to form walls and piers forming and defining the artificial port called the Mulberry harbour. These comprised pontoons linked to the land by floating roadways. One of these ports was assembled at Arromanches and even today sections of the Mulberry harbour still remain with huge concrete blocks sitting on the sand and more can be seen further out at sea.

 

Some key figures: by 12 June 1944 more than 300,000 men, 54,000 vehicles, 104,000 tons of supplies had been landed. During 100 days of operation of the port 2.5 million men, 500,000 vehicles, and 4 million tons of material were landed. The best performance of the port was in the last week of July 1944: during those seven days the traffic through Arromanches exceeded 136,000 tons or 20,000 tons per day.

Great Britain, London, Duck Tours amphibian sightseeing bus with 30 passengers seats. Pick-up & drop-off point is from the “Duck Stop”, situated near the London Eye. The tour lasts roughly 75 minutes with around 30 minutes on the Thames River.

The “Duck”, that’s how this amphibian truck is called by the public & militaries since its first day of production in 1942 by the General Motors Corporation, who provided the automotive components & New York City yacht designers Sparkman & Stephens. The official name is “DUKW”, it is a six-wheel-drive amphibious truck first made in the US in the mid-1940th. 21 thousand DUKWs were produced for use during World War Two to move men & materials ashore where no port facilities existed, they served on D-Day in the Normandy landings, where 40% of supplies landed on the beaches were carried by DUKWs. DUKWs remained in service with the British & other armies into the 1970th.

DUKW is the abbreviation for; D - first year of production code "D" is for 1942, U - body style "U" utility amphibious truck, K - front wheel drive, W - two tandem axle rear driving wheels

 

...Danke, Xièxie 谢谢, Thanks, Gracias, Merci, Grazie, Obrigado, Arigatô, Dhanyavad, Chokrane to you for over

2.300.000 visits in my photostream with countless motivating comments

 

Great Britain, London, Duck Tours amphibian sightseeing bus with 30 passengers seats. Pick-up & drop-off point is from the “Duck Stop”, situated near the London Eye. The tour lasts roughly 75 minutes with around 30 minutes on the Thames River.

The “Duck”, that’s how this amphibian truck is called by the public & militaries since its first day of production in 1942 by the General Motors Corporation, who provided the automotive components & New York City yacht designers Sparkman & Stephens. The official name is “DUKW”, it is a six-wheel-drive amphibious truck first made in the US in the mid-1940th. 21 thousand DUKWs were produced for use during World War Two to move men & materials ashore where no port facilities existed, they served on D-Day in the Normandy landings, where 40% of supplies landed on the beaches were carried by DUKWs. DUKWs remained in service with the British & other armies into the 1970th.

DUKW is the abbreviation for; D - first year of production code "D" is for 1942, U - body style "U" utility amphibious truck, K - front wheel drive, W - two tandem axle rear driving wheels

 

...Danke, Xièxie 谢谢, Thanks, Gracias, Merci, Grazie, Obrigado, Arigatô, Dhanyavad, Chokrane to you for over

2.300.000 visits in my photostream with countless motivating comments

 

Arromanches is remembered as a historic place of the Normandy landings and in particular as the place where a Mulberry harbour artificial port was installed. This artificial port allowed the disembarkation of 9,000 tons of material per day.

 

It was on the beach of Arromanches that, during the Invasion of Normandy immediately after D-Day, the Allies established an artificial temporary harbour to allow the unloading of heavy equipment without waiting for the conquest of deep water ports such as Le Havre or Cherbourg. Although at the centre of the Gold Beach landing zone, Arromanches was spared the brunt of the fighting on D-Day so the installation and operation of the port could proceed as quickly as possible without damaging the beach and destroying surrounding lines of communication. The port was commissioned on 14 June 1944.

 

This location was one of two sites chosen to establish the necessary port facilities to unload quantities of supplies and troops needed for the invasion during June 1944, the other was built further West at Omaha Beach. The British built huge floating concrete caissons which, after being towed from England, then had to be assembled to form walls and piers forming and defining the artificial port called the Mulberry harbour. These comprised pontoons linked to the land by floating roadways. One of these ports was assembled at Arromanches and even today sections of the Mulberry harbour still remain with huge concrete blocks sitting on the sand and more can be seen further out at sea.

 

Some key figures: by 12 June 1944 more than 300,000 men, 54,000 vehicles, 104,000 tons of supplies had been landed. During 100 days of operation of the port 2.5 million men, 500,000 vehicles, and 4 million tons of material were landed. The best performance of the port was in the last week of July 1944: during those seven days the traffic through Arromanches exceeded 136,000 tons or 20,000 tons per day.

Arromanches-les-Bains, Normandy. The coastal town is in the heart of the area where the Normandy landings took place on D-Day, on 6 June 1944.

 

Godersi il sole ad Arromanches-les-Bains, Normandia, uno dei principali siti del D-Day, 6 giugno 1944.

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

Known as Utah Beach during the Normandy landings on June 6 1944 (D-Day) - by the village of La Madeleine.

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

Details from the Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840.

 

The church suffered heavy damages in the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

The Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840. The church suffered heavy damages on the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

The 101st Airborne Division—the "Screaming Eagles" is a U.S. Army modular infantry division trained for air assault operations. During World War II, it was renowned for action during the Normandy landings and in the Battle of the Bulge. During the Vietnam War, the 101st Airborne Division was redesignated first an airmobile division, then later as an air assault division.

Read More...

-------

1940's Weekend Crich, Derbyshire, England 2010

 

Camera Imagery Re-enactment Photography

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

Inside the Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840.

 

The church suffered heavy damages in the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

The Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840.

 

The church suffered heavy damages in the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

View of Omaha Beach, the code name for one of the five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during World War II. Omaha is located on the coast of Normandy, France, facing the English Channel, and is 5 miles (8 km) long, from east of Sainte-Honorine-des-Pertes to west of Vierville-sur-Mer on the right bank of the Douve River estuary.

 

Landings here were necessary in order to link up the British landings to the east at Gold with the American landing to the west at Utah, thus providing a continuous lodgement on the Normandy coast of the Bay of the Seine.

After years that we tried to meet up I finally met Solange yesterday for a Blue Hour Shoot in London. Thanks for coming along and hope to see you again soon.

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, permanently moored in London on the River Thames. She was originally a Royal Navy light cruiser and served during the Second World War and Korean War. In June 1944 the ship took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings.

  

The Normandy landings, codenamed Operation Neptune, were the landing operations on 6 June 1944 (termed D-Day) of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. The largest seaborne invasion in history, the operation began the invasion of German-occupied western Europe, led to the restoration of the French Republic, and contributed to an Allied victory in the war...BUT I ASK HAVE WE LEARNED ANYTHING...MY mums brother who obviously i never met died in a wellington bomber.

   

HMS Belfast is a Town-Class light cruiser that was built for the Royal Navy. She is currently a museum ship. She was launched on St Patrick's Day 1938. She saw action during WWII escorting Artic convoys to the Soviet Union, played a part in the destruction of the German warship Scharnhorst in the Battle of North Cape and also took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy Landings in 1945. She also saw further combat in the Korean War in 1950-52 before entering reserve in 1963.

Ouwerkerk, Schouwen-Duiveland, Zeeland, The Netherlands

 

facebook | website | maasvlakte book | portfolio book | getty images

 

© 2014 Bart van Damme

 

Ordered by Winston Churchill in 1942, the Phoenix breakwaters were a set of reinforced concrete caissons built as part of the artificial Mulberry harbours that were assembled as part of the follow-up to the Normandy landings during World War II. Four of the caissons were used in the Netherlands to plug a gap in the dyke at Ouwerkerk after the North Sea Flood of 1953. They have now been converted into a museum for the floods called the Watersnoodmuseum.

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.

 

Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Returning to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour, Belfast was the largest and arguably most powerful cruiser in the Royal Navy at the time. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship Scharnhorst. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

 

In 1967, efforts were initiated to avert Belfast's expected scrapping and preserve her as a museum ship. A joint committee of the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum and the Ministry of Defence was established, and reported in June 1968 that preservation was practical. In 1971 the government decided against preservation, prompting the formation of the private HMS Belfast Trust to campaign for her preservation. The efforts of the Trust were successful, and the government transferred the ship to the Trust in July 1971. Brought to London, she was moored on the River Thames near Tower Bridge in the Pool of London. Opened to the public in October 1971, Belfast became a branch of the Imperial War Museum in 1978. A popular tourist attraction, Belfast receives around a quarter of a million visitors per year.[7] As a branch of a national museum and part of the National Historic Fleet, Core Collection, Belfast is supported by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, by admissions income, and by the museum's commercial activities. It has been closed to visitors since an accident in November 2011, and is expected to re-open after Easter 2012.

 

Paddle Steamer Ryde aka Ryde Queen, built in 1937 and now rusting away on a mud bank on the Isle of Wight.

 

She used to operate between Portsmouth and Ryde.

 

www.paddlesteamers.info/Ryde.htm

 

RYDE QUEEN was built for the Southern Railway Co. for the ferry service between Portsmouth and Ryde on the Isle of Wight.

 

During the Second World War she served as a minesweeper. In 1942, RYDE was converted into an anti-aircraft vessel and took part in the Normandy Landings of June 1944. She returned to passenger service in 1945. Withdrawn from service in 1970, she opened as a restaurant/pub in Binfield in 1972. December 2006 saw her lying ashore on the River Medina, Isle of Wight, in poor condition with her funnel collapsed.

Paddle Steamer Ryde aka Ryde Queen, built in 1937 and now rusting away on a mud bank on the Isle of Wight.

 

She used to operate between Portsmouth and Ryde.

 

www.paddlesteamers.info/Ryde.htm

 

RYDE QUEEN was built for the Southern Railway Co. for the ferry service between Portsmouth and Ryde on the Isle of Wight.

 

During the Second World War she served as a minesweeper. In 1942, RYDE was converted into an anti-aircraft vessel and took part in the Normandy Landings of June 1944. She returned to passenger service in 1945. Withdrawn from service in 1970, she opened as a restaurant/pub in Binfield in 1972. December 2006 saw her lying ashore on the River Medina, Isle of Wight, in poor condition with her funnel collapsed.

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

The church in Colleville suffered heavy damages in the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

 

The Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville-sur-Mer. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840.

  

Paddle Steamer Ryde aka Ryde Queen, built in 1937 and now rusting away on a mud bank on the Isle of Wight.

 

She used to operate between Portsmouth and Ryde.

 

www.paddlesteamers.info/Ryde.htm

 

At 223 ft long she was hard to miss

 

RYDE QUEEN was built for the Southern Railway Co. for the ferry service between Portsmouth and Ryde on the Isle of Wight.

 

During the Second World War she served as a minesweeper. In 1942, RYDE was converted into an anti-aircraft vessel and took part in the Normandy Landings of June 1944. She returned to passenger service in 1945. Withdrawn from service in 1970, she opened as a restaurant/pub in Binfield in 1972. December 2006 saw her lying ashore on the River Medina, Isle of Wight, in poor condition with her funnel collapsed.

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a light cruiser built for the Royal Navy, currently permanently moored on the River Thames in London, England, and operated by the Imperial War Museum.

Construction of Belfast, the first ship in the Royal Navy to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939, Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment, and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943 and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship Scharnhorst. In June 1944, Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945, Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

In 1967, efforts were initiated to avert Belfast's expected scrapping and to preserve her as a museum ship. A joint committee of the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime

A total of 935 locomotives of this type were built in 1943, for war service.

After being 'run in' in the UK, all 935 were shipped to mainland Europe as part of the Normandy Landings and formed an important part of the logistics chain, supplying Allied troops liberating Europe from the Nazis.

At the end of hostilities, 733 locomotives came back to the UK and were eventually numbered 90000 to 90732. The remainder were used in various countries, primarily The Netherlands until the 1960s. 90733 spent most of it's working life in Sweden and was repatriated to the UK some years ago. It is the only surviving example of this class of locomotive

Ouwerkerk, Schouwen-Duiveland, Zeeland, The Netherlands

 

facebook | website | maasvlakte book 2014 | portfolio book

 

© 2014 Bart van Damme

 

Ordered by Winston Churchill in 1942, the Phoenix breakwaters were a set of reinforced concrete caissons built as part of the artificial Mulberry harbours that were assembled as part of the follow-up to the Normandy landings during World War II. Four of the caissons were used in the Netherlands to plug a gap in the dyke at Ouwerkerk after the North Sea Flood of 1953. They have now been converted into a museum for the floods called the Watersnoodmuseum.

  

Omaha, commonly known as Omaha Beach was the code name for one of the five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during World War II. Omaha is located on the coast of Normandy, France, facing the English Channel, and is 5 miles (8 km) long, from east of Sainte-Honorine-des-Pertes to west of Vierville-sur-Mer on the right bank of the Douve River estuary.

 

Mit Omaha Beach bezeichneten die Alliierten im Zweiten Weltkrieg einen französischen Küstenabschnitt in der Normandie bei Colleville-sur-Mer und Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer, an dem die Landung des V. US-Korps im Rahmen der Operation Neptune stattfand.

 

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

French military at the remembrance ceremony for the Normandy landings in 1944 at Ranville war cemetery.

Omaha, commonly known as Omaha Beach, was the code name for one of the five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on June 6, 1944, during World War II. 'Omaha' refers to a section of the coast of Normandy, France, facing the English Channel 8 kilometers (5 mi) long, from east of Sainte-Honorine-des-Pertes to west of Vierville-sur-Mer on the right bank of the Douve River estuary and an estimated 150-foot (45 m) tall cliffs. Landings here were necessary to link the British landings to the east at Gold with the American landing to the west at Utah, thus providing a continuous lodgement on the Normandy coast of the Bay of the Seine. Taking Omaha was to be the responsibility of United States Army troops, with sea transport, mine sweeping, and a naval bombardment force provided predominantly by the United States Navy and Coast Guard, with contributions from the British, Canadian, and Free French navies.

 

The primary objective at Omaha was to secure a beachhead of eight kilometres (5.0 miles) depth, between Port-en-Bessin and the Vire River, linking with the British landings at Gold to the east, and reaching the area of Isigny to the west to link up with VII Corps landing at Utah. Opposing the landings was the German 352nd Infantry Division. Of the 12,020 men of the division, 6,800 were experienced combat troops, detailed to defend a 53-kilometer (33 mi) front. The German strategy was based on defeating any seaborne assault at the water line, and the defenses were mainly deployed in strongpoints along the coast. The untested American 29th Infantry Division, along with nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers redirected from Pointe du Hoc, assaulted the western half of the beach. The battle-hardened 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. The initial assault waves, consisting of tanks, infantry, and combat engineer forces, were carefully planned to reduce the coastal defenses and allow the larger ships of the follow-up waves to land.

 

Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets throughout the day. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing U.S. troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles; later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

MY"Christina O" - motor yacht that once belonged to the billionaire shipowner Aristotle Onassis,was launched in 1943.

She is 99.15 metres long and number 31st among the Top 100 largest yachts in the world as of 2013.

She was originally a Canadian anti-submarine River-class frigate called HMCS Stormont and served as a convoy escort during the Battle of the Atlantic and was present at the Normandy landings.

MY"Christina O" - motor yacht that once belonged to the billionaire shipowner Aristotle Onassis,was launched in 1943.

She is 99.15 metres long and number 31st among the Top 100 largest yachts in the world as of 2013.

She was originally a Canadian anti-submarine River-class frigate called HMCS Stormont and served as a convoy escort during the Battle of the Atlantic and was present at the Normandy landings.

Best viewed large and Cinematic. The Spitfire in this photograph is a replica and was originally commissioned by the 610 Squadron Association. During her time with 610 she carried the markings DW-D and was stationed in Hangar 3 at Hooton Park, the original Liverpool Airport. She was purchased by the Fylde Spitfire Memorial Fund in 2009 and following a full refurbishment was painted with 611 RAF West Lancashire Squadron markings. I took this photo at Barton Grange car park on a day when the public could view her and a full working cockpit. I intend to take more photographs of her in the future as I will be part of the team tking her to RIAT (the Royal International Air Tattoo) at Fairford, as a celebration of the Battle of Britain 70th Anniversary

 

In 1939 the 611 RAF West Lancashire Squadron went for summer camp to Duxford in Cambridgeshire never to return to Speke as it was called up for war duty. 611 Squadron excelled in cover of the UK whilst France fell to the Nazis, patrolled high above the Dunkirk beaches during the evacuation, played an active part in the Battle of Britain, took a very active part in the ill-fated Dieppe raid, covered the Normandy landings, escorted bomber intrusions over occupied France and later, with Mustangs, was able to provide long range bomber cover for both RAF and USAAF raids deep into Europe.

 

This display is helping to raise funds for a new RAF Memorial, featuring a full size replica of the Lytham St. Annes Mark Vb Spitfire W3644. The memorial will be built to mark the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain whilst at the same time remembering the brave men and women of Fighter and Bomber Command whom were recruited from or served on the Fylde Coast during WW2.

 

More details can be found at:

www.w3644.com/

 

This photo is dark and moody to match the sentiment of the sacrifice young men made seventy years ago. Best viewed large and Cinematic

Saint Aubin Sur Mer, Normandy, France, august 2011

 

This was the easternmost part of the Canadian assigned Juno Beach on June 6, 1944, codenamed "Nan Red". Note the casemate of WN (Widerstandsnest) 27 on the foreground; a German strongpoint with a 5cm gun which on d-day was responsible for casualties and considerable damage amongst the Canadian forces.

 

Juno or Juno Beach was one of five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during the Second World War. The sector spanned from Saint-Aubin, a village just east of the British Gold sector, to Courseulles, just west of the British Sword sector. The Juno landings were judged necessary to provide flanking support to the British drive on Caen from Sword, as well as to capture the German airfield at Carpiquet west of Caen. Taking Juno was the responsibility of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division and commandos of the Royal Marines, with support from Naval Force J, the Juno contingent of the invasion fleet, including the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). The beach was defended by two battalions of the German 716th Infantry Division, with elements of the 21st Panzer Division held in reserve near Caen.

 

The first units of the North Shore Regiment's "A" and "B" companies touched down on Nan Red at 08:10 in chest-deep water. They were tasked with securing Saint-Aubin and clearing defences in the village. "B" Company landed to find that the Saint-Aubin strongpoint "appeared not to have been touched" by preliminary naval bombardment. The two assault companies faced a 100-yard (91 m) sprint across open beach in the face of fire from Saint-Aubin. "A" Company suffered the heaviest casualties, incurring many fatalities from beach mines.

 

"B" Company faced stronger opposition at the strongpoint, yet managed to breach the seawall and barbed wire. The strongpoint's 50 mm antitank gun was still active, and the thick concrete casemates protected it from infantry fire. By 08:10 Sherman tanks of the Fort Garry Horse and Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers (AVRE) tanks of the 80th Assault Squadron, Royal Engineers, had landed at Nan Red, and began to assist "B" Company in clearing the gun emplacement. The 50 mm gun knocked out four of the squadron's tanks, while the North Shore's machine-gun platoon flanked the position. The right section of the strongpoint was eliminated by antitank guns and combat engineers, while the central antitank gun was silenced by petard shells from the British AVREs. When the North Shore captured the strongpoint, approximately half the defenders were killed; 48 German soldiers surrendered. (source: Wikipedia)

 

For a photo of the same beach after the invasion click here

 

A link to my other photos of the British and Canadian invasion sectors

 

A link to my set of photo's and notes of Omaha beach, one of two American sectors

  

Nikon D70 with Tokina AT-X 124 12-24 f/4. Photo was tonemapped using three differently exposed shots (handheld).

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.

  

Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Returning to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour, Belfast was the largest and arguably most powerful cruiser in the Royal Navy at the time. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship Scharnhorst. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

  

In 1967, efforts were initiated to avert Belfast's expected scrapping and preserve her as a museum ship. A joint committee of the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum and the Ministry of Defence was established, and reported in June 1968 that preservation was practical. In 1971 the government decided against preservation, prompting the formation of the private HMS Belfast Trust to campaign for her preservation. The efforts of the Trust were successful, and the government transferred the ship to the Trust in July 1971. Brought to London, she was moored on the River Thames near Tower Bridge in the Pool of London. Opened to the public in October 1971, Belfast became a branch of the Imperial War Museum in 1978. A popular tourist attraction, Belfast receives around a quarter of a million visitors per year.[7] As a branch of a national museum and part of the National Historic Fleet, Core Collection, Belfast is supported by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, by admissions income, and by the museum's commercial activities. The ship was closed to visitors following an accident in November 2011, and re-opened on 18 May 2012.

Omaha Beach is the code name for one of the five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during World War II. The beach is located on the coast of Normandy, France, facing the English Channel, and is 5 miles (8 km) long, from east of Sainte-Honorine-des-Pertes to west of Vierville-sur-Mer on the right bank of the Douve River estuary. Landings here were necessary in order to link up the British landings to the east at Gold Beach with the American landing to the west at Utah Beach, thus providing a continuous lodgement on the Normandy coast of the Bay of the Seine. Taking Omaha was to be the responsibility of United States Army troops, with sea transport and naval artillery support provided by the U.S. Navy and elements of the British Royal Navy.

 

1944AD 1st June, Bletchley Park, England. The improved Colossus Mark 2 starts working in time for the Normandy Landings.

 

The Colossus was the world's first electronic digital computer that was at all programmable. It was designed by Tommy Flowers to solve a problem posed by a mathematician, Max Newman. In December 1943 the prototype, Colossus Mark 1, was shown to work. There were ten Colossus computers in use at the end of the second world war.

 

The computers were used by British code breakers, giving the Allies valuable intelligence, obtained from reading many encrypted high-level telegraphic messages between the German High Command and their army commands.

 

View from Overbecks House, former home of Otto Overbeck the inventor and scientist. The house and subtropical garden are well worth a visit, but the road up to them is narrow and steep with no passing places, leading to fraught tempers in high season. Salcombe is a delightful village with some connection to the Normandy Landings. It is also the home of Jack Wills the renowned clothing brand. 2015 shot revised with LR. Critique: I should have used a larger depth of field to get better focus on the distant village. In the rework I have exaggerated the parameters of the village area to make it look like a painting, so the foreground is natural and the background, hopefully, looks like a painted picture.

This is the beach in Normandy (Riva Bella) where the Normandy Landings celebrations were held this year.

Monument to the Heroic American Ranger commandoes:

 

TO THE HEROIC RANGER COMMANDOES

D 2 RN E 2 RN F 2 RN

OF THE 116 th INF

WHO UNDER THE COMMAND OF

COLONEL JAMES E RUDDER

OF THE FIRST AMERICAN DIVISION

ATTACKED AND TOOK POSSESSION OF

THE POINTE DU HOC.

 

Visit: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normandy_landings

 

Normandy landings

 

The Normandy landings (codenamed Operation Neptune) were the landing operations on Tuesday, 6 June 1944 (termed D-Day) of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. The largest seaborne invasion in history, the operation began the liberation of German-occupied northwestern Europe from Nazi control, and contributed to the Allied victory on the Western Front.

Planning for the operation began in 1943. In the months leading up to the invasion, the Allies conducted a substantial military deception, codenamed Operation Bodyguard, to mislead the Germans as to the date and location of the main Allied landings. The weather on D-Day was far from ideal, but postponing would have meant a delay of at least two weeks, as the invasion planners had requirements for the phase of the moon, the tides, and the time of day that meant only a few days in each month were deemed suitable. Adolf Hitler placed German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel in command of German forces and of developing fortifications along the Atlantic Wall in anticipation of an Allied invasion.

 

The amphibious landings were preceded by extensive aerial and naval bombardment and an airborne assault—the landing of 24,000 American, British, and Canadian airborne troops shortly after midnight. Allied infantry and armoured divisions began landing on the coast of France at 06:30. The target 50-mile (80 km) stretch of the Normandy coast was divided into five sectors: Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno, and Sword. Strong winds blew the landing craft east of their intended positions, particularly at Utah and Omaha. The men landed under heavy fire from gun emplacements overlooking the beaches, and the shore was mined and covered with obstacles such as wooden stakes, metal tripods, and barbed wire, making the work of the beach-clearing teams difficult and dangerous. Casualties were heaviest at Omaha, with its high cliffs. At Gold, Juno, and Sword, several fortified towns were cleared in house-to-house fighting, and two major gun emplacements at Gold were disabled, using specialised tanks.

The Allies failed to achieve any of their goals on the first day. Carentan, St. Lô, and Bayeux remained in German hands, and Caen, a major objective, was not captured until 21 July. Only two of the beaches (Juno and Gold) were linked on the first day, and all five beachheads were not connected until 12 June; however, the operation gained a foothold which the Allies gradually expanded over the coming months. German casualties on D-Day have been estimated at 4,000 to 9,000 men. Allied casualties were at least 10,000, with 4,414 confirmed dead.

Museums, memorials, and war cemeteries in the area now host many visitors each year. (Wikipedia)

 

© Copyright

This photo and all those in my Photostream are protected by copyright. No one may reproduce, copy, transmit or manipulate them without my written permission.

Omaha, commonly known as Omaha Beach was the code name for one of the five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during World War II. Omaha is located on the coast of Normandy, France, facing the English Channel, and is 5 miles (8 km) long, from east of Sainte-Honorine-des-Pertes to west of Vierville-sur-Mer on the right bank of the Douve River estuary.

 

Mit Omaha Beach bezeichneten die Alliierten im Zweiten Weltkrieg einen französischen Küstenabschnitt in der Normandie bei Colleville-sur-Mer und Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer, an dem die Landung des V. US-Korps im Rahmen der Operation Neptune stattfand.

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 34 35