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sugar cane near Tumbulgum

Northern Rivers NSW AU

Tweed River, Tumbulgum, New South Wales

Tumbulgum is a beautiful little place to sit and watch the sun go down, overlooking Mt Warning in the background while fish jump from the water of the Tweed River

Overlooking Mt Warning from the banks of the Tweed River in Tumbulgum, NSW

Car ferry at Tumbulgum, northern NSW, in September 1966.

Late afternoon sunlight provides some interesting colours.

Surfside Buslines (Tweed Heads) Bustech "XDi" (MkIII/CAT C7) 7867 MO (325) is seen in the mid-afternoon sun gliding along Riverside Drive through the historic town of Tumbulgum on the Tweed River working an outbound route 605 to Murwillumbah on its first day under the reformed timetable and route changes that took effect for the Tweed, 16th of December 2019.

A sign highlighting that the area is a koala black spot. Hogans Road, Near Tumbulgum, New South Wales, Australia.

Brahminy Kite, Tweed River, Tumbulgum, New South Wales

Tweed River, Tumbulgum, New South Wales

Pacific Black Ducks, Tweed River, Tumbulgum, New South Wales

Brahminy Kite, Tweed River, Tumbulgum, New South Wales

The widely distributed Ardea modesta is distinguished from other egrets by its large size (0.8-1.05m) and relatively long and kinked neck. This example is from the flood reinforced bank of the Tweed River at Tumbulgum New South Wales. Unusually for this wader its feet are clearly visible on the rocks.

Tweed River, Tumbulgum, New South Wales

Tweed River, Tumbulgum, New South Wales

An Eastern Osprey (Pandion haliaetus cristatus) eats prey beneath an artificial nesting site beside the Tweed River New South Wales, a rich source of food. Osprey numbers have been in decline due to habitat degradation, lack of nesting sites and fishing tackle entanglement. This is not a pretty photo but hopefully a reassuring picture.

Two more photographs in first comment.

 

Why Not Take The Side Roads? That is the question I asked my wife. It's been so many times we come in this region of Australia. Go a little further inland could be great. And you know I like Adventure.

 

Although the weather conditions do not lend themselves to them, the countries we are experiencing are magnificent. Landscapes take on dramatic appearance. No traffic jam on this secondary road (tourists remained on the Surfers Paradise' beaches). Finally, it is nearly noon, and we stop in Tumbulgum, a small village on the banks of Tweed River. 390 souls inhabit this small village. Some fishermen are devoted to their favourite pastime. This place is so peaceful.

 

Back in the 1880's, Tumbulgum was the principal town on the Tweed, a very busy river port at the junction of the Rous and Tweed Rivers. There was great rivalry with nearby Murwillumbah, but when Murwillumbah gained both the railway to Lismore (1897) and the Murwillumbah Bridge (1901), Tumbulgum slowly settled back into historic village status, with many buildings including the Tumbulgum Hotel protected by National Heritage classification.

 

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Et Pourquoi Pas Prendre Les Chemins De Traverse ? C'est la question que j'ai posée à Brigitte. Depuis le temps que nous venons dans cette région de l'Australie, aller un peu plus à l'intérieur des terres ne peut pas faire de mal. Et j'aime l'aventure.

 

Bien que le temps ne s'y prête guère, les contrées que nous traversons sont magnifiques. Et les paysages prennent des allures dramatiques. La petite route est très peu fréquentée (les touristes sont restés sur la plage à Surfers Paradise). Finalement, il n'est pas loin de midi, et nous nous arrêtons à Tumbulgum, petit patelin de 390 âmes, au bord de la rivière Tweed.

 

Quelques pêcheurs s'adonnent à leur passe temps favori. Le calme règne tout autour de ce lieu paisible.

 

Un peu d'Histoire : dans les années 1880, Tumbulgum était un port fluvial à la jonction des rivières Rous et Tweed. Il existait une grande rivalité avec Murwillumbah, sa ville voisine plus au sud. Mais lorsque Murwillumbah acquit à la fois la voie ferrée à Lismore (1897) et le pont de Murwillumbah (1901), Tumbulgum redevint lentement un petit village historique.

 

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Infos prises de vue

Canon 7D & EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM ▪ 1/250s à f/13 ▪ Iso 200 ▪ 60mm ▪ Handheld | aperture priority |RAW|

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

One more photograph in first comment.

 

Leaving The Dallis Park I reach Murwillumbah. Then a wonderful landscape view comes up and I try to find a place to park the car on the roadside. The Tweed Shire is here as far as eyes can see.

 

The first people to live in the area were Bundjalung people. The name Murwillumbah derives from an Aboriginal word meaning "camping place" – from Murrie, meaning "aboriginal people", Wolli, "a camp"; and Bab, "the place of". Nearby Mount Warning and its attendant national park are known as Wollumbin, meaning "Cloud Catcher", in the Bundjalung language. Timber-getters were drawn to the region in the 1840s. The river port at Tumbulgum was initially the main settlement. In 1902, a local government municipality was declared with Murwillumbah as its centre.

 

Most of the town's business district was destroyed by fire in 1907. Murwillumbah is the location for Australia’s largest-ever bank robbery which occurred in 1978 and has not been solved. The major industry of the area, apart from tourism, is sugarcane growing. There were numerous tramways in the area serving the sugar mill at Condong. There is also some dairy farming in the area. Since 2002 an annual historic motor racing festival has been run through the streets of Murwillimbah, featuring a parade through town, a one kilometre hill climb course, and connected events, attracting thousands of spectators.

 

This trip ended here, and we went back home. We had to rest because we knew we'd had a long trip the next day: going to Lamington National Park. See you later Folks!

 

Click the image for a view in light box.

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Je Laisse Dallis Park et roule en direction de Murwillumbah. Juste avant d'entrer dans le village, j'assiste à un spectacle exceptionnel pour les yeux. Il faut que je trouve une place pour me garer, mais ce n'est pas facile ici. La place trouvée, le Comté de Tweed s'étale devans mes yeux.

 

Le premier peuple à vivre ici était les Bundjalung. Murwillumbah est d'origine aborigène et veut dire "point de peuplement". A proximité, le mont Warning et son parc national sont connus sous le nom de Wollumbin, ce qui signifie 'Attrapeur de Nuages' en langue Bundjalung. Des exploitants forestiers ont été attirés par cette région dans les années 1840. La première colonie s'est installée au port fluvial à Tumbulgum. En 1902, les élus locaux ont déclaré Murwillumbah comme centre principal.

 

La plus grosse partie du centre d'affaires a brûlé dans un incendie en 1907. Murwillumbah est aussi le lieu où a eu un spectaculaire vol à main armée en 1978, qui n'est toujours pas résolu. En dehors du tourisme, l'industrie de la canne à sucre est l'activité principale, et aussi quelques producteurs de lait. Depuis 2002 le festival historique de courses automobiles se déroule dans les rues de la ville, attirant ainsi des milliers de spectateurs.

Après ce périple quotidien, nous sommes rentrés contents de notre journée. Il fallait nous reposer car nous savions que le lendemain, nous devions aller dans le parc national de Lamington. A très bientôt donc!

 

Cliquer sur la photo ou appuyer sur 'L' pour une vue dans lightbox.

______________________________________________________________________________________

Infos prises de vue

Canon 7D & EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM ▪ 1/400s à f/14 ▪ Iso 125 ▪ 24mm ▪ Handheld | aperture priority |Raw|

 

See where this picture was taken. [?]

Tumbulgum Historical Cemetery maps.google.com/maps?q=-28.26666667,153.45616667&spn=... The historic cemetery, hidden in a pocket of rainforest at North Tumbulgum, was the burial place for the Tweed Valley’s early white settlers.

Back in the 1800s, Tumbulgum was the principal town on the Tweed River, populated by the timber-getters who spread through the Valley in search of red cedars.

From a small parking area on McAuleys Road, just over 3.5 kms from Tumbulgum Village, a set of stairs carved into the hillside leads up to the final resting place of 150 of those pioneers. The oldest grave dates back to 1873 – an infant, Christina McLeod, who drowned in the river at just 20 months of age.

The surrounding hand-carved headstones, decorated with moss and lichens and surrounded by fallen leaves and rambling ferns, tell a similar story of hardship and heartbreak with so many early deaths attributed to drownings and tree-felling accidents. Very few lived beyond 60 years of age.

In 1993, the almost-forgotten cemetery was rescued from the encroaching rainforest and preserved as a historical site by a team of community volunteers who built access paths, seats and rest areas. They also planted many of the original rainforest species, including the Bird Wing Vine to encourage breeding of the endangered Richmond River Bird Wing Butterfly.

As the last few minutes of sunlight linger over the quiet, historic river-side settlement of Tumbulgum on the banks of the Tweed River, Surfside's 8150 MO (326), a Bustech "XDi" (MkIII/Cummins ISC) of Tweed Heads depot breaks the silence working the last outbound 609 of the day from Kingscliff TAFE to Murwillumbah running via Tweed Valley Way (Old Pacific Highway) and Tumbulgum express.

The 609 was introduced with the major changes the Tweed region saw to its bus services on December 16th, 2019, to provide TAFE students in Murwillumbah with a quicker and more convenient method of reaching the North Coast TAFE at Kingscliff. Prior to the introduction of this thrice-daily weekdays-only return service, TAFE students residing in Murwillumbah had to catch a 605 to Minjungbal Drive outside Tweed City (or alternatively Wharf Street, Tweed Heads) and then wait for a route 601 service to Kingscliff TAFE from there, and vice versa on their way home. That said, at least there was an hourly frequency for the 605 on weekdays before the changes, with its patrons suffering 2 to 3 hour frequencies on both weekdays and weekends as a result of the so called "improvements".

New friends Dan and Simon -- from Tumbulgum, NSW -- drinking Cusqueña, a tasty Peruvian beer, on the train from Machu Picchu back to Cusco.

 

For your safety and well-being, I Googled "Tumbulgum" before I posted this. It really is a town in Australia. Trust me on this...

A photo inspired by the song "Great Southern Land" by Icehouse.

Surfside Buslines (Tweed Heads) Bustech "XDi" (MkIII/CAT C7) 8148 MO (323) seen operating an outbound route 605 to Murwillumbah via Terranora and Tumbulgum in its final days of operating via Sexton Hill Drive, Terranora Road and Bushranger Circuit at an hourly weekday frequency before the new changes took effect four days later.

Tumbulgum Historical Cemetery maps.google.com/maps?q=-28.26666667,153.45616667&spn=... The historic cemetery, hidden in a pocket of rainforest at North Tumbulgum, was the burial place for the Tweed Valley’s early white settlers.

Back in the 1800s, Tumbulgum was the principal town on the Tweed River, populated by the timber-getters who spread through the Valley in search of red cedars.

From a small parking area on McAuleys Road, just over 3.5 kms from Tumbulgum Village, a set of stairs carved into the hillside leads up to the final resting place of 150 of those pioneers. The oldest grave dates back to 1873 – an infant, Christina McLeod, who drowned in the river at just 20 months of age.

The surrounding hand-carved headstones, decorated with moss and lichens and surrounded by fallen leaves and rambling ferns, tell a similar story of hardship and heartbreak with so many early deaths attributed to drownings and tree-felling accidents. Very few lived beyond 60 years of age.

In 1993, the almost-forgotten cemetery was rescued from the encroaching rainforest and preserved as a historical site by a team of community volunteers who built access paths, seats and rest areas. They also planted many of the original rainforest species, including the Bird Wing Vine to encourage breeding of the endangered Richmond River Bird Wing Butterfly.

Tumbulgum Historical Cemetery maps.google.com/maps?q=-28.26666667,153.45616667&spn=... The historic cemetery, hidden in a pocket of rainforest at North Tumbulgum, was the burial place for the Tweed Valley’s early white settlers.

Back in the 1800s, Tumbulgum was the principal town on the Tweed River, populated by the timber-getters who spread through the Valley in search of red cedars.

From a small parking area on McAuleys Road, just over 3.5 kms from Tumbulgum Village, a set of stairs carved into the hillside leads up to the final resting place of 150 of those pioneers. The oldest grave dates back to 1873 – an infant, Christina McLeod, who drowned in the river at just 20 months of age.

The surrounding hand-carved headstones, decorated with moss and lichens and surrounded by fallen leaves and rambling ferns, tell a similar story of hardship and heartbreak with so many early deaths attributed to drownings and tree-felling accidents. Very few lived beyond 60 years of age.

In 1993, the almost-forgotten cemetery was rescued from the encroaching rainforest and preserved as a historical site by a team of community volunteers who built access paths, seats and rest areas. They also planted many of the original rainforest species, including the Bird Wing Vine to encourage breeding of the endangered Richmond River Bird Wing Butterfly.

Historical grave at North Tumbulgum, NSW, Australia. Over 150 burials took place in this cemetery between 1870 and 1947. It was the burial place for the early white settlers of the area who were cedar tree cutters. The first documented burial was that of a drowned infant, Christina McLeod in 1873. Many early deaths were attributed to drownings and tree felling accidents. The cemetery is in a small area of rainforest, a short walk up a hill & most of the graves are slightly overgrown.

Sunset over the Tweed River. A fish jumped just as I took the shot.

Tumbulgum Historical Cemetery maps.google.com/maps?q=-28.26666667,153.45616667&spn=... The historic cemetery, hidden in a pocket of rainforest at North Tumbulgum, was the burial place for the Tweed Valley’s early white settlers.

Back in the 1800s, Tumbulgum was the principal town on the Tweed River, populated by the timber-getters who spread through the Valley in search of red cedars.

From a small parking area on McAuleys Road, just over 3.5 kms from Tumbulgum Village, a set of stairs carved into the hillside leads up to the final resting place of 150 of those pioneers. The oldest grave dates back to 1873 – an infant, Christina McLeod, who drowned in the river at just 20 months of age.

The surrounding hand-carved headstones, decorated with moss and lichens and surrounded by fallen leaves and rambling ferns, tell a similar story of hardship and heartbreak with so many early deaths attributed to drownings and tree-felling accidents. Very few lived beyond 60 years of age.

In 1993, the almost-forgotten cemetery was rescued from the encroaching rainforest and preserved as a historical site by a team of community volunteers who built access paths, seats and rest areas. They also planted many of the original rainforest species, including the Bird Wing Vine to encourage breeding of the endangered Richmond River Bird Wing Butterfly.

Tumbulgum Historical Cemetery maps.google.com/maps?q=-28.26666667,153.45616667&spn=... The historic cemetery, hidden in a pocket of rainforest at North Tumbulgum, was the burial place for the Tweed Valley’s early white settlers.

Back in the 1800s, Tumbulgum was the principal town on the Tweed River, populated by the timber-getters who spread through the Valley in search of red cedars.

From a small parking area on McAuleys Road, just over 3.5 kms from Tumbulgum Village, a set of stairs carved into the hillside leads up to the final resting place of 150 of those pioneers. The oldest grave dates back to 1873 – an infant, Christina McLeod, who drowned in the river at just 20 months of age.

The surrounding hand-carved headstones, decorated with moss and lichens and surrounded by fallen leaves and rambling ferns, tell a similar story of hardship and heartbreak with so many early deaths attributed to drownings and tree-felling accidents. Very few lived beyond 60 years of age.

In 1993, the almost-forgotten cemetery was rescued from the encroaching rainforest and preserved as a historical site by a team of community volunteers who built access paths, seats and rest areas. They also planted many of the original rainforest species, including the Bird Wing Vine to encourage breeding of the endangered Richmond River Bird Wing Butterfly.

Tumbulgum Historical Cemetery maps.google.com/maps?q=-28.26666667,153.45616667&spn=... The historic cemetery, hidden in a pocket of rainforest at North Tumbulgum, was the burial place for the Tweed Valley’s early white settlers.

Back in the 1800s, Tumbulgum was the principal town on the Tweed River, populated by the timber-getters who spread through the Valley in search of red cedars.

From a small parking area on McAuleys Road, just over 3.5 kms from Tumbulgum Village, a set of stairs carved into the hillside leads up to the final resting place of 150 of those pioneers. The oldest grave dates back to 1873 – an infant, Christina McLeod, who drowned in the river at just 20 months of age.

The surrounding hand-carved headstones, decorated with moss and lichens and surrounded by fallen leaves and rambling ferns, tell a similar story of hardship and heartbreak with so many early deaths attributed to drownings and tree-felling accidents. Very few lived beyond 60 years of age.

In 1993, the almost-forgotten cemetery was rescued from the encroaching rainforest and preserved as a historical site by a team of community volunteers who built access paths, seats and rest areas. They also planted many of the original rainforest species, including the Bird Wing Vine to encourage breeding of the endangered Richmond River Bird Wing Butterfly.

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