new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged The+Normandy+Landings

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

Known as Utah Beach during the Normandy landings on June 6 1944 (D-Day) - by the village of La Madeleine.

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

Details from the Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840.

 

The church suffered heavy damages in the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

The Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840. The church suffered heavy damages on the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

Inside the Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840.

 

The church suffered heavy damages in the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

A peaceful scene at Carentan Lock, on the Douve river in Normandy, north France. During World War II, this area was the scene of fierce fighting during the Normandy landings, code name 'Operation Overlord'. Following the landings at Omaha and Utah beaches, only a mile from Carentan, one of the bloodiest engagements occurred, which came to be known as 'The Battle of Bloody Gulch'. The German 17th SS Panzergrenadier with the 6th Fallschamjager (paratroops) regiments fought regiments of the U.S. 101st Airborne division for control of the rivers, roads and bridges around Carentan.

Nowadays it's hard to imagine such a tranquil area, being the scene of such carnage and bloodshed.

Paddle Steamer Ryde aka Ryde Queen, built in 1937 and now rusting away on a mud bank on the Isle of Wight.

 

She used to operate between Portsmouth and Ryde.

 

www.paddlesteamers.info/Ryde.htm

 

RYDE QUEEN was built for the Southern Railway Co. for the ferry service between Portsmouth and Ryde on the Isle of Wight.

 

During the Second World War she served as a minesweeper. In 1942, RYDE was converted into an anti-aircraft vessel and took part in the Normandy Landings of June 1944. She returned to passenger service in 1945. Withdrawn from service in 1970, she opened as a restaurant/pub in Binfield in 1972. December 2006 saw her lying ashore on the River Medina, Isle of Wight, in poor condition with her funnel collapsed.

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

The Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840.

 

The church suffered heavy damages in the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

The Plane has been specially painted with D-Day invasion stripes. The purpose was to increase recognition by friendly forces during and after the Normandy Landings.

For more infos pls. visit Wikipedia

AIR14, Switzerland

After years that we tried to meet up I finally met Solange yesterday for a Blue Hour Shoot in London. Thanks for coming along and hope to see you again soon.

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, permanently moored in London on the River Thames. She was originally a Royal Navy light cruiser and served during the Second World War and Korean War. In June 1944 the ship took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings.

  

Yes, me and Riley are having a contest on alternate history.

 

1st catagory- Old World

This would be anything between the creation of the Earth to 1870. Why 1870? Because .

Ex. What if Columbus didn’t reach America? What if Napoleon had died early in his conquests?

 

2nd catagory- Pre Modern

This would be between 1871 and 1950. Basically, recent…. But not too recent.

Ex. What if the Russian Revolution of 1917 had failed? What if the Normandy landings had ended up with the Allies being slaughtered, then pushed back?

 

3- Category 3: Modern

This is 1951 on to today. The most recent things, basically.

Ex. What if Ghaddafi had stayed in power? What if we never caught Saddam?

 

Written by Dr.Orange. The Contest might be on the LCN or we might make our own group. We're still waiting on a response and the full rules will be posted in the coming weeks.

View of Omaha Beach, the code name for one of the five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during World War II. Omaha is located on the coast of Normandy, France, facing the English Channel, and is 5 miles (8 km) long, from east of Sainte-Honorine-des-Pertes to west of Vierville-sur-Mer on the right bank of the Douve River estuary.

 

Landings here were necessary in order to link up the British landings to the east at Gold with the American landing to the west at Utah, thus providing a continuous lodgement on the Normandy coast of the Bay of the Seine.

The Normandy landings, codenamed Operation Neptune, were the landing operations on 6 June 1944 (termed D-Day) of the Allied invasion of Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. The largest seaborne invasion in history, the operation began the invasion of German-occupied western Europe, led to the restoration of the French Republic, and contributed to an Allied victory in the war...BUT I ASK HAVE WE LEARNED ANYTHING...MY mums brother who obviously i never met died in a wellington bomber.

   

Arromanches is remembered as a historic place of the Normandy landings and in particular as the place where an artificial port was installed. This artificial port allowed the disembarkation of 9,000 tons of material per day.

 

It was on the beach of Arromanches that, during the Invasion of Normandy immediately after D-Day, the Allies established an artificial temporary harbour to allow the unloading of heavy equipment without waiting for the conquest of deep water ports such as Le Havre or Cherbourg. Although at the centre of the Gold Beach landing zone, Arromanches was spared the brunt of the fighting on D-Day so the installation and operation of the port could proceed as quickly as possible without damaging the beach and destroying surrounding lines of communication. The port was commissioned on 14 June 1944.

 

This location was one of two sites chosen to establish the necessary port facilities to unload quantities of supplies and troops needed for the invasion during June 1944, the other was built further West at Omaha Beach. The British built huge floating concrete caissons which, after being towed from England, then had to be assembled to form walls and piers forming and defining the artificial port called the Mulberry harbour. These comprised pontoons linked to the land by floating roadways. One of these ports was assembled at Arromanches and even today sections of the Mulberry harbour still remain with huge concrete blocks sitting on the sand and more can be seen further out at sea

 

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.

 

Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Returning to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour, Belfast was the largest and arguably most powerful cruiser in the Royal Navy at the time. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship Scharnhorst. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

 

In 1967, efforts were initiated to avert Belfast's expected scrapping and preserve her as a museum ship. A joint committee of the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum and the Ministry of Defence was established, and reported in June 1968 that preservation was practical. In 1971 the government decided against preservation, prompting the formation of the private HMS Belfast Trust to campaign for her preservation. The efforts of the Trust were successful, and the government transferred the ship to the Trust in July 1971. Brought to London, she was moored on the River Thames near Tower Bridge in the Pool of London. Opened to the public in October 1971, Belfast became a branch of the Imperial War Museum in 1978. A popular tourist attraction, Belfast receives around a quarter of a million visitors per year.[7] As a branch of a national museum and part of the National Historic Fleet, Core Collection, Belfast is supported by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, by admissions income, and by the museum's commercial activities. It has been closed to visitors since an accident in November 2011, and is expected to re-open after Easter 2012.

 

HMS Belfast is a Town-Class light cruiser that was built for the Royal Navy. She is currently a museum ship. She was launched on St Patrick's Day 1938. She saw action during WWII escorting Artic convoys to the Soviet Union, played a part in the destruction of the German warship Scharnhorst in the Battle of North Cape and also took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy Landings in 1945. She also saw further combat in the Korean War in 1950-52 before entering reserve in 1963.

Ouwerkerk, Schouwen-Duiveland, Zeeland, The Netherlands

 

facebook | website | maasvlakte book | portfolio book | getty images

 

© 2014 Bart van Damme

 

Ordered by Winston Churchill in 1942, the Phoenix breakwaters were a set of reinforced concrete caissons built as part of the artificial Mulberry harbours that were assembled as part of the follow-up to the Normandy landings during World War II. Four of the caissons were used in the Netherlands to plug a gap in the dyke at Ouwerkerk after the North Sea Flood of 1953. They have now been converted into a museum for the floods called the Watersnoodmuseum.

Nan Red sector - Juno Beach

Saint Aubin-Sur-Mer, Normandy, France

 

This was the easternmost part of the Canadian assigned Juno Beach on June 6, 1944, codenamed "Nan Red".

 

Juno or Juno Beach was one of five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during the Second World War. The sector spanned from Saint-Aubin, a village just east of the British Gold sector, to Courseulles, just west of the British Sword sector. The Juno landings were judged necessary to provide flanking support to the British drive on Caen from Sword, as well as to capture the German airfield at Carpiquet west of Caen. Taking Juno was the responsibility of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division and commandos of the Royal Marines, with support from Naval Force J, the Juno contingent of the invasion fleet, including the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). The beach was defended by two battalions of the German 716th Infantry Division, with elements of the 21st Panzer Division held in reserve near Caen.

 

The first units of the North Shore Regiment's "A" and "B" companies touched down on Nan Red at 08:10 in chest-deep water. They were tasked with securing Saint-Aubin and clearing defences in the village. "B" Company landed to find that the Saint-Aubin strongpoint "appeared not to have been touched" by preliminary naval bombardment. The two assault companies faced a 100-yard (91 m) sprint across open beach in the face of fire from Saint-Aubin. "A" Company suffered the heaviest casualties, incurring many fatalities from beach mines.

 

"B" Company faced stronger opposition at the strongpoint, yet managed to breach the seawall and barbed wire. The strongpoint's 50 mm antitank gun was still active, and the thick concrete casemates protected it from infantry fire. By 08:10 Sherman tanks of the Fort Garry Horse and Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers (AVRE) tanks of the 80th Assault Squadron, Royal Engineers, had landed at Nan Red, and began to assist "B" Company in clearing the gun emplacement. The 50 mm gun knocked out four of the squadron's tanks, while the North Shore's machine-gun platoon flanked the position. The right section of the strongpoint was eliminated by antitank guns and combat engineers, while the central antitank gun was silenced by petard shells from the British AVREs. When the North Shore captured the strongpoint, approximately half the defenders were killed; 48 German soldiers surrendered. (source: Wikipedia)

 

For a photo of the same beach after the invasion click here

 

A link to my other photos of the British and Canadian invasion sectors

 

A link to my set of photo's and notes of Omaha beach, one of two American sectors

 

Nikon D70 with Tokina AT-X 124 12-24 f/4. Photo taken at dusk , july 2010.

   

Paddle Steamer Ryde aka Ryde Queen, built in 1937 and now rusting away on a mud bank on the Isle of Wight.

 

She used to operate between Portsmouth and Ryde.

 

www.paddlesteamers.info/Ryde.htm

 

RYDE QUEEN was built for the Southern Railway Co. for the ferry service between Portsmouth and Ryde on the Isle of Wight.

 

During the Second World War she served as a minesweeper. In 1942, RYDE was converted into an anti-aircraft vessel and took part in the Normandy Landings of June 1944. She returned to passenger service in 1945. Withdrawn from service in 1970, she opened as a restaurant/pub in Binfield in 1972. December 2006 saw her lying ashore on the River Medina, Isle of Wight, in poor condition with her funnel collapsed.

The 101st Airborne Division—the "Screaming Eagles" is a U.S. Army modular infantry division trained for air assault operations. During World War II, it was renowned for action during the Normandy landings and in the Battle of the Bulge. During the Vietnam War, the 101st Airborne Division was redesignated first an airmobile division, then later as an air assault division.

Read More...

-------

1940's Weekend Crich, Derbyshire, England 2010

 

Camera Imagery Re-enactment Photography

Dredger mored near the Mulberry Harbour in the Thames Estuary which broke free from from its Tug in the Second World War on its way to the Normandy landings.

Note the defence fort on the Isle of Grain in the background.

 

The ruined village of Tyneham in Dorset, England.

 

In 1942 this valley by the sea was favoured by the Ministry of Defence to train British and American tank crews in preparation for the Normandy landings. The use of live ordnance dictated the evacuation of this tiny village which lay at the base of the valley.

 

The villagers were rehoused nearby with the promise of a return to their homes in peacetime. At the end of hostilities the government deemed it necessary to retain the land indefinately.

 

As the villagers left their homes in the Winter of 1943 they pinned a parting plea to the village church door:

 

"Please treat the church and houses with care; we have given up our homes where many of us lived for generations to help win the war to keep men free. We shall return one day and thank you for treating the village kindly"

 

The villagers were never allowed to return and were compensated only for the produce of their gardens.

 

For me the feeling I experienced when walking here was that it had been deserted hundreds of years ago when in fact it was less than sixty.

Paddle Steamer Ryde aka Ryde Queen, built in 1937 and now rusting away on a mud bank on the Isle of Wight.

 

She used to operate between Portsmouth and Ryde.

 

www.paddlesteamers.info/Ryde.htm

 

RYDE QUEEN was built for the Southern Railway Co. for the ferry service between Portsmouth and Ryde on the Isle of Wight.

 

During the Second World War she served as a minesweeper. In 1942, RYDE was converted into an anti-aircraft vessel and took part in the Normandy Landings of June 1944. She returned to passenger service in 1945. Withdrawn from service in 1970, she opened as a restaurant/pub in Binfield in 1972. December 2006 saw her lying ashore on the River Medina, Isle of Wight, in poor condition with her funnel collapsed.

22000 drapeaux britanniques ont été plantés sur la plage d'Asnelles (Gold beach).

There are a number of war cemeteries (French, USA, Canadian, German...) along the coast of Normandy. The cemetery of Saint James covers mostly the losses from the campaign that pushed, toward and, into Brittany.

Estimates:

Over 425,000 Allied and German troops were killed, wounded or went missing during the Battle of Normandy.

The French Résitant Forces, or FFI (Forces Françaises de l'intérieur) fought mostly from behind the lines. They were joined by the Free French Forces- lead by De Gaulle - and formed L' Armée française de la Liberation. On D-Day, they numbered more than 400,000, and participated in the Normandy landings and the protection of parachutists landing behind the lines.

 

Civilian deaths (these are the forgotten people):

It is estimated that the bombings in Normandy before and after D-Day caused over 50,000 civilian deaths, and thousands of women were raped by the advancing troops - a tragedy that is rarely mentioned.

 

Every year, on D-Day, local school children are taken by bus to these cemeteries to bring flowers to the tombs of the fallen soldiers.

There are also a number of war museums along the coast, and hundreds of bunkers dot the coastline of Brittany, Normandy and the North. It is impossible to visit these regions and not be reminded of WWII, and also of WWI.

For tourists, there are organized bus trips available from every major city in Normandy to reach the cemeteries, Saint Lo and other towns as well as museums and bunkers.

 

Also, one should look for the "monument aux morts" that stands in front of the main church in every village, and there are inscribed the names of the local young men who gave their lives for their country.

For photos, you will find quite a few that I posted in my albums on Normandy.

 

Ouwerkerk, Schouwen-Duiveland, Zeeland, The Netherlands

 

facebook | website | maasvlakte book 2014 | portfolio book

 

© 2014 Bart van Damme

 

Ordered by Winston Churchill in 1942, the Phoenix breakwaters were a set of reinforced concrete caissons built as part of the artificial Mulberry harbours that were assembled as part of the follow-up to the Normandy landings during World War II. Four of the caissons were used in the Netherlands to plug a gap in the dyke at Ouwerkerk after the North Sea Flood of 1953. They have now been converted into a museum for the floods called the Watersnoodmuseum.

Paddle Steamer Ryde aka Ryde Queen, built in 1937 and now rusting away on a mud bank on the Isle of Wight.

 

She used to operate between Portsmouth and Ryde.

 

www.paddlesteamers.info/Ryde.htm

 

At 223 ft long she was hard to miss

 

RYDE QUEEN was built for the Southern Railway Co. for the ferry service between Portsmouth and Ryde on the Isle of Wight.

 

During the Second World War she served as a minesweeper. In 1942, RYDE was converted into an anti-aircraft vessel and took part in the Normandy Landings of June 1944. She returned to passenger service in 1945. Withdrawn from service in 1970, she opened as a restaurant/pub in Binfield in 1972. December 2006 saw her lying ashore on the River Medina, Isle of Wight, in poor condition with her funnel collapsed.

1941 Historical Aircraft Group

N345AB (330652)

Douglas C-47A Skytrain

C/n 13803

Prestwick Airport

Scotland

20th May 2014

 

Performing a low fly past prior to landing

  

Omaha, commonly known as Omaha Beach was the code name for one of the five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during World War II. Omaha is located on the coast of Normandy, France, facing the English Channel, and is 5 miles (8 km) long, from east of Sainte-Honorine-des-Pertes to west of Vierville-sur-Mer on the right bank of the Douve River estuary.

 

Mit Omaha Beach bezeichneten die Alliierten im Zweiten Weltkrieg einen französischen Küstenabschnitt in der Normandie bei Colleville-sur-Mer und Saint-Laurent-sur-Mer, an dem die Landung des V. US-Korps im Rahmen der Operation Neptune stattfand.

 

The University of Bristol Botanic Gardens, in Stoke Bishop, Bristol, Avon.

 

The University of Bristol established a botanic garden in 1882 at Royal Fort House adjacent to Tyndall Avenue. It was laid out by Adolf Leipner. This site was later known as the Hiatt Baker Garden.

 

In 1959 the site of the Botanic Garden was used to build the university's Senate House. The botanic collection was moved to the spacious gardens of Bracken Hill beside North Road, Leigh Woods, near the Clifton Suspension Bridge. The Bracken Hill house and gardens had been established in 1886 by Melville Wills, a noted benefactor to Bristol University.

 

Bracken Hill house and some of the gardens continued to be used by the plant pathology and other services of the government's National Agricultural Advisory Service (NAAS), advising farmers and growers from Herefordshire and Dorset to Lands End during and after World War II when UK-grown crops were vital to minimise rationing. See, for instance, the cereal and vegetable diseases work of Lawrence Ogilvie at Bracken Hill. The NAAS staff, laboratories and offices had moved there from the Long Ashton Research Station also to the west of Bristol.

 

In 2005 the botanic collections were relocated to The Holmes, a site in Stoke Bishop opposite Churchill Hall. The Holmes had been built in 1879 and had a 1.77 hectares (4.4 acres) ornamental garden. It had been used by United States Army staff during the preparations for the Normandy landings during World War II. The new garden designed by Land Use Consultants advised by Peter Crane, was the first University Botanic Garden built in the UK in the 21st century.

 

The garden has 640 square metres (6,900 sq ft) of greenhouses divided into cool, warm-temperate, sub-tropic and tropical zones which house plants from the evolution collection. The tropical zone includes a raised pool with aquatic plants including the water lily Victoria cruziana.

 

The displays include 4500 plant species. These are divided into collections of evolution, Mediterranean, local-flora, rare-native, and finally useful plants. The useful-plant displays include herb gardens with western, Chinese and herbal medicine, including species used in Ayurvedic and Southern African medicine. Displays of plants from the Mediterranean climate region include those from several continents. Plant evolution is illustrated by several displays.

 

The local-flora and rare-native collection includes the unusual species found in the Avon Gorge, Mendip Hills, Somerset Levels and surrounding areas. These plants include the Bristol Onion, Cheddar Pink and various species of Whitebeam.

 

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.

 

Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Returning to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour, Belfast was the largest and arguably most powerful cruiser in the Royal Navy at the time. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship Scharnhorst. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

 

In 1967, efforts were initiated to avert Belfast's expected scrapping and preserve her as a museum ship. A joint committee of the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum and the Ministry of Defence was established, and reported in June 1968 that preservation was practical. In 1971 the government decided against preservation, prompting the formation of the private HMS Belfast Trust to campaign for her preservation. The efforts of the Trust were successful, and the government transferred the ship to the Trust in July 1971. Brought to London, she was moored on the River Thames near Tower Bridge in the Pool of London. Opened to the public in October 1971, Belfast became a branch of the Imperial War Museum in 1978. A popular tourist attraction, Belfast receives around a quarter of a million visitors per year.As a branch of a national museum and part of the National Historic Fleet, Core Collection, Belfast is supported by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, by admissions income, and by the museum's commercial activities.

 

First track day of 2015.

 

Oulton Park occupies much of the area which was previously known as the Oulton Estate. The track is set in the grounds of Oulton Hall, which were used as an army staging camp by General Patton prior to the Normandy landings. At this time the famous boxer Joe Louis gave exhibition bouts at Oulton Park in the vicinity of the Deer Leap section of the circuit.

 

The track is characterised by rapidly changing gradients, blind crests and several tight corners. The full circuit is 2.8 mi (4.5 km). The highest part of the course is Hill Top. Paddock facilities are reasonable in size with large areas of hard-standing and some power points.

 

The race track can be adapted for shorter courses. The "Foster's" Circuit, which is 1.66 miles (2.7 km), comprises half of the "Cascades" corner followed by the "Hizzy's" chicane, it then heads onto Knickerbrook and up Clay Hill to work its way round to the start/finish straight. The British Touring Car Championships uses all of the Cascades Corner and Lakeside but then forks off into a hairpin before Island Bend. This hairpin cuts out all of the Island section of the circuit and takes the cars straight back over Hill Top.

 

Beginning in 2007, all the circuit's marshalling stations were redesigned with protective cages. This was to prevent incidents similar to those seen in the 2006 season when cars had collided with marshalling posts. A cage-protected marshals station was also built at the bottom of the back straight near the chicane preceding Knickerbrook.

Saint Aubin Sur Mer, Normandy, France, august 2011

 

This was the easternmost part of the Canadian assigned Juno Beach on June 6, 1944, codenamed "Nan Red"

 

Juno or Juno Beach was one of five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during the Second World War. The sector spanned from Saint-Aubin, a village just east of the British Gold sector, to Courseulles, just west of the British Sword sector. The Juno landings were judged necessary to provide flanking support to the British drive on Caen from Sword, as well as to capture the German airfield at Carpiquet west of Caen. Taking Juno was the responsibility of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division and commandos of the Royal Marines, with support from Naval Force J, the Juno contingent of the invasion fleet, including the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). The beach was defended by two battalions of the German 716th Infantry Division, with elements of the 21st Panzer Division held in reserve near Caen.

 

The first units of the North Shore Regiment's "A" and "B" companies touched down on Nan Red at 08:10 in chest-deep water. They were tasked with securing Saint-Aubin and clearing defences in the village. "B" Company landed to find that the Saint-Aubin strongpoint "appeared not to have been touched" by preliminary naval bombardment. The two assault companies faced a 100-yard (91 m) sprint across open beach in the face of fire from Saint-Aubin. "A" Company suffered the heaviest casualties, incurring many fatalities from beach mines.

 

"B" Company faced stronger opposition at the strongpoint, yet managed to breach the seawall and barbed wire. The strongpoint's 50 mm antitank gun was still active, and the thick concrete casemates protected it from infantry fire. By 08:10 Sherman tanks of the Fort Garry Horse and Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers (AVRE) tanks of the 80th Assault Squadron, Royal Engineers, had landed at Nan Red, and began to assist "B" Company in clearing the gun emplacement. The 50 mm gun knocked out four of the squadron's tanks, while the North Shore's machine-gun platoon flanked the position. The right section of the strongpoint was eliminated by antitank guns and combat engineers, while the central antitank gun was silenced by petard shells from the British AVREs. When the North Shore captured the strongpoint, approximately half the defenders were killed; 48 German soldiers surrendered. (source: Wikipedia)

 

For a photo of the same beach after the invasion click here

 

Nikon D70 with Tokina AT-X 124 12-24 f/4. Photo was tonemapped using four differently exposed shots (handheld).

 

A link to my other photos of the British and Canadian invasion sectors on D-Day

 

A link to my set of photo's and notes of Omaha beach, one of two American sectors during D-Day

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

At the Romanesque church of Notre-Dame de l'Assomption (Our Lady of the Assumption - referring to the Catholic idea of the assumption of the Virgin Mary, that is that she was taken to Heaven alive after her life here on Earth) in Colleville. The church was built in the 12th and 13th century and became a historical monument in 1840.

 

The church suffered heavy damages in the Normandy landings in 1944 when seven German soldiers sat there giving coordinates to the German batteries at the coast - the tower was just a pile of rubble after the war. The church was rebuilt 1946-1951, to look like it had done before the war.

ⓒRebecca Bugge, All Rights Reserved

Do not use without permission.

 

French military at the remembrance ceremony for the Normandy landings in 1944 at Ranville war cemetery.

A panoramic shot of HMS Belfast at night.

 

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a light cruiser built for the Royal Navy, currently permanently moored on the River Thames in London, England, and operated by the Imperial War Museum.

 

Construction of Belfast, the first ship in the Royal Navy to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939, Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs.

 

Belfast returned to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment, and armour. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943 and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship Scharnhorst. In June 1944, Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945, Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

WN27, Nan Red Sector, Saint-Aubin-sur-Mer, Normandy, France, july 2010.

 

On the photo:

Widerstandsnest 27 was a 50mm Gun emplacement of the Vf600-SK type able to enfillade the beach while being protected from offshore fire. It was involved in the heavy fighting on Juno beach when the Canadian 3rd division landed on june 6, 1944.

 

"Nan Red" was the easternmost part of the Canadian assigned Juno Beach and a prime target on June 6, 1944.

 

Juno or Juno Beach was one of five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during the Second World War. The sector spanned from Saint-Aubin, a village just east of the British Gold sector, to Courseulles, just west of the British Sword sector. The Juno landings were judged necessary to provide flanking support to the British drive on Caen from Sword, as well as to capture the German airfield at Carpiquet west of Caen. Taking Juno was the responsibility of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division and commandos of the Royal Marines, with support from Naval Force J, the Juno contingent of the invasion fleet, including the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). The beach was defended by two battalions of the German 716th Infantry Division, with elements of the 21st Panzer Division held in reserve near Caen.

 

The first units of the North Shore Regiment's "A" and "B" companies touched down on Nan Red at 08:10 in chest-deep water. They were tasked with securing Saint-Aubin and clearing defences in the village. "B" Company landed to find that the Saint-Aubin strongpoint "appeared not to have been touched" by preliminary naval bombardment. The two assault companies faced a 100-yard (91 m) sprint across open beach in the face of fire from Saint-Aubin. "A" Company suffered the heaviest casualties, incurring many fatalities from beach mines.

 

"B" Company faced stronger opposition at the strongpoint, yet managed to breach the seawall and barbed wire. The strongpoint's 50 mm antitank gun was still active, and the thick concrete casemates protected it from infantry fire. By 08:10 Sherman tanks of the Fort Garry Horse and Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers (AVRE) tanks of the 80th Assault Squadron, Royal Engineers, had landed at Nan Red, and began to assist "B" Company in clearing the gun emplacement. The 50 mm gun knocked out four of the squadron's tanks, while the North Shore's machine-gun platoon flanked the position. The right section of the strongpoint was eliminated by antitank guns and combat engineers, while the central antitank gun was silenced by petard shells from the British AVREs. When the North Shore captured the strongpoint, approximately half the defenders were killed; 48 German soldiers surrendered. (source: Wikipedia)

 

For a photo of the same beach after the invasion click here

  

Shot with a Nikon D70 at dusk and tonemapped using 3 differently exposed handheld (hence the not too sharp result) shots, july 2010.

 

A link to my other photos of the British and Canadian invasion sectors on D-Day

 

A link to my set of photo's and notes of Omaha beach, one of two American sectors during D-Day

   

Well-trained fighting men.

CHECK.

 

Newest and the best contemporary military technology on land, sea, or in the air.

CHECK.

 

Eager, fearless, and courageous Canadians, British, and American Infantry.

CHECK.

 

Hasty, cavalier plan of attack with unrealistic objectives (capture the port and hold it for two tides, gather intelligence from prisoners and captured material, lure the Luftwaffe into open battle, and steal German encryption equipment for Allied code-breakers) .

CHECK.

 

Imminent disaster for all involved.

CHECK. CHECK.

  

AUGUST 19, 1942…all of Europe was under Nazi domination.

 

Ignoring that sobering point that should have been reflected upon…the Raid on the French coastal town of Dieppe began in earnest, at 5am…as 6,000 men storm the six beaches of Dieppe.

 

While Churchill and Admiral Mountbatten presumptuously oversaw and authorized the raid, months before General Montgomery had been firmly against raiding the French sea port, or any French sea port. He predicted disaster. However, and unfortunately for Canada, Montgomery was now in North Africa heading up the desert campaign…so cooler heads would not prevail in this August of '42, as the Canadian government and the Chiefs of Staff concurred with Churchill and Mountbatten to authorize the suicidal raid that consisted mostly of Canadians.

 

Since June, months before the ill-fated raid, the BBC had been warning the occupied French coastal towns to evacuate because war was coming to the neighbourhood. Typical misguided leftist sympathies. And what was the actual effect of these dire BBC radio warnings? Did the French citizens leave?

 

Nope.

 

But the Germans listened and dug in even deeper and reinforced the entire French coast against such an attack!

 

Good one, BBC!

 

Air recon units of the Nazi Luftwaffe confirmed a build up of Allied military activity along the Southern English coast, while simultaneously French double-agents warned of a British interest in Dieppe.

 

And to add a final stupidity to the mix, those emasculated Canadian and British military personnel ninnies that planned the Dieppe Raid felt they should play nice, avoid civilian losses, and not anger the traitorous collaborating Vichy government by letting the beach area reap the whirlwind.

 

So the trusting Canadians were expected to make a full frontal assault on those fortified beaches of Dieppe without prior air and naval bombardment of the port city's defences!

 

Huh?

 

THAT was never done before. Ever.

 

You always bomb the hell out of the landing arena.

 

How do you spell die, as one of the Canadian soldiers from the 2nd Canadian Infantry noted while enroute to his demise at Dieppe?

 

"Why look the first three letters of Dieppe are D-I-E …" he noted ominously.

 

Two days before the raid, on August 17, former footballer turned high school teacher, Leonard Dawe compiled the Daily Telegraph crossword with the clue "French port". The answer appeared in the English newspaper the following day. The answer was Dieppe!

 

Was Dawe passing intelligence on to the enemy?

 

The War Office called up the Scot, Lord Tweedsmuir, who was then assisting the Canadian Army as a senior intelligence officer. Dawe needed to be investigated. Tweedsmuir called upon MI5, the counter-intelligence and security agency of Great Britain.

 

After an immediate and intense inquiry of Dawe, at his home, it was determined the crossword containing the solution, was a complete fluke, a MERE coincidence!

 

Dawe was cleared of any suspicion.

 

Fast forward to 1944, one month before D-Day. Another crossword coincidence authored by Dawe appears in the Telegraph. This time there are multiple references to Operation Overlord, or D-Day, the Allied invasion of North Eastern Europe. Heck, even Overlord appeared in the crossword on May 27! Previous Dawe crosswords had contained, Juno, Gold, Sword and Omaha which were all code names for beaches assigned to various Allied forces. Juno was the beach assigned to the Canadian attack force. This was too much. MI5 was again called in to investigate the crossword compiler, Dawe.

 

In the end it is again concluded that relevant invasion terms that appear in Dawe's Telegraph crossword were an explainable coincidence.

 

However, the general public didn't find out the "rest of the story" until 1958 when Dawe appeared in a BBC TV interview. At the time, during the war, Dawe would encourage his school kids to come into his study and help him fill in the blank crossword puzzles. They provided the solution word. Then Dawe would create the clues for their chosen words.

 

In the end, the British teenagers were getting the code words from Canadian and American soldiers who were billeted close to Dawe's school!

 

Mystery solved. Now, back to the raid.

 

When the Dieppe Raid was over at 10:50 am that morning, 3,367 Canadians were dead, wounded or captured! The Canadians had landed on the beach only to be pinned down, and trapped on that beach by the high sea wall and the German machine guns.

 

The British suffered 934 dead, wounded, or captured.

 

The Germans were unimpressed with the raid.

 

General Conrad Haase described the Dieppe Raid as "incomprehensible". How could a single division be expected to overrun a German regiment that was heavily fortified in its surroundings and supported in that position by heavy artillery.

 

The Churchill tanks although a new and fresh British design were "easy to fight", "poor and obsolete".

 

German Field Marshall Von Rundstedt noted the Allies would not have another Dieppe because "it has gained that experience dearly."

 

…and notably, from Wikipedia,

 

ALLIED ANAYSIS of the DIEPPE RAIDTHE LESSONS LEARNED AT DIEPPE essentially became the textbook of “what not to do” in future amphibious operations, and laid the framework for the Normandy landings two years later.

 

Most notably, Dieppe highlighted:

 

1. the need for preliminary artillery support, including aerial bombardment;

 

2. the need for a sustained element of surprise;

 

3. the need for proper intelligence concerning enemy fortifications;

 

4. the avoidance of a direct frontal attack on a defended port city; and,

 

5. the need for proper re-embarkation craft.

 

As a consequence of the lessons learned at Dieppe, the British developed a whole range of specialist armoured vehicles which allowed their engineers to perform many of their tasks protected by armour, most famously Hobart's Funnies. The operation showed major deficiencies in RAF ground support techniques, and this led to the creation of a fully integrated Tactical Air Force to support major ground offensives.

 

Another effect of the raid was change in the Allies' previously held belief that seizure of a major port would be essential in the creation of a second front. Their revised view was that the amount of damage that would be done to a port by the necessary bombardment to take it, would almost certainly render it useless as a port afterwards. As a result, the decision was taken to construct prefabricated harbours, codenamed "Mulberry", and tow them to lightly defended beaches as part of a large-scale invasion.

 

(FAMOUS DIEPPE photos tinted, cropped, blown out by me)

 

Best viewed large and Cinematic. The Spitfire in this photograph is a replica and was originally commissioned by the 610 Squadron Association. During her time with 610 she carried the markings DW-D and was stationed in Hangar 3 at Hooton Park, the original Liverpool Airport. She was purchased by the Fylde Spitfire Memorial Fund in 2009 and following a full refurbishment was painted with 611 RAF West Lancashire Squadron markings. I took this photo at Barton Grange car park on a day when the public could view her and a full working cockpit. I intend to take more photographs of her in the future as I will be part of the team tking her to RIAT (the Royal International Air Tattoo) at Fairford, as a celebration of the Battle of Britain 70th Anniversary

 

In 1939 the 611 RAF West Lancashire Squadron went for summer camp to Duxford in Cambridgeshire never to return to Speke as it was called up for war duty. 611 Squadron excelled in cover of the UK whilst France fell to the Nazis, patrolled high above the Dunkirk beaches during the evacuation, played an active part in the Battle of Britain, took a very active part in the ill-fated Dieppe raid, covered the Normandy landings, escorted bomber intrusions over occupied France and later, with Mustangs, was able to provide long range bomber cover for both RAF and USAAF raids deep into Europe.

 

This display is helping to raise funds for a new RAF Memorial, featuring a full size replica of the Lytham St. Annes Mark Vb Spitfire W3644. The memorial will be built to mark the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain whilst at the same time remembering the brave men and women of Fighter and Bomber Command whom were recruited from or served on the Fylde Coast during WW2.

 

More details can be found at:

www.w3644.com/

 

This photo is dark and moody to match the sentiment of the sacrifice young men made seventy years ago. Best viewed large and Cinematic

Saint Aubin Sur Mer, Normandy, France, august 2011

 

This was the easternmost part of the Canadian assigned Juno Beach on June 6, 1944, codenamed "Nan Red". Note the casemate of WN (Widerstandsnest) 27 on the foreground; a German strongpoint with a 5cm gun which on d-day was responsible for casualties and considerable damage amongst the Canadian forces.

 

Juno or Juno Beach was one of five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, during the Second World War. The sector spanned from Saint-Aubin, a village just east of the British Gold sector, to Courseulles, just west of the British Sword sector. The Juno landings were judged necessary to provide flanking support to the British drive on Caen from Sword, as well as to capture the German airfield at Carpiquet west of Caen. Taking Juno was the responsibility of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division and commandos of the Royal Marines, with support from Naval Force J, the Juno contingent of the invasion fleet, including the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN). The beach was defended by two battalions of the German 716th Infantry Division, with elements of the 21st Panzer Division held in reserve near Caen.

 

The first units of the North Shore Regiment's "A" and "B" companies touched down on Nan Red at 08:10 in chest-deep water. They were tasked with securing Saint-Aubin and clearing defences in the village. "B" Company landed to find that the Saint-Aubin strongpoint "appeared not to have been touched" by preliminary naval bombardment. The two assault companies faced a 100-yard (91 m) sprint across open beach in the face of fire from Saint-Aubin. "A" Company suffered the heaviest casualties, incurring many fatalities from beach mines.

 

"B" Company faced stronger opposition at the strongpoint, yet managed to breach the seawall and barbed wire. The strongpoint's 50 mm antitank gun was still active, and the thick concrete casemates protected it from infantry fire. By 08:10 Sherman tanks of the Fort Garry Horse and Armoured Vehicle Royal Engineers (AVRE) tanks of the 80th Assault Squadron, Royal Engineers, had landed at Nan Red, and began to assist "B" Company in clearing the gun emplacement. The 50 mm gun knocked out four of the squadron's tanks, while the North Shore's machine-gun platoon flanked the position. The right section of the strongpoint was eliminated by antitank guns and combat engineers, while the central antitank gun was silenced by petard shells from the British AVREs. When the North Shore captured the strongpoint, approximately half the defenders were killed; 48 German soldiers surrendered. (source: Wikipedia)

 

For a photo of the same beach after the invasion click here

 

A link to my other photos of the British and Canadian invasion sectors

 

A link to my set of photo's and notes of Omaha beach, one of two American sectors

  

Nikon D70 with Tokina AT-X 124 12-24 f/4. Photo was tonemapped using three differently exposed shots (handheld).

The Merville Gun Battery was a coastal fortification in Normandy, France, in use as part of the Nazis' Atlantic Wall built to defend continental Europe from Allied invasion. It was a particularly heavily fortified position and one of the first places to be attacked by Allied forces during the Normandy Landings commonly known as D-Day.

 

youtu.be/3gVWMRXujGk

Kilkenny, Ireland.

Be my friend on Facebook: www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1057635838 :-)

A LINK TO MY GALLERIES WITH KILKENNY PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY.

www.pbase.com/kilkenny_photo_society/edward_d ullard

all rights reserved.

Do not use this image on websites, blogs or other media without my permission.

© All rights reserved.

HMS Belfast is a museum ship, originally a Royal Navy light cruiser, permanently moored in London on the River Thames and operated by the Imperial War Museum.

  

Construction of Belfast, the first Royal Navy ship to be named after the capital city of Northern Ireland, and one of ten Town-class cruisers, began in December 1936. She was launched on St Patrick's Day, 17 March 1938. Commissioned in early August 1939 shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War, Belfast was initially part of the British naval blockade against Germany. In November 1939 Belfast struck a German mine and spent more than two years undergoing extensive repairs. Returning to action in November 1942 with improved firepower, radar equipment and armour, Belfast was the largest and arguably most powerful cruiser in the Royal Navy at the time. Belfast saw action escorting Arctic convoys to the Soviet Union during 1943, and in December 1943 played an important role in the Battle of North Cape, assisting in the destruction of the German warship Scharnhorst. In June 1944 Belfast took part in Operation Overlord supporting the Normandy landings. In June 1945 Belfast was redeployed to the Far East to join the British Pacific Fleet, arriving shortly before the end of the Second World War. Belfast saw further combat action in 1950–52 during the Korean War and underwent an extensive modernisation between 1956 and 1959. A number of further overseas commissions followed before Belfast entered reserve in 1963.

  

In 1967, efforts were initiated to avert Belfast's expected scrapping and preserve her as a museum ship. A joint committee of the Imperial War Museum, the National Maritime Museum and the Ministry of Defence was established, and reported in June 1968 that preservation was practical. In 1971 the government decided against preservation, prompting the formation of the private HMS Belfast Trust to campaign for her preservation. The efforts of the Trust were successful, and the government transferred the ship to the Trust in July 1971. Brought to London, she was moored on the River Thames near Tower Bridge in the Pool of London. Opened to the public in October 1971, Belfast became a branch of the Imperial War Museum in 1978. A popular tourist attraction, Belfast receives around a quarter of a million visitors per year.[7] As a branch of a national museum and part of the National Historic Fleet, Core Collection, Belfast is supported by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, by admissions income, and by the museum's commercial activities. The ship was closed to visitors following an accident in November 2011, and re-opened on 18 May 2012.

MY"Christina O" - motor yacht that once belonged to the billionaire shipowner Aristotle Onassis,was launched in 1943.

She is 99.15 metres long and number 31st among the Top 100 largest yachts in the world as of 2013.

She was originally a Canadian anti-submarine River-class frigate called HMCS Stormont and served as a convoy escort during the Battle of the Atlantic and was present at the Normandy landings.

1944AD 1st June, Bletchley Park, England. The improved Colossus Mark 2 starts working in time for the Normandy Landings.

 

The Colossus was the world's first electronic digital computer that was at all programmable. It was designed by Tommy Flowers to solve a problem posed by a mathematician, Max Newman. In December 1943 the prototype, Colossus Mark 1, was shown to work. There were ten Colossus computers in use at the end of the second world war.

 

The computers were used by British code breakers, giving the Allies valuable intelligence, obtained from reading many encrypted high-level telegraphic messages between the German High Command and their army commands.

 

Omaha, commonly known as Omaha Beach, was the code name for one of the five sectors of the Allied invasion of German-occupied France in the Normandy landings on June 6, 1944, during World War II. 'Omaha' refers to a section of the coast of Normandy, France, facing the English Channel 8 kilometers (5 mi) long, from east of Sainte-Honorine-des-Pertes to west of Vierville-sur-Mer on the right bank of the Douve River estuary and an estimated 150-foot (45 m) tall cliffs. Landings here were necessary to link the British landings to the east at Gold with the American landing to the west at Utah, thus providing a continuous lodgement on the Normandy coast of the Bay of the Seine. Taking Omaha was to be the responsibility of United States Army troops, with sea transport, mine sweeping, and a naval bombardment force provided predominantly by the United States Navy and Coast Guard, with contributions from the British, Canadian, and Free French navies.

 

The primary objective at Omaha was to secure a beachhead of eight kilometres (5.0 miles) depth, between Port-en-Bessin and the Vire River, linking with the British landings at Gold to the east, and reaching the area of Isigny to the west to link up with VII Corps landing at Utah. Opposing the landings was the German 352nd Infantry Division. Of the 12,020 men of the division, 6,800 were experienced combat troops, detailed to defend a 53-kilometer (33 mi) front. The German strategy was based on defeating any seaborne assault at the water line, and the defenses were mainly deployed in strongpoints along the coast. The untested American 29th Infantry Division, along with nine companies of U.S. Army Rangers redirected from Pointe du Hoc, assaulted the western half of the beach. The battle-hardened 1st Infantry Division was given the eastern half. The initial assault waves, consisting of tanks, infantry, and combat engineer forces, were carefully planned to reduce the coastal defenses and allow the larger ships of the follow-up waves to land.

 

Very little went as planned during the landing at Omaha. Difficulties in navigation caused the majority of landing craft to miss their targets throughout the day. The defenses were unexpectedly strong, and inflicted heavy casualties on landing U.S. troops. Under heavy fire, the engineers struggled to clear the beach obstacles; later landings bunched up around the few channels that were cleared. Weakened by the casualties taken just in landing, the surviving assault troops could not clear the heavily defended exits off the beach. This caused further problems and consequent delays for later landings. Small penetrations were eventually achieved by groups of survivors making improvised assaults, scaling the bluffs between the most heavily defended points. By the end of the day, two small isolated footholds had been won, which were subsequently exploited against weaker defenses further inland, thus achieving the original D-Day objectives over the following days.

View from Overbecks House, former home of Otto Overbeck the inventor and scientist. The house and subtropical garden are well worth a visit, but the road up to them is narrow and steep with no passing places, leading to fraught tempers in high season. Salcombe is a delightful village with some connection to the Normandy Landings. It is also the home of Jack Wills the renowned clothing brand. 2015 shot revised with LR. Critique: I should have used a larger depth of field to get better focus on the distant village. In the rework I have exaggerated the parameters of the village area to make it look like a painting, so the foreground is natural and the background, hopefully, looks like a painted picture.

Arromanches is remembered as a historic place of the Normandy landings and in particular as the place where a Mulberry harbour artificial port was installed. This artificial port allowed the disembarkation of 9,000 tons of material per day.

 

It was on the beach of Arromanches that, during the Invasion of Normandy immediately after D-Day, the Allies established an artificial temporary harbour to allow the unloading of heavy equipment without waiting for the conquest of deep water ports such as Le Havre or Cherbourg. Although at the centre of the Gold Beach landing zone, Arromanches was spared the brunt of the fighting on D-Day so the installation and operation of the port could proceed as quickly as possible without damaging the beach and destroying surrounding lines of communication. The port was commissioned on 14 June 1944.

 

This location was one of two sites chosen to establish the necessary port facilities to unload quantities of supplies and troops needed for the invasion during June 1944, the other was built further West at Omaha Beach. The British built huge floating concrete caissons which, after being towed from England, then had to be assembled to form walls and piers forming and defining the artificial port called the Mulberry harbour. These comprised pontoons linked to the land by floating roadways. One of these ports was assembled at Arromanches and even today sections of the Mulberry harbour still remain with huge concrete blocks sitting on the sand and more can be seen further out at sea.

 

Some key figures: by 12 June 1944 more than 300,000 men, 54,000 vehicles, 104,000 tons of supplies had been landed. During 100 days of operation of the port 2.5 million men, 500,000 vehicles, and 4 million tons of material were landed. The best performance of the port was in the last week of July 1944: during those seven days the traffic through Arromanches exceeded 136,000 tons or 20,000 tons per day.

USS Texas (BB-35) is a New York-class battleship, and the second ship of the United States Navy named to honor the 28th state. Texas’s keel was laid down on 17 April 1911 at Newport News, Virginia, by the Newport News Shipbuilding Company. She was launched on 18 May 1912 sponsored by Miss Claudia Lyon, and commissioned on 12 March 1914 with Captain Albert W. Grant in command.

 

During her career Texas saw action in Mexican waters following the "Tampico Incident", and escorted Allied convoys across the Atlantic Ocean during World War I. When the United States formally entered World War II, Texas resumed her role of escorting war convoys across the Atlantic, and later shelled Axis-held beaches for the North African campaign and the Normandy Landings before being transferred to the Pacific Theater late in 1944 to provide naval gunfire support during the Battle of Iwo Jima and Battle of Okinawa.

 

Texas was decommissioned in 1948, having earned a total of five battle stars for service in World War II, and is presently a museum ship near Houston, Texas. Among the world's remaining battleships, Texas is notable for being the oldest remaining dreadnought battleship. She is also noteworthy for being one of only two remaining ships to have served in both World War I and World War II. Among U.S. built battleships, Texas is notable for her sizable amount of firsts: the first US battleship to mount anti-aircraft guns, the first US ship to control gunfire with directors and range-keepers (analog forerunners of today's computers), the first battleship to launch an aircraft, the first to receive a commercial radar in the U.S. Navy, and the first battleship to become a museum ship.

  

CameraNikon D7000

Exposure0.001 sec (1/2000)

Aperturef/4.0

Focal Length25 mm

ISO Speed200

  

© All rights are reserved, please do not use my photos and videos without my permission.

High up on the cliffs above Fecamp is a small church dedicated to the local fishermen. Right next to the church although not as tall the concrete structures left over from World War two take attention. These defensive structures where quickly built to defend the shore from British attack. This coast and more to the west was the focal point of the Normandy landings that marked the beginning of the end of the war.

Beginning a series of images I took a little over a year ago of the Battleship Texas. This image was broadcast on a Houston area TV station. Here is a little information about the beautiful ol' girl.

USS Texas (BB-35), is a New York-class battleship. The ship was launched on 18 May 1912 and commissioned on 12 March 1914.

Soon after her commissioning, Texas saw action in Mexican waters following the "Tampico Incident" and made numerous sorties into the North Sea during World War I. When the United States formally entered World War II in 1941, Texas took on the role of escorting war convoys across the Atlantic, and she later shelled Axis-held beaches for the North African campaign and the Normandy Landings before being transferred to the Pacific Theater late in 1944 to provide naval gunfire support during the Battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

Texas was decommissioned in 1948, having earned a total of five battle stars for service in World War II, and is presently a museum ship near Houston, Texas. Among the world's remaining battleships, Texas is notable for being the oldest remaining dreadnought battleship. She is also noteworthy for being one of only six remaining ships to have served in both World Wars. Among US-built battleships, Texas is notable for her sizable number of firsts: the first US battleship to mount anti-aircraft guns, the first US ship to control gunfire with directors and range-keepers (analog forerunners of today's computers), the first US battleship to launch an aircraft, one of the first to receive the CXAM-1 version of CXAM commercial radar in the US Navy, the first US battleship to become a permanent museum ship, and the first battleship declared to be a US National Historic Landmark.

 

MY"Christina O" - motor yacht that once belonged to the billionaire shipowner Aristotle Onassis,was launched in 1943.

She is 99.15 metres long and number 31st among the Top 100 largest yachts in the world as of 2013.

She was originally a Canadian anti-submarine River-class frigate called HMCS Stormont and served as a convoy escort during the Battle of the Atlantic and was present at the Normandy landings.

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 36 37