new icn messageflickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged Thanksgiving+traditions

Over the River and

Through the Woods

 

Over the river and thru the wood,

To grandfparent's house we go;

The horse knows the way

To carry the sleigh,

Thru the white and drifted snow, oh!

Over the river and thru the wood,

Oh, how the wind does blow!

It stings the toes,

And bites the nose,

As over the ground we go.

 

Over the river and thru the wood,

To have a first-rate play;

Oh, hear the bell ring,

"Ting-a-ling-ling!"

Hurrah for Thanksgiving Day-ay!

Over the river and thru the wood,

Trot fast my dapple gray!

Spring over the ground,

Like a hunting hound!

For this is Thanksgiving Day.

  

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THANK YOU everyone for your visits, comments and favs!

I appreciate your invites and awards very much!

:copyright: ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Use without permission is illegal.

 

One of my turkey decorations by our Spin-the-Bottle Hibiscus flowers on a quilted place mat by my hubby...

HAPPY THANKSGIVING ~

 

Thanksgiving

 

Wikipedia

 

Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday celebrated primarily in the United States and Canada as a day of giving thanks for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year. Several other places around the world observe similar celebrations. It is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States and on the second Monday of October in Canada. Thanksgiving has its historical roots in religious and cultural traditions, and has long been celebrated in a secular manner as well.

 

Prayers of thanks and special thanksgiving ceremonies are common among almost all religions after harvests and at other times. The Thanksgiving holiday's history in North America is rooted in English traditions dating from the Protestant Reformation. It also has aspects of a harvest festival, even though the harvest in New England occurs well before the late-November date on which the modern Thanksgiving holiday is celebrated.

 

In the English tradition, days of thanksgiving and special thanksgiving religious services became important during the English Reformation in the reign of Henry VIII and in reaction to the large number of religious holidays on the Catholic calendar. Before 1536 there were 95 Church holidays, plus 52 Sundays, when people were required to attend church and forego work and sometimes pay for expensive celebrations. The 1536 reforms reduced the number of Church holidays to 27, but some Puritans wished to completely eliminate all Church holidays, including Christmas and Easter. The holidays were to be replaced by specially called Days of Fasting or Days of Thanksgiving, in response to events that the Puritans viewed as acts of special providence. Unexpected disasters or threats of judgment from on high called for Days of Fasting. Special blessings, viewed as coming from God, called for Days of Thanksgiving. For example, Days of Fasting were called on account of drought in 1611, floods in 1613, and plagues in 1604 and 1622. Days of Thanksgiving were called following the victory over the Spanish Armada in 1588 and following the deliverance of Queen Anne in 1705. An unusual annual Day of Thanksgiving began in 1606 following the failure of the Gunpowder Plot in 1605 and developed into Guy Fawkes Day.

 

Continuing my tradition of thanksgiving turkey mechs, I present you with the VT08, Vertical Turkey.

Happy Thanksgiving!

in cincinnati, ohio it is a Thanksgiving tradition of one of the most popular rock radio stations to play "alice's restaurant" by arlo guthrie. i hope you like it! enjoy!

 

www.youtube.com/watch?v=m57gzA2JCcM

  

I must tell you that this morning's sunrise was punctuated by the sound of gunfire echoing across the lake as deer hunters took advantage of this holiday, as they traditionally do, to give thanks by killing things. Somehow the sound was distinctly incongruous with the scene. We are in the midst of the nine day rifle season and the news is gleefully reporting that the buck take is up 23% after the first weekend. And, of course, with the advent of a far longer wolf hunting season and the subsequent further elimination of a natural balance holding the deer population in check, one might expect that future years will provide even more opportunity for slaughter.

 

While I understand that hunting is big business in the north country bringing in millions of dollars to the states' economies annually, I, who avoid stepping on ants, will never understand the apparent thrill of killing an unsuspecting creature going about its business. And it didn't take long for the annual accompanying tally of gun accidents to be reported when a fatality occurred on the very first day, a hunter shooting and killing his partner. He is quoted as saying, "I thought he was a deer..."

 

On a lighter note, a very Happy Thanksgiving to all my Flickr friends. I, too, have my traditions and I thought I would repost this vintage home movie of the male members of my family enjoying a bit of tomfoolery before dinner. I trust you'll be able to pick me out. The womenfolk were, of course, in the kitchen, mostly barefoot, doing what they're supposed to be doing...

www.youtube.com/watch?v=VsnZxfkkoKQ

  

It has become my tradition now for the past few years to go out hiking on Black Friday, the day after Thanksgiving. I love it. It is my favourite hiking day of the year. Everyone else is either sleeping in or out shopping. I never see anyone else out in the wilderness. This year I went to McCloud in northern CA to the three waterfalls on the McCloud River. This is the middle falls, 46 ft. high.

 

View in larger size and read about my adventure on my blog.

 

The Waterfall-Aholics T-Shirt is now available. Click here for details.

 

Copyright © Leon Turnbull Photography.

This photo may not be used in any form without prior permission. All rights reserved.

 

Happy Thanksgiving everyone.

 

I haven't had time in the last few weeks to take the camera out, but we did put our Christmas tree up; a Thanksgiving tradition.

 

Have a wonderful holiday.

 

Facebook | Website | Pintrest | ViewBug

I've just emerged from my Turkey coma. Thanksgiving is a US tradition that I am more than happy to embrace. It's like having two Xmas days in one year. However, if I carry on eating like this I'll end up looking more like Santa than I'd like, and I'm not referring to the white beard or the ostentatious red suit with white fur trim! Ho Ho Ho Hum, widen the belt of the Englishman.

 

Model is Jordi Smith. This incorporates a couple of textures, some of my own, but I also used one really cool free texture from SkeletalMess. www.flickr.com/photos/skeletalmess/

I really appreciate the use of it.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THANK YOU everyone for your visits, comments and favs!

I appreciate your invites and awards very much!

:copyright: ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Use without permission is illegal.

 

~ Amy Grant ~ Amy Lee Grant (born November 25, 1960) is an American singer-songwriter, musician, author, media personality and actress. She is known for performing contemporary Christian music (CCM) and for a successful crossover to pop music in the 1980s and 1990s. She has been referred to as "The Queen of Christian Pop". As of 2009, Grant had sold more than 30 million albums worldwide.

 

These pumpkins were on display at the Fall Owl Fest , Avian Reconditioning Center in Apopka.

 

Wishing everyone that celebrates a very Happy Thanksgiving :)

 

** For Poetography... a weekly inspiration and the theme this week is mine is "Thanks" this week ~

  

Thanksgiving Day ~

 

Wikipedia

 

Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday celebrated in Canada and the United States as a day of giving thanks for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year. It is celebrated on the second Monday of October in Canada and on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States. Several other places around the world observe similar celebrations. Thanksgiving has its historical roots in religious and cultural traditions and has long been celebrated in a secular manner as well.

 

Thanksgiving is now a statutory holiday in most jurisdictions of Canada, with the exception of the Atlantic provinces of Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia.

 

Well,a Christmas tradition around here is that every year we each get to pick out an ornament at Walmart.Which we usually do like right after Thanksgiving.We write our names on them and the year so we each have one from each year.

This is one has always been one of my favorites,well since 2000,from the year 2000,of course.

 

The history of Thanksgiving in Canada goes back to an explorer, Martin Frobisher, who had been trying to find a northern passage to the Pacific Ocean. Frobisher's Thanksgiving was not for harvest but homecoming. He had safely returned from a search for the Northwest Passage, avoiding the later fate of Henry Hudson and Sir John Franklin. In the year 1578, he held a formal ceremony in Newfoundland to give thanks for surviving the long journey. French settlers who came to New France with explorer Samuel de Champlain in the early 1600s also took to celebrating their successful harvests. They even shared their food with the indigenous people of the area as well as setting up what became known as the "Order of Good Cheer." As many more settlers arrived in Canada, more celebrations of good harvest became common. New immigrants into the country, such as the Irish, Scottish, Germans would also add their own harvest traditions to the harvest celebrations. Most of the American aspects of Thanksgiving (such as the turkey) were incorporated when United Empire Loyalists began to flee from the United States during the American Revolution and settled in Canada.

Thanksgiving in Canada did not have a fixed date until the late 19th Century, when in 1879 Parliament declared November 6 as a day of Thanksgiving. It was celebrated as a national rather than a religious holiday. Later and earlier dates were observed, the most popular being the third Monday in October. After the First World War, Thanksgiving and Armistice (later Remembrance) Day were celebrated in the same week. It was not until January 31, 1957 that Parliament proclaimed “a day of General Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the bountiful harvest with which Canada has been blessed," to be observed on the second Monday in October.

 

Happy Thanksgiving and a Joyful Festive Season to all.

 

English: "The First Thanksgiving at Plymouth" (1914) By Jennie A. Brownscombe

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

 

Obviously not my picture originally as it was a painting, Just Kicked up a Notch.

Thought that is was appropriate to see what the "First Thanksgiving" Really looked like.

 

Thanksgiving or Thanksgiving Day, is a holiday celebrated in the United States on the fourth Thursday in November. It has officially been an annual tradition since 1863, when during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of thanksgiving to be celebrated on Thursday, November 26.[1] As a federal and popular holiday in the U.S., Thanksgiving is one of the major holidays of the year. Together with Christmas and the New Year, Thanksgiving is a part of the broader holiday season.

The event that Americans commonly call the "First Thanksgiving" was celebrated to give thanks to God for guiding them safely to the New World.[2] The first Thanksgiving feast lasted three days, providing enough food for 13 Pilgrims and 90 Native Americans.[3] The feast consisted of fish (cod, eels, and bass) and shellfish (clams, lobster, and mussels), wild fowl (ducks, geese, swans, and turkey), venison, berries and fruit, vegetables (peas, pumpkin, beetroot and possibly, wild or cultivated onion), harvest grains (barley and wheat), and the Three Sisters: beans, dried Indian maize or corn, and squash.[2][4][5][6] The New England colonists were accustomed to regularly celebrating "thanksgivings"—days of prayer thanking God for blessings such as military victory or the end of a drought.[7]

 

The Original Thanksgiving~

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Thanksgiving-Brownscombe.jpg

A Song for today ~`~

http://www.visitsierraleone.org/Reviews/hotels/Hotel-Bintumani.html

Holiday traditions - we would always have a bowl of mixed nuts for Thanksgiving & Christmas Holiday's.

To all of my Flickr friends: HAVE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING - ŽETVENA ZAHVALA 2012 !

 

Thanksgiving Day is a holiday celebrated primarily in the United States (the fourth Thursday of November) and Canada (the second Monday of October). Thanksgiving in North America had originated from a mix of European and Native traditions. Typically in Europe, festivals were held before and after the harvest cycles to give thanks for a good harvest, and to rejoice together after much hard work. At the time, Native Americans had also celebrated the end of a harvest season. In the USA, the modern Thanksgiving holiday tradition traces its origins to a 1621 celebration at Plymouth in present-day Massachusetts (when the Plymouth colony did not have enough food to feed half of the 102 colonists, the Wampanoag Indians helped the Pilgrims by providing seeds and teaching them to fish). Historically, this was how the American Thanksgiving has started.

Thanksgiving - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving

To all of my Flickr friends: HAVE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING - ŽETVENA ZAHVALA 2012 !

Thanksgiving Day is a holiday celebrated primarily in the United States (the fourth Thursday of November) and Canada (the second Monday of October). Thanksgiving in North America had originated from a mix of European and Native traditions. Typically in Europe, festivals were held before and after the harvest cycles to give thanks for a good harvest, and to rejoice together after much hard work. At the time, Native Americans had also celebrated the end of a harvest season. In the USA, the modern Thanksgiving holiday tradition traces its origins to a 1621 celebration at Plymouth in present-day Massachusetts (when the Plymouth colony did not have enough food to feed half of the 102 colonists, the Wampanoag Indians helped the Pilgrims by providing seeds and teaching them to fish). Historically, this was how the American Thanksgiving has started.

Thanksgiving - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving

Click on the photo to view Large on Black.

 

One of the pies I baked this year for Thanksgiving. It is tradition in my family that I bake the pies. I always decorate them with my favorite sun and moon motifs. By the time I set up this still-life, the man-in-the-moon pie was long gone. LOL I think I'm a frustrated food stylist or something.

 

Happy Thanksgiving to all my fine Flickr friends. There is so much to be grateful for!

 

Textures: thanks to Jenny and Sekeltalmess.

I’m not finishing my story today. I’m injured. That’s not a real reason to not finish, because I am typing, aren’t I? Still. I’m hurt, so I’m going to talk about my stupid injury instead.

 

I’m injured, and it’s my own fault. I would tell you where I’m injured, except I don’t know what part of me it is. I don’t think it’s a bone…or a muscle. I tweaked a region somewhere in the lower back/upper right butt-cheek area playing softball two weeks ago.

 

It was cold.

 

I stretched. (I’m not dumb); hamstrings, calf muscles, arms, shoulders, Achilles tendons, I stretched it all out…I even jogged to stay warm. Yet, when I slipped on wet/frozen turf going into 3rd base, I felt something in my lower back/upper right butt-cheek twinge.

 

This kind of stuff doesn’t happen with dirt infields…only on multi-million dollar ’softball establishments’ with Astro-Turf infields, that get wet, and freeze in the cold. It didn’t even have the luxury of occurring on one of the replica fields at said establishment…it happened on one of their generic softball fields. If I'm going to tweak myself, at least it could've happened at Fenway Park.

 

It hurt…a little. Desepite that, I played on it the next week. It hurt more after that game. I played on it last night as well.

 

It was cold….a lot more so than the previous two games. I stretched beforehand…and somehow, even though I tried hard to avoid getting on base…I still had to pinch run THREE TIMES for one of the old guys on the team (League rules only allow the last out to pinch run.) Needless to say, I re-re-aggravated the injury.

 

Someone said I tweaked my sciatic nerve…I don’t even know where my sciatic is. I got home last night, and 2 hours later, I was in some serious pain.

 

It’s funny when your body introduces you to parts you never knew existed. I still can’t find the real source of this pain. I’ve tried bending, stretching, and whatever to make something move that will isolate the pain…and let me figure out exactly whete it is, so I can treat it.

 

I can’t do it. I can’t move something to pinpoint that weird area of my lower back/upper right butt-cheek that harbours the pain. The worst part is it only really hurts when I sleep. I can STAND, or SIT…and it’s not too bad…but when I lay down…ouch.

 

What kind of janky injury won’t let you lay down? That’s not right. I can't even rest properly.

 

"Why you standing there."

 

"Resting an injury."

 

"Shouldn't you be, uh, lying down?"

 

To make matters worse. I’m hiking with my son tomorrow (Thanksgiving tradition.) I’m hiking on Saturday with a friend, and when next Tuesday rolls around…I’m playing ball again.

 

I’m missing the part of my brain that tells me to ‘take a play off’ Wednesday will be a blast I'm sure.

 

Have a nice Thanksgiving everyone, and if you’re in a part of the world without that holiday…enjoy Thursday.

A Happy & Blessed Thankgsiving wish from our Home to Yours. ..I give thanks each and every day for all the kind and wonderful friends I've made online (SL & Flickr) throught the years.

 

Edith Piaf - Autumn Leaves (Les Feuilles Mortes) www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2s2tPORlW4

 

Thanksgiving Day is a holiday celebrated primarily in the United States and Canada. Thanksgiving is celebrated each year on the second Monday of October in Canada and on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States. Thanksgiving in Canada falls on the same day as Columbus Day in the United States. Because of the longstanding traditions of the holiday, the celebration often extends to the weekend that falls closest to the day it is celebrated.

 

In the United States, the modern Thanksgiving holiday tradition traces its origins to a 1621 celebration at Plymouth in present-day Massachusetts. There is also evidence for an earlier harvest celebration on the continent by Spanish explorers in Florida during 1565, as well as thanksgiving feasts in the Virginia Colony. The initial thanksgiving observance at Virginia in 1619 was prompted by the colonists' leaders on the anniversary of the settlement . The 1621 Plymouth feast and thanksgiving was prompted by a good harvest. In later years, the tradition was continued by civil leaders such as Governor Bradford who planned a thanksgiving celebration and fast in 1623. While initially, the Plymouth colony did not have enough food to feed half of the 102 colonists, the Wampanoag Native Americans helped the Pilgrims by providing seeds and teaching them to fish. The practice of holding an annual harvest festival like this did not become a regular affair in New England until the late 1660s

  

i'm eating these babies like they are going out of style. it's a winter tradition of mine.

PURPOSE OF DRESSING THE STATUE

 

The ancient tradition of dressing the grace-giving statue of the Infant Jesus is intended to bring Jesus closer to the faithful as a real human being. It helps us to experience the closeness of Jesus and to express our love and reverence. It is not a case of idolatry, for the statue is not alive and it serves only as a reminder and a means of enabling a spiritual encounter with the living Christ.

 

The statue itself represents Jesus as a very small child, wearing a simple gown. This statue, sublime in its simplicity, is dressed in a white alb and royal robes to express the thought that is common to all Christians, that this child is a king of the house of David, and, what is more, that Jesus is Son of God and God himself, King of Kings and Lord of Lords.

 

The Infant Jesus of Prague has been dressed in different clothes from time immemorial, and people know him best in his royal robes. Most of his outfits are gifts of thanksgiving. The wardrobe numbers around a hundred costumes, some of which are incomplete or unusable. Some of the costumes can be seen in the museum, which the public can visit free of charge. The task of changing the Infant Jesus' robes is entrusted to the Carmelite Sisters of the Child Jesus, who help the Discalced Carmelite Fathers to look after this place of pilgrimage.

 

(from the web)

Made from worried turkey from gravityx9. Check out her great photostream!

 

Disguised as a carrot this guy should be safe enough. Most people eat sweet potatoes and green beans on Thanksgiving. We hope!

 

And do yourself a favor - for a happy Le Jour de Merci Donnant get re-acquainted with Kilomètres Deboutish and read Art Buchwald's Chacun à son goût one of the all time great colums. If you haven't seen it before, you'll want to make it a tradition!

 

Kylemore Castle and Abbey

  

Kylemore Abbey, that stunning castle at the foot of Duchruach and beside the waters of Lough Pollacappul, has fascinated visitors to this part of Connemara since its completion in 1871. It was four years in construction and the cost come to little over £29,000. Now, splendid new look “The History of Kylemore Castle and Abbey’ has just been published and was launched recently at a ceremony in Kylemore Abbey by An Taoiseach, Mr Bertie Ahern.

 

The author is Kathleen Villers-Tuthill who was born in Clifden and who has devoted much of the past twenty five years to researching the history of Connemara. Other books on the region complied by Kathleen include The History of Clifden 1810-1860 and ‘Beyond the Twelve Bens’.

 

I first met Kathleen on a trip to the Holy Land back in 1987. We were among a group of over 100 people who enjoyed a very pleasant ten day journey to that famous part of the world. Our group was led by Donncha O’Dulaing, the well known RTE radio broadcaster and it involved stays in Tiberius and Jerusalem as well as visits to many of the famous Biblical places.

 

Her latest publications is a superb work of research and presentation and is an engrossing read. Kathleen goes into great detail on the history of Mitchell Henry and his family and their association with politics, including a political career in England as well as contesting the Galway seat, the advent of tenant rights, the Home Rule Bill, and the closing years.

 

In a foreword, Mother Abbess Magdalena Fitzgibbon reflects on the history of this famous place. “Kylemore Abbey has been a Benedictine House for over eighty years. The Abbey, which was once a fairy-tale Castle, was built in the 19th century by Mitchell Henry and stands today as a monument to a great gentlemen and kindly landlord who spent most of his fortune on the estate and for the good of the local people.

 

The Community of twenty four nuns, who took up residence here in 1920, had fled from their Abbey at Ypres, Belgium, at the outbreak of World War 1 in 1914. They were of mixed nationality and had displayed great courage and determination in the six years prior to settling at Kylemore.

“The Community brought with them a strong devotion to the Benedictine tradition and the Benedictine way of life. They also brought with them a history that stretches back much further than that of Kylemore.

 

“Founded in Ypres in 1662, our community was made an Irish House in 1684. On the request of King James 11, and under the guidance of Lady Abbess Butler, the Community moved to Ireland in 1688. However, following James’s defeat at the Battle of the Boyne two years later; the Nuns returned to Ypres, where they remained for the next 224 years.

 

“Having gone through the vicissitudes of wars, extreme poverty and few vocations at times, the Community has reached this new Millennium. It is quite a tradition we carry with us, one which we cherish and shall always endeavour to keep fully alive.

 

“Since its beginning, Kylemore has been a focal point in the West of Ireland. Previous generations of Benedictine Nuns, for whom Kylemore served as home, have left us with a legacy of love for the place, a sense of stewardship for its continuance and a recognition of its uniqueness in location and attraction.

 

“Here , there is not only a natural beauty, there is an aura of peace and tranquillity and a sense of spiritualness. Peace is the Benedictine motto and at Kylemore Abbey it is a palpable presence. In the midst of a busy tourist area, Kylemore is an oasis of peace in a restless world and we, as a community, are glad to share this peace with all who visit. The Benedictine life is balanced with prayer and work (Ora et Labora) and at the Abbey we invite those who wish to do so, to join us in prayer.

“Mitchell Henry was a deeply spiritual person and it can only please him to know that a Community of Benedictine now has its home in his Castle, praying the Liturgical Hours, while maintaining the estate and undertaking the tremendous task of observing and restoring its many natural and important heritage features”.

 

The book contains a wealth of background knowledge set against the prevailing conditions of the time in this region of Connemara. The Galway Express of 1882 reported:

“The country is ruined, and the people find nothing can save them but emigration”. A scheme was set up by James Hack Tuke, and others, to assist evicted tenants to emigrate to America and Canada. Between April and June 1882, a total of 1,276 people left Clifden, Errismore, Roundstone, Renvyle and Letterfrack under the Tuke scheme. And for those with means, the Allen Line was now offering direct service between Galway and Boston”.

 

The story of the Benedictine Nuns at their famous convent in Ypres (Belgium) and how they has to evacuate it as German forces advanced on the area is recalled in the chapter on “Leaving Ypres”. German bombs were raining down on the beautiful monastery as the nuns made their exit from the building . “ A cry of anguish arose from hearts as, hurrying along the deserted street, we saw our convent apparently burning”. is a quote from the Mother Prioress. A bomb had exploded as they were preparing to leave.

 

As the War continued to rage in Europe the nuns decided to move to Ireland and took up residence in Merton House, Macmine, Co. Wexford in February 1916, It was from here that they were to travel in a saloon carriage provided by the Midland Railway Company to Galway.

 

The nuns took possession of Kylemore Castle and estate on the 30th November 1920. The purchase price was £45,000 for a property that “ stood silent and forlorn” at the time. As Kathleen says: “The cold and unwelcoming appearance of the family and guests of Margaret and Mitchell Henry.”

 

The background to the large statue of the Sacred Heart, which is located halfway up Suchruach mountain, is recalled here. In 1932, Lady Abbess Maura fulfiled her promise to erect a statue in thanksgiving for their safe delivery to Kylemore. The Sacred Heart was chosen in recognition of the community’s long tradition of devotion to it.

 

It was put in place by ten men John Joyce, Tom Conroy, Tommy Kearney, Jack Coyne, Pat Nee, John Lydon, Anthony McDonald, Frank Keane, J.J. McLoughlan and Michael Fitzsimons, the carpenter.

“Using a large hand barrow made by Fitzsimons, the statue was carried up a previously prepared path. The men were followed by members of the community reciting the rosary. At the designated spot, the statue was blessed and cemented into place on a platform over looking the Abbey.”

 

In 1953, history was made when Lady Abbess Agnes Finnegan, a native of Westport, became the youngest Abbess in Europe at the age of 36. There were forty two nuns in the community at the time.

The guesthouse had become enormously popular and Kylemore Abbey was fast becoming a popular destination for almost every tourist visiting Connemara. Lunches and afternoon teas were served to accommodate the growing numbers of day visitors and a small shop was opened in the hall, selling religious objects and craft work made by the nuns.

 

But the events of the early hours of Sunday 25 January 1959 had a major impact on the life of the community. It was a beautiful , calm moonlit night, with no wind, but very cold and frosty, Inside the Abbey the community of thirty-six nuns who had been invalids for some years, thirty students, aged between seven and seventeen, and two lay mistresses, were sleeping in their beds. Lady Abbess Agnes would recall the events of the night many years later.

 

“I remember going to bed that night and it was very, very cold and I was thanking God that I had a bed to go to, and I was thinking of people who were suffering and living rough, that was what was going through my mind.

 

“I remember waking up about two in the morning, and I heard a cracking sound, It had snowed a short time before that and then it was frozen over, and so I thought it was the frozen snow falling off the roof. And as I was thinking this the door opened and in came my next door neighbour, Dame Michael, “Oh! Lady Abbess there is a fire,” she said . The two of us ran around waking everybody up. I ran up to the school dormitory, and I called the nun sleeping there and told her to get the girls up. We got them out the back way, there was a door leading onto the mountain at the back. If that door had not been there we would all have been burnt. We had just got out in time when the whole dormitory was up in flames. Dame Michael was great, she went around calling the nuns.”

 

Fire Brigades from Clifden, Galway, Westport, Castlebar, Claremorris, Gort, Loughrea and Athenry attended the fire. The Galway firemen later told the nuns they could see the ‘reflection’ in the sky at Recess and felt sure they would be unable to control the fire. When they turned into the avenue, the fire captain later recalled being greeted by a ‘magnificent view of the Abbey in flames reflected on the lake’.

 

The chief fire officer on the night was Captain P.B. Sugrue. The source of the fire was an electrical fault and was traced to an old fuse board.

 

Radio and news reporters from around Ireland made their way to Kylemore while the post office was inundated with telephone calls from around the country and overseas.

 

After three years of hard work and great attention to detail, the Abbey was fully restored by the contractor John Sisk and Sons and normal life resumed again.

 

Kathleen refers to the sweeping changes in the aftermath of the Second Vatican Council in 1961.

“The daily prayer was shortened and changed from latin to the vernacular: devotions that had grown up during the centuries were dropped , but all liturgical prayer was kept, The vernacular, however, did not entirely supersede Latin at Kylemore,Latin Vespers are still sung each Sunday evening and plainchant remains the dominant music in the nuns worship.

 

“By for the most popular change to come under Vatican 11 was the one which allowed the nuns regular trips home to visit aging parents and to holiday with family and friends. However, for many that trip home had come too late, forbidden under the strict rules of enclosure to attend the funerals of their parents, the irony of being allowed home to an empty house was not lost on them,” says the author:

In the past few years, under the guidance and direction of Mother Abbess Magdalena Fitzgibbon and her committed group, a number of major restoration projects have been undertaken including the old Gothic Church which has been lovingly restored after being in a state of most severe disrepair and the Walled Garden which represented a huge challenge.

 

Today, there are eighteen Benedictine nuns in Kylemore Abbey, A total of one hundred and sixty two pupils are attending the school, eighty of whom are boarders. It is the only Benedictine community for nuns in Ireland and, like many other orders, is experiencing a serious decline in vocations.

The author quotes Sr. Benedict, the community archivist, who remains optimistic: “The House has witnessed a fall in numbers in the past and has survived to tell the tale. This too shall pass. And today’s dilemma will simply to be case study for the historians of the future.

 

And Mother Abbess Magdalena concludes; “I believe Monastic life holds a key to the secret of stability, peace and tranquillity, We then have a responsibility towards the healing of society, to help, through our liturgy, our prayer life and our hospitality, through our Ora et Labora. This is the challenge of the new millennium for us in Kylemore.”

 

The History of Kylemore Castle & Abbey by Kathleen Villiers-Tuthill is published by Kylemore Abbey Publications and retails at 25 Euros. Their contact number is 095 41146.

 

Courtesy of Michael Commins and the Western People

   

Our Thanksgiving dinner, perhaps like yours, ends with a special ceremony. We ceremonially placed the turkey wishbone, the "pulley bone" as my grandmother called it, on the sunlit shelf above the sink. There it remains until it's bone dry. Then we dust it off and use it for its main purpose - to bring good luck to the person who comes away with the largest piece of bone in a little tug of war for two. For anyone unfamiliar with this tradition, each person takes hold of one end of the turkey's double-pronged clavicle. They pull until it breaks. The winner gets a wish.

 

For 2011, I wish:

* For good health

* For relief from financial woes

* for true happiness - oh! forgot - #3 WORLD PEACE!

 

Dear friends, make your three wishes, too!!!

 

This photo was taken for 52 Weeks of Twenty Eleven's first challenge: I wish.

 

Thanks to Wenström for catching this photo on Explore, when Scout missed it!

 

Thank you Jerry, Skeletal Mess, for the textures.

To all of my Flickr friends: HAVE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING - ŽETVENA ZAHVALA 2012 !

 

Thanksgiving Day is a holiday celebrated primarily in the United States (the fourth Thursday of November) and Canada (the second Monday of October). Thanksgiving in North America had originated from a mix of European and Native traditions. Typically in Europe, festivals were held before and after the harvest cycles to give thanks for a good harvest, and to rejoice together after much hard work. At the time, Native Americans had also celebrated the end of a harvest season. In the USA, the modern Thanksgiving holiday tradition traces its origins to a 1621 celebration at Plymouth in present-day Massachusetts (when the Plymouth colony did not have enough food to feed half of the 102 colonists, the Wampanoag Indians helped the Pilgrims by providing seeds and teaching them to fish). Historically, this was how the American Thanksgiving has started.

Thanksgiving - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving

To all of my Flickr friends: HAVE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING - ŽETVENA ZAHVALA 2011 !

 

Thanksgiving Day is a holiday celebrated primarily in the United States (the fourth Thursday of November) and Canada (the second Monday of October). Thanksgiving in North America had originated from a mix of European and Native traditions. Typically in Europe, festivals were held before and after the harvest cycles to give thanks for a good harvest, and to rejoice together after much hard work. At the time, Native Americans had also celebrated the end of a harvest season. In the USA, the modern Thanksgiving holiday tradition traces its origins to a 1621 celebration at Plymouth in present-day Massachusetts (when the Plymouth colony did not have enough food to feed half of the 102 colonists, the Wampanoag Indians helped the Pilgrims by providing seeds and teaching them to fish). Historically, this was how the American Thanksgiving has started.

Thanksgiving - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving

 

Since Thanksgiving began as a tradition of celebrating the harvest of the year, I will be posting a few of my 'own harvest' pics. Today's pic is GARDEN HACKLEBERRY (Solanum melanocerasum), a decorative annual berry-producing plant. It grows to a 3-ft bushy plant in one season, producing clusters of plump nightshade jet-black fruit (looks like large, dark blueberries.) Huckleberry makes delicious pies, jellies, and jams (but needs about 1/3 more sugar than a blueberries.) The fruits are not edible until fully ripe and cooked. They are toxic if eaten unripe, and the raw fruit is quite bitter. The berries are ready to harvest about two weeks after they first turn black.

 

Huckleberries hold a place in archaic English slang. The tiny size of the berries led to their frequent use as a way of referring to something small, often in an affectionate way. "I'm your huckleberry" is a way of saying that one is just the right person for a given job. Mark Twain in his famous Adventures of Huckleberry Finn named his fictional character 'Huckleberry' having in mind a rich meaning of this word in the slang of that era.

Thanksgiving is usually my favorite holiday. I love a holiday that focuses on sharing a meal with people I love rather than on "stuff." This year family feasts are harsh reminders that not everything is perfect in my family. My daughter, who was extremely sick this summer, will still not be able to fully join in, and that makes me really sad. I'm trying to make the best of it though.

 

We always spend the holiday with my mother's family. This year we will be at her sister's house in New Haven. I have so many fond childhood memories that take place in her house. I adore my aunt and my cousins and their families. My sister and one of my brothers will be coming as well. I am looking forward to seeing everyone!

 

I'm making the cranberry sauce and brussel sprouts and three pies (pumpkin, pecan, and sour cream raisin).

 

I'm grateful for family traditions and a wonderful extended family to share them with.

 

{gratitude 21/30}

This article made me laugh so hard and wanted to share it in memory

of Art Buchwald, a great favorite of mine.

I hope that you all will enjoy it in the humorous spirit that it was intended...

 

Happy Thanksgiving to all my wonderful Flickr friends...! ! !

 

How to Explain Thanksgiving to the French

 

This classic Thanksgiving column by the great Art Buchwald has been published for decades, each year with a new introduction by Buchwald, in the International Herald Tribune and the Washington Post. Art Buchwald died earlier this year; time will tell which introduction will become part of the tradition.

  

ONE of the most important holidays is Thanksgiving Day, known in France as le Jour de Merci Donnant.

 

Le Jour de Merci Donnant was started by a group of pilgrims (Pèlerins) who fled from l'Angleterre before the McCarran Act to found a colony in the New World (le Nouveau Monde) where they could shoot Indians (les Peaux-Rouges) and eat turkey (dinde) to their hearts' content. They landed at a place called Plymouth (now a famous voiture Americaine) in a wooden sailing ship named the Mayflower, or Fleur de Mai, in 1620. But while the Pèlerins were killing the dindes, the Peaux-Rouges were killing the Pèlerins, and there were several hard winters ahead for both of them.

 

The only way the Peaux- Rouges helped the Pèlerins was when they taught them how to grow corn (mais). The reason they did this was because they liked corn with their Pèlerins.

 

In 1623, after another harsh year, the Pèlerins' crops were so good that they decided to have a celebration and give thanks because more mais was raised by the Pèlerins than Pèlerins were killed by the Peaux-Rouges.

 

Every year on le Jour de Merci Donnant, parents tell their children an amusing story about the first celebration.

 

It concerns a brave capitaine named Miles Standish (known in France as Kilomètres Deboutish) and a shy young lieutenant named Jean Alden. Both of them were in love with a flower of Plymouth named Priscilla Mullens (no translation). The vieux capitaine said to the jeune lieutenant:

 

"Go to the damsel Priscilla (Allez très vite chez Priscilla), the loveliest maiden of Plymouth (la plus jolie demoiselle de Plymouth). Say that a blunt old captain, a man not of words but of action (un vieux Fanfan la Tulipe), offers his hand and his heart — the hand and heart of a soldier. Not in these words, you understand, but this, in short, is my meaning.

 

"I am a maker of war (Je suis un fabricant de la guerre) and not a maker of phrases. You, bred as a scholar (Vous, qui êtes pain comme un étudiant), can say it in elegant language, such as you read in your books of the pleadings and wooings of lovers, such as you think best suited to win the heart of the maiden."

 

Although Jean was fit to be tied (convenable à être emballé), friendship prevailed over love and he went to his duty. But instead of using elegant language, he blurted out his mission. Priscilla was muted with amazement and sorrow (rendue muette par l'étonnement et la tristesse).

At length she exclaimed, breaking the ominous silence, "If the great captain of Plymouth is so very eager to wed me, why does he not come himself and take the trouble to woo me?" (Ou est-il, le vieux Kilomètres? Pourquoi ne vient-il pas auprès de moi pour tenter sa chance?)

 

Jean said that Kilomètres Deboutish was very busy and didn't have time for such things. He staggered on, telling her what a wonderful husband Kilomètres would make. Finally, Priscilla arched her eyebrows and said in a tremulous voice, "Why don't you speak for yourself, Jean?" (Chacun à son gout.)

 

And so, on the fourth Thursday in November, American families sit down at a large table brimming with tasty dishes and for the only time during the year eat better than the French do.

No one can deny that le Jour de Merci Donnant is a grande fête, and no matter how well fed American families are, they never forget to give thanks to Kilomètres Deboutish, who made this great day possible.

 

flickr random views~ métrogirl

 

© All rights reserved

Every year at this time it's tradition to think of things we're thankful for. I, for one, am thankful to live in this part of the world at this time in history, to see the sights of the American West across the seasons, and share them with you, our great lovers of photography from around the world.

History

In 1964, four businessmen — Joe Neuhoff, Julius Schepps, John Stemmons, and Peter Stewart — wanted the City of Dallas to be known not only for its worldly aspirations and economic accomplishments, but also for the enduring heart of its citizens.

Researchers and spiritual leaders discovered a long history of “giving and living thanks” in Dallas. Thanksgiving — gratitude in action — was recognized as a human universal, present in cultures and faith traditions around the world. The Thanks-Giving Foundation was chartered to create a public space in the heart of the city dedicated in gratitude to God and to the “most ancient and enduring of American traditions.”

Forming the first public-private venture in the city’s history, the Thanks-Giving Foundation worked with the City of Dallas to acquire land in 1968. Construction began in 1973. Designated as one of the region’s American Revolution Bicentennial Projects, the Chapel of Thanksgiving and the Bell Tower were dedicated on Thanksgiving Day, 1976. President Gerald Ford recognized Thanks-Giving Square as a “major national shrine.” The remainder of the grounds opened in 1977, two hundred years after General George Washington proclaimed the first national Day of Thanksgiving on request of the Continental Congress.

Today, Thanks-Giving Square continues to serve as common ground

where people of all cultures and religions are welcome. What began as a simple park has become a refuge and space to celebrate values, thoughts, and spirituality.

If you've known me for a wee while, you'll know the importance of this tradition for us. It fills me with such nostalgia as each year we return, a little taller for two and a little less agile for another.

Captured at Moorpark

Thanksgiving to Christmas--fresh fruits symbolize the festive harvest season in this old-fashioned mountain town. Shenandoah Valley, Virginia. (Ten years ago. . . . ) I think the leaves are magnolia.

Buchanan Presbyterian Church.

www.pcusa.org/congregations/22956/

 

Formerly posted to Wunderground.com, which is ending its Photos program.

 

Olympus SP500UZ.

Hey everyone! WOW, what a day!!! It's been my tradition the last few years to spend Thanksgiving Day at the Poarch Creek Indian Pow Wow outside Atmore, Alabama but decided to wait until today, when the tribal dances start earlier and the evening shadows wouldn't affect the shoot...and I'm so glad I picked today, as I had a wonderful surprise as three of my very dear friends from the Eastern Shore Camera Club, Kathy , Georgia , and Phyllis

showed up and we could share the thrill of being immersed in the vibrant culture and heritage of the Poarch Creek Indians on this gorgeous, crisp day! The Creek nation is so dynamic and are focused on preserving their culture, beliefs and music for generations to come...and it is a wonderful spiritual experience to see the coming together of their tribe, young and old, from across the country for this annual Pow Wow, now in its 43rd year...and invite the public to join in on their celebration of who they are and have always been-and the many blessings God has granted them! A truly memorable day of Native American music, dance and good food!!!

 

This will be a continuing series over the next few days...with 970 shots taken, I feel like one of the astronomers now sorting through an overwhelming amount of data trying to decide Comet Ison's next move...LOL Like them, it will take me a few days to sort this all out!

 

Have a WONDERFUL weekend, everyone!

   

:copyright: ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Use without permission is illegal.

  

~ Melody Beattie ~ Melody Beattie is the author of Codependent No More, published in 1987 by the Hazelden Foundation. The book was successful and influential within the self-help movement, selling over eight million copies and introducing the word codependent to the general public.

 

Happy Thanksgiving dear friends.... from my home to yours :)

 

 

Thanksgiving ~

 

Wikipedia

 

Thanksgiving, or Thanksgiving Day, is a holiday celebrated in the United States on the fourth Thursday in November. It has officially been an annual tradition since 1863, when, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national day of "Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens", to be celebrated on Thursday, November 26. As a federal and popular holiday in the U.S., Thanksgiving is one of the major holidays of the year. Together with Christmas and the New Year, Thanksgiving is a part of the broader holiday season.

The event that some Americans commonly call the "First Thanksgiving" was celebrated by the Pilgrims after their first harvest in the New World in 1621. The first Thanksgiving feast lasted three days, and was attended by 53 Pilgrims and 90 Native Americans. The New England colonists were accustomed to regularly celebrating "thanksgivings"—days of prayer thanking God for blessings such as military victory or the end of a drought, though the 1621 events were likely not a religious observation.

 

The first documented thanksgiving feasts in territory currently belonging to the United States were conducted by Spaniards in the 16th century. Thanksgiving services were routine in what was to become the Commonwealth of Virginia as early as 1607, with the first permanent settlement of Jamestown, Virginia holding a thanksgiving in 1610.

On December 4, 1619, 38 English settlers arrived at Berkeley Hundred, which comprised about 8,000 acres (3,200 ha) on the north bank of the James River, near Herring Creek, in an area then known as Charles Cittie, about 20 miles (32 km) upstream from Jamestown, where the first permanent settlement of the Colony of Virginia had been established on May 14, 1607.

The group's charter required that the day of arrival be observed yearly as a "day of thanksgiving" to God. On that first day, Captain John Woodlief held the service of thanksgiving. As quoted from the section of the Charter of Berkeley Hundred specifying the thanksgiving service: "We ordaine that the day of our ships arrival at the place assigned for plantacon in the land of Virginia shall be yearly and perpetually kept holy as a day of thanksgiving to Almighty God."

 

During the Indian massacre of 1622, nine of the settlers at Berkeley Hundreds were killed, as well as about a third of the entire population of the Virginia Colony. The Berkeley Hundred site and other outlying locations were abandoned as the colonists withdrew to Jamestown and other more secure points.

After several years, the site became Berkeley Plantation, and was long the traditional home of the Harrison family, one of the First Families of Virginia. In 1634, it became part of the first eight shires of Virginia, as Charles City County, one of the oldest in the United States, and is located along Virginia State Route 5, which runs parallel to the river's northern borders past sites of many of the James River plantations between the colonial capital city of Williamsburg (now the site of Colonial Williamsburg) and the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia at Richmond.

 

The weekend after Thanksgiving has become a bit of a tradition with my family in which we put up many of the Christmas decorations. We weren't sure if we would get to them this year, with Cody not liking Sundays, but eventually we made it happen. Cody really seemed to like looking at the lights and especially listening to the Star Trek Ornaments that light up and play classic clips/sounds.

 

Strobist info: Used a flash sitting to the right of the scene, pointing away from the objects, and a big gold reflector dish to bounce the light back in a relatively soft way (I could really use an umbrella or large soft box here).

 

Used Aperture for all the edits to help bring out some of the clarity and color.

Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday celebrated primarily in the United States and Canada. Thanksgiving is celebrated each year on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States and on the second Monday of October in Canada. Because of the longstanding traditions of the holiday, the celebration often extends to the weekend that falls closest to the day it is celebrated. Several other places around the world observe similar celebrations. Thanksgiving has its historical roots in religious traditions, but today is celebrated in a more secular manner. Kim Klassen texture used. Blurred edges.

I borrow the American tradition of thanksgiving to thank you my love for being in my life, for bringing me hope, for your curiosity and creativity and for giving me the love for classical music when you moved me so deeply playing your piano for me.

 

I also thank all my Flickr friends for all the beautiful photos and inspiration you give me.

To all of my Flickr friends: HAVE A HAPPY THANKSGIVING - ŽETVENA ZAHVALA 2012 !

 

Thanksgiving Day is a holiday celebrated primarily in the United States (the fourth Thursday of November) and Canada (the second Monday of October). Thanksgiving in North America had originated from a mix of European and Native traditions. Typically in Europe, festivals were held before and after the harvest cycles to give thanks for a good harvest, and to rejoice together after much hard work. At the time, Native Americans had also celebrated the end of a harvest season. In the USA, the modern Thanksgiving holiday tradition traces its origins to a 1621 celebration at Plymouth in present-day Massachusetts (when the Plymouth colony did not have enough food to feed half of the 102 colonists, the Wampanoag Indians helped the Pilgrims by providing seeds and teaching them to fish). Historically, this was how the American Thanksgiving has started.

Thanksgiving - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thanksgiving

Our annual family tradition and it was a complete success! Served it with beet greens for a perfect combination. Good dinner to serve to guests! And it's a perfect way to use up leftover turkey from Thanksgiving. Mmmm! Sorry, it's gone now, all that's left is the picture. :)

Wild turkey

Turkeys have some strange habits. They lived in the woods

behind my home for a couple years. I feed them corn. They would roost in the tall pine trees. One day they all disappeared. Several months later they came running into the backyard like they never left.

 

The traditional meal on Thanksgiving includes turkey, mashed potatoes and wonderful turkey gravy, stuffing, side dishes and pumpkin pie.

 

44 million turkeys are consumed on Thanksgiving in America.

88% of the people eat turkey on the holiday.

 

Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday celebrated in Canada and the United States as a day of giving thanks for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year. It is celebrated on the second Monday of October in Canada and on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States. Several other places around the world observe similar celebrations. Thanksgiving has its historical roots in religious and cultural traditions and has long been celebrated in a secular manner as well.

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 79 80