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View allAll Photos Tagged Tetragnathidae

Tetragnathidae

2/6/2017

Topsham, Devon

probably T.montana but impossible to be sure from photos

Leucauge cf dromedaria Family Tetragnathidae

Tetragnathidae

2/6/2017

Topsham, Devon

probably T.montana but impossible to be sure from photos

Tetragnathidae

2/6/2017

Topsham, Devon

probably T.montana but impossible to be sure from photos

Long-jawed orb weaver (Tetragnathidae)

May 16, 2017

Brownsville, Fayette County, Pennsylvania

Long-jawed Orb Weavers

St Olaf Natural Lands

Northfield, Minnesota

Leucauge decorata Tetragnathidae

Leucauge decorata Tetragnathidae

Not only long-jawed but very long-butted spider!

 

seems surprising how short the 3rd set of legs are.

 

For Beautiful Bug Butt Thursday

Orb-weaver spiders or araneids are members of the spider family Araneidae. They are the most common group of builders of spiral wheel-shaped webs often found in gardens, fields and forests. "Orb" was previously used in English to mean "circular",[2] hence the English name of the group. Araneids have eight similar eyes, hairy or spiny legs, and no stridulating organs.[1]

 

The family is cosmopolitan, including many well-known large or brightly colored garden spiders. With around 3,100 species in 169 genera worldwide, Araneidae is the third-largest family of spiders (behind Salticidae and Linyphiidae).[1] Araneid webs are constructed in a stereotyped fashion. A framework of nonsticky silk is built up before the spider adds a final spiral of silk covered in sticky droplets.

 

Orb-webs are also produced by members of other spider families. The large golden orb-weavers (Nephilidae) and the long-jawed orb weavers (Tetragnathidae) were formerly included in the Araneidae; they are closely related, being part of the superfamily Araneoidea. The cribellate or hackled orb-weavers (Uloboridae) belong to a different group of spiders. Their webs are strikingly similar, but use a different kind of sticky silk.

Scource : WIKIPEDIA

 

Wood spider or Banana spider.

Family: Tetragnathidae

Size: Female: 50-60 mm; Male: 5-6 mm.

Location : Muthukad, Kozhikode Dt, Kerala, India

 

Habitat: Primary and secondary forests, wasteland and gardens.

 

The cephalothorax is thin and flat with the cephalus raised. At the rear of the cephalus, there are two short horn-like projections. The abdomen is long, rounded, widest and truncated in the front, narrowing gradually to a rounded posterior. The abdomen covers pedicel and spinnerets. The legs are very long. The front legs are about twice as long as the spider, thin, brittle and swollen at the joints. There is a longitudinal row of short spines on the femora. Carapace is black and covered with very short silvery hairs. The abdomen is black with yellow longitudinal bands. The male is reddish brown in colour and hangs on the edge of the web and is very smaller than the female.

 

Information Courtesy southindianspiders.org/

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