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There are some good parts of working till 4am on Saturday night .. OK Sunday morning

I'm able to pay more taxes to Ottawa

I can get to place ( that I didn't want to get at 3:30 am ) and shoot at 4:30am

I'm done shooting and it's only 6:30 am

 

Here are three bridges connecting New Westminster to Surrey. One on the front SkyTrain bridge that only carries rapid transit rail ( metro ) , second Pattullo (very narrow 4-lane bridge that took many lives) and in the back the oldest , railway bridge. As you can see all of the quite different design.

 

Please - View Large On Black

 

See where this picture was taken, New Westminster BC [?]

My Website - Aaron Yeoman Photography

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Aldwych Underground Station (Formally Strand Underground Station), London, England

UPDATE DECEMBER 2012 - #2 on Explore for 11.12.2012 - thank you very much everybody! :-)

 

View on Black

 

I managed to pick up some tickets for the tour of the abounded 'ghost' station Aldwych Underground Station. The tour was run by the London Transport Museum and got the tickets on their website. I believe that they only run it once a year so was well chuffed when I got the tickets. It was very well run and the tour guides were very knowledgeable, I just wish it was a longer tour as it only lasted 1 hour so it was not enough time to get as many photos that I wanted, however this is not a problem as I will try and visit again next year.

 

For this image I had to wait for all the people to move onto the next section of the tour so I did find myself always being last in areas of the tour trying to get the images I wanted (another thanks to the tour guides for being so patient) but it was worth it. It is a very photogenic station, its like stepping back in time.

 

The station closed its doors in 1994 due to dwindling passenger numbers and the cost to refurbish the original 1907 lifts. Theres like two different periods of time within the station itself. This is the Eastern tunnel/platform that only stayed open for 6 years after the station opened and this part of the station was used to store Elgin Marbles from the British Museum during the war. Other parts of the station were also used an air raid shelter.

 

Within this part of the station I believe its used for training staff and testing out new construction materials to improve the current network now. I tell you a little bit more about the station in the next upload I have. :-)

 

I hope you all had a great weekend.

 

Photo Details

Sony Alpha SLT-A77

Sigma 10-20mm 1:4-5.6 EX DC HSM

RAW

f/8

10mm

ISO400

1/4s exposure

 

Software Used

Lightroom 4.2

 

Information

Aldwych is a closed London Underground station in the City of Westminster, originally opened as Strand in 1907. It was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The disused station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

 

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

 

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a variety of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

Valentine's Day full moon! Not as sharp as I would of liked it, but light tripod, no cable release {forgot to bring it} and high wind equals a little shake! There is such a thing as a sun dog (ring around it) think this is moon dog?

I looked it up, This is the Wikipedia version.

 

A moon dog, moondog, or mock moon,[1] (scientific name paraselene,[1] plural paraselenae, i.e. "beside the moon") is a relatively rare bright circular spot on a lunar halo caused by the refraction of moonlight by hexagonal-plate-shaped ice crystals in cirrus or cirrostratus clouds. Moondogs appear 22° to the left and right of the moon.[2] They are exactly analogous to sun dogs, but are rarer because to be produced the moon must be bright and therefore full or nearly full. Moondogs show little color to the unaided eye because their light is not bright enough to activate the cone cells of humans' eyes.

 

I loved the backlit clouds.

 

Sky Train bridge linking rapid transit from New Westminster to Surrey B.C.

 

Explore Feb.19/2014. Thank you!

My Website - Aaron Yeoman Photography

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Aldwych Underground Station, London, England

 

Another image from my tour around Aldwych Underground Station. If your as fanatical as me about the London Underground and you have never been before I reccommend you do go. I do believe that the tour will run again sometime this year, I will keep you all posted when it does appear and put the link in my London Underground Flickr group. Link below

 

www.flickr.com/groups/2214683@N22/

 

This is the main walkway tunnel that leads from the lifts to the two platforms, one completely unused in terms of tube train traffic and the other still has live tracks and this is often used for staff training and filming. The station was used recently for filming in the series 'Mr Selfridge' that was shown on Sundays for the last few weeks, did any of you recognise it?

 

In other news I have been busy yesterday trying to get my website upto date, feel free to have a look and I always appreciate any feedback or constructive criticism on it you may have.

 

www.aaronyeomanphotography.co.uk

 

I hope you all have a great Friday and Weekend, it looks like here in the UK we are due more snow yet again!! Oh well :-)

 

Photo Details

Sony Alpha SLT-A77

Sigma 10-20mm 1:4-5.6 EX DC HSM

RAW

f/8

10mm

ISO800

1/15s exposure

 

Software Used

Lightroom 4.3

 

Information

Aldwych is a closed London Underground station in the City of Westminster, originally opened as Strand in 1907. It was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The disused station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

 

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

 

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

 

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a variety of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

My Website - Aaron Yeoman Photography & Image Prints for Sale

Also Follow Me at 500px * Getty Images * Twitter * Facebook * Google+

 

Aldwych Underground Station, London, England

 

Drumroll please...........this is my first Full Frame image with my new Sony A99! Such a great camera and I really enjoyed it. The fact it was not too different from my A77 allowed me to get working with it straight away. Also this image was taken with my new Samyang 14mm which is a great lens on initial impressions but I have to get use to it a little bit. Also the low light handling capabilities made it a joy to use the A99.

 

Anyway, back to Aldwych Underground Station. I went to this station December 2012 and went again couple of days ago as I really enjoyed the tour so much, if you have never been before I suggest going as they have a lot more days available this month, just book your tickets via the London Transport Museum. This tour was as popular as last year with about 20 people in my tour. We got to visit the same stuff as last year but the tour guide did surprise me and said he has some new stuff to show us, will show you these uploads in the next couple of days. The only thing I felt is that the paint work of parts of the station has deteriorated a little since I was there last year. Also what amazes me how this station was so over engineered when it was built as they expected it to busier than it actually turned out to be, sadly it was never to be. Anyway, I better get ready to go out, back out with the camera again today :-).

 

Photo Details

Sony Alpha SLT-A99 / ISO800 / f/5.6 / 1/5 / Samyang 14mm F2.8 @ 14mm

 

Software Used

Lightroom 5

 

Location Information

Aldwych is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

 

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

 

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

 

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

This is the view down the street from where I live. The bridge on the left, the Pattullo carries vehicle traffic and was built in 1936. The one on the right, Skybridge was built in 1987 and carries commuter trains. Below these crossings lies the river with the most productive salmon fishery in the world - the "Mighty Fraser", also known as the "Muddy Fraser".

 

I work near the towers that are closer to the center of the screen....so which bridge to take tomorrow? Decisions, decisions....

New Westminster, British Columbia

 

The SkyBridge is a transit only cable-stayed bridge and the only one of its kind in the world. It was built between 1987 and 1989 as part of the extension of the rapid transit line to Surrey from New Westminster. The Skybridge was officially opened on March 16th, 1990.

West Sussex Fire & Rescue Service Ford Transit Mobile Workshop seen at Horsham

My Website - Aaron Yeoman Photography & Image Prints for Sale

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Aldwych Underground Station, London, England

 

Another from the Ghost Station that is Aldwych Underground Station. To my surprise this year compared to last years tour, the tour guide said there was new bits of the station they could show us, never seen by the public before! As mentioned in previous Aldwych Station uploads of mine, Aldwych was heavily over engineered and was built a lot bigger than intended as it did have long term plans but sadly this never happened. When the station designers and architects that passenger numbers would not reflect the size of the station, they stopped building parts of the station and bricked it up. What your seeing here is an example of that, it was meant to be a passage way to one of the platforms but work just stopped and was left like this. I really like this type of architecture, very bare and genuine, some would say its sad in a way as it was never ever used by a passenger. Its great to see behind the tidy, clean shiny tiles you often see in tube stations and see the skeleton. This station is a testament to Victorian Engineering.

 

Photo Details

Sony Alpha SLT-A99 / ISO800 / f/5.6 / 1/5 / Samyang 14mm F2.8 @ 14mm

 

Software Used

Lightroom 5

 

Location Information

Aldwych is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

 

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

 

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

 

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

My Website - Aaron Yeoman Photography & Image Prints for Sale

Also Follow Me at 500px * Getty Images * Twitter * Facebook * Google+

 

Aldwych Underground Station, London, England

 

Another in my Aldwych Series, never had chance to do this last year sadly but managed to get it this time. This is an image of the Eastern Platform that was taken out of use as early as 1914! The demand at this station was not great enough to financially keep this platform in use. However it was used for numerous things since its closure. It was used to store valuable artefacts from the British Museum during the war and the other platform was used as a bunker for safety of people. The track you see here is the original c1900 and even includes the original insulator pots, apparently the only ones left in existence from that time. Also notice that there is no safety pit. The safety pit on London Underground stations didn't come into existence until much later after the closure of this platform.

 

Still really liking my A99, such an improvement over my A77, very happy I went FF. This image was taken at ISO 1600 but I would have seen the same or more noise at ISO 800 on my old A77.

 

Photo Details

Sony Alpha SLT-A99 / ISO1600 / f/5.6 / 1/8 / Samyang 14mm F2.8 @ 14mm

 

Software Used

Lightroom 5

 

Location Information

Aldwych is a closed station on the London Underground, located in the City of Westminster in central London. It was opened in 1907 with the name Strand and was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

 

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

 

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

 

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a number of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

Bridges over the Fraser River in Nerw Westminster BC.

The sky train cable stayed Skybridge, the through arch Patullo and the low level railway swing bridge.

A Translink Model I skytrain is crossing the Skybridge. This bridge has two support towers.

 

SKYBRIDGE:

The SkyBridge is a cable-stayed bridge in Metro Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Built between 1987 and 1989, it spans the Fraser River and connects New Westminster with Surrey.

The does not carry automotive vehicles and has two tracks enabling the TransLink SkyTrains to pass either way on the bridge on its journey between King George Station in Surrey and Waterfront Station in Downtown Vancouver. A third set of rails in the middle, not connected to the SkyTrain tracks, is used by maintenance crews to truck equipment back and forth on the bridge. The bridge has two 123-metre (404 ft) tall towers and carries trains 45 metres (148 ft) above the Fraser River and valley. The main span is 340 metres (1,120 ft) and the total length is 616 metres (2,021 ft), making it the longest cable-supported transit-only bridge in the world.

 

PATULLO:

The Pattullo Bridge is a through arch bridge located in the Metro Vancouver region of British Columbia, Canada. Constructed in 1936–37, it spans the Fraser River and links the city of New Westminster on the north bank of the river to the city of Surrey on the south bank. The bridge was named in honour of Thomas Dufferin Pattullo, former premier of British Columbia. The bridge's base is constructed of wood. A key link between Surrey and the rest of Greater Vancouver, according to TransLink, the Pattullo bridge handles an average of 67,000 cars and 3400 trucks daily, or roughly 20 percent of vehicle traffic across the Fraser River. These number are low now the Port Mann toll bridge opened up river. Motorists come here to avoid the toll.

***In 2017 the new NDP government removed the Port Mann tolls and traffic on the Pattullo dropped significantly.

 

SWING BRIDGE:

The New Westminster Bridge (also known as the Fraser River Swing Bridge) crosses the Fraser River and connects New Westminster with Surrey, British Columbia, in Canada.

The New Westminster Bridge was constructed in 1904 and was originally built with two decks.

 

The lower deck was used for rail traffic, and the upper deck was used for automobile traffic. With the opening of the Pattullo Bridge in 1937, the upper deck was removed and the bridge was converted exclusively for rail use.

 

The toll for the upper bridge was 25 cents and created quite an uproar for farmers who found out quickly that by taking their livestock across on foot would cost them a quarter a head but if they put them in a truck it cost a quarter for the whole load.

 

The bridge was the preferred method of transport across the Fraser until the Pattullo Bridge opened in 1937. Prior to that to cross that part of the river meant using the K De K ferry which would dock at the present day Brownsville location.

 

The bridge is owned and operated by the BNSF Railway, while the Canadian National Railway has trackage rights as do Via Rail's The Canadian (to Toronto) and Amtrak's Cascades passenger trains (to Seattle).

Mark I cars cross over the Fraser River to Surrey

 

SKYBRIDGE FACTS (BC Transit 1990):

 

- Two concrete towers support the main span and the two sidespans by 124 stay-cables that fan out from their anchorages in the tower tops of the bridge deck level

 

- SkyBridge is the world's longest cable-stayed bridge designed solely for carrying rapid transit

 

- The total length of the cable-supported structure is 616 metres

 

- The SkyBridge deck is 50 metres above the Fraser River

A METPOL Ford Transit Van and Two Astras at a call not far from Brockwell Park in Lambeth.

VX58EJL / 181 West Midlands Ambulance Service, Honda Cr-v Se Incident Support Officers Vehicle at University Hospital Of North Staffordshire, Stoke on Trent

A 53 & 05 reg ford focui response cars, a 58 reg Land Rover Defender, & a 55 reg ford transit cctv & cage van as well as personal cars.

  

GX05HDC, GX55GDF, GX53SVG, GX58LZW

VX58EJL / 181 West Midlands Ambulance Service, Honda Cr-v Se Incident Support Officers Vehicle at University Hospital Of North Staffordshire, Stoke on Trent

Emergency Control Vehicle Based at London Bradbury North Central Complex

  

A foggy day often gives the effect of black and white, even though you are shooting colour. This is the Skytrain bridge over the Fraser from New Westminster to Surrey, at about ten in the morning.

The Skybridge and Pattullo Bridge connect Surrey to New Westminster over the Fraser River. The Skybridge carries only the rapid transit line while all other vehicles use the Patullo Bridge further northeast.

 

New Westminster, British Columbia

A selection of photos taken at BTP London Waterloo

BX59BZY BTH Ford Transit Cage Van, BX09AEF BTS BMW 3 Series Area Car, BX08LKG, BV57LHF AGX, BX08LGO AWE, BU07NCC LDQ & Unmarked Metropolitan Police Vauxhall Astra Incident Response Vehicles in the Yard of Wimbledon Police Station

HY 41 AA Defence Fire & Rescue Service Foam Tender Based at the Army Aviation Centre Middle Wallop Near Andover, Hampshire

 

If any one had more info on this vehicle please feel free to add :D

 

Army Aviation Center:

www.army.mod.uk/training_education/training/21226.aspx

AJ58UKO Cambridgeshire Constabulary Volvo V70 S T6 Roads Policing Unit Vehicle

 

Parked outside The A&E Department at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge

 

Sorry for poor quality they were taken on my phone

Y999STS - HO2 Skoda Octavia Vrs HEMS Rapid Response Vehicle at the Royal London Hospital

East of England Ambulance Service Volvo V70 SE HART RRV & Honda CR-V HART RRV n

As a trainset of newer Bombardier-built stock makes its way across the Skybridge from Surrey, what appears to be a BNSF track geometry train (an unexpected surprise, especially since there were crews working on the bridge!) crosses the Fraser River on the swing bridge below. Between the two is the Pattullo bridge for road traffic.

 

September 4, 2013

Emergency Control Vehicle Based at London Bradbury North Central Complex

My Website - Aaron Yeoman Photography

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Aldwych Underground Station (Formally Strand Underground Station), London, England

 

Logged on this morning to find a nice surprise and that yesterdays photo had made Flickr Explore #2, thank you everyone for your time and comments :-).

 

Anyway this is another one from my Aldwych Underground station tour. Sadly I did not get as many images that I wanted here due to the short tour time however as soon as those tickets go on sale again next year I will get them and go back and get the images that I didn't get this time round.

 

This is the Western Platform and is in stark contrast to the Eastern platform (see yesterdays upload). When we went on this platform we were greeted with this and were lucky enough to have the tube train stabled here I was very happy with a tube train here as it adds a very nice perspective to the image here.

 

This part of the station is often used for staff training and filming for big blockbusters like Creep and 28 Weeks Later. This has the detailed and intricate tiles on the ceiling however bizarrely they only tiled it 3/4 of the platform. When I quizzed the tour guide on it he said it had always been like that because when the station was operational that part of the platform was never used. Some of the posters you see here are left overs from recent films so sadly are not part of the originality of the platform unlike its counterpart, the Eastern platform where you can see relics of old posters scattered around the platform.

 

Again I had to wait to get this image but so happy that I did as next time I go the tube train may not be there again. I could have spent all day down here in this Underground station ;-).

 

Photo Details

Sony Alpha SLT-A77

Sigma 10-20mm 1:4-5.6 EX DC HSM

RAW

f/13

10mm

ISO800

1/5s exposure

 

Software Used

Lightroom 4.2

 

Information

Aldwych is a closed London Underground station in the City of Westminster, originally opened as Strand in 1907. It was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The disused station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

 

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

 

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a variety of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

A New Flyer D60LF negotiates a corner near Guildford Mall in Surrey, BC. This bus is on the 96 B-Line, a new rapid transit route connecting Guildford Mall with Newton Exchange in Surrey which began in September 2013.

East of England Ambulance Service Vauxhall 4x4 Paramedic Response Unit

EJ59ZKU - HO4 & X999STS - HO6 Skoda Octavia Vrs HEMS Rapid Response Vehicle's at the Royal London Hospital

BX09AFJ BXZ Metropolitan Police BMW 325d Area Car at the Royal London Hospital Whitechapel

 

Seen after it escorted an ambo in on blues

Y999STS - HO2 Skoda Octavia Vrs HEMS Rapid Response Vehicle at the Royal London Hospital

South East Coast Immediate Medical Care Scheme, BMW X3 Xdrive 35d M Sport, BASICS Doctor Rapid Response Vehicle in the A&E Bay at the Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton.

 

Sorry for poor photo, taken on my phone.

Y999STS - HO2 Skoda Octavia Vrs HEMS Rapid Response Vehicle at the Royal London Hospital

EJ59ZKU - HO4 Skoda Octavia Vrs HEMS Rapid Response Vehicle at the Royal London Hospital

The Port Mann Bridge is a 10-lane cable-stayed bridge that opened to traffic in 2012. It is currently the second longest cable-stayed bridge in North America and was the widest bridge in the world until the opening of the new Bay Bridge in California.

 

The new bridge replaced a steel arch bridge that spanned the Fraser River, connecting Coquitlam to Surrey in British Columbia near Vancouver.

 

The new bridge is 2.02 kilometres (1.26 mi) long, 65 metres (213 ft) wide carrying 10 lanes, and has a 42 metres (138 ft) clearance above the river's high water level (the same length and clearance as the old bridge).

 

The towers are approximately 75 metres (246 ft) tall above deck level, with the total height approximately 163 metres (535 ft) from top of footing. The main span (between the towers) is 470 metres (1,540 ft) long, the second longest cable-stayed span in the western hemisphere.

 

The main bridge (between the end of the cables) has a length of 850 metres (2,790 ft) with two towers and 288 cables. In addition to the 10 traffic lanes, the new bridge was built to accommodate the future installation of a light rapid transit line underneath the main deck.

  

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Mann_Bridge

EJ59ZKU - HO4 & X999STS - HO6 Skoda Octavia Vrs HEMS Rapid Response Vehicle's at the Royal London Hospital

A selection of photos taken at BTP London Waterloo

EJ59ZKT - HO3 Skoda Octavia Vrs HEMS Rapid Response Vehicle at the Royal London Hospital

EU08AEL Essex Police Ford Transit 130 T300 Parked up at at Petrol Station there were no officers there so guessing its a anti bilking thing

British Transport Police Unmarked Vauxhall Vectra Special V6 Response Vehicle seen at BTP Waterloo

Y999STS - HO2 Skoda Octavia Vrs HEMS Rapid Response Vehicle at the Royal London Hospital

EJ59ZKU - HO4 Skoda Octavia Vrs HEMS Rapid Response Vehicle at the Royal London Hospital

East of England Ambulance Service Volvo XC60 Officers Car

EJ59ZKT - HO3 Skoda Octavia Vrs Skoda Octavia Vrs HEMS Rapid Response Vehicle at the Royal London Hospital

VX58EJL / 181 West Midlands Ambulance Service, Honda Cr-v Se Incident Support Officers Vehicle at University Hospital Of North Staffordshire, Stoke on Trent

My Website - Aaron Yeoman Photography

Also Follow Me at 500px * Getty Images * Twitter * Facebook * Google+

 

Aldwych Underground Station (Formally Strand Underground Station), London, England

 

Different composition today compared to my previous uploads. This was taken at the Aldwych Underground station tour run by the London Transport Museum. As you know (or guessed) I am absolutely fascinated with the Tube as it is but to get the opportunity and go on a tour of a disused station which awesome, the tour just was not long enough, I could have spent all day at this station.

 

You maybe wondering what you are looking at here, well this is one of the two lifts that were in operation at Aldwych Underground station which date back to 1907. When you stand in them they are massive, not sure how many people they fit it but they make modern lifts look small. Sadly the demise of this station was due to these ageing lifts. In the late 80s and 90s it was estimated that it would cost £3 million pounds to restore these lifts to modern standards and was deemed financially not viable as passenger numbers were very low so hence the station closed its doors for the final time in 1994. This is why I have called this image Achilles Heel.

 

Oh just on another note ironically when they first built this station they had envisaged the station to be far more busy than it actually was when it opened so they built 2 more lift shafts but these were not actually used but were there just incase. This is what amazes me with engineering projects around the time of Aldwych station and before is the sheer over engineering that went into them, sometimes it can be its success (which is often the case) but sometimes it can be its on downfall.

 

I tired to get the image as straight as possible when taking it but I think the lift must be slightly out as no matter how many times I correct the composition something was not straight so this was the best compromise.

 

Photo Details

Sony Alpha SLT-A77

Sigma 10-20mm 1:4-5.6 EX DC HSM

RAW

f/8

10mm

ISO400

1/4s exposure

 

Software Used

Lightroom 4.2

 

Information

Aldwych is a closed London Underground station in the City of Westminster, originally opened as Strand in 1907. It was the terminus and only station on the short Piccadilly line branch from Holborn that was a relic of the merger of two railway schemes. The disused station building is close to the junction of Strand and Surrey Street. During its lifetime, the branch was the subject of a number of unrealised extension proposals that would have seen the tunnels through the station extended southwards, usually to Waterloo.

 

Served by a shuttle train for most of their life and suffering from low passenger numbers, the station and branch were considered for closure several times. A weekday peak hours-only service survived until closure in 1994, when the cost of replacing the lifts was considered too high compared to the income generated.

Disused parts of the station and the running tunnels were used during both World Wars to shelter artworks from London's public galleries and museums from bombing.

 

The station has long been popular as a filming location and has appeared as itself and as other London Underground stations in a variety of films. In recognition of its historical significance, the station is a Grade II listed building.

 

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldwych_tube_station

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