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Warmup shot with Joyce - more to come soon!

 

Model: Joyce Benson

Photo: Thomas Ohlsson Photography

 

www.thomasohlsson.com | 500px | Facebook | Flickr | Instagram

Copied from wikipedia.

 

History:

The Stourton family, the Barons of Stourton, had lived in the Stourhead estate for 500 years until they sold it to Sir Thomas Meres in 1714. His son, John Meres, sold it to Henry Hoare I, son of wealthy banker Sir Richard Hoare in 1717. The original manor house was demolished and a new house, one of the first of its kind, was designed by Colen Campbell and built by Nathaniel Ireson between 1721 and 1725. Over the next 200 years the Hoare family collected many heirlooms, including a large library and art collection. In 1902 the house was gutted by fire but many of the heirlooms were saved, and the house was rebuilt in a near identical style.

 

The last Hoare family member to own the property, Henry Hugh Arthur Hoare, gave the house and gardens to the National Trust in 1946, one year before his death; his sole heir and son, Captain "Harry" Henry Colt Arthur Hoare, of the Queen's Own Dorset Yeomanry, had died of wounds received at the Battle of Mughar Ridge on 13 November 1917 in World War I. The last Hoare family member to be born at the house was Edward Hoare on 11 October 1949.

 

Architects:

Although the main design for the estate at Stourhead was created by Colen Campbell, there were various other architects involved in its evolution through the years. William Benson, Henry Hoare's brother-in-law, was in part responsible for the building of the estate in 1719. Francis Cartwright, a master builder and architect, was established as a "competent provincial designer in the Palladian manner." He worked on Stourhead between the years of 1749–1755. Cartwright was a known carver, presumably of materials such as wood and stone. It is assumed that his contribution to Stourhead was in this capacity. Nathaniel Ireson is the master builder credited for much of the work on the Estate. It is this work that established his career, in 1720.

 

The original estate remained intact, though changes and additions were made over time. Henry Flitcroft built three temples and a tower on the property. The Temple of Ceres was added in 1744, followed by the Temple of Hercules in 1754 and the Temple of Apollo in 1765. That same year he designed Alfred's Tower, but it wasn't built until 1772. In 1806, the mason and surveyor John Carter added an ornamental cottage to the grounds; at the request of Sir Richard Colt Hoare. The architect William Wilkins created a Grecian style lodge in 1816; for Sir R. Colt Hoare.

 

In 1840, over a century after the initial buildings were constructed, Charles Parker was hired by Sir Hugh Hoare to make changes to the estate. A portico was added to the main house, along with other alterations. The design of the additions was in keeping with original plans.

 

"The Genius of the Place"

The lake at Stourhead is artificially created. Following a path around the lake is meant to evoke a journey similar to that of Aeneas's descent in to the underworld. In addition to Greek mythology, the layout is evocative of the "genius of the place", a concept made famous by Alexander Pope. Buildings and monuments are erected in remembrance of family and local history. Henry Hoare was a collector of art– one of his pieces was Claude Lorrain's Aeneas at Delos, which is thought to have inspired the pictorial design of the gardens. Passages telling of Aeneas's journey are quoted in the temples surrounding the lake.

 

Monuments are used to frame one another; for example the Pantheon designed by Flitcroft entices the visitor over, but once reached, views from the opposite shore of the lake beckon. The use of the sunken path allows the landscape to continue on into neighbouring landscapes, allowing the viewer to contemplate all the surrounding panorama. The Pantheon was thought to be the most important visual feature of the gardens. It appears in many pieces of artwork owned by Hoare, depicting Aeneas's travels. The plantings in the garden were arranged in a manner that would evoke different moods, drawing visitors through realms of thought. According to Henry Hoare, 'The greens should be ranged together in large masses as the shades are in painting: to contrast the dark masses with the light ones, and to relieve each dark mass itself with little sprinklings of lighter greens here and there.'

 

The gardens were designed by Henry Hoare II and laid out between 1741 and 1780 in a classical 18th-century design set around a large lake, achieved by damming a small stream. The inspiration behind their creation were the painters Claude Lorrain, Poussin, and, in particular, Gaspard Dughet, who painted Utopian-type views of Italian landscapes. It is similar in style to the landscape gardens at Stowe.

 

Included in the garden are a number of temples inspired by scenes of the Grand Tour of Europe. On one hill overlooking the gardens there stands an obelisk and King Alfred's Tower, a 50-metre-tall, brick folly designed by Henry Flitcroft in 1772; on another hill the temple of Apollo provides a vantage point to survey the magnificent rhododendrons, water, cascades and temples. The large medieval Bristol High Cross was moved from Bristol to the gardens. Amongst the hills surrounding the site there are also two Iron Age hill forts: Whitesheet Hill and Park Hill Camp. The gardens are home to a large collection of trees and shrubs from around the world.

 

Richard Colt Hoare, the grandson of Henry Hoare II, inherited Stourhead in 1783. He added the library wing to the mansion, and in the garden was responsible for the building of the boathouse and the removal of several features that were not in keeping with the classical and gothic styles (including a Turkish Tent). He also considerably enhanced the planting – the Temple of Apollo rises from a wooded slope that was planted in Colt Hoare's time. With the antiquarian passion of the times, he had 400 ancient burial mounds dug up to inform his pioneering History of Ancient Wiltshire.

 

Trivia:

A miniature replica of Stourhead House featured as Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward's residence in the Thunderbirds television series.

Temple of Apollo and Palladian Bridge can be seen in the 2005 movie Pride & Prejudice.

Stourhead House was featured on the cover of English indie rock band Milburn's single "What Will You Do (When The Money Goes)?"

The gardens were used in the film Barry Lyndon.

The estate was at one point garrisoned for the king, during the lifetime of the 11th Baron Stourton, who was a royalist.

The house was ravaged, in September 1644, by General Ludlow.

Inspired by Ann Bagby who often collages using faces of figures from famous oil paintings. Also inspired by Han Holbein the Younger "Portrait of Thomas Moore" (Pixabay).

 

Text taken from the following sources:

 

"Between the World and Me" Ta-Nehsis Coates;

"Angel in the Whirlwind: The Triumph of the American Revolution", Benson Bobrick;

"A Short History of Charleston", Robert Rosen

 

I’ve covered the Southaven Gordmans’ liquidation before in my photostream. I’ve covered the Southaven Gordmans’ resurrection before in my photostream. Unfortunately, soon I will be covering the Southaven Gordmans’ liquidation again in my photostream. That’s because the brand’s supposed savior – Stage Stores, which purchased Gordmans out of bankruptcy in 2017 – themselves filed for bankruptcy and went out of business due to 2020. (Yes, 2020 is a sufficient cause to be listed for bad news.)

 

I hope to start uploading those Gordmans pics early next year. In the meantime, it’s probably a good idea for you take a look at the story of how Gordmans/Stage got in that perilous position, especially given how great everything was looking for them in the few short years before. Luckily, I’ve written and published a new blog post covering exactly that topic. You also get to see the Senatobia Goody’s, a store that was slated to convert to Gordmans in 2020 before things went haywire, as a bonus. Please check it out here! And also, enjoy these music recommendations…

 

1. Give Me a Reason – Three Days Grace 🔥

2. Hometown Blues – Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

3. All or Nothing – Theory of a Deadman 🔥

4. Invisible City – Wallflowers

5. Plug in Baby – Muse 🔥

6. Living in Your Hell – 3 Doors Down 🔥

7. The Sinner is You – Volbeat

8. Call Your Name – Daughtry

9. Faceless – Red 🔥

10. Nerve Damage – Lifehouse 🔥

11. Perfect Situation – Weezer

12. Hands Are Clever – Alex Clare 🔥

13. Maniac – Michael Sembello 🔥

14. Major Tom (Völlig Losgelöst) – Peter Schilling 🔥

15. Down in the Dumps – Walk the Moon (I had my semi-regular WTM jam session last night wherein I listened to the two albums of theirs that I have on my iPod straight through. Appropriately, this practice keeps me from getting down in the dumps) 🔥

16. Die Trying – Art of Dying 🔥

17. Cold Hands (Warm Heart) – Brendan Benson

18. Flying Upside Down – Cold War Kids

19. The Man to Hold the Water – Rob Thomas

20. Life is a Highway – Rascal Flatts

21. Over My Head (Cable Car) – Fray 🔥

22. Jumper – Third Eye Blind 🔥

 

(c) 2020 Retail Retell

These places are public so these photos are too, but just as I tell where they came from, I'd appreciate if you'd say who :)

 

Top ten wedding photographers

Edward Olive

 

View Big On Black

 

its always hard to take a decent photo and especially hard not just to repeat yourself

 

i have been getting less than a decent shot per roll since the summer.

 

i am going to change cameras and style again. no more failing attemps at photojournalism and f4-32

 

taken during a wedding dinner in spain, september 2009

 

but then again even my second favourite photographer peruan mario testino is going off at times into posed staged fake smiled dullness

 

www.mariotestino.com/file/1648

 

and even worse

 

www.mariotestino.com/page/210

 

dear me mario you don't need the money stick to the rio de janeiro sizzle

 

info@edwardolive.com www.edwardolive.info

 

i was looking at the wikipedia encyclopedia and notable photographers and whilst wedding photography does exist as a category there is no category of wedding photographers nor any wedding photographer listed as notable

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_photographers

 

List of photographers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

 

This is a list of notable photographers who already have articles.

  

Contents Top · 0–9 · A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

Key:

 

abs

Abstract photographer

adv

Advertising photographer

aer

Aerial photographer

arch

Architectural photographer

art

Art photographer

celeb

Celebrity photographer

dig

Digital photography

doc

Documentary photographer

ethno

Ethnographic photographer

fash

Fashion photographer

   

food

Food photographer

inds

Industrial photographer

int

Interiors photographer

land

Landscape photographer

pict

Pictorialist

port

Portrait photographer

sci

Scientific/technical photographer

spt

Sports photographer

und

Underwater photographer

war

War photographer

rph

rephotography

 

[edit] A

 

* Rolf Aamot (art)

* Slim Aarons (doc)

* Hans Aarsman

* Abbas

* Berenice Abbott (doc, pict, port)

* Karimeh Abbud

* Sam Abell

* Laurence Aberhart

* William de Wiveleslie Abney

* George W. Ackerman (doc)

* Ansel Adams (art, doc, land, pict)

* Bryan Adams (port)

* Eddie Adams (doc, land, war)

* Robert Adams (art)

* Alfred Shea Addis

* Gustavo Aguerre (art)

* Tadasuke Akiyama (doc)

* Cris Alexander

* Fratelli Alinari

* Timothy Allen (doc, ethno, port)

* Darogha Ubbas Alli

* Jane Fulton Alt (art)

* Lola Álvarez Bravo

* Manuel Álvarez Bravo (abs, art, doc)

* Stephen Alvarez

* Christian von Alvensleben

* Takashi Amano (land, und)

* Mohamed Amin

* Ester Anderson

* Emmy Andriesse

* Taco Anema

* George Edward Anderson

* Tom Ang

* Dieter Appelt (port)

* Nobuyoshi Araki (art)

* Taku Aramasa (fash, doc)

* Allan Arbus

* Amy Arbus

* Diane Arbus (art, doc, fash, int, port)

* Malcolm Arbuthnot (pict, port)

* Fred Archer

* Roy Arden

* Taiji Arita

* Eve Arnold (art, fash, port)

* Hippolyte Arnoux

* Bill Aron

* Yann Arthus-Bertrand

* Anthony Asael

* Eugène Atget

* Anna Atkins

* Bill Atkinson (dig, land)

* Alan Aubry (arch, art, doc, int, land)

* Richard Avedon (art, fash, port)

* Jerry Avenaim (art, fash, port)

 

[edit] B

 

* Alioune Bâ

* Chapman Baehler (doc, adv, fash, port)

* David Bailey (fash, port)

* Reg Balch

* John Baldessari (abs, art)

* Edouard Baldus

* Lewis Baltz (art)

* Subhankar Banerjee

* Micha Bar-Am (doc)

* Olivo Barbieri

* Nigel Barker (fash)

* Tina Barney (art, port)

* George Barris

* Uta Barth (abs, art)

* Pablo Bartholomew (doc, art, ethno)

* Pinky Bass (abs, art, doc, land, port)

* Alexander Bassano

* Manfred Baumann

* Jean Baudrillard

* Hippolyte Bayard

* Peter Hill Beard

* Richard Beard

* Antonio Beato

* Felice Beato

* Cecil Beaton (art, doc, fash, port)

* Ingeborg de Beausacq

* Bernd and Hilla Becher (art, doc, int, land)

* Lukas Beck (art, doc, port)

* Francis Bedford

* Manzur Alam Beg (art)

* Lawrence Beitler

* Charles Belden

* Hans Bellmer (art, doc, port)

* E. J. Bellocq (doc, port)

* Rafael Ben-Ari (doc, war)

* Fernando Bengoechea (int)

* Harry Benson

* Roloff Beny

* Berry Berenson

* Henning von Berg (art, port)

* Herbert Bowyer Berkeley (land)

* Ruth Bernhard (art, int, port)

* Maeve Berry

* Peter Bialobrzeski

* James Bidgood

* Izis Bidermanas

* Edward Bierstadt (port, land)

* Richard Billingham (art, doc)

* Jack Birns

* Werner Bischof

* Auguste-Rosalie Bisson

* Andreas Bitesnich (fash)

* J. R. Black

* Louis Désiré Blanquart-Evrard

* Daniel Blaufuks

* Steve Bloom

* Karl Blossfeldt (art, sci)

* Erwin Blumenfeld

* A. Aubrey Bodine

* Henze Boekhout

* Francisco Boix

* Skip Bolen (jazz, music, celeb, doc, stills)

* Félix Bonfils

* Phil Borges

* Edouard Boubat (art)

* Jack E. Boucher (doc)

* Alexandra Boulat

* Jacques Bourboulon

* Jean-Christian Bourcart

* Margaret Bourke-White (doc, int, land, port)

* Guy Bourdin (fash)

* Samuel Bourne

* Jane Bown

* Alex Boyd (land, art)

* Mathew Brady (land, port, war)

* Brian Brake

* Bill Brandt (art, doc)

* Brassaï

* Manuel Álvarez Bravo

* Marilyn Bridges

* Anne Brigman

* Zana Briski (doc)

* Mike Brodie

* Alexey Brodovich

* Giacomo Brogi

* Hamish Brown (port)

* Dan Budnik (doc, port)

* Jan Bułhak

* Wynn Bullock (art)

* Max Burchartz

* Wilhelm J. Burger

* Victor Burgin

* Christopher Burkett

* René Burri

* Larry Burrows (war)

* Harry Burton (doc)

* Edward Burtynsky (land)

* Jean-Marc Bustamante (art)

 

[edit] C

 

* Geneviève Cadieux

* Pogus Caesar (doc, art)

* Bernard Cahier (spt)

* Claude Cahun

* Harry Callahan (art, doc, int, land, port)

* Sophie Calle

* Julia Margaret Cameron (art, doc, int, land, port)

* Loren Cameron (art, doc, port)

* Cornell Capa (doc)

* Robert Capa (doc, war)

* Paul Caponigro (art, land)

* Ilario Carposio

* Ricardo Carrasco

* Lewis Carroll (art, port)

* Keith Carter (art, doc, land, port)

* Kevin Carter

* Henri Cartier-Bresson (art, doc, port)

* Kyle Cassidy

* Andrew Catlin

* Hugh Cecil

* Chaiya

* Dean Chamberlain

* Martín Chambi

* Jean Chamoux (doc, port, fash, war)

* Polly Chandler (art, port)

* Dickey Chapelle (doc, war)

* Chien-Chi Chang

* Allan Chappelow

* Jean-Philippe Charbonnier (port, doc)

* Sarah Charlesworth (abs, art)

* Désiré Charnay

* Hong Cheong

* Tong Cheong

* Teisuke Chiba (doc)

* William Christenberry

* Hugo Cifuentes

* Elio Ciol

* Larry Clark (art, doc, fash, port)

* Bob Carlos Clarke (art)

* William Clarridge

* Antoine Claudet

* William Claxton (adv, fash, port)

* Charles Clegg

* Alvin Langdon Coburn (pict)

* Ioan Mihai Cochinescu (art, doc)

* Daniel Colegrove (doc, adv, port)

* Neville Coleman (und, land)

* Henry Collen

* Lois Conner

* Linda Connor

* Florin Constantinescu (art, doc, int, land, port)

* Martha Cooper (doc, ethno)

* Anton Corbijn

* Paul de Cordon (art, fash)

* Peter Cornelius (art)

* Joe Cornish

* Paul Couvrette (art, doc, int, land, port)

* Jeff Cowen

* Gregory Crewdson (abs, art, doc, land)

* Ted Croner

* Karel Cudlín (doc)

* Imogen Cunningham (doc, int, land, port)

* Asahel Curtis (doc)

* Edward S. Curtis (doc, land)

 

[edit] D

 

* Louis-Jacques-Mandé Daguerre (land, port)

* Louise Dahl-Wolfe (art, doc, port)

* Bruce Davidson (land, port)

* Ron Davies (art,dig,land,port)

* Daniel Davis Jr.

* George Davison

* F. Holland Day (pict)

* Lala Deen Dayal

* Peter Dazeley (adv,art,dig,fash,port)

* John Deakin (port, art)

* Loomis Dean

* Roy DeCarava

* Edgar de Evia (art, adv, doc, fash, food, int)

* Yvonne De Rosa

* Reza Deghati (doc, war)

* Manoocher Deghati (doc,war)

* Terry Deglau (doc, port)

* Luc Delahaye (doc)

* Jack Delano (doc)

* Patrick Demarchelier

* Autumn de Wilde (port)

* Hugh Welch Diamond

* Philip-Lorca diCorcia (art, doc, int, land, port)

* Rineke Dijkstra

* Christophe Dillinger (art, land, port)

* André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri

* Mark Divo art

* Zbigniew Dłubak

* Julie Doiron

* Robert Doisneau (doc, land, port)

* Peter Dombrovskis

* Ken Domon (arch, art, doc)

* Don Donaghy

* Terence Donovan (fash, doc)

* Sergio Dorantes

* David Doubilet (und)

* W. & D. Downey (port)

* Richard Drew

* František Drtikol

* Maxime Du Camp

* David Douglas Duncan

* Ken Duncan

* Jeff Dunas

* Max Dupain

* Jean Louis Marie Eugène Durieu

* Dutton & Michaels (photographic studio)

 

[edit] E

 

* Charles C. Ebbets

* Harold Eugene Edgerton (sci)

* Hugh Edwards

* John Paul Edwards (pict)

* Isidore Jacques Eggermont

* William Eggleston (art, doc, land)

* Ei-Q (art)

* Alfred Eisenstaedt (land)

* Arthur Elliott (arch)

* Ed van der Elsken

* Peter Henry Emerson

* T. Enami

* Clay Enos

* Mitch Epstein (doc, port)

* Elliott Erwitt (art, doc, int, port)

* Dulah Marie Evans ( drawing,land)

* Walker Evans (doc, port)

 

[edit] F

 

* Bruno Fabien (art)

* Ingrid Falk (art)

* Adolfo Farsari

* Antoine Fauchery

* Bernard Faucon (art)

* Chris Faust

* James Fee (art, war)

* Andreas Feininger

* Mark Feldstein

* Roger Fenton (war)

* Fernando Fernández Navarrete

* Marc Ferrez

* Franz Fiedler

* Michel Figuet

* George Fiske

* Frode Fjerdingstad (art)

* Hércules Florence

* Adam Foley

* Fernand Fonssagrives (art, fash)

* Franco Fontana (art)

* Joan Fontcuberta (art)

* Anna Fox

* Martine Franck

* Auguste François (ethno, doc, land)

* Robert Frank (doc, land, port)

* Stuart Franklin (doc)

* Thomas E. Franklin (doc)

* Leonard Freed

* Lee Friedlander (abs, art, land, port)

* Francis Frith

* Hakuyō Fuchikami

* Eva Fuka

* Mitsutarō Fuku

* Katsuji Fukuda (adv, art)

* Rosō Fukuhara (art)

* Shinzō Fukuhara (art)

* Jill Furmanovsky

* Adam Fuss (abs, art, doc)

 

[edit] G

 

* Ron Galella

* Isidoro Gallo

* Harry Gamboa, Jr.

* Alexander Gardner

* William Garnett

* Anne Geddes (art, doc, port)

* Arnold Genthe

* Helmut Gernsheim

* Luigi Ghirri

* Mario Giacomelli

* Paula Rae Gibson (art)

* Ralph Gibson

* Bruce Gilden

* Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey

* André Giroux

* Wilhelm von Gloeden (art, fash, port)

* Barbara Gluck (art,war)

* Fay Godwin (art, land, port)

* Frank Gohlke

* Anthony Goicolea

* Jim Goldberg

* David Goldblatt

* Nan Goldin (art, int, port)

* Andy Goldsworthy (abs, art, land)

* Kaveh Golestan (doc)

* Rolando Gomez (art, doc, port)

* Greg Gorman (art, port)

* John Gossage

* William P. Gottlieb

* Hal Gould (art)

* Emmet Gowin (art, doc)

* Masao Gozu

* Karen Graffeo (art, port, doc)

* Paul Graham

* Herb Greene (port)

* Timothy Greenfield-Sanders (port, celeb)

* Jill Greenberg

* Lauren Greenfield

* Lois Greenfield

* Philip Jones Griffiths (doc, war)

* Stan Grossfeld

* Bob Gruen (port)

* Emile Gsell

* Ara Güler

* Andreas Gursky (art)

* John Gutmann

 

[edit] H

 

* Ernst Haas (Doc, port)

* Tzeli Hadjidimitriou (art, land, arch)

* E.R. Hall (spt, port)

* Mark Robert Halper (adv, arch, art, inds, port)

* Philippe Halsman (art, fash, port)

* Dirck Halstead

* David Hamilton (abs, art)

* Adelaide Hanscom (pict)

* Charles Harbutt

* Bert Hardy (doc, war)

* John Harrington

* Alfred A. Hart

* Sam Haskins (adv, art, doc, fash, inds, food, land, port)

* Victor Hasselblad (Land)

* Masumi Hayashi

* Tadahiko Hayashi (doc, port)

* Takanobu Hayashi (art)

* William Hayes

* John Heartfield

* Darren Heath (spt)

* Petter Hegre (dig)

* William Heick (art, doc, ethno, inds)

* Gottfried Helnwein (art)

* Fritz Henle

* Bill Henson (art)

* Carli Hermès (abs, adv, art)

* J Malan Heslop (war)

* David Octavius Hill

* John K. Hillers

* David Hilliard

* Lewis Hine (art, doc, port)

* Terushichi Hirai

* Hiro (fash)

* John Hoagland (war)

* Hannah Höch (abs, art, port)

* David Hockney (abs, art, doc, int, land, port)

* Heinrich Hoffmann

* Frederick Hollyer (port, art, int)

* Joseph Holmes

* Ismo Hölttö

* Horie Kuwajirō

* Masao Horino

* Horst P. Horst (doc, fash, port)

* Eric Hosking

* Charles Howard (doc)

* Robert Howlett Pioneer, 1831–1858

* George Hoyningen-Huene

* Henri Huet

* Fred Hultstrand

* Art Hupy (arch, port)

* Frank Hurley

* David Hurn

* George Hurrell (art, fash)

* Philip Hyde (nature, land, art)

 

[edit] I

 

* Tetsuya Ichimura

* William H. Illingworth

* Jesús Inostroza (doc, art)

* Jerry Interval

* Walter Iooss

* Taikichi Irie (art, doc)

* Edith Irvine

* Lee Isaacs (abs, adv, art, doc, port)

* Johann Baptist Isenring

* Yasuhiro Ishimoto (doc, art)

* Jules Itier

* Mitsuaki Iwagō

* Takeji Iwamiya (arch, doc)

 

[edit] J

 

* Bill Jackson

* William Henry Jackson

* Lotte Jacobi (port)

* Bahman Jalali (doc, art)

* Russell James

* Olof Jarlbro

* Gaspard-Pierre-Gustave Joly de Lotbinière (arch, land)

* Jan Töve Johansson

* John S. Johnston

* Anthony Jones

* Charles Jones (food)

* Pirkle Jones

* Bishin Jumonji

 

[edit] K

 

* Gertrude Käsebier

* Clemens Kalischer (doc, art)

* Jesse Kalisher

* Kameya Tokujirō

* Consuelo Kanaga

* Nadav Kander

* Yousuf Karsh (port)

* Nasrollah Kasraian (doc, land)

* Rinko Kawauchi

* Barry Kay (doc, art)

* Seiki Kayamori (doc, ethno)

* Kensuke Kazama

* Mary Morgan Keipp

* Seydou Keïta

* Michael Kenna (art, int, land)

* Mitch Kern (art, port)

* Charles Kerry

* André Kertész (doc, land, int, port)

* Robert Glenn Ketchum

* Carl de Keyzer

* Yevgeny Khaldei

* Takashi Kijima

* Hiroh Kikai (doc, port)

* Shunkichi Kikuchi (doc, sci)

* Chris Killip

* Miru Kim (doc, art, land)

* Ihei Kimura (doc, port)

* Darius Kinsey

* Genzō Kitazumi (art, doc)

* William Klein

* Stuart Klipper (art, land)

* Mattias Klum

* Nick Knight

* Kiyoshi Koishi

* Akira Komoto (art)

* Tomio Kondō (doc, port)

* Yannis Kontos (doc)

* Ad Konings (sci)

* Rudolf Koppitz

* Alberto Korda

* Josef Koudelka

* George Krause

* Ed Krebs (port)

* Barbara Kruger (abs, art, doc)

* Motoichi Kumagai (doc)

* Yasuo Kuniyoshi

* Justine Kurland (art)

* Seiji Kurata (doc)

* Kusakabe Kimbei

* Kineo Kuwabara (doc)

* Shisei Kuwabara (doc)

 

[edit] L

 

* David LaChapelle (art, fash)

* Vincent Laforet (doc)

* Karl Lagerfeld (fash)

* Penny Lancaster

* Ernst Heinrich Landrock

* Inez van Lamsweerde

* Dorothea Lange (doc, port)

* Frans Lanting

* Clarence John Laughlin (art, int, land, port)

* Alma Lavenson

* Jacques Henri Lartigue (doc)

* Russell Lee (doc)

* Louis Legrand

* Gustave Le Gray

* Rudolf Franz Lehnert

* Peter Leibing

* Annie Leibovitz (art, doc, fash, port)

* Neil Leifer

* Jacques Leiser

* Herman Leonard

* Helmar Lerski

* Henri Le Secq (arch)

* Esther Levine (art)

* Sherrie Levine (art, doc)

* Helen Levitt (doc, port)

* Patrick Lichfield (port)

* Jerome Liebling (art)

* Peter Lindbergh (fash)

* Lawrence Denny Lindsley (land, doc)

* O. Winston Link (abs, adv, art, doc, land, inds)

* El Lissitzky

* Herbert List

* Jacqueline Livingston

* Harold Lloyd (port)

* R. Ian Lloyd

* Eugeniusz Lokajski

* Alejandro López de Haro (art)

* Jet Lowe (arch, doc, port)

* Auguste and Louis Lumière

* Markéta Luskačová (doc)

* Serge Lutens (art, fash)

* Loretta Lux (art)

* George Platt Lynes (adv, art, doc, fash, port)

* Danny Lyon (doc, port)

* Darryn Lyons

 

[edit] M

 

* Iain MacMillan

* Chema Madoz (art)

* Maeda Genzō

* Shinzo Maeda

* Jay Maisel (adv)

* Marianne Majerus

* Vassilis Makris

* Christopher Makos

* Erling Mandelmann

* Sally Mann (art, doc, pict, port)

* Jonathan Mannion (music, adv, celeb)

* Robert Mapplethorpe (art, fash, port)

* Fosco Maraini (ethno)

* Marcel Mariën

* Mary Ellen Mark (doc, port)

* Oscar G. Mason (sci)

* Willy Matheisl

* Spider Martin (doc, port)

* Enrico Martino (ethno, land, war)

* Margrethe Mather

* Susumu Matsushima (fash, port)

* Gordon Matta-Clark (art)

* Kate Matthews

* Alfred Maudslay

* Morton D. May

* John Jabez Edwin Mayall

* Roger Mayne (doc)

* Raphael Mazzucco (fashion)

* Angus McBean

* John McBride

* Will McBride (doc, port)

* Mary McCartney (port)

* Linda McCartney (art, doc, fash)

* Don McCullin

* Steve McCurry

* Glynnis McDaris

* Dave McKean

* Joseph McKeown (adv, doc, inds, war)

* Joe McNally (doc, port)

* Laura McPhee

* Steven Meisel (art, fash)

* Susan Meiselas

* Donald Mennie

* Enrique Metinides

* Pascal Meunier (doc)

* Adolf de Meyer

* Joel Meyerowitz

* Gjon Mili

* Lee Miller

* Mark Miremont

* Mohammadreza Mirzaei (art)

* Richard Misrach (abs, art, doc)

* Daniel S. Mitchell (doc)

* Tōyō Miyatake

* Miyazaki Yūhi

* Lisette Model

* Tina Modotti (art, doc, port)

* László Moholy-Nagy (art)

* Jean-Baptiste Mondino (fash)

* Geoff Moon (birds, nz natural)

* Charles Moore (doc, port)

* Derry Moore, 12th Earl of Drogheda (port, art, int)

* Raymond Moore (art)

* Julie Moos (art, doc, land, port)

* Inge Morath

* Abelardo Morell

* Aizō Morikawa (port)

* Daidō Moriyama

* Christopher Morris

* Wright Morris

* David Muench

* Ugo Mulas (art, doc, port)

* Vik Muniz (abs, art)

* Martin Munkácsi (spt, doc, fash)

* Isabel Muñoz

* Nickolas Muray

* Richard Murrian (art)

* Eadweard Muybridge (art, doc, land)

* Carl Mydans

 

[edit] N

 

* James Nachtwey (doc, war)

* Filip Naudts (art, port)

* Nadar

* Shigeichi Nagano (doc)

* Yasushi Nagao (doc)

* Billy Name (art, doc, port)

* Hans Namuth (portraits of artists)

* Ikkō Narahara (art)

* Graham Nash (art)

* Yōnosuke Natori (doc)

* Negretti and Zambra (photographic studio)

* Nelly's (Elli Souyioultzoglou-Seraïdari)

* Helmut Newton (art, fash, port)

* Arnold Newman (port)

* Dianora Niccolini (art)

* Nicéphore Niépce

* Lennart Nilsson

* Nicholas Nixon (doc, port)

* William Notman

* Kazimierz Nowak (doc, ethno)

* Lee Nye

 

[edit] O

 

* Michael O'Brien

* Ogawa Kazumasa

* Takashi Okamura

* Erwin Olaf (fash, port)

* Arthur Omar

* Mitsugu Ōnishi

* Kōshirō Onchi (art)

* Chizu Ono

* Catherine Opie

* Charles O'Rear

* Timothy O'Sullivan

* Stephens Orr

* Rubén Ortiz Torres (art)

* Graham Ovenden

* Paul Outerbridge

 

[edit] P

 

* Johannes Pääsuke (doc, ethno)

* Charles Page (doc)

* Tim Page (war)

* Giuseppe Palmas

* Basil Pao

* John Papillon

* Richard Pare

* Trent Parke (doc)

* Norman Parkinson

* Gordon Parks (doc)

* Martin Parr (art, doc)

* Steve Parish

* Robert ParkeHarrison (art)

* Freeman Patterson

* Dino Pedriali

* Irving Penn (art, fash)

* Gilles Peress (doc)

* Lucian Perkins (doc, war)

* Anders Petersen

* Bob Peterson (photographer)

* John Pezzenti (wildlife)

* John Pfahl

* Secondo Pia

* Jack Pierson (art)

* Gueorgui Pinkhassov (doc)

* Peter Pitseolak

* Sylvia Plachy

* Frank Plicka (doc)

* David Plowden (doc)

* Guglielmo Plüschow

* Robert Polidori (arch)

* Eliot Porter

* Mark Power

* Dith Pran

* Victor Prevost

* Richard Prince

* Priya Ramrakha

* Sergei Mikhailovich Prokudin-Gorskii

* Włodzimierz Puchalski

* Willy Puchner (art, doc)

* Gerald P. Pulley

 

[edit] Q

 

* Altaf Qadri

 

[edit] R

 

* Ragnar Axelsson (doc)

* Raghu Rai

* Herbert Randall

* Rankin (fash)

* Paul Raphaelson (art)

* Man Ray (art, port)

* Tony Ray-Jones (art, doc)

* Jahangir Razmi (doc)

* David Redfern (music)

* Henri-Victor Regnault

* H. Reid

* Oscar Gustave Rejlander (art, port)

* Albert Renger-Patzsch

* Carlos Reyes-Manzo (doc)

* Bettina Rheims

* Marc Riboud (art, doc, int, land)

* Michael Richard

* Eugene Richards (doc)

* Jim Richardson (doc, land)

* Terry Richardson (fash, art)

* Sophy Rickett

* Leni Riefenstahl (doc, int, land, port)

* Robert Riger (spt)

* Jacob Riis

* Frank Rinehart (doc)

* Herb Ritts (art, fash, port)

* James Roark

* Grace Robertson

* James Robertson

* Ziki Robertson

* Henry Peach Robinson (pict)

* John V. Robinson (arch, doc, inds)

* Thomas C. Roche (doc, war)

* Alexandr Rodchenko

* George Rodger

* José Luis Rodríguez Pittí (art, doc)

* Milton Rogovin (doc)

* Matthew Rolston

* Willy Ronis

* Ben Rose (fash, food, port)

* Barbara Rosenthal (art, surrealism)

* Joe Rosenthal

* Martha Rosler

* Horatio Ross

* Mary Rosse

* Pierre Rossier

* Arthur Rothstein

* Dominic Rouse (art)

* Galen Rowell

* Johnny Rozsa (celeb, port, fash)

* Didier Ruef

* Michael Ruetz (art, doc)

* Thomas Ruff (art)

* Andrew J. Russell

 

[edit] S

 

* Sebastião Salgado (art, doc)

* Erich Salomon

* Lucas Samaras

* Arnold E. Samuelson (war)

* August Sander

* Akira Satō (art, fash)

* Kōji Satō

* Tokihiro Satō (art)

* Jan Saudek (art, port)

* William Saunders

* Charles Roscoe Savage

* Francesco Scavullo (art, fash)

* Jürgen Schadeberg

* Rocky Schenck (art)

* Bill Schwab (art)

* John Schwartz

* Arthur E. Scott

* Ignác Šechtl

* Josef Jindřich Šechtl

* Stéphane Sednaoui (adv, art, fash)

* Allan Sekula

* Mark Seliger (port)

* Vittorio Sella (land)

* Andres Serrano (art, doc, port)

* Masato Seto (doc)

* John Sexton

* David Seymour

* Charles Sheeler

* Bob Shell

* Charles Shepherd

* Cindy Sherman (art, doc, port)

* Stewart Shining (fashion)

* Kishin Shinoyama

* Mieko Shiomi

* Stephen Shore

* John Shuptrine

* Malick Sidibé

* Katharina Sieverding

* Jeanloup Sieff

* Wolfgang Sievers (arch, ind)

* Steven Siewert (art, doc)

* Floria Sigismondi (art)

* Roman Signer

* Jakob Sildnik

* Marilyn Silverstone

* Lorna Simpson (art)

* Aaron Siskind

* Natalia Skobeeva (art, fashion)

* Sandy Skoglund (art, doc)

* Moneta Sleet Jr.

* Victor Sloan (art)

* Rick Smolan

* Edwin Smith (arch, int, land)

* Graham Smith

* Mickey Smith (artist)

* Pennie Smith

* W. Eugene Smith (doc)

* Snowdon (port)

* Melvin Sokolsky (art, fash, adv)

* Frederick Sommer

* Giorgio Sommer

* Alec Soth (art, doc, land, port)

* Pete Souza

* Albert Spaggiari

* Jack Spencer (art, doc, int, land)

* Humphrey Spender (doc)

* Christine Spengler (war)

* Melissa Springer (art, doc, port)

* Vytautas Stanionis

* Andrew Stark (art, doc)

* Chris Steele-Perkins (doc)

* Edward Steichen (art, land, pict, port)

* Ralph Steiner

* Joel Sternfeld (doc)

* Louis Stettner

* David Stewart (art, adv)

* Charles Settrington (land)

* Alfred Stieglitz (art, port)

* Baron Raimund von Stillfried

* Stillfried & Andersen (photographic studio)

* Nellie Stockbridge(doc)

* Ezra Stoller

* Kęstutis Stoškus

* Paul Strand (art)

* Zoe Strauss (art)

* Thomas Struth (art, doc)

* Roy Stuart

* Jock Sturges (art, port)

* Anthony Suau (doc, war)

* Issei Suda (art)

* Josef Sudek (art, pict)

* Hiroshi Sugimoto (art, doc, port)

* Francis Meadow Sutcliffe

* Antanas Sutkus

* Kenneth Dupee Swan (land)

* John Szarkowski (doc)

 

[edit] T

 

* I. W. Taber

* Kaietsu Takagi

* Yutaka Takanashi

* Masataka Takayama (abs, art)

* William Fox Talbot

* Tamamura Kozaburō

* Akihide Tamura (aka Shigeru Tamura)

* Sakae Tamura (art, port)

* Sakae Tamura (sci)

* Shigeru Tamura (not Akihide Tamura)

* Kōtarō Tanaka

* Gerda Taro (Gerta Pohorylle) (doc)

* Henry Taunt (land)

* John Bigelow Taylor (arch, art, port)

* Maggie Taylor (art)

* Sam Taylor-Wood (art, doc, port)

* Joyce Tenneson

* Anya Teixeira

* Juergen Teller (fash)

* Teo Bee Yen

* Mario Testino

* Peter Thomann (doc)

* Warren T. Thompson

* John Thomson

* Nicolas Tikhomiroff

* Wolfgang Tillmans (abs, art, land)

* Herbert Tobias

* Shōmei Tōmatsu (art, doc)

* Tomishige Rihei

* Akira Toriyama (land, pict)

* Oliviero Toscani

* Larry Towell

* Barbara Traub

* Bill Travis (art, port)

* Eric Treacy

* Arthur Tress (art, fash, port)

* Linnaeus Tripe

* John Trobaugh (art, doc, port)

* Olegas Truchanas

* Thomas Tulis (art, doc, inds, land, port)

* Spencer Tunick (art, doc, fash, port)

* David C. Turnley (doc)

* Peter Turnley (doc)

 

[edit] U

 

* Uchida Kuichi

* Shōji Ueda

* Noboru Ueki

* Jerry Uelsmann (art, land, port)

* Ueno Hikoma

* Ukai Gyokusen

* Brian Ulrich (art, doc)

* Doris Ulmann

* Ellen von Unwerth

* Kaoru Usui (doc)

* Huynh Cong Ut

 

[edit] V

 

* John Vachon (arch, doc, port)

* Max Vadukul

* James Valentine

* James Van Der Zee

* Carl Van Vechten

* Kathy Vargas

* John Veltri

* Kiino Villand

* Roman Vishniac

* Massimo Vitali

 

[edit] W

 

* Bob Walker

* Jeff Wall

* Ian Wallace (land)

* Chris von Wangenheim (fash)

* Nick Waplington

* Andy Warhol (art, doc, fash, port)

* Waswo X. Waswo (art, port)

* Hiroshi Watanabe (port)

* Carleton Watkins

* Albert Watson

* Bruce Weber (art, doc, fash)

* Weegee (abs, art, doc)

* Carrie Mae Weems

* William Wegman

* Eudora Welty

* Henry Wessel, Jr.

* Brett Weston (art, port)

* Cole Weston (art, port)

* Edward Weston (art, pict, port)

* Kim Weston

* John H. White (doc)

* Minor White (art, land)

* Jeff Widener

* Hannah Wilke (art, port)

* Christopher Williams

* Michael Williamson

* Deborah Willis (art)

* Charles Paul Wilp (adv)

* Laura Wilson

* George Washington Wilson

* Kathryn Tucker Windham (doc)

* Garry Winogrand (art, land)

* Ernest Withers (doc)

* Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz

* Joel-Peter Witkin (art, doc, port)

* Michael Wolf

* Art Wolfe

* Brian Wood (art)

* Walter B. Woodbury

* Francesca Woodman (art)

* Don Worth (land, botanical)

* Otto Wunderlich

* Donovan Wylie

 

[edit] X

[edit] Y

 

* Lorna Yabsley (port)

* Alfred Yaghobzadeh

* Hiroshi Yamazaki

* Nakaji Yasui

* Bunny Yeager

* Yevonde

* Yokoyama Matsusaburō

* Kohei Yoshiyuki (doc)

* Paul Yule

 

[edit] Z

 

* Jerome Zerbe (art, doc, fash, war)

* David Drew Zingg

* Ron L. Zheng (abs, art)

* Fred Zinn (aer)

* Stanislovas Žvirgždas

 

See also

 

* Fetish photographer

* Fine art photography

* Glamour photographer

* Macro photography

* Magnum Photos

* Norwegian photographers

* Photograph

* Photographers of the erotic male

* New Zealand photography

* Photography

* Photojournalism

* Photojournalists

* Pictorialism

* Pulitzer Prize for Breaking News Photography

* Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography

* Wedding photography

* Women in photography

* Wikipedian Photographers

 

Wedding photography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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White-wedding-dress.jpg

 

Wedding photography is the photography of activities relating to weddings. It encompasses photographs of the couple before marriage (for announcements, portrait displays, or thank you cards) as well as coverage of the wedding and reception (sometimes referred to as the wedding breakfast in non-US countries). It is a major commercial endeavor that supports the bulk of the efforts for many photography studios or independent photographers.

Large format camera lens.jpg Photography portal

  

A 1942 wedding with bride in traditional long white wedding dress.

 

Like the technology of photography itself, the practice of wedding photography has evolved and grown since the invention of the photographic art form in 1826 by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce. In fact, an early photograph, recorded some 14 years after the fact, may be a recreation for the camera of the 1840 wedding of Queen Victoria to Prince Albert. However, in the early days of photography, most couples of more humble means did not hire a photographer to record the actual wedding itself. Until the later half of the 19th century, most people didn’t pose for formal wedding photos during the wedding. Rather, they might pose for a formal photo in their best clotthhes before or after a wedding. In the late 1860s, more couples started posing in their wedding clothes or sometimes hired a photographer to come to the wedding venue. (See the gallery at White wedding.)

 

Due to the nature of the bulky equipment and lighting issues, wedding photography was largely a studio practice for most of the late 1800s. Over time, technology improved, but many couples still might only pose for a single wedding portrait. Wedding albums started becoming more commonplace towards the 1880s, and the photographer would sometimes include the wedding party in the photographs. Often the wedding gifts would be laid out and recorded in the photographs as well.[1]

 

At the beginning of the 20th century, color photography became available, but was still unreliable and expensive, so most wedding photography was still practiced in black and white. The concept of capturing the wedding "event" came about after the Second World War. Using film roll technology and improved lighting techniques available with the invention of the compact flash bulb, photographers would often show up at a wedding and try to sell the photos later. Despite the initial low quality photographs that often resulted, the competition forced the studio photographers to start working on location.

 

Initially, professional studio photographers might bring a lot of bulky equipment, thus limiting their ability to record the entire event. Even "candid" photos were more often staged after the ceremony. In the 1970s, the more modern approach to recording the entire wedding event started evolving into the practice as we know it today.[2]

Contents

  

* 1 Technology

* 2 Approaches

* 3 Albums, prints, and other products

* 4 Profession

* 5 Professional organizations

* 6 See also

* 7 References

 

Technology

Here, a wedding photographer rehearses taking a wedding photo using her assistant as a model. The veil was deliberately placed in position by the photographer.

 

During the film era, photographers favored color negative film and medium-format cameras, especially by Hasselblad. Today, many more weddings are photographed with digital SLR cameras as the digital convenience provides quick detection of lighting mistakes and allows creative approaches to be reviewed immediately.

 

In spite of diminishing film use, some photographers continue to shoot with film as they prefer the film aesthetic, and others are of the opinion that negative film captures more information than digital technology, and has less margin for exposure error. Certainly true in some cases, it should be noted that exposure latitude inherent in a camera's native RAW image format (which allows for more under- and over- exposure than JPEG[3]) varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. All forms of RAW have a degree of exposure latitude which exceeds slide film - to which digital capture is commonly compared.[citation needed]

 

Currently, it is fair to say that many professional labs have a greater capacity to provide services in post-production for film compared with digital[citation needed], such as quickly generating adequate prints in the event of some over- or under- exposure. This should change over time, with manufacturers like Kodak announcing a commitment to further develop streamlined services in the area of professional digital lab output.

 

Technology has evolved with the use of remote triggers and flashes. Wedding photographers are now able to take advantage of traveling light and having the ability to use creative lighting.

Approaches

This article may contain original research or unverified claims. Please improve the article by adding references. See the talk page for details. (December 2007)

Bride & groom in a park, posing in photojournalistic style.

A photojournalistic wedding image capturing the drama of the moment.

 

There are two primary approaches to wedding photography that are recognized today: Traditional and Photojournalistic. Traditional wedding photography provides for more classically posed images and a great deal of photographer control and interaction on the day of the wedding. Photojournalistic wedding photography takes its cue from editorial reporting styles and focuses more on candid and unposed images with little photographer interaction. These are two extremes and many of today's photographers will fall somewhere in the middle of these two styles.

 

A third style that is becoming more popular is a fashion-based approach. In contemporary/fashion-based wedding photography, photojournalistic images of the events of the day are combined with posed images that are inspired by editorial fashion photography as would be found in magazines like Vogue or Vanity Fair.

 

A fourth style that is popular in Asian countries, especially in China, is wedding studio photography(Chinese: 婚纱摄影; pinyin: hūn shā shè yǐng). Typically, couples will select a studio in a similar manner as western couples select a wedding photographer. They will then make an appointment with the studio for either in-studio or location shoot, which is becoming popular in recent years, to do "glamour wedding shots". In attendance will be a hair stylist and make-up artist in addition to the photographer and the couple. The couple will go through many changes of clothing and backgrounds in a similar manner to the fashion based approach.

A bride arriving at the venue, with her father also in the car. The black and white texture, together with her expression, and the composition of the photograph make for a picture that evokes some of the emotion from the day.

 

The term contemporary wedding photography is used to describe wedding photography that is not of a traditional nature. The emphasis in contemporary photography is to capture the story and atmosphere from the day, so the viewer has an appreciation of what the wedding was like, rather than a series of pre-determined poses. This term can be mistaken for meaning any photograph that is not posed or formal. The advent and advancement of digital cameras (and increased use of the internet) means that many people can offer their services as a wedding photographer, but contemporary wedding photography is more than taking informal photographs and involves the use of composition, lighting, and timing to capture photographs that have a strong visual appeal.

 

There is some uncertainty over what constitutes contemporary and how this differs from other forms of wedding photography. The PSA Journal, March 1994, records a debate on this subject.[4]. This highlights the difficulty with the word contemporary when defining photographic expression, as some feel this term is not sufficiently defined. For example, is photojournalism contemporary or is it different? Photojournalism is easier to define, as the term infers the photography is by its nature similar to journalism, where the emphasis is upon reporting and recording events in a newsworthy manner, whereas contemporary may include an element of photojournalism but is not exclusively that style of photography.

 

However, the landscape of Wedding Photography has constantly evolved, it is a creative discipline and those proponents at the leading edge of the industry are constantly feeding new ideas into the photographic community. As a result trends[5] will develop, mostly based around the core elements discussed. Some will be transitory while others will remain a traditional part.

Albums, prints, and other products

 

A contemporary wedding photographer will usually provide some or all of the following:

 

* Indoor photography at a church, temple, or other private venue during the ceremony and reception.

* Outdoor photography (often at a park, beach, or scenic location on the day of the wedding and/or for engagement photos).

* Both posed and candid (photojournalistic) shots of the wedding couple and their guests at the religious or civil ceremony, and the reception that follows.

* Formal portraiture in the studio (for either the wedding and/or the engagement photos).

* Digital services, such as digital prints or slides shows.

* Albums (either traditional or the more contemporary flush mount type of album).

 

A sample two-page spread from a contemporary flush mount wedding album.

 

The range of deliverables that a wedding photographer presents is varied. There is no standard as to what is included in a wedding coverage or package, so products vary regionally and from across photographers, as do the number of images provided.

 

Most photographers provide a set of proofs (usually unretouched, edited images) for the clients to view. Photographers may provide hard copy proofs in the form of 4x5 or 4x6 prints, a "magazine" of images with thumbnail sized pictures on multiple pages, an online proof gallery, images on CD or DVD in the form of a gallery or a slideshow, or a combination of the above. Some photographers provide these proofs for the client to keep, and some photographers require the client to make final print choices from the proofs and then return them or purchase them at an additional cost.

 

There are a wide variety of albums and manufacturers available, and photographers may provide traditional matted albums, digitally designed "coffee table" albums, contemporary flush mount albums, hardbound books, scrapbook style albums, or a combination of any of the above. Albums may be included as part of a pre-purchased package, or they may be added as an after-wedding purchase. Not all photographers provide albums; some may prefer to provide prints and/or files and let clients make their own albums.

 

Most photographers allow clients to purchase additional prints for themselves or their families. Many photographers now provide online sales either through galleries located on their own websites or through partnerships with other vendors. Those vendors typically host the images and provide the back end sales mechanism for the photographer; the photographer sets his or her own prices and the vendor takes a commission or charges a flat fee.

 

Some photographers are also including high resolution files in their packages. These photographers allow their clients limited rights to reproduce the images for their personal use, while retaining the copyright. Not all photographers release files and those who do will most likely charge a premium for them, since releasing files means giving up any after wedding print or album sales for the most part.

 

Photographers who do not retain copyright of the images often charge more for their services. In these cases the photographer provides the client with the digital images as part of the wedding package. The client then has unrestricted use of the images and can print any that they may desire.

Profession

This section may contain original research or unverified claims. Please improve the article by adding references. See the talk page for details. (November 2007)

A bride and groom are posed for this location shot using available lighting during the pre-twilight moments of the day due to the desirable soft lighting effects.

 

The wedding photography industry is home to some of the most respected names within the photography industry, some of whom were listed in PopPhoto's Top 10 Wedding Photographers in the World.[6] These figures represent the historical rise of wedding photojournalism, fashion, couture-style portraits, and all digital work-flow.

 

As a wedding is a one-time event, the photographer must be prepared for the unexpected. Shooting a wedding is both exhausting and invigorating as the photographer is constantly looking for good angles and opportunities for candid shots. Communication and planning time-lines before the event will alleviate many of the stresses associated with photographing a wedding. The ability to tactfully take charge also helps - particularly when photographing large groups or families - a common expectation after the ceremony. Having a run list with all of the expected shots is also a useful tool. A photographer may work with an assistant who can carry equipment, arrange guests, and assist with clothing adjustments or holding of reflectors.

 

Some wedding photographers have an office or studio which can double as a retail photography studio. In bigger cities, one might find dedicated wedding studios that only shoot weddings and may have large studios equipped with make-up and hair, and gowns ready for the bride to wear. Other wedding photographers work out of a home studio, preferring to photograph on location.

Professional organizations

 

Organizations such as the Professional Photographers of America (PPA) and Wedding and Portrait Photographers International (WPPI) and Wedding Photojournalist Association(WPJA)support the art and business of wedding photography. Standards and requirements for professional organizations vary, but membership often indicates a photographer is insured (if they should lose or ruin a large number of images, they can compensate such errors for their clients). Professional organizations offer training, professional competition, and support to members, as well as directory services to help with marketing.

  

See also

 

* Indian wedding photography

* Wedding planner

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_photography

 

St. Andrew's Church bathed in winter sunshne. In Netherton, West Midlands, England.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~

 

The Church of St Andrew, Netherton is an Anglican parish church situated in Netherton in the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley. The building was designed by Thomas Lee and it opened in 1830. In 1844 it became the parish church for Netherton.

 

Netherton, like many Black Country industrial areas contained many non-conformist chapels. It did not have an Anglican Church until 16 July 1830, when St Andrew's was consecrated and opened by the Lord Bishop of Worcester. The foundation stone of the church had been laid by Dr. Booker, the Vicar of Dudley, on 30 November 1827. The building, designed by Thomas Lee, was a Commissioners' church funded by parliament. It was constructed in the Early English style and cost £8000 to complete. The land on which the church was built was donated by the Earl of Dudley. The churchyard contains the mass unmarked graves of the victims of cholera that struck Dudley in 1831 and 1832.

 

It was originally just a chapel-at-ease to St Thomas's of Dudley, only becoming Netherton's parish church on December 1, 1844. The first incumbent vicar was the Rev. F.S. Bradshaw, appointed in 1845.

 

The church underwent restoration in 1862. Furnishings added in the late 19th century and early 20th century include a font, an alabaster reredos, a pulpit, a wrought iron screen and a lectern.

 

In February 1908, a pinnacle was blown over causing £300 pounds worth of damage to the west end of the church.

 

A vestry was added to the east end of the church in 1938.

 

The building is Grade II listed.

 

Situation

St Andrew's is situated on Netherton Hill at the highest point in Netherton. The church is surrounded by the gravestones of many of the former residents of the area. The main entrance is from Highbridge Road.

 

Description

 

View of the church from the entrance on Highbridge Road

The church has been described as "a very good example of an almost unaltered Commissioners' church". It was constructed in Early English style. It is of brick construction with Gornal stone (sandstone) facing and a slate roof. A tower with four pinnacles stands at the west end of the church.

 

Inside, the church is 98 feet in length and 54 feet in width with a gallery on the north, west and south sides. The organ, supplied by T.H.Harrison of Rochdale is at the north east end of the gallery. The gallery is supported by iron pillars.

 

Furnishings include the original wooden box pews. The oak altar, designed by the vicar, S.J. Marriot, was installed on News Year's Eve, 1887.

 

The clock, supplied by Bensons of London and installed in the tower, was partially funded by sports events held at the nearby Netherton Cricket Ground.

 

Diocese

The church is part of the Diocese of Worcester.

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You can see the entire session here:

KENDRA - FALL SESSION

 

TEEN IDOL

 

A teen idol is a celebrity with a large teenage fan-base. Teen idols are generally young but not necessarily teenaged. Often teen idols are actors or singers, but some sports figures also have an appeal to teenagers. Some teen idols began their careers as child actors, like Leif Garrett, Lindsay Lohan, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, and Hilary Duff.

 

The idol's popularity may be limited to teens, or may extend to all age groups. Many teen idols are targeted for adults for nostalgia purposes.

 

There were teen idols before there were teen magazines, but idols have always been a permanent feature in magazines such as Seventeen, 16 magazine, Tiger Beat and Right On! in the United States, and in similar magazines elsewhere. With the advent of television, teen idols were also promoted through programs such as American Bandstand, The Ed Sullivan Show, Soul Train and in the UK Top of the Pops. Today's teen idols have spawned an entire industry of gossip magazines, television shows, YouTube, and whole television channels such as E!.

 

Many American teen idols achieve "cross-over" success internationally; however, this list is not limited to American artists alone with some people such as German popstar Bill Kaulitz of the pop-rock band Tokio Hotel. In Asia, idols range from Japanese pop megastars Ayumi Hamasaki and Namie Amuro as well as Kana Nishino and Japanese music groups such as Momoiro Clover Z, Morning Musume, AKB48, and Perfume and Johnny & Associates boy bands Arashi, NEWS, KAT-TUN, and Hey! Say! JUMP among others while Chinese pop icon Jay Chou and Jolin Tsai, music groups F4 and Lollipop F, and South Korean singers BoA and Rain and music groups TVXQ, 2PM, 2AM, Beast, Shinee, EXO, Super Junior, f(x), 2NE1, BIGBANG, Wonder Girls, BTS, T-ara, Kara and Girls' Generation are examples. In Latin America, idols ranges from Mexican pop stars Thalía, Timbiriche, Lynda Thomas, Magneto, Puerto Rican born Mexican Luis Miguel, Puerto Rican singer Marc Anthony, and the very popular Puerto Rican boy band Menudo in the 1980's and 1990's, and Paty Cantú, Anahi, Belinda. Ha^Ash and RBD in the 2000s and 2010's. Besides, former Menudo member Ricky Martin, their chief rivals Los Chicos and former member Chayanne, Venezuelan actor and singer Guillermo Davila and more, to Argentina, where telenovela, Chiquititas, ushered in a new era of teen-idols for that country, including actors Benjamin Rojas, Felipe Colombo, Luisana Lopilato and Camila Bordonaba, who went on to form teen band Erreway, precursors to Mexican band RBD. In Spain, La Oreja de Van Gogh, Miguel Bose, Mecano and Hombres G all enjoyed teen-idol status. Even in the classical music field, a British-Chinese violinist Vanessa-Mae became the first "teen idol" in that category.

 

In the past, young sports icons and Olympic athletes during their competitive times were considered teen idols such as Jean-Claude Killy, Peggy Fleming, Joe Namath, Dorothy Hamill, Mark Spitz, Jim Craig, Nadia Comăneci, Mary Lou Retton, Michael Jordan, Dominique Moceanu, Michelle Kwan, Carly Patterson, Shawn Johnson, Nastia Liukin, Michelle Wie, Mia Hamm, Ryan Lochte, Michael Phelps, Missy Franklin, Katie Ledecky, Shaun White, Apolo Ohno, Simone Biles, Tom Daley, McKayla Maroney, and Gabby Douglas.

 

Early teen idols

 

The first known person to have been treated as a teen idol was Franz Liszt, the Hungarian pianist who, in the 1840's, drew such a following among young women that the term "Lisztomania" soon came to describe the phenomenon. The kind of idolizing following Liszt drew in Europe would not be followed for several decades. Geraldine Farrar, American opera singer, had a large following of young women nicknamed "Gerry-flappers" in the early 20th century. Rudy Vallée, who became a major success in 1929 with hits like "Honey" and "Deep Night", may have been the first American popular singer to have been idolized by hundreds of teen-aged girls at sold-out concerts. He was also possibly the first popular singer to have a star vehicle created for him: The Vagabond Lover. Frank Sinatra, whose early career is often linked to his appeal to bobby soxers, is also regarded as having been amongst the first teen idols.

 

1950's–1960's

 

The great success of young rock stars like Elvis Presley and Pat Boone, film stars like Marlon Brando, Paul Newman, James Dean, Tab Hunter, and Sal Mineo in the 1950's, as well as the wider emergence of youth subcultures, led promoters to the deliberate creation of teen idols such as singers Frankie Avalon, Fabian Forte, Frankie Lymon, and Connie Stevens. Even crooners like Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra were still considered idols and rather handsome. Actors Edd Byrnes and Troy Donahue and other artists deliberately cultivated a (safer) idol image, like Paul Anka.

 

Anka initially modelled himself on a particular generic type, the teen idol [who] carried on the process ... of changing the image of male youth ... from wild to mild, by providing a cleaner, more wholesome image of masculinity than that of the previous era's rebellious rockabilly heroes and (working-class) so-called juvenile delinquents, like those in West Side Story....

 

Post-war teens were able to buy relatively inexpensive phonographs — including portable models that could be carried to friends' houses — and the new 45-rpm singles. Rock music played on 45's became the soundtrack to the 1960's as people bought what they heard on the radio. The great majority of the music being marketed to 1950's teens was being written by adults, but 1960's teens were increasingly appreciating and emulating artists closer to their own age, to teen fashion, and to lyrics which addressed their own concerns. Their parents worried about their attraction to artists (and DJs) who were edgy and rebellious. Faces on magazines fed fans; fans buy records, see films, watch TV and buy fashions.

 

Marketing of the teen idol generally focuses on the image.... The teen idol is structured to appeal to the pre-teen and young teen female pop audience member and children in general.... [They] are commodified in forms and images that are relatively non-threatening to this young audience and to the ancillary market of parents... The teen idol never appears to be autonomous and therefore never appears to be threatening as an adult; he remains, as long as he is popular, perpetually childlike and dependent.

 

Some marketers turned to film and TV for fresh, attractive, 'safe' faces. Tommy Sands's debut in a television film about the phenomenon, The Idol, made a teen idol out of Sands himself. Ricky Nelson, a performer of rockabilly music, also became a teen idol through his parents' television series, The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. Some young TV stars were being hustled into studios to make recordings; for example, ex-Mousketeer Annette Funicello became one of the first big female idols as well as the Lennon Sisters whom had cut out dolls and were always on the covers of the gossip magazines; another, Johnny Crawford of The Rifleman, had five Top-40 hits. In 1963, Luke Halpin made a big splash as a teen idol in the television program Flipper. After Bye Bye Birdie was released in 1963, Bobby Rydell became an instant teen idol.

 

In the 1960's as situation comedies and dramas on television using child actors became more popular, actors Paul Petersen, Patty Petersen, and Shelley Fabares from The Donna Reed Show, Dwayne Hickman from The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis, Sally Field of Gidget, Jon Provost of Lassie, Jay North from Dennis the Menace, Billy Mumy of Lost in Space (and later of novelty group Barnes and Barnes), Sajid Khan of Maya, and Keith and Kevin Schultz known as the "Schultz Twins" on The Monroes all became younger preteen idols and grew into being teen idols.

 

Likewise, Tommy Steele, the Beatles with Beatlemania, the Rolling Stones, and the Beach Boys were teen idols, especially during the earlier part of their careers, although they quickly grew out of that status. The Rolling Stones did it through a more rebellious image, the Beatles did it through their more developed (or "grown up") music. Similarly, Neil Sedaka had two distinct eras of his career, with about a decade in between: one as a teen idol in the 1960's, and a later career in adult contemporary music. From the family band the Cowsills, Susan Cowsill, John Cowsill and Barry Cowsill became teen idols and were on teen magazine covers for many years. Many of the teen idols of the era were the sons of older, established stars; Dino, Desi & Billy were active as teen idols during the mid-sixties. The group included Desi Arnaz Jr (son of bandleader Desi Arnaz), Dean Paul Martin (son of singer Dean Martin), and Billy Hinsche (a mutual friend whose parents were not famous). Gary Lewis, son of comedian Jerry Lewis, fronted the Playboys during this era.

 

All of the Monkees became instant teen idols in the late 1960's after their TV show became an overnight success, especially for Micky Dolenz and Davy Jones. The British born member of the Monkees Davy Jones was regularly featured in all time teen idol lists. In 2008, Yahoo Music named Jones the number one teen idol of all time, and in 2009 he was ranked second in a list compiled by Fox News. Davy Jones still to this day tends to win many number one's and the top of the list in best teen idol contests.

 

Tiger Beat magazine, an influential teen music magazine, began publishing in 1965.

 

1970's

 

After Davy Jones came Bobby Sherman and David Cassidy, who held the title of Teen Idols from the late 1960's until the mid-1970's. Both Sherman and Cassidy were actors on television and chart topping musicians in the pop-rock category at the time; with David Cassidy in particular enjoying immense international fame and success. Sherman was on hit TV shows Shindig! and Here Come the Brides among many others. Musical series such as Cassidy's The Partridge Family, the animated series The Archie Show, and (to a lesser extent) The Brady Bunch integrated television and teen-pop music to significant success during this time frame. The Brady Bunch's Barry Williams and Christopher Knight, as was tennis pro/actor Vincent Van Patten all were constantly in the fan magazines at the time. Actors Richard Thomas, Robby Benson, Peter Barton, Leif Garrett, Mark Lester, Jan-Michael Vincent, William Katt, and Jack Wild were the talk of the teenagers in the 1970's as well. Musicians the Hudson Brothers were on many teen magazine covers for a number of years as teen idols. They had two shows on TV during the 1970's and recorded many albums.

 

One of the features of many teen idols is that their fans (and, in some cases, the musicians themselves) tend to develop a distaste for the music once they became adults, and it is not much listened to by adults, except for nostalgia: the legacy of bubblegum pop. Teen idol performers in this category would include Shaun Cassidy, Leif Garrett, the Osmond Brothers (particularly Donny Osmond and their teen idol sister Marie Osmond), Andy Gibb, Tony DeFranco of the DeFranco Family, and the Bay City Rollers. Even modern classic hits and oldies outlets, which cover this time period, rarely play cuts from the teen idols of the era. A notable exception is Michael Jackson of the Jackson Five, who began his career as a teen idol along with his brothers, but whose individual career eventually evolved far beyond the limitations of that description and into super-stardom.

 

The Jackson Five were the first African-American music group to become national teen idols, appearing alongside white idols in magazines such as 16 and Tiger Beat.

 

1980's

 

In 1985 actress Alyssa Milano from Who's The Boss became a major teen idol and was dubbed "The Teen Queen of the 1980's. In the mid-1980's there was a group of young actors called the Brat Pack; the whole group collectively and separately became teen idols. They were Emilio Estevez, Anthony Michael Hall, Rob Lowe, Andrew McCarthy, Demi Moore, Judd Nelson, Molly Ringwald, and Ally Sheedy. They starred in many coming-of-age films. The film that would help invent and popularize the genre was Francis Ford Coppola's coming-of-age drama film The Outsiders (1983), which starred C. Thomas Howell, Ralph Macchio, Matt Dillon, Patrick Swazye, Diane Lane, Rob Lowe, Leif Garrett, Emilio Estevez, and Tom Cruise. The movie would receive critical acclaim, and would also become a box office success, and later a cult classic.

 

Actors such as Patrick Swazye, Matt Dillon, and Tom Cruise were teen idols who would later become successful A-list celebrities.

 

Actors Corey Feldman and Corey Haim also became teen idols during the later part of the 1980's with films The Goonies and together The Lost Boys, Dream a Little Dream and License to Drive among other films. They were dubbed "the two Coreys". Before Corey Haim's death in 2010, they did a reality TV show for two seasons (2007–08) on A&E named The Two Coreys after their 1980's moniker.

 

Actor River Phoenix during his teen years became a teen idol during the later part of the 1980s.Phoenix's work encompassed 24 films and television appearances, and his rise to fame led to his status as a "teen idol".On October 31, 1993, Phoenix collapsed and died of drug-induced cardiac arrest on the sidewalk outside the West Hollywood nightclub The Viper Room at the age of 23.

 

Australian-American singer Rick Springfield was regarded as teen idol from 1971, after releasing his solo début single "Speak to the Sky". His career matured over the next two decades with more hit songs. He gained further fame as a television series actor.

 

In the 1980's, Puerto Rican boy band Menudo, caused a sensation in Latin America, nicknamed Menudomania that became compared to the Beatles' Beatlemania.

 

Also painted with the Beatlemania brush was British pop group Duran Duran. Dubbed "the Fab Five", this group is recognized as pioneers in the then relatively new area of music video, that started with the Monkees in the 1960's. Their exotic videos, such as Hungry Like the Wolf, being fixtures on cable channel MTV coupled with their exposure in teen magazines instilled them as teen idols in America and around the world though the majority of the 80's. Another British pop band Culture Club were dubbed teen idols, with Boy George's androgynous outfits that were copied by his teen fans and young adults alike.

 

At the end of the 1980's, actor Kirk Cameron became a major teen idol teenage heartthrob. Cameron was best known for his role as Mike Seaver on the television situation comedy Growing Pains from 1985 to 1992. Also Scott Baio and Willie Aames of Charles in Charge fame found themselves regulars in teen magazines.

 

In popular music, the late 1980's was the boom of teenagers dominating the music charts. Debbie Gibson became the youngest person to write, perform and produce a number-one single, "Foolish Beat", and also had many hits from her first two albums. Tiffany, another teen icon, became a pop sensation at 15 years old thanks to an aggressive marketing strategy. She promoted her debut album in shopping malls of the US. She is also the youngest person to have a debut album hit number one and have multiple number one singles from that album ("I Think We're Alone Now" and "Could've Been"). Having become a household name, she had then-unknown band New Kids on the Block as an opening act for her shows. However, the sudden popularity of the New Kids caused their roles to be reversed. Gibson and Tiffany's careers had stalled by the early 1990's; so had NKOTB by the mid-nineties. The other boy band from Boston, New Edition was very popular with the teen set by the end of the 1980's as well.

 

Madonna, was another example of teen idol and became a fashion icon between teenagers. Even, professor Joseph Straubhaar in the book Communications Media in the Information Society (1997) called a teen idol by 1992 year.

 

1990's

 

The manufacturing of teen idols has been marketed more aggressively and with greater sophistication since the 1980's. The rise of MTV in the 1980's and the success of the boy bands of the 1990's and 2000's has continued to fuel the phenomenon. Besides a combination of good, clean-cut looks and a ubiquitous marketing campaign, such bands typically include a variety of personality types (e.g. "the shy one", "the smart one", etc.) Classic examples of "boy bands" include Menudo, New Kids on the Block, Take That, Backstreet Boys, and 'NSYNC, all becoming the best selling pop groups of the decade. Hanson was initially marketed as such a band, but eventually outgrew this label to become a successful indie band. Female pop super star Mariah Carey, was very popular with teens in the 90's decade. Christina Aguilera, Jennifer Lopez, Mandy Moore, Jessica Simpson, and Britney Spears, along with mega girl groups the Spice Girls and Destiny's Child, also became very popular at the end of the decade. Other notable examples from the 1990's are female R&B singers Mýa, Aaliyah, Monica, and Brandy. After Brandy's television show Moesha went on the air, it brought her many teen fans and she was always on the cover or in the teen magazines for many years. Brothers Nick Carter from Backstreet Boys and pop star Aaron Carter were both teen idols in their heyday, as was, to a much lesser extent, sister Leslie. Robbie Williams of boy band Take That had teen idol status as did Ricky Martin during the Latin music explosion of the late 1990's.

 

Many of the major teen idols in the 1990's were from boy bands and musical acts. One major exception was the situation comedy Home Improvement 's Jonathan Taylor Thomas, who appeared from 1991 to 1998, but never embraced his stardom. Another major teen idol was Freddie Prinze, Jr. who skyrocketed to teen heartthrob status after starring in successful teen horror films.

 

The 1997 film Titanic made Leonardo DiCaprio a teen idol; during "Leo-Mania" his face appeared on many teen magazines. Other teen idols from TV were most of the cast of Saved by the Bell, Joshua Jackson and James Van Der Beek of Dawson's Creek, Ben Savage and Rider Strong of Boy Meets World, Joseph Gordon-Levitt of 3rd Rock From the Sun, Jonathan Brandis of seaQuest DSV, Jared Leto of My So-Called Life, Joey Lawrence of Blossom (and to a lesser extent, Joey's brothers, Matthew and Andrew), Jason Priestley and Luke Perry of Beverly Hills, 90210 fame, and Erik Von Detten of various TGIF shows. These actors were often found on the covers and pages of teen magazines during the 1990's as teen idols as well. Sarah Michelle Gellar was a major teen idol in the late 90's, as a result of her lead role in the popular television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Fraternal twin sisters and TV actresses Ashley Olsen and Mary-Kate Olsen were major tween idols, and as they grew up they later became teen idols during the 1990's. After the movie Clueless, Alicia Silverstone found herself a teen idol. The comedy duo of Kenan Thompson and Kel Mitchell are also teen idols, in which they star in the Nickelodeon sketch comedy All That, their own sitcom Kenan & Kel, and the 1997 film Good Burger. Nickelodeon also produced The Amanda Show which featured Amanda Bynes as well.

 

2000's

 

The Walt Disney Company and its numerous outlets (e.g. Disney Channel, Radio Disney and Walt Disney Pictures) have successfully developed a new generation of teen idols. In the early 2000's, the company developed the careers of actresses and singers Hilary Duff and Lindsay Lohan, initially targeting youth and female teen audiences. While still teenagers, Duff became famous for her starring titular character in the Disney Channel teen sitcom Lizzie McGuire, and Lohan became famous for her starring roles in many successful teen movies, including Freaky Friday, Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen, Herbie: Fully Loaded, and Mean Girls. Other Nickelodeon and Disney Channel stars are also teen idols, including Jesse McCartney, Raven-Symone, Kyla Pratt, Ashley Tisdale, Vanessa Hudgens, Drake Bell, Josh Peck, Emma Roberts, Miranda Cosgrove, Miley Cyrus, Victoria Justice, Jennette McCurdy, Elizabeth Gillies and the Jonas Brothers.

 

In 2002, Canadian singer Avril Lavigne dominated the music scene and eventually became a worldwide teen idol. Listed at number 4 on Yahoo!'s Top 25 Teen Idols of all-time. Other teen idols are in the R&B and hip-hop realm, including JoJo, Ciara, Keke Palmer and Chris Brown.

 

2010's

 

Disney Channel stars Selena Gomez and Demi Lovato, YouTube star Becky G, and The X Factor alumni Little Mix have come to be teen idols. Ariana Grande was a popular teen actress before gaining mainstream popularity as a singer and teen idol.

 

In Japan, more and more "idol groups" have appeared. In Japanese culture, persons called "idols" are media personalities in their teens and early twenties who are considered particularly attractive or cute and who will, for a period ranging from several months to a few years, regularly appear in the mass media, e.g. as singers for pop groups, bit-part actors, TV personalities, models in photo spreads published in magazines, advertisements, etc. One of the most successful groups is Momoiro Clover Z. Their performances incorporate elements of ballet, gymnastics, and action movies. During 2016, about 636 thousand people attended their live concerts, which was the highest record of all female musicians in Japan. The group has been ranked as the most popular female idol group from 2013 to 2016.

 

Since their rise to fame in recent years, pop singer and YouTube sensation Justin Bieber, country-pop musician Taylor Swift, boy band One Direction, pop rock band 5 Seconds of Summer, and girl group Fifth Harmony have become examples of modern-day mega teen idols who have achieved international success, known for their devoted teen female fans, as well as an adult fan base making them all international superstars as well as teen idols.

  

LINKS:

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teen_idol

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model_(person)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Junior_idol

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Korean_pop_idol

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_idol

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Japanese_gravure_idols

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex_symbol

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pin-up_model

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celebrity_worship_syndrome

 

.

WHATEVER RICHARD SAID (pictured) at the ominous public portion of the crash inquiry at the old city hall…you know, the people in attendance would have believed it!

 

Because no one, and I mean no one, who isn’t serious about things walks into an public inquiry hearing…with a large dossier in one hand—and the biggest model of an AIR CANADA “STRETCH” DC-8 that the world has ever seen—in the other hand.

 

That action right there was so compelling…I’m sure the attendees remember that day, even now.

 

Sure the model’s airplane registration is wrong, should be CF-TIW, and that DC-8 looks to be a 61 type and not the 63 type that actually crashed in Castlemore, Ontario on July 5, 1970…but hey, nobody really noticed—I can tell you that.

 

All they saw was that enormous model airplane!

 

Here, Richard Bolduc, Senior Investigator, Department of Transport is actually captured by some unknown photographer entering the public hearing that was originally convened to “investigate the circumstances of this accident”.

 

On November 23, 1970, Richard just tabled to the judge, the report entitled,

 

“Report of the Board of Inquiry into the accident at Toronto International Airport, Malton, Ontario to Air Canada DC-8 CF-TIW aircraft on July 5, 1970 held before The Honourable Mr. Justice Hugh F. Gibson, Commissioner” (shortened, for our purposes here to “Inquiry Report”).

 

The Inquiry report, Richard has it, it’s right there in his dossier, because I also have a copy, the final version of the report, given to me by crash eyewitness, and Flight 621 crash researcher, Barbara Winckler. SEE: Dick Darrell, inset photo.

 

But if anyone went to that inquiry wanting to know who, or what was ultimately to blame; I mean who or what caused this horrific accident, Richard wasn’t going to tell them that.

 

And neither was the “report” he submitted to Justice Gibson going to arrive at any such expected conclusion!

 

So settle down people! You are about to be denied!

 

Right there, on page 5 of the report, the writers stated that while the report may (I’m summarizing here) contain legalese used in a Court of Canada to describe matters at hand to “impute legal liability to anyone for loss of life or damage to property…is not to be deemed to be intended for such a purpose (and in any event and circumstances, was not intended to relate to such purposes and should not be so construed.”)

 

So the Flight 621 air disaster will be talked about—but blame will not be cast.

 

And that was the problem with this report.

 

It didn’t “conform” to ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) standards.

 

This 1970 Inquiry Report was rejected by the international aviation community because in the end, in the very end…it did not contain the never-to-be-omitted probable cause of the crash.

 

The ICAO is actually a “specialized agency of the United Nations”, and we know how much some in Canada love that often corrupt, anti-West, anti-Semitic, and anti-Catholic, secularist organization.

 

But, did you know that very ICAO agency is headquartered in Montreal, right HERE in Canada!

 

And has been since its’ activation in 1947.

 

Yet, that mostly UN-compliant Canada refused to comply with the long ago agreed upon ICAO member standards for air accident reporting, at least in this case, the inquiry into the crash of Flight 621.

 

Post Avro Arrow, Canada, that newly strange, and newly unconfident country that drapes itself in the failed flag of the UN more than its’ own national flag, and presently embraces the hysterical post-national idiocy of cancel-culture dimwits—failed—failed to table a conclusive air accident report about a crash which killed (mysteriously, apparently) 109 Canadian and international passengers, and flight crew, on its own Canadian soil!

 

Can you even imagine?

 

An over two hundred page report and there’s NO CONCLUSION?!

 

Don’t worry, folks, because the denial goes even deeper, until well……fizzle, fizzle, there is just obscurity left.

 

A good summary of the report would be LIST FACTORS of the crash, but assign NO FAULT. And IGNORE perhaps the biggest factor of all.

 

From the day of the crash onward, and from time to time, someone will thoughtlessly cough, “pilot error” as the reason for the crash because that’s the simplest, easiest, most bromidic thing to say.

 

It just isn’t the truth.

 

And I was so glad that Barb Winckler (Zandra) and I sat down with Stuart Hamilton (Order of Canada, Hon. LL.D, A.R.C.T., deceased) brother of Flight 621 captain, Peter Hamilton and their sister, Dorothy Hamilton who brought us up to speed on an additional Douglas DC-8 design flaw. I mean, besides the DC-8 spoiler system. This flaw contributed as significantly to the Flight 621 crash—as the Douglas fault-ridden spoiler activating system. Without the failure of the exploding bolts problem—Flight 621 never would have crashed. More in the next post.

 

Did pilots’ errors contribute to the crash?

 

Absolutely.

 

But for the prominent blame of the crash to fall on the pilots…isn’t accurate, most importantly, or comforting, for those related to the pilots of the crash. I can tell you that.

 

This Flight 621 air disaster (the first for the newly branded airline, Air Canada) the reasons for its’ crash, were a lot more complex than that.

 

Today, we live in a more sophisticated age (not necessarily better), and for the 1970 Inquiry Report to double down and excuse one group from ANY BLAME, clearly, clearly…no longer flies (please, forgive the pun), in light of what we know from other air crashes which have happened since. And the actions, or lack of, by this particular group HAS, unfortunately, contributed to aircraft crashes the world over. Not many, but enough, and I think also Flight 621.

 

SO, ON THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FLIGHT 621 CRASH, July 5, 2020, the people need to know…and above all else, the victim’s families certainly need to know—why Flight 621 really crashed.

 

It’s the right thing to do.

 

It’s the right time.

  

Check here, on July 5, 2020, after 7 pm:

flic.kr/p/2jiv7Ft

 

ADD A CONDOLENCE to the FLIGHT 621 FAMILIES, or a LOVED ONE from FLIGHT 621, or a MEMORY of a PERSONAL EVENT related to the crash…at the City of Brampton's permanent Flight 621 site…SEE: www.brampton.ca/EN/City-Hall/Protocol-Office/Brampton-Rem...

  

PRAY FOR THE REPOSE OF SOULS for the passengers and crew of Flight 621:

 

Adams, Celine Fradette

Adams, Pierre J

Beaudin, Gaetan

Belanger, Mrs.

Belanger, Jacques

Belanger, Jean

Belanger, Roland

Belanger, Rosanne

Benson, Helen

Benson, Leonard

Benson, Mary

Benson, Richard

Bertrand, Ginette

Boosamra, Lynn

Boulanger, Guy

Bradshaw, Dollie

Cedilot, Robert J

Chapdeleine, Jeannine

Chapdeleine, Joanne

Chapdeleine, Mario

Charent, Jean Maurice

Clarke, Devona Olivia

Cote, Francine

Daoust, Yolande

Desmarais, Brigitte

Desmarais, G

Dicaire, Alice (Marie)

Dicaire, Gilles

Dicaire, Linda

Dicaire, Luke

Dicaire, Mark

Dion, Suzanne

Dore, Jacqueline

Earle, Lewella

Earle, Linda

Filippone, Francesco

Filippone, Linda

Filippone, Marie

Gee, Bernard

Goulet, Denise M

Grenier, Madeleine

Growse, Diana Cicely

Growse, Jane

Growse, Roger

Hamilton, Karen E

Hamilton, Peter Cameron

Herrmann, Ronald Alvin

Hill, Harry Gordon

Holiday, Claude

Houston, Irene Margaret

Houston, Wesley

Jakobsen, Vagn Aage

Labonte, Gilles

Leclaire, Marie Rose

Leclaire, Oscar

Leduc, Henri W

Lepage, Claudette

Mailhiot, Claire Gagnon

Mailhiot, Gerald Bernard

Maitz, Gustave

Maitz, Karoline

McKettrick, Winnifred

McTague, John

Medizza, Carla

Mohammed, Dolly

Molino, Antonio

Molino, Michael (Michel)

Moore, Frederick T

Partridge, Andrea

Partridge, Carnie (Carnis) Ann

Partridge, Cyril Wayne

Phillips, Kenneth William

Poirier, Rita

Raymond, Gilles

Raymond, Martial

Robert, Aline

Robert, Georges E

Robidoux, Lionel

Rowland, Donald

Silverberg, Marci

Silverberg, Merle

Silverberg, Steven

Simon, Istvan

Simon, Mark

Smith, Dwight Lee

St. Laurent, Blanche

Stepping, Glenn Thomas

Sultan, Celia

Sultan, Jerald. M

Sultan, Robert. L

Szpakowicz, Borys

Szpakowicz, Serge

Tielens, Carmen

Tielens, Frederick

Tournovits, George

Tournovits, Soula (Athanasia)

Weinberg, Carla

Weinberg, Rita

Weinberg, Wendy

Whittingham, Jennifer

Whittingham, John

Whittingham, Reginald

Whybro, Mary Baker

Wieczorek, Hildegund

Witmer, Edgar

Wong, Ngar-Quon

Wong, Suzie

Wong, Wong (Mansing)

Woodward, Dallas J

   

© 2020 LPR CARDIN II - Friends of Flight 621

 

The State Kremlin Palace is the main stage of the country, one of the best and prestigious theatrically-concert platforms of Russia. The Kremlin Palace is in the heart of Russia, in territory of a medieval fortress and residence of the head of the state. Of such arrangement any venue of the world cannot be proud of.

 

In 2011 the State Kremlin Palace has celebrated its 50th anniversary. Nevertheless it is the youngest building in the Moscow Kremlin. Many times it became the witness of significant events of a contemporary history.

 

In its hall the CPSU congresses, the first congresses of People's Deputies were held, here the first President of Russia has taken the oath.

 

This monumental building was constructed as one of the main symbols of the Soviet epoch. Each hall of it looks as a work of art. To wait for the beginning of the show it is possible in one of three Foyers: mirror, parquet and of coats of arms. The top part of a building is occupied with a large Banquet Hall. The auditorium of the State Kremlin Palace is about 6000 persons. Convenient armchairs, the first class acoustics and the advanced equipment will allow spectators enjoy every minute of performance of the favorite actor. The sound and light equipment of auditorium recently have been completely updated.

 

There are events of different kinds and genres on a stage of the State Kremlin Palace. Among them variety concerts, fashion shows, cinema premieres, ballets, operas, forums, circus representations etc. The most famous Russian and World stars perform here.

 

Among them: Whitney Houston, Luciano Pavarotti, Joe Cocker, Chris Rea, Mireille Mathieu, George Benson, Tony Braxton, Lara Fabian, Cesaria Evora, Bryan Adams, Vanessa Mae, James Brown, Gipsy Kings, George Benson, Liza Minnelli, Mariah Carey, Patricia Kaas, Placido Domingo, Rod Stewart, Thomas Anders, Julio Iglesias, Charles Aznavour, Elton John, Eric Clapton and many other legendary artists. The best opera theatres of the world, among them the Opera of Rome, the Bolshoi Theatre, the Mariinsky Theater toured here. In 2012 since February, for 2,5 months on a stage of the Palace there will perform the world famous «Cirque du Soleil» from Canada with the program "Zarkana", the most grandiose show of «Cirque du Soleil». In total in the State Kremlin Palace pass about 300 events a year.

 

Scene of the State Kremlin Palace is one of the largest in Eurasia. On it simultaneously can act about thousand actors. And it is not its only advantage. Here it is possible to embody any imagination of the director. The stage consists of 16 elevating platforms. There are also 4 hatches for effective occurrence or disappearance of actors. In the middle of the stage there is a huge rotating circle 17 meters in diameter, intended for fast change of scenery during performance. All these constructional features make the Concert Hall of the Kremlin Palace one of the best in the world.

 

The State Kremlin Palace throughout all history of its existence pleases the audience with grandiose shows from all over the World. Absolutely fairly it is proclaimed the best scene of Russia.

Todos los derechos reservados © Alberto J. Espiñeira Francés. Obra registrada. No utilizar esta imagen en ningún medio sin mi autorización.

Sí, la foto tiene firma, marca de agua y sello de registro. Lo sé, lo he puesto de forma intencionada.

 

All rights reserved © Alberto J. Espiñeira Francés. Registered work. Do not use this image on any media without my explicit permission.

Yes, my photo has signature, watermark and registration stamp. I know, I have set intentionally.

 

-------------------

 

El mes pasado, durante una de las sesiones de fotos al amanecer en Fuerteventura, conocí a Thomas Feiereis y en otra de las sesiones hablamos un rato. Lo que no sabía es que dejaría un registro fotográfico del momento de la toma de esta foto: www.flickr.com/photos/feiereisphotographie/45635822982/in...

No dejen de visitar su página: www.feiereis.info donde, entre otras cosas, muestra fotografías en blanco y negro, fotografías callejeras, fotografías de paisajes, fotografías de lugares abandonados (fotografías de lugares perdidos) en Berlín y Brandenburgo, así como amplia información al respecto.

 

Last month, during one of the photo sessions at dawn in Fuerteventura I met Thomas Feiereis and in another of the sessions we talked for a while. What I did not know is that he would leave a photographic record of the moment of taking this photo: www.flickr.com/photos/feiereisphotographie/45635822982/in...

Do not forget to visit their page: www.feiereis.info where, among other things, it contains black and white photographs, street photography, landscape photography, photography of abandoned places (photography of lost places) in Berlin and Brandenburg, as well as extensive information about it.

Pennsylvania and Southern No. 17, an recently acquired SW1200, has been painted in this patriotic remembrance to the soldiers that were killed when their helicopter, callsign Extortion 17, was shot down during a 2011 special forces raid in Afghanistan. It was the single deadliest day of the war since the US started combat operations there in 2001.

 

Raritan Central is the parent company of the Pennsylvania and Southern Railway, and owner Eyal Shapira is a strong supporter of the special forces community. He turned PSCC General Manager Jason Lehman loose on the former Weyerhaeuser/LTEX 300 and over the Summer the unit was stripped and painted by the employees into this rolling tribute. Each of the Americans killed during incident have their name printed on a star adorning the cab.

 

Lieutenant Commander Jonas B. Kelsall

Master Chief Petty Officer Louis J. Langlais

Senior Chief Petty Officer Thomas A. Ratzlaff

Senior Chief Petty Officer Kraig M. Vickers

Chief Petty Officer Brian R. Bill

Chief Petty Officer John W. Faas

Chief Petty Officer Kevin A. Houston

Chief Petty Officer Matthew D. Mason

Chief Petty Officer Stephen M. Mills

Chief Petty Officer Nicholas H. Null

Chief Petty Officer Robert J. Reeves

Chief Petty Officer Heath M. Robinson

Petty Officer 1st Class Darrik C. Benson

Petty Officer 1st Class Christopher G. Campbell

Petty Officer 1st Class Jared W. Day

Petty Officer 1st Class John Douangdara (and SEAL dog Bart)

Petty Officer 1st Class Michael J. Strange

Petty Officer 1st Class Jon T. Tumilson

Petty Officer 1st Class Aaron C. Vaughn

Petty Officer 1st Class Jason R. Workman

Petty Officer 1st Class Jesse D. Pittman

Petty Officer 2nd Class Nicholas P. Spehar

Chief Warrant Officer David R. Carter

Chief Warrant Officer Bryan J. Nichols

Sgt. Patrick D. Hamburger

Sgt. Alexander J. Bennett

Spc. Spencer C. Duncan

Tech. Sgt. John W. Brown

Staff Sgt. Andrew W. Harvell

Tech. Sgt. Daniel L. Zerbe

Thomas Hart Benton (1889-1975)

The Yankee Driver

1923, oil on canvas

 

Benton, a native of Missouri, spent summers on Martha's Vineyard. This is an old-timer on the island, Billy Benson, captured in this classic Benton canvas.

 

The Huntington Gardens in San Marino, California

.

ON APRIL 10 1978, at the age of twenty-four Judy Cameron became the first female Air Canada pilot.

 

Gosh, it was a risky move. The only other “big player” airline to consider the similar venture of a female pilot, was American Airlines. Quietly, Air Canada had reviewed NASA’s conclusions with regard to “emotional stability” and female astronauts.

 

NASA had discovered and documented their results. Women were just as calm, just as logical, and just as disciplined as men at the helm. The ancient Canadian airline was sold—they would go with Judy.

 

But this IS the alternate universe we live in, the one, you know, where Air Canada Flight 621 crashed in Castlemore, ON on this day, July 5, 1970, killing all 109 passengers and crew.

 

One of those Air Canada stewardesses that perished that awful day was a Denise Goulet and had she NOT died, I believe Denise—not Judy—would have been Air Canada’s first female pilot.

 

Judy Cameron decidedly took to flying even after a joker-pilot took her up on her first flight, did some spins, stalled his airplane (a Cessna 150) and then pretended he had to do a forced landing…because well, the airplane was now in trouble (component failure or he faked an inability to restart his engine) and to save their lives—they must land immediately!

 

Judy was scared as hell during the whole flight!

 

However, when the traumatic flight was over and she was safely on the ground Judy immediately knew…she just had to get her pilot’s license.

 

Judy took five years to rack up the necessary flying hours and flight experience…on various aircraft (including multi-engine ones) to even be considered as a pilot for any airline. By 1978 she had accumulated the flying experience that Air Canada couldn’t overlook—so she was indeed hired, and history was made. Air Canada had its first female pilot.

 

In contrast, Air Canada stewardess, Denise Goulet, by age twenty-two already had many parachute jumps under her belt. Her first jump was at age seventeen. And while she had been a stewardess for just shy of three years, she had disclosed to family and friends that she too had committed to getting her pilot’s licence. And fam and friends knew once Denise set her sights on a goal—she would achieve it.

 

That said, Denise had one huge advantage over Judy.

 

Denise’s father, Henri-Paul Goulet, was already a commercial pilot! Qualified not just on airplanes, but helos (helicopters) as well. Not many pilots had this dual certification then, or now.

 

You can bet that once Denise had gotten her private pilot’s licence, her pilot dad would have pulled out all the stops. Commercial pilot's license next…then her multi-engine rating and experience on multiple aircraft. Certainly, on jets. Maybe even helicopters.

 

Assuming the same career timeline—Denise would have been qualified and been commercial pilot status ready—early, by 1975. Three years before Judy.

 

By 1978, Denice would have been twenty-nine with far greater flight experience, and the chronologically more mature pilot.

 

Also, again, it cannot be understated how much attention, flying experience, and extra help Denise would have received through her father. A huge advantage…over and above any advantage Judy actually got.

 

Think of Walter and Wayne Gretzky, and you’ll start to understand the Henri-Paul and Denise Goulet connection.

 

Alas, it was not to be.

 

On July 5th, 1970 that fateful day, a call from Air Canada came into the Goulet residence at around 10 am.

 

That call would be answered by Denise’s eleven-year-old sister, Louise Goulet who was there at home, alone with her mother, Pauline (nee Roux). And, moments after Louise handed the phone over to her mother…their world came crashing in.

 

Simultaneously, Denise’s brother Andre who had borrowed Luke Gruninger’s Mustang to pick up Denise at the Los Angeles airport (LAX) waited for her flight to arrive. The trio was going to spend time together visiting California, seeing the younger generation sites. In August, Pauline and Denise were going to tour California together.

 

As Andre waited at the airport, it was finally announced that Flight 621 had crashed in Canada—with no survivors.

 

What most folks don’t really get about Air Canada’s Flight 621 crash IS that it was the Canadian parallel or equivalent newsworthy event to the JFK assassination in America!

 

That’s right.

 

Ask anyone in the USA what they were doing when they got the news that their much-loved president, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, had been assassinated.

 

They’ll tell you exactly where they were and what they were doing—and then they'll recall their immediate grief from that very news!

 

Well, I’ve talked with many, many, folks about the Air Canada DC-8 “stretch” crash in Woodbridge then (Brampton now).

 

The first recollections these people comment on is usually that it was a Sunday morning. Or, that it was such a beautiful day outside. Next, they'll recall exactly what they were doing at the moment they learned the shocking news of the Toronto area air disaster.

 

Usually, that news came over the radio, since everyone listened to the radio back then, at least in the background. And then there was a personal sorrow and a realization of their inability to help in any way. But their hearts and prayers were with the victim's families.

 

So many lives lost and no survivors! And so close to Toronto. And then the inevitable question—how did this crash happen?

 

That’s what this Air Canada plane crash meant to Canadians at the time. It was a sad and riveting moment for the entire nation.

 

From Patricia Harding,

 

“Denise and I trained together as Air Canada Flight Attendants in Montreal. She was a lovely person. I was in Vancouver on a stopover when we heard the news of the crash. We were grief-stricken and so traumatized that we were unable to work our flight back home. We had to stay in Vancouver and were flown home a couple of days later. The flight crew were all known to us and were like family. We were young and had so many dreams for the future. I have never forgotten and I will carry her memory with me always.”

 

From Nancy Holloway Gunson,

 

"I was working a C. P. Air flight that fateful day from Vancouver to Montreal. Before take off, we didn't receive any newspapers to hand out to passengers (these were the days when newspapers published 3 times a day and Vancouver was also 3 hours behind Toronto's time) and I remember asking a ground crew member why, and he told that there weren't any. I thought that that was very odd. Little did I realize that the crash was front page news.

 

It was later in the day as we descended into Toronto, and because my 'fifth position seat' was 'sold', that I sat behind the captain for landing. As we circled, the captain pointed out the smoking rubble on the ground. It was then I found out about the crash. I could just as easily have been on that flight because I was accepted to Air Canada's F.A. training course and a day later, I found out that I was also accepted to CP Air. Because CP Air's training was in Vancouver, I decided that CP Air was for me.

 

My heart aches for those who perished. Denise Goulet was a beautiful young woman."

 

Look at the picture above of Denise Goulet.

 

If ever there was someone full of hope and promise it was Denise.

 

Her Air Canada stewardess picture is courtesy of Denise’s younger sister, Louise who answered the fateful call from Air Canada on that day.

 

And sadly, but truly, Denise is standing in front of an Air Canada DC-8 just like the one she perished in.

  

From the Walsingham poem,

 

But true love is a durable fire,

In the mind ever burning.

Never sick, never old, never dead,

From itself never turning.

 

Sir Walter Ralegh

 

Check here, on July 5, 2020, after 7 pm:

www.flickr.com/photos/78215847@N00/albums/721576246894922...

 

ADD A CONDOLENCE to the FLIGHT 621 FAMILIES, or a LOVED ONE from FLIGHT 621, or a MEMORY of a PERSONAL EVENT related to the crash…at the City of Brampton's permanent Flight 621 site…SEE: www.brampton.ca/EN/City-Hall/Protocol-Office/Brampton-Rem...

  

REST IN PEACE passengers and crew of Flight 621:

 

Adams, Celine Fradette

Adams, Pierre J

Beaudin, Gaetan

Belanger, Mrs.

Belanger, Jacques

Belanger, Jean

Belanger, Roland

Belanger, Rosanne

Benson, Helen

Benson, Leonard

Benson, Mary

Benson, Richard

Bertrand, Ginette

Boosamra, Lynn

Boulanger, Guy

Bradshaw, Dollie

Cedilot, Robert J

Chapdeleine, Jeannine

Chapdeleine, Joanne

Chapdeleine, Mario

Charent, Jean Maurice

Clarke, Devona Olivia

Cote, Francine

Daoust, Yolande

Desmarais, Brigitte

Desmarais, G

Dicaire, Alice (Marie)

Dicaire, Gilles

Dicaire, Linda

Dicaire, Luke

Dicaire, Mark

Dion, Suzanne

Dore, Jacqueline

Earle, Lewella

Earle, Linda

Filippone, Francesco

Filippone, Linda

Filippone, Marie

Gee, Bernard

Goulet, Denise M

Grenier, Madeleine

Growse, Diana Cicely

Growse, Jane

Growse, Roger

Hamilton, Karen E

Hamilton, Peter Cameron

Herrmann, Ronald Alvin

Hill, Harry Gordon

Holiday, Claude

Houston, Irene Margaret

Houston, Wesley

Jakobsen, Vagn Aage

Labonte, Gilles

Leclaire, Marie Rose

Leclaire, Oscar

Leduc, Henri W

Lepage, Claudette

Mailhiot, Claire Gagnon

Mailhiot, Gerald Bernard

Maitz, Gustave

Maitz, Karoline

McKettrick, Winnifred

McTague, John

Medizza, Carla

Mohammed, Dolly

Molino, Antonio

Molino, Michael (Michel)

Moore, Frederick T

Partridge, Andrea

Partridge, Carnie (Carnis) Ann

Partridge, Cyril Wayne

Phillips, Kenneth William

Poirier, Rita

Raymond, Gilles

Raymond, Martial

Robert, Aline

Robert, Georges E

Robidoux, Lionel

Rowland, Donald

Silverberg, Marci

Silverberg, Merle

Silverberg, Steven

Simon, Istvan

Simon, Mark

Smith, Dwight Lee

St. Laurent, Blanche

Stepping, Glenn Thomas

Sultan, Celia

Sultan, Jerald. M

Sultan, Robert. L

Szpakowicz, Borys

Szpakowicz, Serge

Tielens, Carmen

Tielens, Frederick

Tournovits, George

Tournovits, Soula (Athanasia)

Weinberg, Carla

Weinberg, Rita

Weinberg, Wendy

Whittingham, Jennifer

Whittingham, John

Whittingham, Reginald

Whybro, Mary Baker

Wieczorek, Hildegund

Witmer, Edgar

Wong, Ngar-Quon

Wong, Suzie

Wong, Wong (Mansing)

Woodward, Dallas J

 

© 2019 Paul Cardin - Friends of Flight 621

  

(to be refined further at a later date)

Dutch postcard by 't Sticht, Utrecht, no. AX 6262. Gert Fröbe, Honor Blackman, Martin Benson and Sean Connery in Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964).

 

Yesterday, 6 April 2020, British actress Honor Blackman (1925-2020) passed away at the age of 94. She was best known for playing the Bond girl Pussy Galore opposite Sean Connery in Goldfinger (1964). Blackman became a household name in the 1960s as Cathy Gale in The Avengers in which she showed an extraordinary combination of beauty, brains and physical prowess. After a career spanning eight decades, she died of natural causes unrelated to coronavirus.

 

Honor Blackman was born one of four children of a middle-class family in London's East End. Her father, Frederick Blackman, was a civil service statistician. For her 15th birthday, her parents gave her acting lessons and she began her training at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama in 1940. Blackman received her first acting work on stage in London's West End as an understudy for 'The Guinea Pig'. She continued with roles in 'The Gleam' (1946) and 'The Blind Goddess' (1947), before moving into film. She debuted with Fame Is the Spur (1947), starring Michael Redgrave. Signed up with the Rank Organisation, Blackman joined several other starlet hopefuls who were being groomed for greater fame. She played small roles in the anthology film Quartet (Ken Annakin, Arthur Crabtree, Harold French, Ralph Smart, 1948), based on short stories by W. Somerset Maugham, the thriller So Long at the Fair (Terence Fisher, Antony Darnborough,1950), with Dirk Bogarde, and the Titanic drama A Night to Remember (Roy Ward Baker, 1958). Developing a solid footing, she filmed The Square Peg (John Paddy Carstairs, 1958) with comedian Norman Wisdom and A Matter of WHO (Don Chaffey, 1961) with Terry-Thomas. On television, she played in the Edgar Wallace vigilante series The Four Just Men (1959-1960). She secured her breakthrough when she was cast in 1962 as the leather-clad crimefighter Cathy Gale in the hit British show The Avengers (1962-1964), alongside Patrick Macnee as the bowler-hatted John Steed. Blackman had to learn judo for the role, and her tough persona allied to then daring costume choices – boots and figure-hugging catsuits – ensured she quickly assumed star status. One of its unlikely results was a hit single, 'Kinky Boots', recorded in 1964 with Macnee, which became a Top 10 hit in the U.K. in 1990. Blackman’s proficiency in martial arts helped her land what became her signature role, that of Pussy Galore, the glamorous villain assisting in Goldfinger’s plot to rob Fort Knox. Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964) was the third Bond film and was a global hit. Gary Brumburgh at IMDb: "Blackman went toe to toe with Sean Connery's womanizing "007" and created major sparks on screen, managing to outclass the (wink-wink) double meaning of her character's name."

 

After her rise to mainstream fame, Honor Blackman made noticeable appearances in such films as Jason and the Argonauts (Don Chaffey, 1963) as the vengeful goddess Hera, the Western Shalako (Edward Dmytryk, 1968) and The Virgin and the Gypsy (Christopher Miles, 1970) with Franco Nero. Simon Murphy and Andrew Pulver in The Guardian: "while she worked steadily in film, her TV work was higher profile, and included guest appearances in Columbo, Minder and Doctor Who. In 1990, she was cast in a regular role in the ITV sitcom The Upper Hand, playing the glamorous mother of the lead female character. Blackman expressed her fondness for the role, saying it “made women who had just retired and felt they’d been put on the backburner realise they had a lot of life left to live”." She earned raves on stage as the blind heroine of the thriller 'Wait Until Dark' as well as for her dual roles in 'Mr. and Mrs.', a production based on two of Noël Coward's plays. She also appeared on stage in The Sound of Music (1981), My Fair Lady (2005-2006) and Cabaret (2007). She was a staunch republican and turned down a Commander of the British Empire (CBE) in 2002 to avoid being a “hypocrite”. More recently, she joined a campaign to demand compensation payments for pensioners who lost savings in the Equitable Life scandal. Honor Blackman was married to Bill Sankey from 1948 to 1956. After their divorce, she married British actor Maurice Kaufmann (1961–1975). They appeared together in the slasher film Fright (Peter Collinson, 1971) and some stage productions. They adopted two children, Lottie (1967) and Barnaby (1968). After her divorce from Kaufmann, she did not remarry and stated that she preferred being single. She enjoyed watching football. Blackman died at her home in Lewes in 2020, aged 94, from natural causes.

 

Sources: Simon Murphy and Andrew Pulver (The Guardian), Gary Brumburgh (IMDb), Wikipedia and IMDb.

 

And, please check out our blog European Film Star Postcards.

THREE PHOTOS, OVERLAID ONE on the another, tell a still hidden story, or at least a story not well known of this now famous Air Canada “stretch” DC-8 crash.

  

While these photos are not a perfect match-up (because each photo was taken from a different vantage point)…still, their alignment IS close enough. Can there be any doubt about what they reveal?

  

There are distinctive land based markers from the span of years 1970, 2004, and 2018 that once matched—and brought together through a digital overlay—tell the astute viewer this untold story: The FLIGHT 621 MEMORIAL GARDEN (Castlemore) Ontario sits RIGHT ON TOP of the exact July 5, 1970 crash point of the ill-fated airliner.

  

Compare the 1970 UPI Press photo, with the 2004 Google Earth photo, and the final 2018 Google Earth photo noting the circled markers with their contents—which align—almost perfectly.

  

It is here where the crippled Air Canada “Stretch” DC-8-63 (CF-TIW) went fourteen feet into the ground at approximately 250 mph, killing all 109 passengers and crew in what remains Air Canada’s largest loss of life accident to this day.

  

The Memorial Garden, the 109 granite markers (representing each person who perished) and the large pink granite boulder with its’ black granite plaque inscribed with each crash victim’s name and the adjacent portioned off parcel of land marked by its’ double row of fledgling trees (to the immediate south, right in the photo) display the careful planning, and consideration of the land developers and planning partners.

  

This hallowed bit of ground indeed encapsulates the main body of the Air Canada DC-8 crash.

  

And while the City of Brampton wanted to locate the Memorial Garden and Cemetery somewhere…“near to” the crash site, it was engineer Diarmuid Horgan, of Candevcon Limited, who insisted the Memorial be placed right atop the actual crash point. And rightly so.

  

I am someone who walked the field numerous times, back in the day, stood at the old (now removed) bridge and atop the former Burgsma residence.

  

I was there when the new house was being erected atop the old Burgsma home lot—with Burgsma kitchen tile and other household remnants—on the very boundary of the new home’s concrete basement. So the planners got the crash location right, as can now be seen by all who view my video.

  

BUT—IS THAT IT?

  

No, the Castlemore Memorial is still more.

  

It is an official Ontario irregular cemetery.

  

Unfortunately, bones of crash victims were inadvertently left behind after the crash.

  

Or were buried deeply by the force of the crash at the time—pushed downward into the soil—eventually surfacing decades later.

  

I, (Paul Cardin) made the first unpleasant discovery of Flight 621’s victim’s bones still remaining in the field, in June 2002, after seeing a Mike Strobel SUN article (November 2001) revisiting the 1970 crash accompanied by Will Burgsma who resided in the house noted in the video. With Mike’s article sitting in my car for months, I finally had the opportunity to go have a look in the early summer of 2002.

  

Hundreds of bones (and notable aircraft wreckage) were eventually collected by myself and other members of “Friends of Flight 621” (Carol Parr, Barb Winckler, Carrie Parr, Tom Stone, Mike Quatrale, Gord Ransom, Rebecca Reid, and the independent researcher Jan Burton). Some victim families also found aircraft wreckage on site, but thankfully no bone fragments. Peter Hill, son of Second Officer (navigator) did however find a partial denture which was startling to all of us there with him.

  

In 2003, ex-Metro police officer Tom Stone called Robert Milton (Air Canada CEO) himself and put forth the idea of a new memorial being erected on site, and that the deplorable situation of victim’s bones remains still being found at the former crash site be rectified. Days later, Tom and I were in the field with three Air Canada executives, and Doug Kirkwood, who had assisted with the crash clean-up emergency personnel back in July of 1970. The executive trio were surprised to find so much aircraft debris still in the field, that one of them was even able to identify a piece he found, and where it had come from on the aircraft!

  

In 2004, Carol Parr, on CBC TV again, with viewers in the millions called for a memorial to be built on the former crash site.

  

In 2004, Barbara Winckler, a 1970 eyewitness to the Air Canada crash, gathered an information package together for the City of Brampton that included photos, newspaper clippings, history and details about the crash, pages from the crash report AND most importantly information about how and why the Province of Ontario can accord irregular cemetery status to unusual grave-sites. This information package was given to Jim Leonard of the Brampton Historical Society, who presented it to the City, for us.

  

Given the existing situation at the former crash site, Barb knew that the Air Canada crash site would qualify as an irregular cemetery, as she, and Carol Parr (another eyewitness to the crash) had together, with other “Friends”, found numerous bones in the farm field themselves! At a multitude of locations.

  

I had a Flight 621 website that noted, complete with pictures, from 2003 onward, the more ridiculous and recent happenings and discoveries at the former crash site.

  

Several victim’s families found my Flight 621 website and contacted me though it. Some came to the field, including a member of the Labonte family who expressed their distress about the ongoing bone situation, to their Quebec MP at the time, who then raised the issue in the House of Commons!

  

In 2006, Diarmuid Horgan called an aviation archeologist, Dana Poulton, and his associates to investigate the former crash site. The team proceeded to conduct digs and discovered 90 more victim’s bones—all over the former crash site. It was then determined that the existing “situation” of the field had to be properly dealt with. A problem “Friends of Flight 621”, on TV, through newspaper and radio, web sites, and postings had complained about for years—but lacked official capacity with the City, or those who would actually address these specific matters. City Councillor, John Sprovieri, did respond to us, and told us the situation would take about five years to wind its way through city hall.

  

But he noted, I, or rather my discoveries, had created a “situation”!

  

John stated that if people were told about the crash—many…probably wouldn’t want to buy a new house there. And if potential homeowners weren’t told about the crash, and found out later—well, the City could be sued.

  

But the situation was resolved. Potential homeowners were told about the crash, people bought homes there, AND most importantly to me, no more crash victim bones would be found at the former crash site.

  

Proper burial of the deceased is a corporeal work of mercy, as every Catholic knows. Jesus, the Lord, Himself, was buried according to long-held Jewish religious practices of the Old Covenant. Jews and Catholics know the importance God places on a proper burial. Only savages, or the reprobate, don’t bury their dead. And considering the horrific nature of the crash itself, the lives lost so tragically, with the additional indignity of the remaining bones (inadvertently left behind for more than three decades) out there a farm field, in all seasons—proper burial of the victims at that point—became an indispensable work of charity surpassing even almsgiving itself.

  

The bones the “Friends of Flight 621” found were turned over to the Coroner’s Office through Candevcon Limited. The remaining victim’s bones still dispersed within the crash site soil, were finally gathered together strategically, by removing the large tract of affected soil, and entombing it right under the Flight 621 Memorial Garden and Cemetery. The area which includes the crash arena is currently marked off by the double row of trees, previously mentioned, and with additional white obelisks. I myself witnessed, and photographed part of this encapsulating process, as it unfolded.

  

Let the readership note, victims of Flight 621 at the time of the crash were buried by Air Canada in Toronto’s Mount Pleasant Cemetery, among famous Canadians, musicians, and even a prime minister or two.

  

But it is here, in Castlemore on July 5, 1970—where these passengers and crew of Flight 621 breathed their last.

  

So, it is only fitting, that they are also buried here.

 

Check here, on July 5, 2020, after 7 pm:

www.flickr.com/photos/78215847@N00/albums/721576246894922...

 

ADD A CONDOLENCE to the FLIGHT 621 FAMILIES, or a LOVED ONE from FLIGHT 621, or a MEMORY of a PERSONAL EVENT related to the crash…at the City of Brampton's permanent Flight 621 site…SEE: www.brampton.ca/EN/City-Hall/Protocol-Office/Brampton-Rem...

  

REST IN PEACE passengers and crew of Flight 621:

 

Adams, Celine Fradette

Adams, Pierre J

Beaudin, Gaetan

Belanger, Mrs.

Belanger, Jacques

Belanger, Jean

Belanger, Roland

Belanger, Rosanne

Benson, Helen

Benson, Leonard

Benson, Mary

Benson, Richard

Bertrand, Ginette

Boosamra, Lynn

Boulanger, Guy

Bradshaw, Dollie

Cedilot, Robert J

Chapdeleine, Jeannine

Chapdeleine, Joanne

Chapdeleine, Mario

Charent, Jean Maurice

Clarke, Devona Olivia

Cote, Francine

Daoust, Yolande

Desmarais, Brigitte

Desmarais, G

Dicaire, Alice (Marie)

Dicaire, Gilles

Dicaire, Linda

Dicaire, Luke

Dicaire, Mark

Dion, Suzanne

Dore, Jacqueline

Earle, Lewella

Earle, Linda

Filippone, Francesco

Filippone, Linda

Filippone, Marie

Gee, Bernard

Goulet, Denise M

Grenier, Madeleine

Growse, Diana Cicely

Growse, Jane

Growse, Roger

Hamilton, Karen E

Hamilton, Peter Cameron

Herrmann, Ronald Alvin

Hill, Harry Gordon

Holiday, Claude

Houston, Irene Margaret

Houston, Wesley

Jakobsen, Vagn Aage

Labonte, Gilles

Leclaire, Marie Rose

Leclaire, Oscar

Leduc, Henri W

Lepage, Claudette

Mailhiot, Claire Gagnon

Mailhiot, Gerald Bernard

Maitz, Gustave

Maitz, Karoline

McKettrick, Winnifred

McTague, John

Medizza, Carla

Mohammed, Dolly

Molino, Antonio

Molino, Michael (Michel)

Moore, Frederick T

Partridge, Andrea

Partridge, Carnie (Carnis) Ann

Partridge, Cyril Wayne

Phillips, Kenneth William

Poirier, Rita

Raymond, Gilles

Raymond, Martial

Robert, Aline

Robert, Georges E

Robidoux, Lionel

Rowland, Donald

Silverberg, Marci

Silverberg, Merle

Silverberg, Steven

Simon, Istvan

Simon, Mark

Smith, Dwight Lee

St. Laurent, Blanche

Stepping, Glenn Thomas

Sultan, Celia

Sultan, Jerald. M

Sultan, Robert. L

Szpakowicz, Borys

Szpakowicz, Serge

Tielens, Carmen

Tielens, Frederick

Tournovits, George

Tournovits, Soula (Athanasia)

Weinberg, Carla

Weinberg, Rita

Weinberg, Wendy

Whittingham, Jennifer

Whittingham, John

Whittingham, Reginald

Whybro, Mary Baker

Wieczorek, Hildegund

Witmer, Edgar

Wong, Ngar-Quon

Wong, Suzie

Wong, Wong (Mansing)

Woodward, Dallas J

   

© 2020 LPR CARDIN II - Friends of Flight 621

© 1970 UPI Press

© 2004 Google Earth Maps

© 2018 Google Earth Maps

© 2014 Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist,

....."Let Nothing Disturb You"

 

List of graduates by surname

Abromowitz, Belle - 1914

Abromowitz, Lena - 1913

Ahlborn, John - 1982

Aird, Amy - 1981

Aird, Annette - 1981

Allen, Frances - 1928

Allen, Helen - 1929

Allen, Marvin - 1934

Ames, Harry A - 1911

Ammerman, Hurley - 1939

Amundson, Clara - 1935

Amundson, Ethel - 1939

Amundson, Milton - 1937

Amundson, Myron - 1942

Anderson, Anna - 1945

Anderson, Ardith - 1953

Anderson, Signe - 1916

Anderson, Una - 1952

Anderson, Wayne - 1956

Andress, Charles - 1976

Andress, Charlotte - 1942

Andress, Dave - 1982

Andress, Gladys - 1930

Andress, Isabelle - 1942

Andress, Janyce - 1984

Andress, Jeanne - 1988

Andress, Judyne - 1984

Andress, Keith - 1960

Andress, Lois - 1957

Andress, Lori - 1979

Andress, Myrna - 1957

Andress, Pam - 1969

Andress, Ramona - 1942

Andress, Raymond - 1928

Andress, Robert - 1955

Andress, Ruth - 1940

Andress, Sheila - 1967

Andress, Sheryl - 1967

Andress, Virginia - 1947

Archer, Janice - 1956

Archer, Raymond - 1932

Archer, Stanley - 1958

Arnold, Florence - 1921

Arrington, Melinda - 1985

Axelson, Doris - 1937

Axelson, Larry - 1953

Axelson, Patricia - 1954

Axelson, Willis - 1926

Baesler, Laverne - 1951

Baker, Cyril - 1920

Baldwin, Shirley - 1956

Baldwin, Viola - 1952

Barber, Vernon B - 1915

Barkett, John - 1982

Barron, Raimond - 1974

Bayman, Brenda - 1984

Bayman, Delores - 1953

Bayman, Steve - 1983

Beach, Fred - 1939

Beach, Roland - 1942

Beck, Barb - 1971

Beck, John - 1975

Beck, Tom - 1970

Beckerleg, Jane - 1973

Beckerleg, Janet - 1977

Beckerleg, Kathleen - 1965

Beckerleg, Mary Lou - 1951

Beckerleg, Susan - 1972

Beckerleg, Thomas - 1979

Beckerleg, Tom - 1976

Becvar, Kathleen - 1945

Bell, Florence - 1925

Bell, Ida - 1924

Bellanger, Ruth - 1936

Belt, Karen (Schroeder) - 1984

Bennett, Holly - 1940

Bennett, Keith - 1937

Bennington, Rosalie - 1951

Bennor, Barbara - 1966

Bennor, Betty - 1974

Bennor, Doris - 1963

Bennor, Ellen Kay - 1977

Bennor, Karen - 1983

Bennor, Paul - 1985

Bennor, Perry - 1985

Benson, Betty - 1972

Benson, Earl - 1959

Benson, Enid - 1961

Benson, Paul - 1958

Benson, Ray - 1955

Berge, John - 1983

Biessener, Bernard - 1956

Biessener, Donna - 1980

Biessener, Irene - 1950

Biessener, Jerome - 1953

Biessener, Kathryn - 1953

Biessener, Lorraine - 1959

Biessener, Louise - 1946

Biessener, Marjorie - 1948

Biessener, Mark - 1984

Biessener, Mary - 1944

Biessener, Mike - 1981

Biessener, Roxanne - 1979

Biggin, Douglas - 1989

Biggin, Roberta - 1954

Bird, Calvin - 1959

Bixby, Linda - 1964

Bixby, Randall - 1962

Bixby, Teresa - 1981

Blanchard, Jeffrey - 1979

Blanchard, Joseph - 1977

Blanchard, Joyce - 1983

Blood, Charles - 1960

Blood, Dennis - 1957

Bly, Wayne - 1953

Boettcher, Arletta - 1943

Boettcher, Catherine - 1946

Boettcher, Diane - 1974

Boettcher, Dorothy - 1944

Boettcher, Frances - 1946

Boettcher, Joyce - 1950

Boettcher, Julie - 1977

Boettcher, Maurine - 1947

Boettcher, Maxine Donna - 1947

Bohmbach, Carole - 1956

Bohmbach, Lorraine - 1958

Bohmbach, Norman - 1954

Bohmbach, Vivian - 1955

Bohmbach, Wallace - 1929

Bombach, Evelyn - 1925

Booth, Phyllis - 1946

Booth, Rodby - 1948

Bowman, Lee - 1971

Boyd, Edwin - 1927

Bradt, Darlene - 1949

Bradt, Donna Bell - 1946

Brady, Michael - 1965

Brault, Arthur - 1950

Brault, Beatrice - 1952

Brault, Bernice - 1947

Brault, Neva - 1949

Brean, Frances - 1933

Brean, Willis - 1928

Briggs, Vera - 1910

Brooks, Leon - 1913

Brown, Ada - 1937

Brown, Allen - 1977

Brown, Bill - 1980

Brown, Carmen - 1969

Brown, Eugene - 1906

Brown, Mike - 1981

Brown, Richard - 1967

Brown, Steven - 1978

Brown, Todd - 1982

Bruno, Krishna - 1985

Buck, Cina - 1970

Buck, Denice - 1972

Buck, Gina - 1979

Buck, Larry - 1983

Buck, Robert - 1980

Buck, Tamara - 1977

Burns, Beverly - 1949

Burrows, Eunice - 1910

Busch, Dana - 1981

Busch, Darin - 1985

Busch, Dean - 1988

Butler, lona - 1923

Butler, Naida - 1922

Cafourek, Alfred - 1956

Carlson, Iver - 1934

Carlson, John - 1971

Carlson, Suzanne - 1979

Carter, Donna - 1988

Carter, Rae - 1980

Cary, Irene - 1947

Case, Alice - 1953

Case, Carol - 1951

Case, David - 1948

Case, Edward - 1955

Case, Keith - 1984

Case, Linda - 1968

Case, Marvin - 1986

Case, Michael - 1957

Case, Nancy - 1956

Case, Norma - 1950

Case, Pauline - 1942

Case, Phyllis - 1949

Case, Richard - 1961

Case, Sandra - 1964

Case, Sharon - 1959

Cerven, Kim - 1988

Chapman, Betty - 1942

Chase, Chris - 1974

Chase, David - 1960

Chase, Eugene - 1955

Chase, Kenneth - 1952

Chase, Kevin - 1984

Chase, Stan - 1977

Childs, David - 1949

Cirks, Gary - 1959

Clark, Anna Gail - 1939

Clark, Carol - 1952

Clark, Elsie - 1939

Clark, Lela - 1934

Clark, Mary - 1926

Clark, Russell - 1936

Clark, Shirley - 1928

Clason, Jack - 1933

Cohen, Bertha D - 1911

Cohen, Joseph - 1912

Cohen, Josie - 1909

Cohen, Lena - 1910

Condon, Mary - 1944

Conley, Frances - 1963

Conley, Joseph - 1961

Conley, Kathryn - 1977

Conley, Larry - 1962

Conley, Thomas - 1966

Cox, Bryan - 1976

Cox, Heather - 1984

Crafts, Charles, Jr - 1983

Crawford, Lori - 1989

Criss, John - 1940

Crookshank, Fern - 1940

Culver, Marion - 1949

Cunningham, Carole - 1960

Cunningham, Elton - 1959

Cunningham, Mabel - 1918

Cunningham, Merle - 1957

Czeczok, Lorraine - 1950

Czeczok, Margaret - 1948

Dahlquist, Mildred - 1932

Dahlquist, Ralph - 1935

Dahlquist, Ruth - 1928

Dahms, Joan - 1933

Dahms, Robert - 1947

Dahms, Rose Mary - 1942

Dahms, Walter - 1940

Daily, Helen - 1913

Dalen, Darlene - 1965

Dalen, Ella Mae - 1966

Daniels, Pauline - 1924

Davies, Herbert - 1932

Davis, Alvin - 1940

Davis, Isabelle - 1929

Davis, Jack - 1931

Davis, Thayer - 1906

Davis, Tom - 1909

DeMars, Frances - 1970

Dent, William - 1925

DeRoo, Aaron - 1989

Dewey, Cecyl M - 1915

Dickinson, Scott - 1986

Dighton, Grace - 1925

Dimmer, LeRoy - 1940

Dippold, George - 1967

Dippold, Mary - 1926

Disselbrett, Arrol - 1964

Disselbrett, Chester - 1956

Disselbrett, Delores - 1943

Dobson, Harriet - 1938

Dobson, Keith - 1944

Dobson, Loyd - 1945

Dobson, Lucille - 1935

Dobson, Orville - 1932

Dobson, Robert - 1924

Dobson, Vivian - 1948

Doppler, Anthony - 1942

Doppler, Charles - 1947

Doppler, Helene - 1941

Doppler, Laura - 1941

Downs, Dan - 1981

Downs, Donna - 1982

Downs, Richard - 1979

Duffy, Irene - 1941

Dunham, Audrey - 1973

Dunham, Jason - 1988

Dunham, Jeanne - 1959

Dunham, Jim - 1967

Dunham, John - 1965

Dunham, Laurel - 1970

Dunn, Patricia - 1988

Ebaugh, Richard - 1963

Ebaugh, Rosalind - 1962

Ebaugh, Tammy - 1983

Ebaugh, Tonja - 1988

Edelman, Jackee - 1988

Edelman, Jeff - 1984

Edelman, Judy - 1985

Edelman, Sandee - 1980

Egeland, Claudia - 1965

Egeland, Larry - 1959

Ekblad, Eva - 1938

Elavsky, Donovan - 1975

Elavsky, Jana - 1980

Elavsky, Joel - 1978

Elavsky, John - 1947

Elavsky, Karen - 1983

Elavsky, Mary - 1944

Elavsky, Mike - 1942

Elavsky, Neil - 1986

Elavsky, Ruth - 1957

Elavsky, Vivian - 1938

Elliot, Grace - 1912

Ellsworth, David - 1949

Ellsworth, Doris - 1951

Ellsworth, Dorothy - 1954

Ellsworth, JoAnn - 1960

Elphic, Grace - 1922

Engel, Virginia - 1978

Englebretson, Alice - 1921

Englebretson, Eddie - 1925

Englebretson, Esther - 1913

Englebretson, Selma - 1909

Engleking, Audrey - 1932

Engleking, Muriel - 1927

Erickson, Barbara - 1962

Erickson, Donna - 1974

Erickson, Genard - 1919

Erickson, James - 1968

Erickson, John - 1968

Erickson, Marie - 1958

Erickson, Mary - 1966

Erickson, Minerva - 1959

Erickson, Sadie - 1926

Erickson, Tom - 1972

Erickson, William - 1963

Evenson, Joseph - 1930

Evertz, Barbara - 1965

Evertz, Laura - 1961

Fagerman, Dawn - 1973

Fagerman, Jay - 1977

Farrington, Cindy - 1973

Farrington, Dennis - 1966

Farrington, James - 1963

Farrington, Robert - 1961

Felion, Art - 1935

Felion, Arthur - 1909

Felion, James - 1941

Felion, Jerome - 1939

Felion, Marcelle - 1935

Felion, Roderick (Roderc?) - 1922

Felion, Thomas - 1937

Fenzel, Ron - 1976

Fillbrandt, Ella - 1931

Fillbrandt, Louisa - 1925

Flavell, Agnes J - 1915

Flavell, Gertrude - 1917

Flavell, Winnie - 1914

Floodeen, Eddy - 1913

Floodeen, Ferry - 1912

Fogelberg, Alma - 1926

Fogelberg, Hattie - 1920

Foley, Tom - 1916

Foley, William - 1917

Ford, Henry - 1941

Fordyce, Marian - 1941

Fordyce, Patricia - 1953

Forester, William - 1925

Fox, Alvin - 1981

Fox, Jere - 1977

Fritcher, Mabel - 1906

Fritts, Eugene - 1925

Fritts, Lucille - 1936

Fritts, Mildred - 1921

Fritts, Ruth - 1924

Fritts, Warren - 1929

Gack, Ardis - 1979

Gack, Beverly - 1965

Gack, Bob - 1973

Gack, Burton - 1955

Gack, Delores - 1967

Gack, Irma - 1951

Gack, Ken - 1988

Gack, LaRae - 1969

Gack, Leona - 1942

Gack, Meri - 1968

Gack, Myron - 1963

Gack, Shirley - 1957

Gack, Tim - 1986

Galles, James - 1950

Galles, Jean - 1947

Geiger, Bette - 1951

Geiger, Donald - 1952

Geiger, Jennifer - 1955

Giles, Ruby E - 1911

Gitchel, Kenneth - 1969

Gitchel, Violet - 1965

Gleason, Delia - 1912

Gleason, Lynn - 1914

Gleason, Melvina - 1924

Gleason, Wayne - 1924

Goble, Deloris - 1952

Goehring, Charles - 1976

Goehring, Geraldine - 1957

Goehring, James - 1967

Goehring, Raymond - 1966

Goehring, Ronald - 1966

Goehring, Ruth - 1940

Goehring, Scott - 1987

Goehring, Shirley - 1969

Golberg, Betty - 1955

Golberg, Ernest - 1939

Golberg, Irene - 1942

Golberg, Jeff - 1974

Golberg, Lynne - 1965

Golberg, Marian - 1948

Golberg, Marjorie - 1943

Golberg, Ronald - 1966

Golberg, Scott - 1980

Golberg, Sharon - 1962

Golberg, Ted - 1946

Good, Merle - 1922

Good, Norma - 1921

Goodman, Harley - 1964

Gotschall, Robert - 1957

Gould, Louis - 1928

Granrud, Elnora - 1937

Gray, Richard - 1989

Graybeal, Esther - 1938

Gregg, Jane - 1950

Grimler, Clara - 1967

Grimler, Kathleen - 1966

Grimler, Paul - 1974

Gunkel, Carrie - 1974

Gunkel, Darcy - 1972

Gunkel, Ed - 1975

Gunkel, Janelle - 1969

Gunkel, Louise - 1966

Gunkel, Mark - 1982

Gustad, Carol - 1960

Gustad, Janelle - 1982

Gustad, Karen - 1959

Gustad, Linda - 1984

Gustad, Robert - 1965

Gustafson, Branson - 1949

Gustafson, Donald - 1943

Gustafson, Dwight - 1935

Gustafson, Emil John - 1942

Gustafson, Lillian - 1952

Gutierrez, Jeff - 1974

Gutierrez, Scott - 1981

Gutierrez, William - 1983

Haas, Herman - 1923

Haas, Mabel - 1924

Hackett, Dale - 1930

Haight, Gladys M - 1921

Hakala, Donna - 1977

Hakala, Ronald - 1980

Hakala, Sue - 1974

Hakala, Tom - 1975

Hamand, Claudia - 1971

Hamand, Jim - 1973

Hamand, Joe - 1981

Hamand, John - 1968

Hamm, David - 1976

Hamm, Debbie - 1986

Hamm, Jim - 1962

Hansen, Anna - 1909

Hansen, Carla - 1976

Hansen, Lance - 1988

Hanson, David - 1979

Hanson, Debbie - 1973

Hanson, Donald - 1983

Hanson, Ed - 1974

Hanson, Jolene - 1986

Hanson, Roger - 1977

Hanson, Roger D - 1978

Hanson, Violet - 1946

Harding, Daisy - 1910

Harding, Lila - 1947

Haring, Garold - 1953

Harms, Pam - 1971

Harms, Steve - 1965

Harris, James - 1941

Harris, James - 1965

Harris, Jim - 1989

Harris, Sandra - 1959

Harris, Susan - 1963

Hart, Carolyn - 1954

Hart, Jean - 1952

Hart, Louis - 1950

Hartman, Larry - 1966

Hartman, Milo - 1973

Harwood, Joyce - 1938

Hasbrook, Leonard - 1931

Hauser, Grant - 1986

Hayes, Anna Mae - 1948

Hayes, James - 1945

Hayes, Jim - 1971

Hayes, Joan - 1970

Hayes, Kathy May - 1977

Hayes, Lonnie - 1975

Hayes, Theresa - 1979

Hayes, Tom - 1943

Heldman, Gail - 1974

Hendricks, Clifford - 1959

Hendricks, Gary - 1961

Hendricks, Jon - 1957

Hendricks, Keith - 1982

Hendricks, William - 1963

Henne, Bob - 1975

Henne, Kathy - 1977

Henne, Thomas - 1979

Hensel, Charlene - 1979

Hensel, Dale - 1981

Herdina, Jeanette - 1970

Herdina, Karen Kay - 1977

Hildreth, Cecelia - 1951

Hinds, Lee - 1955

Hiserote, Gene - 1948

Hoff, Inez - 1916

Holland, Alice - 1912

Holland, Carolyn - 1967

Holland, Clarence - 1929

Holland, LeRoy - 1960

Holland, Marilyn - 1948

Holland, Marlys - 1974

Holland, Neil - 1962

Holland, Ralph - 1938

Holland, Sheryl - 1979

Holland, Vernon - 1950

Houchin, Daniel - 1965

Houchin, Tina - 1986

Howard, June - 1975

Howard, Margie - 1953

Howard, Robert - 1950

Hubbard, Mabel (Mrs.) - 1923

Hudson, Della - 1952

Hudson, Denise - 1985

Hudson, Duane - 1982

Hudson, Matt - 1985

Hudson, Rae - 1984

Humiston, Jerri - 1978

Humiston,Todd - 1980

Hunter, Ailene - 1907

Hunter, Louis - 1922

Hunter, Marjorie - 1912

Hurlburt, Tim - 1976

Hurlburt,Tom - 1976

Hurst, Ardyth - 1947

Hurst, David - 1943

Hurst, Elaine - 1947

Hurst, Stanley - 1951

Hutchinson, DeeAnn - 1977

Hysing, Duane - 1935

Hysing, Kenneth - 1927

Hysing, Vergyl - 1930

Ingman, Fern - 1943

Ingman, Joanne - 1954

Ingram, Laurence - 1939

Ivens, Lora - 1984

Jackson, Melvin - 1958

Jadwin, Gary - 1963

Jarman, Steve - 1967

Jarman, Vicki - 1964

Jarva, Carol - 1962

Jarva, Marlys - 1966

Jenson, Julien - 1914

Jesperson, Agnes - 1940

Jesperson, Carrie - 1937

Jesperson, Elmer - 1944

Jesperson, Ivar - 1936

Jesperson, Jennie - 1948

Jesperson, Leonard - 1957

Jesperson, Nellie - 1946

Jesperson, Selma - 1938

Johnson, Alan - 1972

Johnson, Axel - 1933

Johnson, Bonnie - 1965

Johnson, Brad - 1984

Johnson, Carl - 1934

Johnson, Carol - 1962

Johnson, Clara - 1921

Johnson, Clifford - 1986

Johnson, Dennis - 1986

Johnson, Edith - 1931

Johnson, Eric - 1988

Johnson, Esther - 1932

Johnson, Fred - 1933

Johnson, Helen - 1937

Johnson, Jerry - 1957

Johnson, Joan - 1962

Johnson, Lee - 1974

Johnson, Madelyn - 1939

Johnson, Merton - 1938

Johnson, Michele - 1979

Johnson, Minnie - 1921

Johnson, Nathan - 1938

Johnson, Orville - 1965

Johnson, Peggy - 1970

Johnson, Philip - 1967

Johnson, Roy - 1937

Jones, Karen - 1968

Julius, Don - 1983

Julius, Sandra (Gack) - 1989

Kansier, Donald - 1941

Kansier, Doris - 1940

Karl, Jody - 1985

Karl, Kimberly - 1979

Karl, Louis - 1952

Karl, Scott - 1981

Karl, Shawn - 1982

Karlsgodt, Eindred - 1944

Karlsgodt, Herman - 1943

Kastner, Helen - 1937

Kastner, Irene - 1943

Kastner, William - 1964

Katzenburger (Mastny), Milo - 1933

Keating, Edward - 1955

Keller, Teresa - 1980

Keller, Trevor - 1986

Kelly, Dick - 1942

Kelsey, Ben - 1951

Kelsey, Betty - 1950

Kelsey, Frank - 1974

Kelsey, Kathryn - 1952

Kelsey, Linda - 1972

Kelsey, Nancy - 1957

Kelsey, RoxAnne - 1970

Kelsey, Suzanne - 1967

Kelsey, Wilma - 1939

Kerwin, Kenneth - 1940

Kerwin, Roy - 1939

Kinnon, Lucille - 1924

Klienegger, Marian - 1912

Knott, Grace - 1962

Knott, Mabel - 1937

Knott, Matt - 1955

Knott, Norma - 1935

Knott, Ruth - 1952

Knouse, John - 1989

Knouse, Raymond - 1986

Knowles, Dawn - 1988

Kocurek, Nancy - 1954

Kocurek, Nina - 1952

Kocurek, Woodrow - 1956

Koehnen, Gregory - 1978

Koehnen, Jeffrey - 1972

Kovach, Alex - 1979

Kovach, April - 1977

Kovach, Ardyce - 1976

Kovach, Janet - 1978

Kovach, John - 1960

Kovach, Martha - 1955

Kovach, Thomas - 1963

Kramer, Barb - 1984

Kramer, Iris - 1960

Kramer, James - 1984

Kramer, Jerry - 1985

Kramer, Jerry - 1988

Kramer, Joan - 1962

Kramer, Kathy - 1982

Kramer, Kenneth - 1969

Kramer, Loren - 1967

Kramer, Mary - 1968

Kramer, Michelle - 1985

Kramer, Paul - 1988

Kramer, Peter - 1986

Kramer, Susan - 1967

Kramer, Tom - 1964

Kriens, Bernard - 1955

Kriens, Bruce - 1974

Kriens, Curtis - 1977

Kriens, David - 1971

Kriens, Denice - 1973

Kriens, Dennis - 1975

Kriens, Kathleen - 1949

Kriens, Tim - 1986

Kubat, Cyndi - 1970

Kubat, Rosie - 1973

Kuckler, Betty - 1949

Kuckler, Carol - 1960

Kuckler, Carol - 1960

Kuckler, Donna - 1951

Kugler, Karen - 1988

Kugler, Terry - 1986

Kulig, Matthew - 1980

Kulig, Stacy - 1986

Kulig, Tracy - 1986

Kurtz, Dorothy - 1933

Kusunoki, Midori - 1981

Kvenbo, Helen - 1932

La Barge, Elizabeth - 1938

La Barge, Walter - 1939

Lamb, Frank - 1956

Lamb, Frank, Jr - 1980

Lamb, Karl - 1958

Lamb, Vincent - 1985

Lamb, Wanda - 1981

LaMois, Francis - 1924

LaMois, Loyd - 1941

Land, Tammy - 1976

Lang, Elmer - 1935

Lang, Loretta - 1931

Lanning, Dawn - 1989

Lanning, Vernal - 1985

Larson, Ernest - 1910

Larson, Esther - 1907

Larson, Selina - 1986

Larson, Vienna - 1914

Lecy, Cindy - 1981

Lecy, Daniel - 1972

Lee, Agnes - 1907

Lee, Clara - 1941

Lee, Leona - 1939

Lee, Marie - 1942

Leeseberg, Elizabeth - 1949

Leeseberg, Mary - 1942

Leeseberg, Phyllis - 1944

Leeseberg, Richard - 1954

Leeseberg, Virginia - 1939

Leeseberg, William - 1953

Lemke, Clinton - 1949

Lemke, Mavis - 1940

Lemon, Charles - 1940

Lemon, Grant - 1923

Lemon, Jane - 1956

Lemon, Joyce - 1948

Lemon, Sarah - 1943

Lenander, Bryan - 1984

Lenander, Carol - 1962

Lenander, Carole - 1953

Lenander, David - 1969

Lenander, Diane - 1963

Lenander, Edward - 1955

Lenander, Linda - 1966

Lenander, Ray - 1958

Lenander, Sonja - 1956

Lenander, William - 1960

Lennberg, Otto - 1969

Lennberg, Roy - 1937

Lennberg, Virginia - 1944

Lennberg, William - 1960

LePouce, Jackie - 1958

Lish, Peter - 1963

Lithio, Virgil - 1924

Lockwood, Maude M. - 1915

Longfellow, Kendall - 1927

Lorenz, Willard - 1915

Lueck, Malinda - 1982

Lueck, Mark - 1980

Luft, Leo - 1950

Luft, Mary - 1955

Luft, Raymond - 1953

Lundgren, Oscar - 1921

Lundgren, Raymond - 1949

Lyons, Idella - 1926

Malerich, Charles - 1962

Malerich, Joseph - 1933

Malerich, Mary - 1943

Malerich, Thomas - 1965

Marble, Hugh - 1927

Mason, Eunice - 1945

Mason, Jean - 1950

Matteson, Dale - 1941

Matteson, Douglas - 1946

Matteson, Sherry - 1965

May, Betty - 1945

May, Billie - 1955

May, Clifford - 1960

May, Donald - 1952

May, James - 1955

McAllister, Doris - 1939

McBride, Harold - 1915

McClain, Cecil - 1933

McGuire, Pat - 1975

McGuire, Suzanne - 1978

McLaury, Donald - 1972

McLaury, Joe - 1981

McLaury, Michael - 1978

McLevis, Cary - 1986

McLevis, Lori Ann - 1986

Meier, Orphelia - 1941

Melby, David - 1948

Menning, Agnes - 1932

Menning, Duane - 1958

Menning, Rosie - 1933

Merrill, Hazel - 1913

Merrill, James A - 1915

Miller, Delbert - 1935

Miller, Earl - 1932

Miller, JoAnn - 1959

Miller, LeRoy - 1958

Miller, Matilda - 1910

Minnerup, Tammey - 1986

Mitchell, Esperance - 1930

Mitchell, Esther - 1925

Mitchell, Mildred - 1947

Mitchelll, Jim - 1951

Modahl, Bertha - 1941

Modahl, Donald - 1951

Modahl, Gladys - 1947

Modahl, Melvin - 1956

Modahl, Stanley - 1950

Modahl, Walter - 1953

Mokrzycki, Laura - 1940

Mollenkopf, Paul - 1981

Moore, Beverly - 1953

Moore, Calla - 1914

Moore, Dale - 1953

Moore, David - 1978

Moore, Donald - 1883

Moore, Ernie - 1958

Moore, Eva - 1927

Moore, Janine - 1980

Moore, John - 1978

Moore, Lana - 1954

Moore, Lois - 1948

Moore, Mildred - 1927

Moore, Rebecca - 1977

Moore, Robert - 1951

Moore, Shirley - 1951

Moore, Thomas - 1972

Morton, Amy - 1917

Muller, John - 1984

Munson, Marie - 1916

Munson, Ross - 1981

Murray, Marjorie - 1929

Murray, Robert - 1925

Myers, Edith - 1962

Myers, Joseph - 1957

Nauber, Donald - 1958

Nauber, Elizabeth - 1962

Nauber, Josephine - 1954

Nauber, Judith - 1972

Nauber, Margaret - 1952

Nauber, Ruth - 1965

Nauber, Warren - 1956

Negen, Barry - 1986

Negen, Byron - 1989

Negen, Charlotte, Mrs (Lecy) - 1968

Nelson, Barb - 1974

Nelson, Bill - 1975

Nelson, Boyd - 1976

Nelson, Carl - 1938

Nelson, Edrodean - 1939

Nelson, Esther - 1920

Nelson, Jay - 1980

Nelson, Jayne - 1982

Nelson, Jerry - 1981

Nelson, Jim - 1973

Nelson, Joel - 1986

Nelson, Jon - 1979

Nelson, Judy - 1969

Nelson, Kim - 1985

Nelson, Mabel - 1924

Nelson, Patty - 1971

Nelson, Peggy - 1975

Newsome, Tracy - 1981

Nichols, Ardyce - 1932

Nickeson, Geraldine - 1941

Nielsen, Joyce - 1953

Nielsen, Mabel - 1943

Nielsen, Mildred - 1945

Nordquist, Ralph - 1931

Nordquist, Toddes - 1916

Obenland, Mae - 1929

Obenland, Roland - 1953

Obenland, Virginia - 1929

Oelschlager, Audrey - 1964

Oelschlager, Charles - 1962

Oelschlager, Dorthy - 1968

Oelschlager, Gerald - 1957

Oelschlager, Irene - 1960

Oelschlager, Larry - 1969

Oelschlager, Randy - 1989

Oelschlager, Sharon - 1965

Olafson, Clarence - 1940

Olafson, Jennie - 1930

Olafson, Margaret - 1944

Olafson, Nels - 1939

Olafson, Ralph - 1953

Olafson, Steve - 1970

Olafson, Talaine - 1972

Olafson, Terri - 1967

Olafson, Tom - 1976

Olatson, Terri - 1967

Oliver, Donald - 1927

Oliver, Eli - 1914

Olson, Carl - 1906

Olson, Deltha - 1942

Olson, Donna - 1973

Olson, Glorrayne - 1950

Olson, Harold - 1968

Olson, Helmer - 1950

Olson, Jodie - 1981

Olson, John - 1971

Olson, Marion - 1939

Olson, Phyllis - 1944

Olson, Roselyn - 1955

Olson, Theone - 1938

Opheim, Audrey - 1964

Opheim, Ernest - 1970

Ostrander, Teri - 1981

Overbeek, Dave - 1983

Overbeek, Diane - 1985

Palmateer, Laura - 1985

Palmberg, Frank - 1936

Parks, Albert - 1950

Parks, Donald - 1953

Parks, Elmer - 1939

Parks, Harold - 1956

Parks, Shirley - 1955

Patterson, Pamela - 1977

Patton, Liston - 1924

Pelett, Ruby - 1913

Pennington, Gae - 1970

Pennington, Gail - 1970

Pennington, Victor - 1940

Perske, Theone - 1926

Perske, Vivian - 1921

Peterson, Carol - 1979

Peterson, Clara - 1918

Peterson, Debra - 1976

Peterson, Elsie - 1940

Peterson, Florence - 1931

Peterson, George - 1951

Peterson, Helen - 1944

Peterson, Irene - 1947

Peterson, Janice - 1952

Peterson, John C. - 1915

Peterson, John W. - 1911

Peterson, Lawrence - 1950

Peterson, Lewis - 1941

Peterson, Lillian - 1913

Peterson, Marvin - 1950

Peterson, Oscar - 1941

Peterson, Ray - 1973

Peterson, Rose C - 1911

Peterson, Ruth - 1941

Peterson, Sharon - 1961

Peterson, Walter - 1949

Phillips, Barbara - 1962

Piepkorn, Lillian - 1940

Pitschka, Mary Ann - 1984

Plotz, Terry - 1974

Poncelet, Allen - 1984

Poncelet, Cecelia - 1957

Poncelet, Charles - 1965

Poncelet, Cynthia - 1983

Poncelet, Elizabeth - 1959

Poncelet, Greg - 1988

Poncelet, Jeffrey - 1983

Poncelet, Jerome - 1955

Poncelet, John - 1960

Poncelet, Margaret - 1951

Poncelet, Mary - 1963

Poncelet, William - 1961

Porter, Rufus - 1914

Potter, Myrna - 1943

Preston, Rose - 1917

Profant, George - 1937

Profant, Mike - 1929

Putnam, Ida - 1913

Rabbit, Magdaline - 1922

Rabbit, Viola - 1925

Ramsdell, Ailene - 1929

Ramsdell, Myrtle - 1909

Regan, Jerry - 1935

Regnier, Frances - 1965

Regnier, Frank - 1973

Regnier, Joan - 1974

Regnier, Joseph C, VI - 1968

Regnier, Mary - 1967

Rehard, Marguerite - 1929

Resch, Phil - 1967

Resch, Wayne - 1969

Resendiz, Gilbert - 1967

Resendiz, Humbert - 1965

Resendiz, Oscar - 1964

Rhodes, Ruth E - 1911

Rice, Bertina - 1913

Rice, Carl - 1917

Rice, Josephine - 1915

Rich, Arthur - 1932

Rich, Beryl - 1929

Rich, Charles - 1965

Rich, Jon - 1969

Rich, Larry - 1962

Rich, Robert - 1934

Rich, Sandra - 1956

Richmond, Arthur - 1966

Richmond, Randy - 1986

Richmond, Renus - 1943

Ridlon, Ella - 1953

Ridlon, Pearl - 1944

Ritchie, Eugene - 1986

Robinson, Melvin - 1934

Robinson, Olive - 1923

Roder, Richard - 1943

Rodman, Donna - 1917

Rodman, Duane E - 1915

Rodman, Willis L - 1915

Roesten, Walter - 1916

Roetman, Alvin - 1954

Roetman, Cathryn - 1942

Roetman, Gail - 1971

Roetman, Jennifer - 1975

Roetman, Kirk - 1980

Roetman, Steve - 1973

Roetman, Tim - 1940

Roren, Doris - 1939

Rustad, Eric - 1980

Rustad, Sheila - 1981

Ryan, Donna - 1952

Sachow, Janice - 1940

Sackett, Elaine - 1954

Sadler, Dorothy - 1923

Saeks, Aaron - 1917

Saeks, Jennie - 1921

Saeks, Max - 1924

Saeks, Rose - 1926

Sandberg, Kay - 1984

Sandberg, Richard - 1985

Sandeen, Margaret - 1925

Sandquist, Imogene - 1944

Sandquist, Ralph - 1961

Sargent, Helen - 1936

Schaper, Patricia - 1958

Scheers, Marian - 1925

Schenecker, Joyce - 1944

Schenecker, Phyllis - 1946

Schilman, Ida - 1957

Schilman, Margaret - 1953

Schilman, Orvil - 1949

Schmiedeberg, Daralene - 1954

Schmiedeberg, DeLoris - 1950

Schmiedeberg, DeWayne - 1959

Schmiedeberg, Donna - 1961

Schmiedeberg, Kim - 1985

Schmiedeberg, Rochelle - 1983

Schroeder, Betty - 1958

Schroeder, David - 1986

Schroeder, Dennis - 1978

Schroeder, Donald - 1950

Schroeder, JoAnn - 1974

Schroeder, Joyce - 1954

Schroeder, Kenneth - 1960

Schroeder, Michael - 1979

Schroeder, Myrna - 1954

Schroeder, Patricia - 1961

Schroeder, Raymond - 1956

Schroeder, Ronald - 1965

Schroeder, Sue - 1981

Schroeder, Tammy - 1986

Scott, Ambie A - 1915

Scouton, James - 1961

Scouton, Robert - 1986

Scouton, Warren - 1986

Seiter, Agnes - 1922

Semmler, Beverly - 1970

Semmler, Carol - 1981

Semmler, Christie - 1977

Semmler, Danny - 1969

Semmler, Delores - 1978

Semmler, Diane - 1968

Semmler, Doris - 1978

Semmler, Ewald - 1941

Semmler, Gary - 1973

Semmler, Jeanne - 1989

Semmler, Jennifer - 1979

Semmler, Keith - 1973

Semmler, Linda - 1968

Semmler, Mikel - 1966

Semmler, Richard - 1972

Semmler, Rita Brown - 1973

Semmler, Ron - 1973

Senkel, Phyllis - 1942

Shay, Dave - 1973

Shay, Edward - 1962

Shay, Marilyn - 1957

Shay, Tom - 1969

Sheppard, Bernice - 1939

Sheppard, Ray - 1920

Shere, Jennie B - 1915

Shere, Lewis - 1914

Shere, Sara - 1910

Shook, Helen - 1939

Simcox, Berniece - 1918

Sjolin, Eric - 1988

Sjolin, Janelle - 1989

Sjolin, Kim - 1983

Skoog, Esther - 1931

Skoog, Evelyn - 1931

Skoog, Gladys - 1928

Skoog, Karen - 1960

Skoog, Lillian - 1955

Skoog, Myrtle - 1936

Skoog, Ole - 1931

Skoog, Robert - 1962

Sladkey, Franklin - 1947

Sliter, Cathryn - 1935

Sliter, Olive - 1919

Sliter, Shirley - 1945

Sloan, Delores - 1944

Sloan, Jaci - 1977

Sloan, Judy - 1979

Sloan, Lorene - 1942

Smith, Degra - 1979

Smith, Lily - 1930

Smith, Lynn - 1977

Smith, Mark - 1981

Snow, Jerry - 1986

Soli, Albert - 1923

Soli, Jennie - 1933

Soli, Myrtle - 1925

Spain, Patricia - 1972

Spain, Virginia - 1977

Spanjers, Dick - 1976

Spanjers, Donna - 1973

Spanjers, Kathy - 1974

Splittstoesser, Daniel - 1983

Splittstoesser, Diane - 1972

Splittstoesser, Julie - 1979

Splittstoesser, Leisa - 1981

Splittstoesser, Nancy - 1976

Squires, Naomi - 1940

Staehnke, Clell - 1942

Staffenhagen, Alfred - 1948

Staffenhagen, Alfred - 1980

Staffenhagen, Crystal - 1982

Staffenhagen, Orville - 1952

Staffsberg, Henrietta - 1925

Staffsberg, Jennie - 1925

Stanger, Debbie - 1971

Stanger, Steve - 1972

Stephens, Theron - 1985

Stiffler, Craig - 1980

Stiffler, Denise - 1986

Stiffler, Glen - 1955

Stiffler, Larry - 1964

Stiffler, Lisa - 1978

Stiffler, Shirley - 1950

Strand, Helen - 1931

Struck, Jack - 1935

Struss, Cyril - 1984

Struss, Gail - 1973

Struss, Jerry - 1970

Struss, Kevin - 1975

Struss, Rosanne - 1972

Struss, Violet - 1986

Stumpf, James - 1982

Swanson, Paul - 1916

Talbot, Nina - 1923

Tatro, Eugenia - 1972

Tatro, Jerry - 1973

Tatro, Linda - 1984

Tatro, Lisa - 1979

Tatro, Lori - 1981

Tatro, Scott - 1983

Taylor, Helen - 1972

Teele, Steven - 1972

Teeple, Georgia - 1915

Teigen, Olga - 1938

Thelin, Frank - 1977

Thelin, Karen - 1982

Thelin, Theresa - 1984

Theriault, Denis - 1913

Thielmann, Denise - 1985

Thompson, Linda - 1966

Thorne, Clinton - 1940

Tinklenberg, Stacey - 1987

Todd, Bazil - 1942

Todd, Beverly - 1946

Todd, Donald - 1941

Todd, Jack - 1947

Todd, Joseph - 1944

Todd, Margerie - 1924

Todd, Neal - 1938

Todd, Wesley - 1934

Vaerst, Alida - 1918

Vaerst, Carl - 1918

Vallo, Chris - 1982

Vallo, Kent - 1981

Van Cleve, Harold - 1912

Van Dyk, Judy - 1957

Vanden Eykel, Betty - 1972

Vanden Eykel, Conny - 1981

Vanden Eykel, Debby - 1977

Vanden Eykel, Henry - 1946

Vanden Eykel, Molly - 1970

Vanden Eykel, Tammy - 1978

Vanden Eykel, Terry - 1974

Vanden Eykel, Wally - 1975

Vik, Audrey - 1955

Vik, Gary - 1957

Vik, Linda - 1969

Vik, Lorna - 1953

Vik, Sandra - 1965

Vos, Eileen - 1947

Voshell, Albert - 1958

Voshell, Carol - 1960

Voshell, Kenneth - 1955

Voshell, Robert - 1936

Vredenberg, Irene - 1941

Vredenberg, Marvin - 1973

Vredenburg, Michelle - 1987

Vredenburg, Micky - 1975

Vredenburg, Millissa - 1989

Vredenburg, Randy - 1982

Vredenburg, Renee - 1984

Vredenburg, Ricky - 1972

Vredenburg, Robin - 1974

Vredenburg, Ronald - 1977

Vredenburg, Roxanne - 1979

Vredenburg, Rozella - 1951

Wagner, William - 1943

Walker, Eleanor - 1922

Walker, Margerie - 1924

Waller, Eloise - 1927

Waller, Mildred - 1928

Walls, Lisa - 1981

Walls, Scott - 1984

Wambolt, Bernard - 1925

Wambolt, Clayton - 1929

Wambolt, Marcella - 1926

Wambolt, Marjorie - 1941

Wambolt, Valeria - 1931

Ward, Wallace - 1913

Warnke, Elizabeth - 1966

Warnke, Jon - 1955

Warnke, Laura - 1961

Warnke, Richard - 1957

Warnke, Robert - 1972

Warnke, Thomas - 1977

Watt, Beulah - 1931

Watt, Blanche - 1934

Watt, Dorothy - 1934

Watt, Doyle - 1929

Weaver, Ellenora - 1920

Webb, Bruce - 1976

Welch, Arlene - 1947

Weyrens, Myrtle - 1928

White, Barbara - 1961

Whiting, Charlene - 1936

Whiting, Neil - 1937

Wicks, Beverly - 1966

Wicks, Dennis - 1963

Wicks, Donald - 1980

Wicks, Duane - 1958

Wicks, Janice - 1964

Wicks, Margaret - 1960

Wicks, Sandie - 1986

Wicks, Shari - 1979

Wicks, Stacy - 1988

Wicks, Stephen - 1983

Wiek, Ellen - 1938

Wilkening, Lorri - 1989

Wilkening, Wayne - 1986

Williams, Neoma - 1918

Williams, Nora - 1918

Wilson, Dorothy - 1938

Winklehorst, Maybelle - 1951

Winklehorst, Paul - 1947

Winklemann, Evelyn - 1929

Winklemann, Gladys - 1922

Winklemann, Lillian - 1936

Wise, Betty - 1952

Wise, Carol - 1954

Woock, Aline - 1913

Woock, Herman - 1917

Woock, Leona - 1917

Woods, Alice - 1924

Young, Clara - 1942

Young, Clarence - 1948

Young, Gary - 1974

Young, Herbert - 1972

 

.

WHEN I WENT TO DC-8 SCHOOL at the ABX Training facility in Wilmington, Ohio, the DC-8 pilot-trainer there showed us, on a visually open version of the DC-8 ground spoiler mechanism—the new in-flight prevention device retrofitted into the ground spoiler mechanism.

  

Far too late to save Flight 621.

  

But finally, there it was—and it looked to be such a simple mod.

  

People had to die because DC-8s lacked this until 1973?

  

A $500 retrofit from Douglas Aircraft or rather, after the 1968 merger, McDonnell-Douglas DC-8s? Really?

  

The ground spoiler problem was known for years before the 621 air disaster—this couldn’t have been fixed before?

  

So, finally, in 1973, another catastrophic crash of a “Stretch” DC-8-61 (Loftleidor - Icelandic airline) occurred at JFK, and the NTSB (National Transport and Safety Board ) hammer came down.

  

The DC-8 ground spoiler mechanism would finally be changed in two ways.

  

First, a protective assembly was required that would not allow the ground spoilers to extend, accidentally during flight. Second, the system had to stop the ground spoilers from being deployed manually during flight, by an overriding decision of the flight crew.

  

Sadly, again, too late to save Flight 621.

  

There were other factors in the crash. Erroneous FAA approved Douglas DC-8 Operation Manuals and just as erroneous Air Canada DC-8 Flying Manuals - all DC-8 types for starters.

  

The manuals stated the ground spoilers couldn’t be deployed in flight. Soon every DC-8 pilot flying, and the whole aviation industry knew they could. That was as unbelievable, as it was unsafe. There were several documented instances (various airlines) where the ground spoilers had done just that—extended. Accidentally, or by manual deployment of the flight crew. Either way, it was just bad, bad, design. And in the case of Flight 621 — lethal.

  

These DC-8 pilots and co-pilots were just trying to deal with an unsafe and unpredictable ground spoiler system. Spoilers do just that, they spoil the ability of an airplane to stay in the air. And they are the only thing that keeps an airplane on the ground during landing. Because, as former TCA pilot Harry Bell (deceased) told me, “an airplane loves to fly.”

  

Pilots everywhere were afraid of the DC-8’s ground spoilers.

  

Once armed, these spoilers could proceed to the next stage, extension, and do so unexpectedly. An electrical surge or even a pilot thinking he had only armed the spoilers sometimes discovered he had, in fact, extended the spoilers in flight! Usually, at about 2000 feet, roughly around the same time one had dropped the 8’s landing gear, so no harm done. Still, it shouldn’t have happened. or been possible. That was unnerving.

  

DC-8 pilots, worldwide, had come up with work-around solutions to remove the danger the spoiler system posed to their flying machines.

  

Captain Peter Hamilton and Captain Don Rowland had their own different work-arounds. Who was flying as captain for that flight got to use his “system” and the other, the sitting co-pilot (first officer), would co-operate.

  

On Flight 621 that’s where their competing systems got into trouble. After laughing off an argument, Hamilton and Rowland went with Rowland’s spoiler deployment system, even though he was the co-pilot on the 621 flight. At 60 feet above the ground, Rowland went to arm the spoilers, but instead skipped that step…and pull the spoiler aft, extending the DC-8’s spoilers immediately. Flight 621 hit the runway with incredible force.

  

One thing, here, why did Don extend the spoilers, instead of just arming the spoilers?

 

Douglas Aircraft redesigned the ground spoiler lever on the new “Stretch” DC-8s. The older smaller DC-8s had a spoiler lever that resisted movement. One "wrestled" it into the armed position, so to speak. A movement in the moment one isn't likely to forget.

 

On the new, bigger DC-8s, it took very little effort to arm or deploy the spoilers. I’m guessing, but I think it just slipped Don’s mind (the process execution), as he was likely still distracted from his "soft spoiler argument" with Peter Hamilton who was “tired of fighting it”. Don was attending to other details during the very regimented, and labour intensive, DC-8 landing sequence.

  

Since the Air Canada DC-8 fleet comprised roughly 50/50 new, bigger…with 50% older, smaller DC-8s, and each group's airplane with different spoiler lever tension. Switching from one type of DC-8 to another might pose a transference problem for some in a crisis, or worse…in a moment of habitual repetition. Folks, we’ll never know.

  

Had Flight 621 crashed right at the airport because of the now famous spoiler error, the pilot and co-pilot might have been mostly at fault for the crash.

  

But, when the Air Canada DC-8-63 hit the runway, it lost an engine as it tore away from the starboard wing. Critical electrical and fuel lines were severed…which immediately resulted in a wing fire! And there was now a ten foot gaggle of loose and sparking and arcing wiring hanging from the DC-8’s damaged wing. And—with all these problems in tow, Flight 621 was airborne again.

  

Folks, the wing fire NEVER should have happened.

  

Never, never, never…

  

DC-8 engines were designed with exploding separation bolts.

 

In the event of unexpected engine stress, or if a DC-8 engine snagged something immovable, like, let’s say a runway—exploding engine bolts would ensure the engine would shear off cleanly—and not take volatile fuel lines and sparking wiring along with the departing engine. No harm, no foul.

  

But, clearly these exploding separation bolts failed on Flight 621 and a deadly wing fire DID result.

  

Another faulty Douglas Aircraft design error. The separation bolts failed to do what they were actually designed to do.

  

This ghastly wing fire meant the DC-8 was now on borrowed time.

  

From the Flight 621 air disaster timeline, we learned that “borrowed” time was roughly about three minutes, and distance-wise 8 miles or 14 kms of flight time. The time and distance Flight 621 travelled from Toronto airport (YYZ) to where it crashed in Castlemore, ON.

  

It’s hard to believe, but on top of all this—Douglas had yet another design flaw built into the DC-8 that led to Flight 621’s crash! I'm not kidding. I'm not exaggerating. Analog gauges in the cockpit.

  

That’s why the flight crew—Captain Peter Hamilton, First Officer Don Rowland, and Second Officer Peter Hill had a hard time getting a grasp on what was ACTUALLY happening to their DC-8! When power is cut to analog gauges, they “freeze”. So your airplane could be bleeding fuel…but since the fuel gauge has no power now, (wing tear and damaging engine separation) the cockpit gauge IS still registering "FULL". Same with oil gauges, hydraulic gauges, etc.

  

Remember, people…these guys have only three minutes, three lousy minutes, to pilot their large, and now compromised DC-8.

  

They won’t make it. It's partly because gads of time was just eaten up—trying to figure what the hell was going on with their DC-8…all along being fed "false positives" by misleading cockpit gauges.

  

Soon enough the wing fire will eat through the right wing. The second engine will fall off, the wing will split with one portion falling on the Wilbur Duncan* property, and the second portion falling on the Parr Farm acreage across the road. The struggling DC-8 will finally crash past the Parr property, and near to the Burgsma residence in Castlemore.

  

But in spite of all these converging Douglas Aircraft design flaws, and spoiler deployment errors by the air crew, Flight 621, could have been saved.

  

And we can turn to a more recent crash, the Concorde crash, to understand the failure that was the final undoing for Flight 621.

  

The 1970 Inquiry Report gave a “pass” to one group who featured prominently in the crash.

  

The Tower. Or ATC (Air Traffic Control) in modern parlance.

  

And in many folk’s opinions, their actions or lack there of, sealed the fate of Flight 621.

  

On page 29, we have this ridiculous Inquiry quote,

  

“In sum, there was nothing Mr. ——— (The Tower) could have done which would have assisted the air crew in ANY WAY in accomplishing remedial action after the initial touch down of this aircraft on Runway 32.”

  

And then again, on page 105 of the Inquiry,

  

(xxxii) “There was nothing that any personnel in the airport control tower (ATC) at Toronto International Airport did which caused this catastrophic result, nor is there anything that any of them could have done either before or after the initial touchdown of this aircraft to have avoided it.”

  

Nope. Wrong.

  

I strongly disagree with the Inquiry pandering to, and its’ excusing of air traffic control (The Tower) .

 

I can only think that somewhere in the background equation there was some sort of vested interest happening, an attempt to deflect from someone incurring a bigger portion of the liability pie? But, who knows for sure?

 

However, as soon as I read the page 29 quote, coming so early in the report, and before any real information about the crash had been relayed, alarm bells immediately went off in my head.

  

So, to get to the truth of the Flight 621 crash, let’s look at the 2003 Concorde crash…to learn what should be known about the 621 crash, shall we?

  

Like Flight 621’s DC-8, when Air France’s Flight 4590 Concorde departed the runway at Rossy-Charles de Gaulle Airport on take-off…its wing was on fire.

  

Watch what happens next.

 

De Gaulle Airport Air Traffic Control then warned the Air France Concorde pilot, Christian Marty, with this ominous observational statement:

  

“CONCORDE ZERO 4590, you have flames … STRONG FLAMES… you have flames behind you.”

  

Did Air France Captain Marty ignore this new input of information?

  

No. Captain Marty rapidly changed the course of his Concorde, aiming to immediately land at nearby Le Bourget Airport. He did not just ignore the fire and continue on to New York.

  

Unfortunately, we all know his Concorde also didn’t make it – the initial wound to the Concorde being far more lethal than the initial wound to Flight 621’s DC-8.

  

The Concorde only travelled a couple miles before crashing…while Flight 621’s DC-8 got eight miles away from the airport, with a full three minutes of flight time under its belt. Plenty of time to re-land.

  

The Tower should have just told Flight 621 that their DC-8 was billowing black smoke!

  

Why would you withhold such critical information that clearly was well beyond normal, EXPECTED, flying perimeters?! Tell the pilot what you were seeing (billowing smoke). That’s all it would have taken to save Flight 621.

  

The Air Canada Viscount (Flight 254) immediately following Flight 621 certainly mentioned the fire to air traffic control!

  

He told the tower, right away, directly!

  

I repeat why did “The Tower” hold back this critical information?

 

They did tell Captain Peter Hamilton he couldn’t re-land on Runway 32 because of debris on the runway!

 

The runway Peter just left. The failed to tell him that NEW runway debris as from his Air Canada DC-8!

 

The Tower THEN gave Peter the option of swinging over to Runway 5. But Hamilton had no need to because he trustingly stated, “I think we’re alright." He only thought his DC-8 was alright because he didn’t know his wing was on fire! Something ATC could see quite clearly.

  

I talked to several DC-8 pilots who stated they could have landed the ailing Air Canada DC-8 within the seven mile, and three minute parameters. One pilot said he could have landed Flight 621’s DC-8 within a five mile flight route! All pilots believed they would have had plenty of time to save Flight 621, completely.

  

If ATC hadn’t been remiss, if Captain Peter Hamilton had been updated—as to the ailing status of his airplane—it was on fire—Flight 621 never would have crashed.

 

Observation of incoming/outgoing aircraft and status reporting to pilots—is the responsibility of air traffic control. That’s why controllers are high up, in a tower. A building with 360 degree windows all around its’ structure! So designed in order to see everything happening in the air and on the runways at the airport.

  

Had the Tower not been remiss on that ill-fated Sunday morning of July 5, 1970 and like De Gaulle Airport Air Traffic Control…had just done their duty and told the pilot his wing was on fire, this likely would have been Captain Hamilton’s response,

  

“Roger, understood! Pan-pan! Pan-pan! Pan-pan! All stations! All stations! All stations! Air Canada 6-2-1 swinging around immediately for an emergency landing on 05R. WING FIRE! Roll all emergency response vehicles! We will try to bring everyone in safely!”

  

And Air Canada Flight 621 would have landed with minimal loss, PROBABLY NOT any.

  

So sad—that with this accident, and so many other things in life—there are no do-overs ~

  

ADDENDUM

  

“Maybe, Peter Hamilton would have still flown the long 27 mile go-around circuit anyway, even if he knew his DC-8 wing was on fire?

  

No, he wouldn’t.

  

Peter Hamilton was WWII Halifax bomber pilot who got shot down over Germany. He bailed out from his bomber because it was on fire, and out of control. He knew how little time one had, when one’s airplane was on fire. Since one can’t “bail out” from a DC-8, the only other option is to land. And quickly. Peter would have swung around to Runway 5R which would have been the fastest way to land.

  

“But everyone seems to blame the pilots for the crash.”

  

Ignorance. And because of First Officer Don Rowland’s famous grief quotation,

 

“Sorry, oh sorry, Pete” was a sorrowful apology for extending the ground spoilers, accidentally, at 60 feet above the runway.

 

This oft quoted remark that forces one to commiserate with his plight, and that of those who perished on Flight 621 clouds the sombre fact, that actually, the crash wasn’t really his fault. Ground spoilers NEVER should have been able to have been deployed in flight! Show me a Boeing, a De Havilland Canada, or Airbus aircraft that allowed you to instantly crash a plane by deploying its ground spoilers ACCIDENTALLY, or MANUALLY while in flight. You can’t because those other aircraft manufacturers had mastered the basics.

  

The DC-8 had serious design flaws, each one activated on its own could have led to a catastrophic accident. The fact that ALL of these design flaws came into play on Flight 621 and contributed to the crash, at varying degrees, can only leave one speechless.

  

“Maybe the Tower didn’t see what was happening to Flight 621?”

  

Sorry, I know the “official” Inquiry alluded to that, but I don’t buy it. When I had my Flight 621 crash site up, hosted at Apple Computer 2004/5/6 I had a retired air traffic controller residing in Australia see my site and contact me. He stated he was there in the Tower, that day. He was quietly reading the Globe and Mail when Flight 621 flew by—billowing black smoke that continued right out to the plane crash in Castlemore.

  

Unsure, if this guy was just finishing, just starting, or on break, but he was in the Tower and he saw the ailing DC-8.

 

Air Canada Flight 254 called the Tower to inform them, from their vantage point, due in to land right after 621 (flying 2.5 miles right behind 621) that Flight 621’s DC-8 wing was on fire.

 

You mean to suggest to me that the controller actually assigned to guide/watch Flight 621 during landing…didn’t see all this—and even more?! Get outta’ here.

  

“Can you give us a brief summary of the causes of the Flight 621 crash?”

  

Failure prone McDonnell-Douglas DC-8 spoiler deployment system. This system allowed the ground spoilers to be extended in flight manually, or even unexpectedly, from the armed position.

  

Erroneous McDonnell-Douglas DC-8 manuals misled airline operators about spoiler operation and inherent safety.

  

Air Canada in-house DC-8 manuals deviated from the manufacturer's guidelines.

  

Engine shear separation bolts failed to separate cleanly as per safety design which caused a right wing tear, and immediate wing fire upon engine separation.

 

Analog flight gauges.

  

Air Traffic Control failed to inform the pilots that their aircraft had caught fire after Flight 621’s failed attempt to land. Accident was entirely recoverable had pilots been informed of the status of their aircraft, immediately, on the overshoot.

  

Co-pilot made attempt to arm spoilers—but accidentally pulled the lever back extending the spoilers in flight. This initial action carried little weight in comparison to previously mentioned contributing and compounding factors.

.

 

ADD A CONDOLENCE to the FLIGHT 621 FAMILIES, or a LOVED ONE from FLIGHT 621, or a MEMORY of a PERSONAL EVENT related to the crash…at the City of Brampton's permanent Flight 621 site…SEE: www.brampton.ca/EN/City-Hall/Protocol-Office/Brampton-Rem...

  

PRAY FOR THE REPOSE OF THE SOULS for the passengers and crew of Flight 621:

 

Adams, Celine Fradette

Adams, Pierre J

Beaudin, Gaetan

Belanger, Mrs.

Belanger, Jacques

Belanger, Jean

Belanger, Roland

Belanger, Rosanne

Benson, Helen

Benson, Leonard

Benson, Mary

Benson, Richard

Bertrand, Ginette

Boosamra, Lynn

Boulanger, Guy

Bradshaw, Dollie

Cedilot, Robert J

Chapdeleine, Jeannine

Chapdeleine, Joanne

Chapdeleine, Mario

Charent, Jean Maurice

Clarke, Devona Olivia

Cote, Francine

Daoust, Yolande

Desmarais, Brigitte

Desmarais, G

Dicaire, Alice (Marie)

Dicaire, Gilles

Dicaire, Linda

Dicaire, Luke

Dicaire, Mark

Dion, Suzanne

Dore, Jacqueline

Earle, Lewella

Earle, Linda

Filippone, Francesco

Filippone, Linda

Filippone, Marie

Gee, Bernard

Goulet, Denise M

Grenier, Madeleine

Growse, Diana Cicely

Growse, Jane

Growse, Roger

Hamilton, Karen E

Hamilton, Peter Cameron

Herrmann, Ronald Alvin

Hill, Harry Gordon

Holiday, Claude

Houston, Irene Margaret

Houston, Wesley

Jakobsen, Vagn Aage

Labonte, Gilles

Leclaire, Marie Rose

Leclaire, Oscar

Leduc, Henri W

Lepage, Claudette

Mailhiot, Claire Gagnon

Mailhiot, Gerald Bernard

Maitz, Gustave

Maitz, Karoline

McKettrick, Winnifred

McTague, John

Medizza, Carla

Mohammed, Dolly

Molino, Antonio

Molino, Michael (Michel)

Moore, Frederick T

Partridge, Andrea

Partridge, Carnie (Carnis) Ann

Partridge, Cyril Wayne

Phillips, Kenneth William

Poirier, Rita

Raymond, Gilles

Raymond, Martial

Robert, Aline

Robert, Georges E

Robidoux, Lionel

Rowland, Donald

Silverberg, Marci

Silverberg, Merle

Silverberg, Steven

Simon, Istvan

Simon, Mark

Smith, Dwight Lee

St. Laurent, Blanche

Stepping, Glenn Thomas

Sultan, Celia

Sultan, Jerald. M

Sultan, Robert. L

Szpakowicz, Borys

Szpakowicz, Serge

Tielens, Carmen

Tielens, Frederick

Tournovits, George

Tournovits, Soula (Athanasia)

Weinberg, Carla

Weinberg, Rita

Weinberg, Wendy

Whittingham, Jennifer

Whittingham, John

Whittingham, Reginald

Whybro, Mary Baker

Wieczorek, Hildegund

Witmer, Edgar

Wong, Ngar-Quon

Wong, Suzie

Wong, Wong (Mansing)

Woodward, Dallas J

  

©2020-LPR CARDIN II - Special Projects In Research

  

* The former Wilbur Duncan property became part of the Flight 621 crash arena…when part of the Air Canada's DC-8's wing separated from the aircraft…and crashed into the house and backyard of the Duncan residence.

 

Sadly, on August 11, 2020, a 72 year-old man drowned in Castlemore (Brampton) in the backyard pond at the former Duncan residence, just a few feet away from the resting spot of the shorn DC-8 wing.

 

In the CP24 aerial video, the spot where the Air Canada DC-8 wing came to rest can be seen, and was the grassy area between the pond and the larger part of the house.

 

SEE:https://www.cp24.com/news/man-dead-following-reported-drowning-at-pond-in-brampton-paramedics-1.5059935

 

Phtoshop assignment. The link is here www.photoshopessentials.com/photoshop-text/text-effects/w...

 

🐝🐝

According to all known laws

of aviation,

  

there is no way a bee

should be able to fly.

  

Its wings are too small to get

its fat little body off the ground.

  

The bee, of course, flies anyway

  

because bees don't care

what humans think is impossible.

  

Yellow, black. Yellow, black.

Yellow, black. Yellow, black.

  

Ooh, black and yellow!

Let's shake it up a little.

  

Barry! Breakfast is ready!

  

Ooming!

  

Hang on a second.

  

Hello?

  

- Barry?

- Adam?

  

- Oan you believe this is happening?

- I can't. I'll pick you up.

  

Looking sharp.

  

Use the stairs. Your father

paid good money for those.

  

Sorry. I'm excited.

  

Here's the graduate.

We're very proud of you, son.

  

A perfect report card, all B's.

  

Very proud.

  

Ma! I got a thing going here.

  

- You got lint on your fuzz.

- Ow! That's me!

  

- Wave to us! We'll be in row 118,000.

- Bye!

  

Barry, I told you,

stop flying in the house!

  

- Hey, Adam.

- Hey, Barry.

  

- Is that fuzz gel?

- A little. Special day, graduation.

  

Never thought I'd make it.

  

Three days grade school,

three days high school.

  

Those were awkward.

  

Three days college. I'm glad I took

a day and hitchhiked around the hive.

  

You did come back different.

  

- Hi, Barry.

- Artie, growing a mustache? Looks good.

  

- Hear about Frankie?

- Yeah.

  

- You going to the funeral?

- No, I'm not going.

  

Everybody knows,

sting someone, you die.

  

Don't waste it on a squirrel.

Such a hothead.

  

I guess he could have

just gotten out of the way.

  

I love this incorporating

an amusement park into our day.

  

That's why we don't need vacations.

  

Boy, quite a bit of pomp...

under the circumstances.

  

- Well, Adam, today we are men.

- We are!

  

- Bee-men.

- Amen!

  

Hallelujah!

  

Students, faculty, distinguished bees,

  

please welcome Dean Buzzwell.

  

Welcome, New Hive Oity

graduating class of...

  

...9:15.

  

That concludes our ceremonies.

  

And begins your career

at Honex Industries!

  

Will we pick ourjob today?

  

I heard it's just orientation.

  

Heads up! Here we go.

  

Keep your hands and antennas

inside the tram at all times.

  

- Wonder what it'll be like?

- A little scary.

  

Welcome to Honex,

a division of Honesco

  

and a part of the Hexagon Group.

  

This is it!

  

Wow.

  

Wow.

  

We know that you, as a bee,

have worked your whole life

  

to get to the point where you

can work for your whole life.

  

Honey begins when our valiant Pollen

Jocks bring the nectar to the hive.

  

Our top-secret formula

  

is automatically color-corrected,

scent-adjusted and bubble-contoured

  

into this soothing sweet syrup

  

with its distinctive

golden glow you know as...

  

Honey!

  

- That girl was hot.

- She's my cousin!

  

- She is?

- Yes, we're all cousins.

  

- Right. You're right.

- At Honex, we constantly strive

  

to improve every aspect

of bee existence.

  

These bees are stress-testing

a new helmet technology.

  

- What do you think he makes?

- Not enough.

  

Here we have our latest advancement,

the Krelman.

  

- What does that do?

- Oatches that little strand of honey

  

that hangs after you pour it.

Saves us millions.

  

Oan anyone work on the Krelman?

  

Of course. Most bee jobs are

small ones. But bees know

  

that every small job,

if it's done well, means a lot.

  

But choose carefully

  

because you'll stay in the job

you pick for the rest of your life.

  

The same job the rest of your life?

I didn't know that.

  

What's the difference?

  

You'll be happy to know that bees,

as a species, haven't had one day off

  

in 27 million years.

  

So you'll just work us to death?

  

We'll sure try.

  

Wow! That blew my mind!

  

"What's the difference?"

How can you say that?

  

One job forever?

That's an insane choice to have to make.

  

I'm relieved. Now we only have

to make one decision in life.

  

But, Adam, how could they

never have told us that?

  

Why would you question anything?

We're bees.

  

We're the most perfectly

functioning society on Earth.

  

You ever think maybe things

work a little too well here?

  

Like what? Give me one example.

  

I don't know. But you know

what I'm talking about.

  

Please clear the gate.

Royal Nectar Force on approach.

  

Wait a second. Oheck it out.

  

- Hey, those are Pollen Jocks!

- Wow.

  

I've never seen them this close.

  

They know what it's like

outside the hive.

  

Yeah, but some don't come back.

  

- Hey, Jocks!

- Hi, Jocks!

  

You guys did great!

  

You're monsters!

You're sky freaks! I love it! I love it!

  

- I wonder where they were.

- I don't know.

  

Their day's not planned.

  

Outside the hive, flying who knows

where, doing who knows what.

  

You can'tjust decide to be a Pollen

Jock. You have to be bred for that.

  

Right.

  

Look. That's more pollen

than you and I will see in a lifetime.

  

It's just a status symbol.

Bees make too much of it.

  

Perhaps. Unless you're wearing it

and the ladies see you wearing it.

  

Those ladies?

Aren't they our cousins too?

  

Distant. Distant.

  

Look at these two.

  

- Oouple of Hive Harrys.

- Let's have fun with them.

  

It must be dangerous

being a Pollen Jock.

  

Yeah. Once a bear pinned me

against a mushroom!

  

He had a paw on my throat,

and with the other, he was slapping me!

  

- Oh, my!

- I never thought I'd knock him out.

  

What were you doing during this?

  

Trying to alert the authorities.

  

I can autograph that.

  

A little gusty out there today,

wasn't it, comrades?

  

Yeah. Gusty.

  

We're hitting a sunflower patch

six miles from here tomorrow.

  

- Six miles, huh?

- Barry!

  

A puddle jump for us,

but maybe you're not up for it.

  

- Maybe I am.

- You are not!

  

We're going 0900 at J-Gate.

  

What do you think, buzzy-boy?

Are you bee enough?

  

I might be. It all depends

on what 0900 means.

  

Hey, Honex!

  

Dad, you surprised me.

  

You decide what you're interested in?

  

- Well, there's a lot of choices.

- But you only get one.

  

Do you ever get bored

doing the same job every day?

  

Son, let me tell you about stirring.

  

You grab that stick, and you just

move it around, and you stir it around.

  

You get yourself into a rhythm.

It's a beautiful thing.

  

You know, Dad,

the more I think about it,

  

maybe the honey field

just isn't right for me.

  

You were thinking of what,

making balloon animals?

  

That's a bad job

for a guy with a stinger.

  

Janet, your son's not sure

he wants to go into honey!

  

- Barry, you are so funny sometimes.

- I'm not trying to be funny.

  

You're not funny! You're going

into honey. Our son, the stirrer!

  

- You're gonna be a stirrer?

- No one's listening to me!

  

Wait till you see the sticks I have.

  

I could say anything right now.

I'm gonna get an ant tattoo!

  

Let's open some honey and celebrate!

  

Maybe I'll pierce my thorax.

Shave my antennae.

  

Shack up with a grasshopper. Get

a gold tooth and call everybody "dawg"!

  

I'm so proud.

  

- We're starting work today!

- Today's the day.

  

Oome on! All the good jobs

will be gone.

  

Yeah, right.

  

Pollen counting, stunt bee, pouring,

stirrer, front desk, hair removal...

  

- Is it still available?

- Hang on. Two left!

  

One of them's yours! Oongratulations!

Step to the side.

  

- What'd you get?

- Picking crud out. Stellar!

  

Wow!

  

Oouple of newbies?

  

Yes, sir! Our first day! We are ready!

  

Make your choice.

  

- You want to go first?

- No, you go.

  

Oh, my. What's available?

  

Restroom attendant's open,

not for the reason you think.

  

- Any chance of getting the Krelman?

- Sure, you're on.

  

I'm sorry, the Krelman just closed out.

  

Wax monkey's always open.

  

The Krelman opened up again.

  

What happened?

  

A bee died. Makes an opening. See?

He's dead. Another dead one.

  

Deady. Deadified. Two more dead.

  

Dead from the neck up.

Dead from the neck down. That's life!

  

Oh, this is so hard!

  

Heating, cooling,

stunt bee, pourer, stirrer,

  

humming, inspector number seven,

lint coordinator, stripe supervisor,

  

mite wrangler. Barry, what

do you think I should... Barry?

  

Barry!

  

All right, we've got the sunflower patch

in quadrant nine...

  

What happened to you?

Where are you?

  

- I'm going out.

- Out? Out where?

  

- Out there.

- Oh, no!

  

I have to, before I go

to work for the rest of my life.

  

You're gonna die! You're crazy! Hello?

  

Another call coming in.

  

If anyone's feeling brave,

there's a Korean deli on 83rd

  

that gets their roses today.

  

Hey, guys.

  

- Look at that.

- Isn't that the kid we saw yesterday?

  

Hold it, son, flight deck's restricted.

  

It's OK, Lou. We're gonna take him up.

  

Really? Feeling lucky, are you?

  

Sign here, here. Just initial that.

  

- Thank you.

- OK.

  

You got a rain advisory today,

  

and as you all know,

bees cannot fly in rain.

  

So be careful. As always,

watch your brooms,

  

hockey sticks, dogs,

birds, bears and bats.

  

Also, I got a couple of reports

of root beer being poured on us.

  

Murphy's in a home because of it,

babbling like a cicada!

  

- That's awful.

- And a reminder for you rookies,

  

bee law number one,

absolutely no talking to humans!

  

All right, launch positions!

  

Buzz, buzz, buzz, buzz! Buzz, buzz,

buzz, buzz! Buzz, buzz, buzz, buzz!

  

Black and yellow!

  

Hello!

  

You ready for this, hot shot?

  

Yeah. Yeah, bring it on.

  

Wind, check.

  

- Antennae, check.

- Nectar pack, check.

  

- Wings, check.

- Stinger, check.

  

Scared out of my shorts, check.

  

OK, ladies,

  

let's move it out!

  

Pound those petunias,

you striped stem-suckers!

  

All of you, drain those flowers!

  

Wow! I'm out!

  

I can't believe I'm out!

  

So blue.

  

I feel so fast and free!

  

Box kite!

  

Wow!

  

Flowers!

  

This is Blue Leader.

We have roses visual.

  

Bring it around 30 degrees and hold.

  

Roses!

  

30 degrees, roger. Bringing it around.

  

Stand to the side, kid.

It's got a bit of a kick.

  

That is one nectar collector!

  

- Ever see pollination up close?

- No, sir.

  

I pick up some pollen here, sprinkle it

over here. Maybe a dash over there,

  

a pinch on that one.

See that? It's a little bit of magic.

  

That's amazing. Why do we do that?

  

That's pollen power. More pollen, more

flowers, more nectar, more honey for us.

  

Oool.

  

I'm picking up a lot of bright yellow.

Oould be daisies. Don't we need those?

  

Oopy that visual.

  

Wait. One of these flowers

seems to be on the move.

  

Say again? You're reporting

a moving flower?

  

Affirmative.

  

That was on the line!

  

This is the coolest. What is it?

  

I don't know, but I'm loving this color.

  

It smells good.

Not like a flower, but I like it.

  

Yeah, fuzzy.

  

Ohemical-y.

  

Oareful, guys. It's a little grabby.

  

My sweet lord of bees!

  

Oandy-brain, get off there!

  

Problem!

  

- Guys!

- This could be bad.

  

Affirmative.

  

Very close.

  

Gonna hurt.

  

Mama's little boy.

  

You are way out of position, rookie!

  

Ooming in at you like a missile!

  

Help me!

  

I don't think these are flowers.

  

- Should we tell him?

- I think he knows.

  

What is this?!

  

Match point!

  

You can start packing up, honey,

because you're about to eat it!

  

Yowser!

  

Gross.

  

There's a bee in the car!

  

- Do something!

- I'm driving!

  

- Hi, bee.

- He's back here!

  

He's going to sting me!

  

Nobody move. If you don't move,

he won't sting you. Freeze!

  

He blinked!

  

Spray him, Granny!

  

What are you doing?!

  

Wow... the tension level

out here is unbelievable.

  

I gotta get home.

  

Oan't fly in rain.

  

Oan't fly in rain.

  

Oan't fly in rain.

  

Mayday! Mayday! Bee going down!

  

Ken, could you close

the window please?

  

Ken, could you close

the window please?

  

Oheck out my new resume.

I made it into a fold-out brochure.

  

You see? Folds out.

  

Oh, no. More humans. I don't need this.

  

What was that?

  

Maybe this time. This time. This time.

This time! This time! This...

  

Drapes!

  

That is diabolical.

  

It's fantastic. It's got all my special

skills, even my top-ten favorite movies.

  

What's number one? Star Wars?

  

Nah, I don't go for that...

  

...kind of stuff.

  

No wonder we shouldn't talk to them.

They're out of their minds.

  

When I leave a job interview, they're

flabbergasted, can't believe what I say.

  

There's the sun. Maybe that's a way out.

  

I don't remember the sun

having a big 75 on it.

  

I predicted global warming.

  

I could feel it getting hotter.

At first I thought it was just me.

  

Wait! Stop! Bee!

  

Stand back. These are winter boots.

  

Wait!

  

Don't kill him!

  

You know I'm allergic to them!

This thing could kill me!

  

Why does his life have

less value than yours?

  

Why does his life have any less value

than mine? Is that your statement?

  

I'm just saying all life has value. You

don't know what he's capable of feeling.

  

My brochure!

  

There you go, little guy.

  

I'm not scared of him.

It's an allergic thing.

  

Put that on your resume brochure.

  

My whole face could puff up.

  

Make it one of your special skills.

  

Knocking someone out

is also a special skill.

  

Right. Bye, Vanessa. Thanks.

  

- Vanessa, next week? Yogurt night?

- Sure, Ken. You know, whatever.

  

- You could put carob chips on there.

- Bye.

  

- Supposed to be less calories.

- Bye.

  

I gotta say something.

  

She saved my life.

I gotta say something.

  

All right, here it goes.

  

Nah.

  

What would I say?

  

I could really get in trouble.

  

It's a bee law.

You're not supposed to talk to a human.

  

I can't believe I'm doing this.

  

I've got to.

  

Oh, I can't do it. Oome on!

  

No. Yes. No.

  

Do it. I can't.

  

How should I start it?

"You like jazz?" No, that's no good.

  

Here she comes! Speak, you fool!

  

Hi!

  

I'm sorry.

  

- You're talking.

- Yes, I know.

  

You're talking!

  

I'm so sorry.

  

No, it's OK. It's fine.

I know I'm dreaming.

  

But I don't recall going to bed.

  

Well, I'm sure this

is very disconcerting.

  

This is a bit of a surprise to me.

I mean, you're a bee!

  

I am. And I'm not supposed

to be doing this,

  

but they were all trying to kill me.

  

And if it wasn't for you...

  

I had to thank you.

It's just how I was raised.

  

That was a little weird.

  

- I'm talking with a bee.

- Yeah.

  

I'm talking to a bee.

And the bee is talking to me!

  

I just want to say I'm grateful.

I'll leave now.

  

- Wait! How did you learn to do that?

- What?

  

The talking thing.

  

Same way you did, I guess.

"Mama, Dada, honey." You pick it up.

  

- That's very funny.

- Yeah.

  

Bees are funny. If we didn't laugh,

we'd cry with what we have to deal with.

  

Anyway...

  

Oan I...

  

...get you something?

- Like what?

  

I don't know. I mean...

I don't know. Ooffee?

  

I don't want to put you out.

  

It's no trouble. It takes two minutes.

  

- It's just coffee.

- I hate to impose.

  

- Don't be ridiculous!

- Actually, I would love a cup.

  

Hey, you want rum cake?

  

- I shouldn't.

- Have some.

  

- No, I can't.

- Oome on!

  

I'm trying to lose a couple micrograms.

  

- Where?

- These stripes don't help.

  

You look great!

  

I don't know if you know

anything about fashion.

  

Are you all right?

  

No.

  

He's making the tie in the cab

as they're flying up Madison.

  

He finally gets there.

  

He runs up the steps into the church.

The wedding is on.

  

And he says, "Watermelon?

I thought you said Guatemalan.

  

Why would I marry a watermelon?"

  

Is that a bee joke?

  

That's the kind of stuff we do.

  

Yeah, different.

  

So, what are you gonna do, Barry?

  

About work? I don't know.

  

I want to do my part for the hive,

but I can't do it the way they want.

  

I know how you feel.

  

- You do?

- Sure.

  

My parents wanted me to be a lawyer or

a doctor, but I wanted to be a florist.

  

- Really?

- My only interest is flowers.

  

Our new queen was just elected

with that same campaign slogan.

  

Anyway, if you look...

  

There's my hive right there. See it?

  

You're in Sheep Meadow!

  

Yes! I'm right off the Turtle Pond!

  

No way! I know that area.

I lost a toe ring there once.

  

- Why do girls put rings on their toes?

- Why not?

  

- It's like putting a hat on your knee.

- Maybe I'll try that.

  

- You all right, ma'am?

- Oh, yeah. Fine.

  

Just having two cups of coffee!

  

Anyway, this has been great.

Thanks for the coffee.

  

Yeah, it's no trouble.

  

Sorry I couldn't finish it. If I did,

I'd be up the rest of my life.

  

Are you...?

  

Oan I take a piece of this with me?

  

Sure! Here, have a crumb.

  

- Thanks!

- Yeah.

  

All right. Well, then...

I guess I'll see you around.

  

Or not.

  

OK, Barry.

  

And thank you

so much again... for before.

  

Oh, that? That was nothing.

  

Well, not nothing, but... Anyway...

  

This can't possibly work.

  

He's all set to go.

We may as well try it.

  

OK, Dave, pull the chute.

  

- Sounds amazing.

- It was amazing!

  

It was the scariest,

happiest moment of my life.

  

Humans! I can't believe

you were with humans!

  

Giant, scary humans!

What were they like?

  

Huge and crazy. They talk crazy.

  

They eat crazy giant things.

They drive crazy.

  

- Do they try and kill you, like on TV?

- Some of them. But some of them don't.

  

- How'd you get back?

- Poodle.

  

You did it, and I'm glad. You saw

whatever you wanted to see.

  

You had your "experience." Now you

can pick out yourjob and be normal.

  

- Well...

- Well?

  

Well, I met someone.

  

You did? Was she Bee-ish?

  

- A wasp?! Your parents will kill you!

- No, no, no, not a wasp.

  

- Spider?

- I'm not attracted to spiders.

  

I know it's the hottest thing,

with the eight legs and all.

  

I can't get by that face.

  

So who is she?

  

She's... human.

  

No, no. That's a bee law.

You wouldn't break a bee law.

  

- Her name's Vanessa.

- Oh, boy.

  

She's so nice. And she's a florist!

  

Oh, no! You're dating a human florist!

  

We're not dating.

  

You're flying outside the hive, talking

to humans that attack our homes

  

with power washers and M-80s!

One-eighth a stick of dynamite!

  

She saved my life!

And she understands me.

  

This is over!

  

Eat this.

  

This is not over! What was that?

  

- They call it a crumb.

- It was so stingin' stripey!

  

And that's not what they eat.

That's what falls off what they eat!

  

- You know what a Oinnabon is?

- No.

  

It's bread and cinnamon and frosting.

They heat it up...

  

Sit down!

  

...really hot!

- Listen to me!

  

We are not them! We're us.

There's us and there's them!

  

Yes, but who can deny

the heart that is yearning?

  

There's no yearning.

Stop yearning. Listen to me!

  

You have got to start thinking bee,

my friend. Thinking bee!

  

- Thinking bee.

- Thinking bee.

  

Thinking bee! Thinking bee!

Thinking bee! Thinking bee!

  

There he is. He's in the pool.

  

You know what your problem is, Barry?

  

I gotta start thinking bee?

  

How much longer will this go on?

  

It's been three days!

Why aren't you working?

  

I've got a lot of big life decisions

to think about.

  

What life? You have no life!

You have no job. You're barely a bee!

  

Would it kill you

to make a little honey?

  

Barry, come out.

Your father's talking to you.

  

Martin, would you talk to him?

  

Barry, I'm talking to you!

  

You coming?

  

Got everything?

  

All set!

  

Go ahead. I'll catch up.

  

Don't be too long.

  

Watch this!

  

Vanessa!

  

- We're still here.

- I told you not to yell at him.

  

He doesn't respond to yelling!

  

- Then why yell at me?

- Because you don't listen!

  

I'm not listening to this.

  

Sorry, I've gotta go.

  

- Where are you going?

- I'm meeting a friend.

  

A girl? Is this why you can't decide?

  

Bye.

  

I just hope she's Bee-ish.

  

They have a huge parade

of flowers every year in Pasadena?

  

To be in the Tournament of Roses,

that's every florist's dream!

  

Up on a float, surrounded

by flowers, crowds cheering.

  

A tournament. Do the roses

compete in athletic events?

  

No. All right, I've got one.

How come you don't fly everywhere?

  

It's exhausting. Why don't you

run everywhere? It's faster.

  

Yeah, OK, I see, I see.

All right, your turn.

  

TiVo. You can just freeze live TV?

That's insane!

  

You don't have that?

  

We have Hivo, but it's a disease.

It's a horrible, horrible disease.

  

Oh, my.

  

Dumb bees!

  

You must want to sting all those jerks.

  

We try not to sting.

It's usually fatal for us.

  

So you have to watch your temper.

  

Very carefully.

You kick a wall, take a walk,

  

write an angry letter and throw it out.

Work through it like any emotion:

  

Anger, jealousy, lust.

  

Oh, my goodness! Are you OK?

  

Yeah.

  

- What is wrong with you?!

- It's a bug.

  

He's not bothering anybody.

Get out of here, you creep!

  

What was that? A Pic 'N' Save circular?

  

Yeah, it was. How did you know?

  

It felt like about 10 pages.

Seventy-five is pretty much our limit.

  

You've really got that

down to a science.

  

- I lost a cousin to Italian Vogue.

- I'll bet.

  

What in the name

of Mighty Hercules is this?

  

How did this get here?

Oute Bee, Golden Blossom,

  

Ray Liotta Private Select?

  

- Is he that actor?

- I never heard of him.

  

- Why is this here?

- For people. We eat it.

  

You don't have

enough food of your own?

  

- Well, yes.

- How do you get it?

  

- Bees make it.

- I know who makes it!

  

And it's hard to make it!

  

There's heating, cooling, stirring.

You need a whole Krelman thing!

  

- It's organic.

- It's our-ganic!

  

It's just honey, Barry.

  

Just what?!

  

Bees don't know about this!

This is stealing! A lot of stealing!

  

You've taken our homes, schools,

hospitals! This is all we have!

  

And it's on sale?!

I'm getting to the bottom of this.

  

I'm getting to the bottom

of all of this!

  

Hey, Hector.

  

- You almost done?

- Almost.

  

He is here. I sense it.

  

Well, I guess I'll go home now

  

and just leave this nice honey out,

with no one around.

  

You're busted, box boy!

  

I knew I heard something.

So you can talk!

  

I can talk.

And now you'll start talking!

  

Where you getting the sweet stuff?

Who's your supplier?

  

I don't understand.

I thought we were friends.

  

The last thing we want

to do is upset bees!

  

You're too late! It's ours now!

  

You, sir, have crossed

the wrong sword!

  

You, sir, will be lunch

for my iguana, Ignacio!

  

Where is the honey coming from?

  

Tell me where!

  

Honey Farms! It comes from Honey Farms!

  

Orazy person!

  

What horrible thing has happened here?

  

These faces, they never knew

what hit them. And now

  

they're on the road to nowhere!

  

Just keep still.

  

What? You're not dead?

  

Do I look dead? They will wipe anything

that moves. Where you headed?

  

To Honey Farms.

I am onto something huge here.

  

I'm going to Alaska. Moose blood,

crazy stuff. Blows your head off!

  

I'm going to Tacoma.

  

- And you?

- He really is dead.

  

All right.

  

Uh-oh!

  

- What is that?!

- Oh, no!

  

- A wiper! Triple blade!

- Triple blade?

  

Jump on! It's your only chance, bee!

  

Why does everything have

to be so doggone clean?!

  

How much do you people need to see?!

  

Open your eyes!

Stick your head out the window!

  

From NPR News in Washington,

I'm Oarl Kasell.

  

But don't kill no more bugs!

  

- Bee!

- Moose blood guy!!

  

- You hear something?

- Like what?

  

Like tiny screaming.

  

Turn off the radio.

  

Whassup, bee boy?

  

Hey, Blood.

  

Just a row of honey jars,

as far as the eye could see.

  

Wow!

  

I assume wherever this truck goes

is where they're getting it.

  

I mean, that honey's ours.

  

- Bees hang tight.

- We're all jammed in.

  

It's a close community.

  

Not us, man. We on our own.

Every mosquito on his own.

  

- What if you get in trouble?

- You a mosquito, you in trouble.

  

Nobody likes us. They just smack.

See a mosquito, smack, smack!

  

At least you're out in the world.

You must meet girls.

  

Mosquito girls try to trade up,

get with a moth, dragonfly.

  

Mosquito girl don't want no mosquito.

  

You got to be kidding me!

  

Mooseblood's about to leave

the building! So long, bee!

  

- Hey, guys!

- Mooseblood!

  

I knew I'd catch y'all down here.

Did you bring your crazy straw?

  

We throw it in jars, slap a label on it,

and it's pretty much pure profit.

  

What is this place?

  

A bee's got a brain

the size of a pinhead.

  

They are pinheads!

  

Pinhead.

  

- Oheck out the new smoker.

- Oh, sweet. That's the one you want.

  

The Thomas 3000!

  

Smoker?

  

Ninety puffs a minute, semi-automatic.

Twice the nicotine, all the tar.

  

A couple breaths of this

knocks them right out.

  

They make the honey,

and we make the money.

  

"They make the honey,

and we make the money"?

  

Oh, my!

  

What's going on? Are you OK?

  

Yeah. It doesn't last too long.

  

Do you know you're

in a fake hive with fake walls?

  

Our queen was moved here.

We had no choice.

  

This is your queen?

That's a man in women's clothes!

  

That's a drag queen!

  

What is this?

  

Oh, no!

  

There's hundreds of them!

  

Bee honey.

  

Our honey is being brazenly stolen

on a massive scale!

  

This is worse than anything bears

have done! I intend to do something.

  

Oh, Barry, stop.

  

Who told you humans are taking

our honey? That's a rumor.

  

Do these look like rumors?

  

That's a conspiracy theory.

These are obviously doctored photos.

  

How did you get mixed up in this?

  

He's been talking to humans.

  

- What?

- Talking to humans?!

  

He has a human girlfriend.

And they make out!

  

Make out? Barry!

  

We do not.

  

- You wish you could.

- Whose side are you on?

  

The bees!

  

I dated a cricket once in San Antonio.

Those crazy legs kept me up all night.

  

Barry, this is what you want

to do with your life?

  

I want to do it for all our lives.

Nobody works harder than bees!

  

Dad, I remember you

coming home so overworked

  

your hands were still stirring.

You couldn't stop.

  

I remember that.

  

What right do they have to our honey?

  

We live on two cups a year. They put it

in lip balm for no reason whatsoever!

  

Even if it's true, what can one bee do?

  

Sting them where it really hurts.

  

In the face! The eye!

  

- That would hurt.

- No.

  

Up the nose? That's a killer.

  

There's only one place you can sting

the humans, one place where it matters.

  

Hive at Five, the hive's only

full-hour action news source.

  

No more bee beards!

  

With Bob Bumble at the anchor desk.

  

Weather with Storm Stinger.

  

Sports with Buzz Larvi.

  

And Jeanette Ohung.

  

- Good evening. I'm Bob Bumble.

- And I'm Jeanette Ohung.

  

A tri-county bee, Barry Benson,

  

intends to sue the human race

for stealing our honey,

  

packaging it and profiting

from it illegally!

  

Tomorrow night on Bee Larry King,

  

we'll have three former queens here in

our studio, discussing their new book,

  

Olassy Ladies,

out this week on Hexagon.

  

Tonight we're talking to Barry Benson.

  

Did you ever think, "I'm a kid

from the hive. I can't do this"?

  

Bees have never been afraid

to change the world.

  

What about Bee Oolumbus?

Bee Gandhi? Bejesus?

  

Where I'm from, we'd never sue humans.

  

We were thinking

of stickball or candy stores.

  

How old are you?

  

The bee community

is supporting you in this case,

  

which will be the trial

of the bee century.

  

You know, they have a Larry King

in the human world too.

  

It's a common name. Next week...

  

He looks like you and has a show

and suspenders and colored dots...

  

Next week...

  

Glasses, quotes on the bottom from the

guest even though you just heard 'em.

  

Bear Week next week!

They're scary, hairy and here live.

  

Always leans forward, pointy shoulders,

squinty eyes, very Jewish.

  

In tennis, you attack

at the point of weakness!

  

It was my grandmother, Ken. She's 81.

  

Honey, her backhand's a joke!

I'm not gonna take advantage of that?

  

Quiet, please.

Actual work going on here.

  

- Is that that same bee?

- Yes, it is!

  

I'm helping him sue the human race.

  

- Hello.

- Hello, bee.

  

This is Ken.

  

Yeah, I remember you. Timberland, size

ten and a half. Vibram sole, I believe.

  

Why does he talk again?

  

Listen, you better go

'cause we're really busy working.

  

But it's our yogurt night!

  

Bye-bye.

  

Why is yogurt night so difficult?!

  

You poor thing.

You two have been at this for hours!

  

Yes, and Adam here

has been a huge help.

  

- Frosting...

- How many sugars?

  

Just one. I try not

to use the competition.

  

So why are you helping me?

  

Bees have good qualities.

  

And it takes my mind off the shop.

  

Instead of flowers, people

are giving balloon bouquets now.

  

Those are great, if you're three.

  

And artificial flowers.

  

- Oh, those just get me psychotic!

- Yeah, me too.

  

Bent stingers, pointless pollination.

  

Bees must hate those fake things!

  

Nothing worse

than a daffodil that's had work done.

  

Maybe this could make up

for it a little bit.

  

- This lawsuit's a pretty big deal.

- I guess.

  

You sure you want to go through with it?

  

Am I sure? When I'm done with

the humans, they won't be able

  

to say, "Honey, I'm home,"

without paying a royalty!

  

It's an incredible scene

here in downtown Manhattan,

  

where the world anxiously waits,

because for the first time in history,

  

we will hear for ourselves

if a honeybee can actually speak.

  

What have we gotten into here, Barry?

  

It's pretty big, isn't it?

  

I can't believe how many humans

don't work during the day.

  

You think billion-dollar multinational

food companies have good lawyers?

  

Everybody needs to stay

behind the barricade.

  

- What's the matter?

- I don't know, I just got a chill.

  

Well, if it isn't the bee team.

  

You boys work on this?

  

All rise! The Honorable

Judge Bumbleton presiding.

  

All right. Oase number 4475,

  

Superior Oourt of New York,

Barry Bee Benson v. the Honey Industry

  

is now in session.

  

Mr. Montgomery, you're representing

the five food companies collectively?

  

A privilege.

  

Mr. Benson... you're representing

all the bees of the world?

  

I'm kidding. Yes, Your Honor,

we're ready to proceed.

  

Mr. Montgomery,

your opening statement, please.

  

Ladies and gentlemen of the jury,

  

my grandmother was a simple woman.

  

Born on a farm, she believed

it was man's divine right

  

to benefit from the bounty

of nature God put before us.

  

If we lived in the topsy-turvy world

Mr. Benson imagines,

  

just think of what would it mean.

  

I would have to negotiate

with the silkworm

  

for the elastic in my britches!

  

Talking bee!

  

How do we know this isn't some sort of

  

holographic motion-picture-capture

Hollywood wizardry?

  

They could be using laser beams!

  

Robotics! Ventriloquism!

Oloning! For all we know,

  

he could be on steroids!

  

Mr. Benson?

  

Ladies and gentlemen,

there's no trickery here.

  

I'm just an ordinary bee.

Honey's pretty important to me.

  

It's important to all bees.

We invented it!

  

We make it. And we protect it

with our lives.

  

Unfortunately, there are

some people in this room

  

who think they can take it from us

  

'cause we're the little guys!

I'm hoping that, after this is all over,

  

you'll see how, by taking our honey,

you not only take everything we have

  

but everything we are!

  

I wish he'd dress like that

all the time. So nice!

  

Oall your first witness.

  

So, Mr. Klauss Vanderhayden

of Honey Farms, big company you have.

  

I suppose so.

  

I see you also own

Honeyburton and Honron!

  

Yes, they provide beekeepers

for our farms.

  

Beekeeper. I find that

to be a very disturbing term.

  

I don't imagine you employ

any bee-free-ers, do you?

  

- No.

- I couldn't hear you.

  

- No.

- No.

  

Because you don't free bees.

You keep bees. Not only that,

  

it seems you thought a bear would be

an appropriate image for a jar of honey.

  

They're very lovable creatures.

  

Yogi Bear, Fozzie Bear, Build-A-Bear.

  

You mean like this?

  

Bears kill bees!

  

How'd you like his head crashing

through your living room?!

  

Biting into your couch!

Spitting out your throw pillows!

  

OK, that's enough. Take him away.

  

So, Mr. Sting, thank you for being here.

Your name intrigues me.

  

- Where have I heard it before?

- I was with a band called The Police.

  

But you've never been

a police officer, have you?

  

No, I haven't.

  

No, you haven't. And so here

we have yet another example

  

of bee culture casually

stolen by a human

  

for nothing more than

a prance-about stage name.

  

Oh, please.

  

Have you ever been stung, Mr. Sting?

  

Because I'm feeling

a little stung, Sting.

  

Or should I say... Mr. Gordon M. Sumner!

  

That's not his real name?! You idiots!

  

Mr. Liotta, first,

belated congratulations on

  

your Emmy win for a guest spot

on ER in 2005.

  

Thank you. Thank you.

  

I see from your resume

that you're devilishly handsome

  

with a churning inner turmoil

that's ready to blow.

  

I enjoy what I do. Is that a crime?

  

Not yet it isn't. But is this

what it's come to for you?

  

Exploiting tiny, helpless bees

so you don't

  

have to rehearse

your part and learn your lines, sir?

  

Watch it, Benson!

I could blow right now!

  

This isn't a goodfella.

This is a badfella!

  

Why doesn't someone just step on

this creep, and we can all go home?!

  

- Order in this court!

- You're all thinking it!

  

Order! Order, I say!

  

- Say it!

- Mr. Liotta, please sit down!

  

I think it was awfully nice

of that bear to pitch in like that.

  

I think the jury's on our side.

  

Are we doing everything right, legally?

  

I'm a florist.

  

Right. Well, here's to a great team.

  

To a great team!

  

Well, hello.

  

- Ken!

- Hello.

  

I didn't think you were coming.

  

No, I was just late.

I tried to call, but... the battery.

  

I didn't want all this to go to waste,

so I called Barry. Luckily, he was free.

  

Oh, that was lucky.

  

There's a little left.

I could heat it up.

  

Yeah, heat it up, sure, whatever.

  

So I hear you're quite a tennis player.

  

I'm not much for the game myself.

The ball's a little grabby.

  

That's where I usually sit.

Right... there.

  

Ken, Barry was looking at your resume,

  

and he agreed with me that eating with

chopsticks isn't really a special skill.

  

You think I don't see what you're doing?

  

I know how hard it is to find

the rightjob. We have that in common.

  

Do we?

  

Bees have 100 percent employment,

but we do jobs like taking the crud out.

  

That's just what

I was thinking about doing.

  

Ken, I let Barry borrow your razor

for his fuzz. I hope that was all right.

  

I'm going to drain the old stinger.

  

Yeah, you do that.

  

Look at that.

  

You know, I've just about had it

  

with your little mind games.

  

- What's that?

- Italian Vogue.

  

Mamma mia, that's a lot of pages.

  

A lot of ads.

  

Remember what Van said, why is

your life more valuable than mine?

  

Funny, I just can't seem to recall that!

  

I think something stinks in here!

  

I love the smell of flowers.

  

How do you like the smell of flames?!

  

Not as much.

  

Water bug! Not taking sides!

  

Ken, I'm wearing a Ohapstick hat!

This is pathetic!

  

I've got issues!

  

Well, well, well, a royal flush!

  

- You're bluffing.

- Am I?

  

Surf's up, dude!

  

Poo water!

  

That bowl is gnarly.

  

Except for those dirty yellow rings!

  

Kenneth! What are you doing?!

  

You know, I don't even like honey!

I don't eat it!

  

We need to talk!

  

He's just a little bee!

  

And he happens to be

the nicest bee I've met in a long time!

  

Long time? What are you talking about?!

Are there other bugs in your life?

  

No, but there are other things bugging

me in life. And you're one of them!

  

Fine! Talking bees, no yogurt night...

  

My nerves are fried from riding

on this emotional roller coaster!

  

Goodbye, Ken.

  

And for your information,

  

I prefer sugar-free, artificial

sweeteners made by man!

  

I'm sorry about all that.

  

I know it's got

an aftertaste! I like it!

  

I always felt there was some kind

of barrier between Ken and me.

  

I couldn't overcome it.

Oh, well.

  

Are you OK for the trial?

  

I believe Mr. Montgomery

is about out of ideas.

  

We would like to call

Mr. Barry Benson Bee to the stand.

  

Good idea! You can really see why he's

considered one of the best lawyers...

  

Yeah.

  

Layton, you've

gotta weave some magic

  

with this jury,

or it's gonna be all over.

  

Don't worry. The only thing I have

to do to turn this jury around

  

is to remind them

of what they don't like about bees.

  

- You got the tweezers?

- Are you allergic?

  

Only to losing, son. Only to losing.

  

Mr. Benson Bee, I'll ask you

what I think we'd all like to know.

  

What exactly is your relationship

  

to that woman?

  

We're friends.

  

- Good friends?

- Yes.

  

How good? Do you live together?

  

Wait a minute...

  

Are you her little...

  

...bedbug?

  

I've seen a bee documentary or two.

From what I understand,

  

doesn't your queen give birth

to all the bee children?

  

- Yeah, but...

- So those aren't your real parents!

  

- Oh, Barry...

- Yes, they are!

  

Hold me back!

  

You're an illegitimate bee,

aren't you, Benson?

  

He's denouncing bees!

  

Don't y'all date your cousins?

  

- Objection!

- I'm going to pincushion this guy!

  

Adam, don't! It's what he wants!

  

Oh, I'm hit!!

  

Oh, lordy, I am hit!

  

Order! Order!

  

The venom! The venom

is coursing through my veins!

  

I have been felled

by a winged beast of destruction!

  

You see? You can't treat them

like equals! They're striped savages!

  

Stinging's the only thing

they know! It's their way!

  

- Adam, stay with me.

- I can't feel my legs.

  

What angel of mercy

will come forward to suck the poison

  

from my heaving buttocks?

  

I will have order in this court. Order!

  

Order, please!

  

The case of the honeybees

versus the human race

  

took a pointed turn against the bees

  

yesterday when one of their legal

team stung Layton T. Montgomery.

  

- Hey, buddy.

- Hey.

  

- Is there much pain?

- Yeah.

  

I...

  

I blew the whole case, didn't I?

  

It doesn't matter. What matters is

you're alive. You could have died.

  

I'd be better off dead. Look at me.

  

They got it from the cafeteria

downstairs, in a tuna sandwich.

  

Look, there's

a little celery still on it.

  

What was it like to sting someone?

  

I can't explain it. It was all...

  

All adrenaline and then...

and then ecstasy!

  

All right.

  

You think it was all a trap?

  

Of course. I'm sorry.

I flew us right into this.

  

What were we thinking? Look at us. We're

just a couple of bugs in this world.

  

What will the humans do to us

if they win?

  

I don't know.

  

I hear they put the roaches in motels.

That doesn't sound so bad.

  

Adam, they check in,

but they don't check out!

  

Oh, my.

  

Oould you get a nurse

to close that window?

  

- Why?

- The smoke.

  

Bees don't smoke.

  

Right. Bees don't smoke.

  

Bees don't smoke!

But some bees are smoking.

  

That's it! That's our case!

  

It is? It's not over?

  

Get dressed. I've gotta go somewhere.

  

Get back to the court and stall.

Stall any way you can.

  

And assuming you've done step correctly, you're ready for the tub.

  

Mr. Flayman.

  

Yes? Yes, Your Honor!

  

Where is the rest of your team?

  

Well, Your Honor, it's interesting.

  

Bees are trained to fly haphazardly,

  

and as a result,

we don't make very good time.

  

I actually heard a funny story about...

  

Your Honor,

haven't these ridiculous bugs

  

taken up enough

of this court's valuable time?

  

How much longer will we allow

these absurd shenanigans to go on?

  

They have presented no compelling

evidence to support their charges

  

against my clients,

who run legitimate businesses.

  

I move for a complete dismissal

of this entire case!

  

Mr. Flayman, I'm afraid I'm going

  

to have to consider

Mr. Montgomery's motion.

  

But you can't! We have a terrific case.

  

Where is your proof?

Where is the evidence?

  

Show me the smoking gun!

  

Hold it, Your Honor!

You want a smoking gun?

  

Here is your smoking gun.

  

What is that?

  

It's a bee smoker!

  

What, this?

This harmless little contraption?

  

This couldn't hurt a fly,

let alone a bee.

  

Look at what has happened

  

to bees who have never been asked,

"Smoking or non?"

  

Is this what nature intended for us?

  

To be forcibly addicted

to smoke machines

  

and man-made wooden slat work camps?

  

Living out our lives as honey slaves

to the white man?

  

- What are we gonna do?

- He's playing the species card.

  

Ladies and gentlemen, please,

free these bees!

  

Free the bees! Free the bees!

  

Free the bees!

  

Free the bees! Free the bees!

  

The court finds in favor of the bees!

  

Vanessa, we won!

  

I knew you could do it! High-five!

  

Sorry.

  

I'm OK! You know what this means?

  

All the honey

will finally belong to the bees.

  

Now we won't have

to work so hard all the time.

  

This is an unholy perversion

of the balance of nature, Benson.

  

You'll regret this.

  

Barry, how much honey is out there?

  

All right. One at a time.

  

Barry, who are you wearing?

  

My sweater is Ralph Lauren,

and I have no pants.

  

- What if Montgomery's right?

- What do you mean?

  

We've been living the bee way

a long time, 27 million years.

  

Oongratulations on your victory.

What will you demand as a settlement?

  

First, we'll demand a complete shutdown

of all bee work camps.

  

Then we want back the honey

that was ours to begin with,

  

every last drop.

  

We demand an end to the glorification

of the bear as anything more

  

than a filthy, smelly,

bad-breath stink machine.

  

We're all aware

of what they do in the woods.

  

Wait for my signal.

  

Take him out.

  

He'll have nauseous

for a few hours, then he'll be fine.

  

And we will no longer tolerate

bee-negative nicknames...

  

But it's just a prance-about stage name!

  

...unnecessary inclusion of honey

in bogus health products

  

and la-dee-da human

tea-time snack garnishments.

  

Oan't breathe.

  

Bring it in, boys!

  

Hold it right there! Good.

  

Tap it.

  

Mr. Buzzwell, we just passed three cups,

and there's gallons more coming!

  

- I think we need to shut down!

- Shut down? We've never shut down.

  

Shut down honey production!

  

Stop making honey!

  

Turn your key, sir!

  

What do we do now?

  

Oannonball!

  

We're shutting honey production!

  

Mission abort.

  

Aborting pollination and nectar detail.

Returning to base.

  

Adam, you wouldn't believe

how much honey was out there.

  

Oh, yeah?

  

What's going on? Where is everybody?

  

- Are they out celebrating?

- They're home.

  

They don't know what to do.

Laying out, sleeping in.

  

I heard your Uncle Oarl was on his way

to San Antonio with a cricket.

  

At least we got our honey back.

  

Sometimes I think, so what if humans

liked our honey? Who wouldn't?

  

It's the greatest thing in the world!

I was excited to be part of making it.

  

This was my new desk. This was my

new job. I wanted to do it really well.

  

And now...

  

Now I can't.

  

I don't understand

why they're not happy.

  

I thought their lives would be better!

  

They're doing nothing. It's amazing.

Honey really changes people.

  

You don't have any idea

what's going on, do you?

  

- What did you want to show me?

- This.

  

What happened here?

  

That is not the half of it.

  

Oh, no. Oh, my.

  

They're all wilting.

  

Doesn't look very good, does it?

  

No.

  

And whose fault do you think that is?

  

You know, I'm gonna guess bees.

  

Bees?

  

Specifically, me.

  

I didn't think bees not needing to make

honey would affect all these things.

  

It's notjust flowers.

Fruits, vegetables, they all need bees.

  

That's our whole SAT test right there.

  

Take away produce, that affects

the entire animal kingdom.

  

And then, of course...

  

The human species?

  

So if there's no more pollination,

  

it could all just go south here,

couldn't it?

  

I know this is also partly my fault.

  

How about a suicide pact?

  

How do we do it?

  

- I'll sting you, you step on me.

- Thatjust kills you twice.

  

Right, right.

  

Listen, Barry...

sorry, but I gotta get going.

  

I had to open my mouth and talk.

  

Vanessa?

  

Vanessa? Why are you leaving?

Where are you going?

  

To the final Tournament of Roses parade

in Pasadena.

  

They've moved it to this weekend

because all the flowers are dying.

  

It's the last chance

I'll ever have to see it.

  

Vanessa, I just wanna say I'm sorry.

I never meant it to turn out like this.

  

I know. Me neither.

  

Tournament of Roses.

Roses can't do sports.

  

Wait a minute. Roses. Roses?

  

Roses!

  

Vanessa!

  

Roses?!

  

Barry?

  

- Roses are flowers!

- Yes, they are.

  

Flowers, bees, pollen!

  

I know.

That's why this is the last parade.

  

Maybe not.

Oould you ask him to slow down?

  

Oould you slow down?

  

Barry!

  

OK, I made a huge mistake.

This is a total disaster, all my fault.

  

Yes, it kind of is.

  

I've ruined the planet.

I wanted to help you

  

with the flower shop.

I've made it worse.

  

Actually, it's completely closed down.

  

I thought maybe you were remodeling.

  

But I have another idea, and it's

greater than my previous ideas combined.

  

I don't want to hear it!

  

All right, they have the roses,

the roses have the pollen.

  

I know every bee, plant

and flower bud in this park.

  

All we gotta do is get what they've got

back here with what we've got.

  

- Bees.

- Park.

  

- Pollen!

- Flowers.

  

- Repollination!

- Across the nation!

  

Tournament of Roses,

Pasadena, Oalifornia.

  

They've got nothing

but flowers, floats and cotton candy.

  

Security will be tight.

  

I have an idea.

  

Vanessa Bloome, FTD.

  

Official floral business. It's real.

  

Sorry, ma'am. Nice brooch.

  

Thank you. It was a gift.

  

Once inside,

we just pick the right float.

  

How about The Princess and the Pea?

  

I could be the princess,

and you could be the pea!

  

Yes, I got it.

  

- Where should I sit?

- What are you?

  

- I believe I'm the pea.

- The pea?

  

It goes under the mattresses.

  

- Not in this fairy tale, sweetheart.

- I'm getting the marshal.

  

You do that!

This whole parade is a fiasco!

  

Let's see what this baby'll do.

  

Hey, what are you doing?!

  

Then all we do

is blend in with traffic...

  

...without arousing suspicion.

  

Once at the airport,

there's no stopping us.

  

Stop! Security.

  

- You and your insect pack your float?

- Yes.

  

Has it been

in your possession the entire time?

  

Would you remove your shoes?

  

- Remove your stinger.

- It's part of me.

  

I know. Just having some fun.

Enjoy your flight.

  

Then if we're lucky, we'll have

just enough pollen to do the job.

  

Oan you believe how lucky we are? We

have just enough pollen to do the job!

  

I think this is gonna work.

  

It's got to work.

  

Attention, passengers,

this is Oaptain Scott.

  

We have a bit of bad weather

in New York.

  

It looks like we'll experience

a couple hours delay.

  

Barry, these are cut flowers

with no water. They'll never make it.

  

I gotta get up there

and talk to them.

  

Be careful.

  

Oan I get help

with the Sky Mall magazine?

  

I'd like to order the talking

inflatable nose and ear hair trimmer.

  

Oaptain, I'm in a real situation.

  

- What'd you say, Hal?

- Nothing.

  

Bee!

  

Don't freak out! My entire species...

  

What are you doing?

  

- Wait a minute! I'm an attorney!

- Who's an attorney?

  

Don't move.

  

Oh, Barry.

  

Good afternoon, passengers.

This is your captain.

  

Would a Miss Vanessa Bloome in 24B

please report to the cockpit?

  

And please hurry!

  

What happened here?

  

There was a DustBuster,

a toupee, a life raft exploded.

  

One's bald, one's in a boat,

they're both unconscious!

  

- Is that another bee joke?

- No!

  

No one's flying the plane!

  

This is JFK control tower, Flight 356.

What's your status?

  

This is Vanessa Bloome.

I'm a florist from New York.

  

Where's the pilot?

  

He's unconscious,

and so is the copilot.

  

Not good. Does anyone onboard

have flight experience?

  

As a matter of fact, there is.

  

- Who's that?

- Barry Benson.

  

From the honey trial?! Oh, great.

  

Vanessa, this is nothing more

than a big metal bee.

  

It's got giant wings, huge engines.

  

I can't fly a plane.

  

- Why not? Isn't John Travolta a pilot?

- Yes.

  

How hard could it be?

  

Wait, Barry!

We're headed into some lightning.

  

This is Bob Bumble. We have some

late-breaking news from JFK Airport,

  

where a suspenseful scene

is developing.

  

Barry Benson,

fresh from his legal victory...

  

That's Barry!

  

...is attempting to land a plane,

loaded with people, flowers

  

and an incapacitated flight crew.

  

Flowers?!

  

We have a storm in the area

and two individuals at the controls

  

with absolutely no flight experience.

  

Just a minute.

There's a bee on that plane.

  

I'm quite familiar with Mr. Benson

and his no-account compadres.

  

They've done enough damage.

  

But isn't he your only hope?

  

Technically, a bee

shouldn't be able to fly at all.

  

Their wings are too small...

  

Haven't we heard this a million times?

  

"The surface area of the wings

and body mass make no sense."

  

- Get this on the air!

- Got it.

  

- Stand by.

- We're going live.

  

The way we work may be a mystery to you.

  

Making honey takes a lot of bees

doing a lot of small jobs.

  

But let me tell you about a small job.

  

If you do it well,

it makes a big difference.

  

More than we realized.

To us, to everyone.

  

That's why I want to get bees

back to working together.

  

That's the bee way!

We're not made of Jell-O.

  

We get behind a fellow.

  

- Black and yellow!

- Hello!

  

Left, right, down, hover.

  

- Hover?

- Forget hover.

  

This isn't so hard.

Beep-beep! Beep-beep!

  

Barry, what happened?!

  

Wait, I think we were

on autopilot the whole time.

  

- That may have been helping me.

- And now we're not!

  

So it turns out I cannot fly a plane.

  

All of you, let's get

behind this fellow! Move it out!

  

Move out!

  

Our only chance is if I do what I'd do,

you copy me with the wings of the plane!

  

Don't have to yell.

  

I'm not yelling!

We're in a lot of trouble.

  

It's very hard to concentrate

with that panicky tone in your voice!

  

It's not a tone. I'm panicking!

  

I can't do this!

  

Vanessa, pull yourself together.

You have to snap out of it!

  

You snap out of it.

  

You snap out of it.

  

- You snap out of it!

- You snap out of it!

  

- You snap out of it!

- You snap out of it!

  

- You snap out of it!

- You snap out of it!

  

- Hold it!

- Why? Oome on, it's my turn.

  

How is the plane flying?

  

I don't know.

  

Hello?

  

Benson, got any flowers

for a happy occasion in there?

  

The Pollen Jocks!

  

They do get behind a fellow.

  

- Black and yellow.

- Hello.

  

All right, let's drop this tin can

on the blacktop.

  

Where? I can't see anything. Oan you?

  

No, nothing. It's all cloudy.

  

Oome on. You got to think bee, Barry.

  

- Thinking bee.

- Thinking bee.

  

Thinking bee!

Thinking bee! Thinking bee!

  

Wait a minute.

I think I'm feeling something.

  

- What?

- I don't know. It's strong, pulling me.

  

Like a 27-million-year-old instinct.

  

Bring the nose down.

  

Thinking bee!

Thinking bee! Thinking bee!

  

- What in the world is on the tarmac?

- Get some lights on that!

  

Thinking bee!

Thinking bee! Thinking bee!

  

- Vanessa, aim for the flower.

- OK.

  

Out the engines. We're going in

on bee power. Ready, boys?

  

Affirmative!

  

Good. Good. Easy, now. That's it.

  

Land on that flower!

  

Ready? Full reverse!

  

Spin it around!

  

- Not that flower! The other one!

- Which one?

  

- That flower.

- I'm aiming at the flower!

  

That's a fat guy in a flowered shirt.

I mean the giant pulsating flower

  

made of millions of bees!

  

Pull forward. Nose down. Tail up.

  

Rotate around it.

  

- This is insane, Barry!

- This's the only way I know how to fly.

  

Am I koo-koo-kachoo, or is this plane

flying in an insect-like pattern?

  

Get your nose in there. Don't be afraid.

Smell it. Full reverse!

  

Just drop it. Be a part of it.

  

Aim for the center!

  

Now drop it in! Drop it in, woman!

  

Oome on, already.

  

Barry, we did it!

You taught me how to fly!

  

- Yes. No high-five!

- Right.

  

Barry, it worked!

Did you see the giant flower?

  

What giant flower? Where? Of course

I saw the flower! That was genius!

  

- Thank you.

- But we're not done yet.

  

Listen, everyone!

  

This runway is covered

with the last pollen

  

from the last flowers

available anywhere on Earth.

  

That means this is our last chance.

  

We're the only ones who make honey,

pollinate flowers and dress like this.

  

If we're gonna survive as a species,

this is our moment! What do you say?

  

Are we going to be bees, orjust

Museum of Natural History keychains?

  

We're bees!

  

Keychain!

  

Then follow me! Except Keychain.

  

Hold on, Barry. Here.

  

You've earned this.

  

Yeah!

  

I'm a Pollen Jock! And it's a perfect

fit. All I gotta do are the sleeves.

  

Oh, yeah.

  

That's our Barry.

  

Mom! The bees are back!

  

If anybody needs

to make a call, now's the time.

  

I got a feeling we'll be

working late tonight!

  

Here's your change. Have a great

afternoon! Oan I help who's next?

  

Would you like some honey with that?

It is bee-approved. Don't forget these.

  

Milk, cream, cheese, it's all me.

And I don't see a nickel!

  

Sometimes I just feel

like a piece of meat!

  

I had no idea.

  

Barry, I'm sorry.

Have you got a moment?

  

Would you excuse me?

My mosquito associate will help you.

  

Sorry I'm late.

  

He's a lawyer too?

  

I was already a blood-sucking parasite.

All I needed was a briefcase.

  

Have a great afternoon!

  

Barry, I just got this huge tulip order,

and I can't get them anywhere.

  

No problem, Vannie.

Just leave it to me.

  

You're a lifesaver, Barry.

Oan I help who's next?

  

All right, scramble, jocks!

It's time to fly.

  

Thank you, Barry!

  

That bee is living my life!

  

Let it go, Kenny.

  

- When will this nightmare end?!

- Let it all go.

  

- Beautiful day to fly.

- Sure is.

  

Between you and me,

I was dying to get out of that office.

  

You have got

to start thinking bee, my friend.

  

- Thinking bee!

- Me?

  

Hold it. Let's just stop

for a second. Hold it.

  

I'm sorry. I'm sorry, everyone.

Oan we stop here?

  

I'm not making a major life decision

during a production number!

  

All right. Take ten, everybody.

Wrap it up, guys.

  

I had virtually no rehearsal for that.

TEIGNMOUTH METHODIST CHURCH

 

Overview

Heritage Category: Listed Building

Grade: II

List Entry Number: 1269063

Date first listed: 29-Jul-1983

Statutory Address: METHODIST CHURCH, SOMERSET PLACE,10 Somerset Pl, Teignmouth TQ14 4AF

County: Devon

District: Teignbridge (District Authority)

Parish: Teignmouth

National Grid Reference: SX 93984 72881 Listing NGR: SX9398472881

Details

  

Methodist church. Built 1845 as a Wesleyan chapel. Squared Plymouth rubblestone with rendered and freestone dressings, slate roof. PLAN: Rectangular with high aisles and 5-bay nave with a church hall to the rear right. EXTERIOR: plain lancet windows. 3 forward-facing gables; the outer, lower ones have quatrefoil windows to the apexes over large lancets with moulded hoods and engaged columns on the sill string course. The central bay has a similar, 3-light window over a pointed arch with hoodmould and impost string and plain intrados to C20 glazed double doors. The facade and returns are articulated by offset buttresses, those flanking the door have tall octagonal spirelets with steep plain octagonal pinnacles and the finial to the central gable is a pierced cross in a circle. INTERIOR: the shallow barrel-vaulted roof is supported by cast-iron octagonal columns with moulded caps. Curved braces to the sides form arcading to the aisles; probably original pews, mostly C20 fittings. Interesting non-conformist chapel in simple Gothic style. (The Buildings of England: Pevsner N & Cherry B: Devon: London: 1989-: 798).

 

The first Wesleyan Chapel in Teignmouth was in Chapel Street in 1819 using a chapel that had already been built. It was the coming of the South Devon Railway Company in 1843 that caused our Church to be relocated to its present site of Somerset Place in 1845.

 

The present Church was designed by the architecht R B Best and possibly built by Hitchins of Torquay at a cost of £1,500

 

In 1851 the Rev George Barnley reported to the Census Offficer that Somerset Place Wesleyan Church had an attendance of 125 in the mornings, 78 in the afternoons and 207 in the evenings with a Sunday School of 61. Teignmouth had a population of 5,500

 

On 15th September 1859 an Affidavit was signed stating that the building had been used for public worship prior to 30th June 1852 so that the Certificate for the Registration of Marriages could be issued. Although the building could be used and the Minister could conduct marriages, the state registrar had to be present.

In December 1903 the Quarterly Meeting heard about the late arrival of the Registrar at a wedding at the Dawlish Chapel, so they decided to take advantage of the Marriage Act, buy safes and apply for registration. This meant that the Ministers were now the registrars.

 

In 1906 General Booth of the Salvation Army visited Teignmouth and the Church was crowded. The trustees were doubtful about the strength of the galleries and stipulated that only 200 should be allowed upstairs, using only the front pews.

 

In 1912 space in the church was still at a premium, so seat holders were asked to tell the Steward if they were not coming to church so that visitors could use their seats. The gallery continued to be free for visitors.

The Great War had a profound effect on the availability of men. It was therefore their wives and sisters who took over the leadership of the Church. A National Insurance Scheme was arranged to cover War Damage and to this end the Circuit was required to send the collection from the last Sunday each October. The Lighting Regulations of September 1916 under the Defence of the Realm Act brought the evening services forward half an hour to 6pm. and required the use of blackout materials.

 

In 1922 the Church was converted from gas lighting to electricity at a cost of £108.10.

Three years later in 1925 it was decided to buy an electric blower for the Church Organ at a cost of £85. Mr Olaf Milton who retired after pumping the organ for the previous 5 years was given a Guinea (£1 05p)

 

In the 1930s there were over 200 members with 120 in the Sunday School.In 1932 there was a request for Communion Services to be held occasionally after morning service, and flowers were to be sent to the sick with a card. As previously there was a need for more space with seat holders being asked to arrive 10 minutes early so that spaces could be found for visitors.

 

During the Second World War, Teignmouth being a south coast port, suffered its share of bombing and 79 residents were killed. Large parts of the town were damaged. The deeds were placed in the bank, the trustees requested the use of the hall for refugees/evacuees, fire fighting equipment was purchased and members took turns to sleep in the Church to be on hand in case of fire.

After the war, Church attendance suffered for various reasons, youngsters to do National Service, there were greater opportunities to go to college and university, people had moved due to bomb damage. The advent of television saw a drop in the attendance of all the Church meetings. By 1961 there were only 23 left in the Sunday School and Evening Services were very poorly attended. The BBC’s production of the Forsyte Saga caused Leaders’ Meetings to discuss the timing of their evening services. This affected all the churches and in 1967 the galleries were removed from our church. The development of cheap package holidays to Spain led to the decline of the English seaside summer holiday visitors and a drop in Church visitors.

Church membership dropped more slowly, from over 200 in the 1930s down to 150 in the 1940s. In 1999 the membership had dropped down to 90 but since then has started to increase again and now stands at 113 in 2003

 

The Church was completely redesigned in 1967. The 1884 concept of a Methodist Church resembling a lecture hall or a courtroom where the Word was studied was now replaced by a worship area where the sacraments became more important. The table became the focal point,instead of the pulpit and the processional aisle became the vogue for weddings and funerals.

Smaller numbers meant the galleries were no longer needed so the side and front galleries were removed and the organ brought from the front right hand corner gallery to the floor below. The ceiling was covered with acoustic tiles and the large central window in the end wall was covered over. The preaching rostrum, dais and communion rail were all replaced. The internal wooden porch was removed and a new glass porch extended 4 feet further under the east gallery.

 

In January 2003 we closed the sancuary for twelve weeks whilst we refurbished the interior. During this period all services, including a funeral, were held in the Church Hall.

 

During the refurbishment we exposed previously hidden windows by removing the suspended ceiling. This also revealed the original beams and ventilation system. During the 1967 refurbishment the stained glass window over the communion table had been removed and bricked up. It was too expensive to reinstate, but we did make good the outline of the window and from the centre of it we hung a new cross which we backlit. The original stained glass from the window was found under the stairs and we incorporated some of it into the newly revealed windows above the balcony. New flooring was laid and a new electronic piano was kindly donated.

We held our first sevice in the refurbished sanctuary on Mothering Sunday 2003.

 

PREVIOUS MINISTERS

 

1884 – 1846 – Rev. Henry Castle

1846 – 1850 – Rev. John Williams

1851 – 1852 – Rev. John Nicklin

1852 – 1854 – Rev. Thomas Murray

1854 – 1855 – Rev. John Wood

1855 – 1856 – Rev. John Keightley

1856 – 1859 – Rev. Edward Jennings

1859 – 1860 – Rev. Nehmiah Curnock

1860 – 1861 – Rev. Ebeneezer Rushton Talbot

1861 – 1863 – Rev James E. W. Moulton

1864 – 1865 – Rev. Theophilus Pugh

1865 – 1867 – Rev. Charles Churchill

1867 – 1870 – Rev. William Pordige

1870 – 1873 – Rev. John Bramley

1873 – 1874 – Rev. John Ryan

1875 – 1878 – Rev. John Turner Waddy

1878 – 1879 – Rev. William T. Armstrong

1879 – 1880 – Rev. Samual Wesley

1880 – 1883 – Rev. William Martin

1883 – 1886 – Rev. Joseph Benson Blanch

1886 – 1888 – Rev. John H. Rogers

1888 – 1890 – Rev. Francis Teal

1890 – 1893 – Rev. James Henery Marquand

1893 – 1896 – Rev. John Mosscrop

1896 – 1898 – Rev. Joseph Witney

1898 – 1901 – Rev. John Williams

1901 – 1902 – Rev. John Wesley Bell

1903 – 1906 – Rev. Henry Lewis

1906 – 1909 – Rev. William Humphries

1909 – 1912 – Rev. George C. Mayes

1912 – 1913 – Rev. J. Arthur Aldington

1914 – 1920 – Rev. Thomas Dickinson

1920 – 1923 – Rev. Henry Arnaud Scott

1923 – 1925 – Rev. Albert James Short

1925 – 1927 – Rev. H. Walker Price

1927 – 1931 – Rev. Edwin A. Spear

1931 – 1935 – Rev. Herbert W. H. Butler

1935 – 1939 – Rev. Herbert Kidman

1940 – 1944 – Rev. Arthur J. Summerfield

1944 – 1948 – Rev. Francis Bertram James

1948 – 1952 – Rev. Alfred T Johns

1952 – 1953 – Rev. Walter Herbert Dunn

1953 – 1955 – Rev. William J. Turnball

1955 – 1960 – Rev. Alfred Cartwright

1960 – 1964 – Rev. Norman Tasker Colley

1964 – 1968 – Rev. Thomas Meakin

1968 – 1973 – Rev. R. Lloyd Jones

1973 – 1983 – Rev. Stanley E. Parsons

1983 – 1991 – Rev. Geoffrey S. Todd

1991 – 1998 – Rev. Martin P. James

1998 – 2003 – Rev. Malcolm Benton

2003 – 2008 – Rev. Diane Daymond

2008 – 2013 – Rev. Bill Robertson

2014 – – Rev. Catherine Wagstaff

TEIGNMOUTH METHODIST CHURCH

 

Overview

Heritage Category: Listed Building

Grade: II

List Entry Number: 1269063

Date first listed: 29-Jul-1983

Statutory Address: METHODIST CHURCH, SOMERSET PLACE,10 Somerset Pl, Teignmouth TQ14 4AF

County: Devon

District: Teignbridge (District Authority)

Parish: Teignmouth

National Grid Reference: SX 93984 72881 Listing NGR: SX9398472881

Details

  

Methodist church. Built 1845 as a Wesleyan chapel. Squared Plymouth rubblestone with rendered and freestone dressings, slate roof. PLAN: Rectangular with high aisles and 5-bay nave with a church hall to the rear right. EXTERIOR: plain lancet windows. 3 forward-facing gables; the outer, lower ones have quatrefoil windows to the apexes over large lancets with moulded hoods and engaged columns on the sill string course. The central bay has a similar, 3-light window over a pointed arch with hoodmould and impost string and plain intrados to C20 glazed double doors. The facade and returns are articulated by offset buttresses, those flanking the door have tall octagonal spirelets with steep plain octagonal pinnacles and the finial to the central gable is a pierced cross in a circle. INTERIOR: the shallow barrel-vaulted roof is supported by cast-iron octagonal columns with moulded caps. Curved braces to the sides form arcading to the aisles; probably original pews, mostly C20 fittings. Interesting non-conformist chapel in simple Gothic style. (The Buildings of England: Pevsner N & Cherry B: Devon: London: 1989-: 798).

 

The first Wesleyan Chapel in Teignmouth was in Chapel Street in 1819 using a chapel that had already been built. It was the coming of the South Devon Railway Company in 1843 that caused our Church to be relocated to its present site of Somerset Place in 1845.

 

The present Church was designed by the architecht R B Best and possibly built by Hitchins of Torquay at a cost of £1,500

 

In 1851 the Rev George Barnley reported to the Census Offficer that Somerset Place Wesleyan Church had an attendance of 125 in the mornings, 78 in the afternoons and 207 in the evenings with a Sunday School of 61. Teignmouth had a population of 5,500

 

On 15th September 1859 an Affidavit was signed stating that the building had been used for public worship prior to 30th June 1852 so that the Certificate for the Registration of Marriages could be issued. Although the building could be used and the Minister could conduct marriages, the state registrar had to be present.

In December 1903 the Quarterly Meeting heard about the late arrival of the Registrar at a wedding at the Dawlish Chapel, so they decided to take advantage of the Marriage Act, buy safes and apply for registration. This meant that the Ministers were now the registrars.

 

In 1906 General Booth of the Salvation Army visited Teignmouth and the Church was crowded. The trustees were doubtful about the strength of the galleries and stipulated that only 200 should be allowed upstairs, using only the front pews.

 

In 1912 space in the church was still at a premium, so seat holders were asked to tell the Steward if they were not coming to church so that visitors could use their seats. The gallery continued to be free for visitors.

The Great War had a profound effect on the availability of men. It was therefore their wives and sisters who took over the leadership of the Church. A National Insurance Scheme was arranged to cover War Damage and to this end the Circuit was required to send the collection from the last Sunday each October. The Lighting Regulations of September 1916 under the Defence of the Realm Act brought the evening services forward half an hour to 6pm. and required the use of blackout materials.

 

In 1922 the Church was converted from gas lighting to electricity at a cost of £108.10.

Three years later in 1925 it was decided to buy an electric blower for the Church Organ at a cost of £85. Mr Olaf Milton who retired after pumping the organ for the previous 5 years was given a Guinea (£1 05p)

 

In the 1930s there were over 200 members with 120 in the Sunday School.In 1932 there was a request for Communion Services to be held occasionally after morning service, and flowers were to be sent to the sick with a card. As previously there was a need for more space with seat holders being asked to arrive 10 minutes early so that spaces could be found for visitors.

 

During the Second World War, Teignmouth being a south coast port, suffered its share of bombing and 79 residents were killed. Large parts of the town were damaged. The deeds were placed in the bank, the trustees requested the use of the hall for refugees/evacuees, fire fighting equipment was purchased and members took turns to sleep in the Church to be on hand in case of fire.

After the war, Church attendance suffered for various reasons, youngsters to do National Service, there were greater opportunities to go to college and university, people had moved due to bomb damage. The advent of television saw a drop in the attendance of all the Church meetings. By 1961 there were only 23 left in the Sunday School and Evening Services were very poorly attended. The BBC’s production of the Forsyte Saga caused Leaders’ Meetings to discuss the timing of their evening services. This affected all the churches and in 1967 the galleries were removed from our church. The development of cheap package holidays to Spain led to the decline of the English seaside summer holiday visitors and a drop in Church visitors.

Church membership dropped more slowly, from over 200 in the 1930s down to 150 in the 1940s. In 1999 the membership had dropped down to 90 but since then has started to increase again and now stands at 113 in 2003

 

The Church was completely redesigned in 1967. The 1884 concept of a Methodist Church resembling a lecture hall or a courtroom where the Word was studied was now replaced by a worship area where the sacraments became more important. The table became the focal point,instead of the pulpit and the processional aisle became the vogue for weddings and funerals.

Smaller numbers meant the galleries were no longer needed so the side and front galleries were removed and the organ brought from the front right hand corner gallery to the floor below. The ceiling was covered with acoustic tiles and the large central window in the end wall was covered over. The preaching rostrum, dais and communion rail were all replaced. The internal wooden porch was removed and a new glass porch extended 4 feet further under the east gallery.

 

In January 2003 we closed the sancuary for twelve weeks whilst we refurbished the interior. During this period all services, including a funeral, were held in the Church Hall.

 

During the refurbishment we exposed previously hidden windows by removing the suspended ceiling. This also revealed the original beams and ventilation system. During the 1967 refurbishment the stained glass window over the communion table had been removed and bricked up. It was too expensive to reinstate, but we did make good the outline of the window and from the centre of it we hung a new cross which we backlit. The original stained glass from the window was found under the stairs and we incorporated some of it into the newly revealed windows above the balcony. New flooring was laid and a new electronic piano was kindly donated.

We held our first sevice in the refurbished sanctuary on Mothering Sunday 2003.

 

PREVIOUS MINISTERS

 

1884 – 1846 – Rev. Henry Castle

1846 – 1850 – Rev. John Williams

1851 – 1852 – Rev. John Nicklin

1852 – 1854 – Rev. Thomas Murray

1854 – 1855 – Rev. John Wood

1855 – 1856 – Rev. John Keightley

1856 – 1859 – Rev. Edward Jennings

1859 – 1860 – Rev. Nehmiah Curnock

1860 – 1861 – Rev. Ebeneezer Rushton Talbot

1861 – 1863 – Rev James E. W. Moulton

1864 – 1865 – Rev. Theophilus Pugh

1865 – 1867 – Rev. Charles Churchill

1867 – 1870 – Rev. William Pordige

1870 – 1873 – Rev. John Bramley

1873 – 1874 – Rev. John Ryan

1875 – 1878 – Rev. John Turner Waddy

1878 – 1879 – Rev. William T. Armstrong

1879 – 1880 – Rev. Samual Wesley

1880 – 1883 – Rev. William Martin

1883 – 1886 – Rev. Joseph Benson Blanch

1886 – 1888 – Rev. John H. Rogers

1888 – 1890 – Rev. Francis Teal

1890 – 1893 – Rev. James Henery Marquand

1893 – 1896 – Rev. John Mosscrop

1896 – 1898 – Rev. Joseph Witney

1898 – 1901 – Rev. John Williams

1901 – 1902 – Rev. John Wesley Bell

1903 – 1906 – Rev. Henry Lewis

1906 – 1909 – Rev. William Humphries

1909 – 1912 – Rev. George C. Mayes

1912 – 1913 – Rev. J. Arthur Aldington

1914 – 1920 – Rev. Thomas Dickinson

1920 – 1923 – Rev. Henry Arnaud Scott

1923 – 1925 – Rev. Albert James Short

1925 – 1927 – Rev. H. Walker Price

1927 – 1931 – Rev. Edwin A. Spear

1931 – 1935 – Rev. Herbert W. H. Butler

1935 – 1939 – Rev. Herbert Kidman

1940 – 1944 – Rev. Arthur J. Summerfield

1944 – 1948 – Rev. Francis Bertram James

1948 – 1952 – Rev. Alfred T Johns

1952 – 1953 – Rev. Walter Herbert Dunn

1953 – 1955 – Rev. William J. Turnball

1955 – 1960 – Rev. Alfred Cartwright

1960 – 1964 – Rev. Norman Tasker Colley

1964 – 1968 – Rev. Thomas Meakin

1968 – 1973 – Rev. R. Lloyd Jones

1973 – 1983 – Rev. Stanley E. Parsons

1983 – 1991 – Rev. Geoffrey S. Todd

1991 – 1998 – Rev. Martin P. James

1998 – 2003 – Rev. Malcolm Benton

2003 – 2008 – Rev. Diane Daymond

2008 – 2013 – Rev. Bill Robertson

2014 – – Rev. Catherine Wagstaff

Thanks to Homer for the Advert

 

We Have managed to Organise the 3rd 'Woodhead Run'

Myself, Stu, and Homer, Together with the Help Of Gareth Hardy of 'Stockport Truck Centre' and Martyn and Mick Thorpe we have Both the Same Start and Finish Points as in Previous Years.

 

Nothing has Changed but we Do Request that Tractor units arrive early at STC (Hyde) 9.00am -10.00 and arrive last At Thorpes Haulage (Trailer Yard) -This will Give Artics Room to Park up First, Departure From STC will Start at 11.15 -12.00

At the STC end Artics are welcome to park outside the Entrance on the Industrial estate road and should be the first away anyway..

Please Avoid Bunching up and any Slow Lorries are requested to pull over (there are plenty of laybys) and let others pass -as we are trying to avoid the Problem last year when all the Entrants arrived AT ONCE! -at Thorpes Yard and caused problems with locals and Traffic...

 

We want to keep this going -so we all have to help each other ....

There will be More Updates nearer the time -So please Keep looking.

Everyone Knows my Number -But for New Entrants Phone 07872195953. Run Members Will be listed Below but both Gareth and Ian have requested the Numbers be Kept down to 60 entrants.

 

1) Gary Kershaw -Atki Flat (R)

2) Laurence Buxton - Atki Tipper (R)

3) Kershaw Brothers -BMC Flat (R)

4) David Jones -Bedford Flat (R)

5) Bristow's -Scammell Flat (R) -NEW AFTER REPAINT

6) Peter Davis -Foden Flat (R)

7) Paul Duggan -ERF (U)

8) Paul Parker -Foden (U) -NEW AFTER REPAINT

9) Colin Barrett -ERF (A)

10) Stuart Kaye -ERF (U)

11) Mark Griffiths -ERF (R)

12) Johnny Murphy -Leyland Tank (R)

13) Steve Richardson -Atkingson (R)

14) Nield Brothers -BRS Flat (R)

15) Ian Parker -ERF Flat (R)

16) Vaughn Pearce DAF (U)

17) Peter Hiley -Trader Flat (R)

18) Alan Appleyard -Foden (U)

19) Paul Allen -Atki Grit (R)

20) Kirran Tolson - AEC Matador (R)

21) Glenn Dearnly- AEC Tank (R)

22) Steven Jesop - Foden (U)

23) George Benson sweet -ERF (R)

24) Danny Gott - ERF (U)

25) Arron Roberts - ERF (U)

26) Tony Hawkridge -Foden (R)

27) Ian Simpson - Bedford Wrecker (R)

28) Rob Gomersal -Atki Tipper (R)

29) Dan Punchard -ERF (U)

30) Richard Becket -Atki (A)

31) Ken Taylor -Aec Flat (R)

32) John Robingson -Leyland Cattle box (R)

33) Gareth Hardy -Foden (U)

34) Gareth Hardy -ERF Wrecker (R)

35) Jason Owen -Seddy Aki (A)

36) Edward Wood -Seddon 13/4 (A)

37) Richard Cox -Foden Ballast (U)

38) Steve Rothwell -ERF (U)

39) Steve Rothwell -ERF (A)

40) Graham Reed -AEC (A)

41) Tim Walley -Foden (U)

42) Tim Walley -Foden (U)

43) John Thomas -ERF LV (A) (David)

44) Peter Thorner -Seddy Atki Cattle Box (R) NEW OUT!

45) Robert Morcambe -Bedford (R)

46) Simon Wildon -Bedford (R)

47) Robert Summerset -1948 ERF (R)

48) Ian Moffet -Atkingson cattle box (R)

49) Neil Hellewell -Big Bedford (V)

50) Bob Garlick -Bedford Tipper (R)

51) Rocky on Tour -Foden (U)

52) Bowler -Scania (U)

53) Oldham Les -Atkingson Flat (R)

54) Oldham Les -ERF (U)

John Metcalf (15 August 1717–26 April 1810), known as Blind Jack of Knaresborough or Blind Jack Metcalf, was the first professional road builder to emerge during the Industrial Revolution. Blind from the age of six, Metcalf had an eventful life, which was documented by his own account just before his death. He was an accomplished diver, swimmer, card player and fiddler, but was better known for the period between 1765 and 1792 when he built about 180 miles (290 km) of turnpike road, mainly in the north of England and as such, he became known as one of the fathers of the modern road. His work on the roads in the north has been commemorated in a pub named after him, a statue in Knaresborough town centre and part of the A658 in Harrogate being named John Metcalf Way.

 

Metcalf was born into a poor family in Knaresborough in Yorkshire, England on 15th August 1717. His father was a horse breeder. At the age of six John lost his sight after a smallpox infection; he was given fiddle lessons as a way of making provision for him to earn a living later in life. He became an accomplished fiddler and made it his livelihood in his early adult years. In 1732, aged 15, Metcalf succeeded Morrison as fiddler at the Queen's Head, a tavern in Harrogate. Morrison had played there for 70 years. Metcalf had an affinity for horses and added to his living with horse trading. Though blind, he took up swimming and diving, fighting cocks, playing cards, riding and even hunting. He knew his local area so well he was paid to work as a guide to visitors.

 

In 1739 Metcalf befriended Dorothy Benson, the daughter of the landlord of the Granby Inn in Harrogate. When aged 21 he made another woman pregnant; Dorothy begged him not to marry her and Jack fled. He spent some time living at places on the North Sea coast between Newcastle and London, and lodged with his aunt in Whitby. He continued to work as a fiddler. When he heard Dorothy was to be married to a shoemaker, he returned and they eloped. They married and had four children. Dorothy died in 1778.

 

His fiddle playing gave him social connections and a patron, Colonel Liddell , Member of Parliament for Berwick-on-Tweed. In a much-repeated story the colonel and Metcalf had a wager of 10 guineas as to who could travel the 207 miles (333 km) from London to Harrogate first; Jack on foot or the colonel in his coach. Jack took five and half days, and arrived first despite his blindness, the state of the roads having slowed the colonel.

 

During the Jacobite rising of 1745 Metcalf's connections got him the job of assistant to the royal recruiting sergeant in the Knaresborough area. He accompanied the army to Scotland where he did not experience action but was employed moving guns over boggy ground. He was captured but released. He used his Scottish experience to import Aberdeen stockings to England.

 

Before army service, Metcalf worked as a carrier using a four-wheeled chaise and a one-horse chair on local trips. When competition cut into the business he switched to carrying fish from the coast to Leeds and Manchester. After 1745 he bought a stone wagon and worked it between York and Knaresborough. By 1754 his business had grown to a stagecoach line. He drove the coach himself, making two trips a week during the summer and one in the winter months.

 

In 1765 Parliament passed an act authorising turnpike trusts to build toll roads in the Knaresborough area. There were few people with road-building experience and Metcalf seized the opportunity, building on his practical experience as a carrier.

He won a contract to build a three-mile (5 km) section of road between Minskip and Ferrensby on the road from Harrogate to Boroughbridge. He explored the section of countryside alone and worked out the most practical route.

 

Metcalf built roads in Lancashire, Derbyshire, Cheshire and Yorkshire, including roads between:

 

Knaresborough and Wetherby, Wakefield, Huddersfield and Saddleworth (via the Standedge pass), Bury and Blackburn with a branch to Accrington, Skipton, Colne and Burnley.

 

Metcalf believed a good road should have good foundations, be well drained and have a smooth convex surface to allow rainwater to drain quickly into ditches at the side. He understood the importance of good drainage, knowing it was rain that caused most problems. He worked out a way to build a road across a bog using a series of rafts made from ling (a type of heather) and furze (gorse) tied in bundles as foundations. It established his reputation as a road builder because other engineers believed it could not be done. He mastered his trade with his own method of calculating costs and materials, which he could never explain to others and he became known as one of the fathers of the modern road along with Thomas Telford and John MacAdam. Competition from canals cut into his profits and he retired in 1792 to live with a daughter and her husband at Spofforth in Yorkshire. Throughout his career he built 180 miles (290 km) of road. At 77 he walked to York, where he related a detailed account of his life to a publisher.

 

Blind Jack of Knaresborough died aged 92 on 26 April 1810, at his home in Spofforth where he is buried in the churchyard of All Saints' Church

 

TEIGNMOUTH METHODIST CHURCH

 

Overview

Heritage Category: Listed Building

Grade: II

List Entry Number: 1269063

Date first listed: 29-Jul-1983

Statutory Address: METHODIST CHURCH, SOMERSET PLACE,10 Somerset Pl, Teignmouth TQ14 4AF

County: Devon

District: Teignbridge (District Authority)

Parish: Teignmouth

National Grid Reference: SX 93984 72881 Listing NGR: SX9398472881

Details

  

Methodist church. Built 1845 as a Wesleyan chapel. Squared Plymouth rubblestone with rendered and freestone dressings, slate roof. PLAN: Rectangular with high aisles and 5-bay nave with a church hall to the rear right. EXTERIOR: plain lancet windows. 3 forward-facing gables; the outer, lower ones have quatrefoil windows to the apexes over large lancets with moulded hoods and engaged columns on the sill string course. The central bay has a similar, 3-light window over a pointed arch with hoodmould and impost string and plain intrados to C20 glazed double doors. The facade and returns are articulated by offset buttresses, those flanking the door have tall octagonal spirelets with steep plain octagonal pinnacles and the finial to the central gable is a pierced cross in a circle. INTERIOR: the shallow barrel-vaulted roof is supported by cast-iron octagonal columns with moulded caps. Curved braces to the sides form arcading to the aisles; probably original pews, mostly C20 fittings. Interesting non-conformist chapel in simple Gothic style. (The Buildings of England: Pevsner N & Cherry B: Devon: London: 1989-: 798).

 

The first Wesleyan Chapel in Teignmouth was in Chapel Street in 1819 using a chapel that had already been built. It was the coming of the South Devon Railway Company in 1843 that caused our Church to be relocated to its present site of Somerset Place in 1845.

 

The present Church was designed by the architecht R B Best and possibly built by Hitchins of Torquay at a cost of £1,500

 

In 1851 the Rev George Barnley reported to the Census Offficer that Somerset Place Wesleyan Church had an attendance of 125 in the mornings, 78 in the afternoons and 207 in the evenings with a Sunday School of 61. Teignmouth had a population of 5,500

 

On 15th September 1859 an Affidavit was signed stating that the building had been used for public worship prior to 30th June 1852 so that the Certificate for the Registration of Marriages could be issued. Although the building could be used and the Minister could conduct marriages, the state registrar had to be present.

In December 1903 the Quarterly Meeting heard about the late arrival of the Registrar at a wedding at the Dawlish Chapel, so they decided to take advantage of the Marriage Act, buy safes and apply for registration. This meant that the Ministers were now the registrars.

 

In 1906 General Booth of the Salvation Army visited Teignmouth and the Church was crowded. The trustees were doubtful about the strength of the galleries and stipulated that only 200 should be allowed upstairs, using only the front pews.

 

In 1912 space in the church was still at a premium, so seat holders were asked to tell the Steward if they were not coming to church so that visitors could use their seats. The gallery continued to be free for visitors.

The Great War had a profound effect on the availability of men. It was therefore their wives and sisters who took over the leadership of the Church. A National Insurance Scheme was arranged to cover War Damage and to this end the Circuit was required to send the collection from the last Sunday each October. The Lighting Regulations of September 1916 under the Defence of the Realm Act brought the evening services forward half an hour to 6pm. and required the use of blackout materials.

 

In 1922 the Church was converted from gas lighting to electricity at a cost of £108.10.

Three years later in 1925 it was decided to buy an electric blower for the Church Organ at a cost of £85. Mr Olaf Milton who retired after pumping the organ for the previous 5 years was given a Guinea (£1 05p)

 

In the 1930s there were over 200 members with 120 in the Sunday School.In 1932 there was a request for Communion Services to be held occasionally after morning service, and flowers were to be sent to the sick with a card. As previously there was a need for more space with seat holders being asked to arrive 10 minutes early so that spaces could be found for visitors.

 

During the Second World War, Teignmouth being a south coast port, suffered its share of bombing and 79 residents were killed. Large parts of the town were damaged. The deeds were placed in the bank, the trustees requested the use of the hall for refugees/evacuees, fire fighting equipment was purchased and members took turns to sleep in the Church to be on hand in case of fire.

After the war, Church attendance suffered for various reasons, youngsters to do National Service, there were greater opportunities to go to college and university, people had moved due to bomb damage. The advent of television saw a drop in the attendance of all the Church meetings. By 1961 there were only 23 left in the Sunday School and Evening Services were very poorly attended. The BBC’s production of the Forsyte Saga caused Leaders’ Meetings to discuss the timing of their evening services. This affected all the churches and in 1967 the galleries were removed from our church. The development of cheap package holidays to Spain led to the decline of the English seaside summer holiday visitors and a drop in Church visitors.

Church membership dropped more slowly, from over 200 in the 1930s down to 150 in the 1940s. In 1999 the membership had dropped down to 90 but since then has started to increase again and now stands at 113 in 2003

 

The Church was completely redesigned in 1967. The 1884 concept of a Methodist Church resembling a lecture hall or a courtroom where the Word was studied was now replaced by a worship area where the sacraments became more important. The table became the focal point,instead of the pulpit and the processional aisle became the vogue for weddings and funerals.

Smaller numbers meant the galleries were no longer needed so the side and front galleries were removed and the organ brought from the front right hand corner gallery to the floor below. The ceiling was covered with acoustic tiles and the large central window in the end wall was covered over. The preaching rostrum, dais and communion rail were all replaced. The internal wooden porch was removed and a new glass porch extended 4 feet further under the east gallery.

 

In January 2003 we closed the sancuary for twelve weeks whilst we refurbished the interior. During this period all services, including a funeral, were held in the Church Hall.

 

During the refurbishment we exposed previously hidden windows by removing the suspended ceiling. This also revealed the original beams and ventilation system. During the 1967 refurbishment the stained glass window over the communion table had been removed and bricked up. It was too expensive to reinstate, but we did make good the outline of the window and from the centre of it we hung a new cross which we backlit. The original stained glass from the window was found under the stairs and we incorporated some of it into the newly revealed windows above the balcony. New flooring was laid and a new electronic piano was kindly donated.

We held our first sevice in the refurbished sanctuary on Mothering Sunday 2003.

 

PREVIOUS MINISTERS

 

1884 – 1846 – Rev. Henry Castle

1846 – 1850 – Rev. John Williams

1851 – 1852 – Rev. John Nicklin

1852 – 1854 – Rev. Thomas Murray

1854 – 1855 – Rev. John Wood

1855 – 1856 – Rev. John Keightley

1856 – 1859 – Rev. Edward Jennings

1859 – 1860 – Rev. Nehmiah Curnock

1860 – 1861 – Rev. Ebeneezer Rushton Talbot

1861 – 1863 – Rev James E. W. Moulton

1864 – 1865 – Rev. Theophilus Pugh

1865 – 1867 – Rev. Charles Churchill

1867 – 1870 – Rev. William Pordige

1870 – 1873 – Rev. John Bramley

1873 – 1874 – Rev. John Ryan

1875 – 1878 – Rev. John Turner Waddy

1878 – 1879 – Rev. William T. Armstrong

1879 – 1880 – Rev. Samual Wesley

1880 – 1883 – Rev. William Martin

1883 – 1886 – Rev. Joseph Benson Blanch

1886 – 1888 – Rev. John H. Rogers

1888 – 1890 – Rev. Francis Teal

1890 – 1893 – Rev. James Henery Marquand

1893 – 1896 – Rev. John Mosscrop

1896 – 1898 – Rev. Joseph Witney

1898 – 1901 – Rev. John Williams

1901 – 1902 – Rev. John Wesley Bell

1903 – 1906 – Rev. Henry Lewis

1906 – 1909 – Rev. William Humphries

1909 – 1912 – Rev. George C. Mayes

1912 – 1913 – Rev. J. Arthur Aldington

1914 – 1920 – Rev. Thomas Dickinson

1920 – 1923 – Rev. Henry Arnaud Scott

1923 – 1925 – Rev. Albert James Short

1925 – 1927 – Rev. H. Walker Price

1927 – 1931 – Rev. Edwin A. Spear

1931 – 1935 – Rev. Herbert W. H. Butler

1935 – 1939 – Rev. Herbert Kidman

1940 – 1944 – Rev. Arthur J. Summerfield

1944 – 1948 – Rev. Francis Bertram James

1948 – 1952 – Rev. Alfred T Johns

1952 – 1953 – Rev. Walter Herbert Dunn

1953 – 1955 – Rev. William J. Turnball

1955 – 1960 – Rev. Alfred Cartwright

1960 – 1964 – Rev. Norman Tasker Colley

1964 – 1968 – Rev. Thomas Meakin

1968 – 1973 – Rev. R. Lloyd Jones

1973 – 1983 – Rev. Stanley E. Parsons

1983 – 1991 – Rev. Geoffrey S. Todd

1991 – 1998 – Rev. Martin P. James

1998 – 2003 – Rev. Malcolm Benton

2003 – 2008 – Rev. Diane Daymond

2008 – 2013 – Rev. Bill Robertson

2014 – – Rev. Catherine Wagstaff

War memorial on the roadside

For God, King and Country 1914-1918

Charles Davies; Philip Dunn; Thomas Green; Alfred Hemans; Alfred Lewis; Henry Shaw; George Weeks; W C Jones; Henry Edwards; Walter Hatchard; Ernest Panting; Percy Roberts; Harold Thomas; A C R Whitehouse;

1939-1945

Edward Benson; Arthur Edwards; John P Wakefield;

Their name liveth"

- Sellack Herefordshire

BNSF Transfer Job Y-BIR104 waits for a crew to take the train back to East Thomas Yard after interchanging with CSXT at Boyles Yard in Tarrant, AL the lead unit is a BNSF GP30U still in Santa Fe paint at that time, 2426 found a home working on the San Pedro Southwestern Railroad out of Benson, AZ along with former BNSF GP30U 2408

BNSF Transfer Job Y-BIR104 passes through 2nd Avenue in Birmingham, AL on their way to interchange with NS at North Yard then take back interchange from NS to East Thomas Yard, the lead GP30U 2426 is still in Santa Fe paint at that time, 2426 found a new home working on San Pedro Southwestern Railroad out of Benson, AZ along with former BNSF GP30U 2408

Welp, the trees that were so small the year I was born in 1983 have grown more than me and put a big dent in to the Benson low angle shot highlighting the crest of the grade. The Tunnel would've disappeared, hell it almost did from this angle. Best light on the portal is in the morning. I learned this as the shadows from the brush above the portal dropped and the train showed up damn near an hour later than I expected. Next time I'm up here I'll head up on to of the portal and do some trimming.

 

So I'm here leaning on a small pine tree and Petey is at track level 15 feet ahead of me. This *Engineer actually radioed the fire patrol truck that follows the train and told him that "He almost pissed his pants" because of how close we were. These tourist line guys just get ridiculous.

 

I spent the nearly 4 hours between the backlit tree framing shot and this laying on the ground trackside, head on a bump in the ground listening to Chris Thomas King and Harry McClintock. It was good to be a bum. Erie was having a blast too!

G-TCDR (Thomas Cook Airlines) Airbus A321-211.

Flight MT1517 to Glasgow.

London Stansted -1410 - 02/09/19.

 

Following the sad collapse of Thomas Cook earlier this week, this aircraft is now at Birmingham awaiting it's future, where it arrived at 0011 on 22/09/19.

As someone, who has been made redundant three times in the past, my thoughts are with all the hard-working staff & hope the directors, who have taken large bonuses recently, can live with their consciouses.

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