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David's been helping with getting feature-based structure from motion systems like Bundler and PMVS to work doriad.myrpi.org/pictures.shtml

Part of a Structure from Motion 3D reconstruction project I've been playing with.

Favorite tweet:

 

カメラ幾何系問題が網羅的に説明されている.すごいボリューム.

SLAM, Visual Odometry, Structure from Motion, Multiple View Stereo t.co/1DBir1Dqr9

 

— aohsato (@aohsato) August 21, 2016

 

早川裕弌・小花和宏之・齋藤 仁・内山庄一郎

※本号掲載総説参照(321-343頁).

 

This is an example of 3D point cloud by Structure-from-Motion (SfM) Multi-View Stereo (MVS) photogrammetry. The 3D point cloud was produced from thousands of aerial photographs taken by small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), or unmanned aircraft or aerial system (UAS). The spectrum of colors indicates different information given to each point: red-green-blue (RGB) color, normalized differential vegetation index (NDVI) calculated using a near infrared camera data, topographic shade by eye-dome lighting (EDL), morphological roughness, and surface curvature. These data are readily obtained by SfM-MVS photogrammetry, and can be effectively used for various applications in geomorphology and related studies. For more details on SfM-MVS photogrammetry, see our review article in this issue (p. 321-343).

 

(Yuichi S. Hayakawa, Hiroyuki Obanawa, Hitoshi Saito, Shoichiro Uchiyama)

 

www.researchgate.net/publication/304674520_SfMduoshidians...

ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA e RESTAURO ARCHITETTURA: M. Galli, M. Griffo, C. Inglese, T. Ismaelli, “VECCHI SCAVI E NUOVE TECNOLOGIE: PRIMI RISULTATI DEL PROGETTO BASILICA IULIA.” Archeologia e Calcolatori 30 (2019): 229-249 [in PDF].

 

ABSTRACT. The paper presents the first results of the Basilica Julia Project, aimed at the analysis and reconstruction of the transformations affecting the southern side of the Forum Romanum. In the excavation campaigns conducted between 1960 and 1964 beneath the Augustan building, the remains of the basilica of Julius Caesar, the Basilica Sempronia (169 BC), a large house with an atrium dated to the 4th cent. BC, and traces of a 5th cent. BC building were brought to light. During the first phase of the work, the stratigraphic sequences were reconstructed according to the archive documentation and the study of the archaeological materials. In the second phase, a wide-ranging survey campaign was undertaken. The paper examines the methods of acquisition, connected to conservation demands, the lack of natural light and the complex physical configuration of the site. Surveying was undertaken by integrating topographical survey with massive data collection through 3D Laser Scanner and Structure from Motion. The paper also focuses on the process of integration of all these different data-sets into a single model, which produces a considerable quantity of information already translated into a unique system. Finally, thanks to the possibility to explore the 3D model in the restitution phase, the model made it possible to produce a 2D plan and sections in a process that ensured the correct reading of the data.

 

Fonte / source:

--- M. Galli, M. Griffo, C. Inglese, T. Ismaelli, Archeologia e Calcolatori 30 (2019): 229-249 [in PDF].

www.researchgate.net/publication/337022518_Vecchi_scavi_e...

 

Foto / fonte / source:

--- The Basilica Julia, fig. 14.2 / p. 241, in: Gilbert J. Gorski & James E. Packer, The Roman Forum: A Reconstruction and Architectural Guide, Cambridge University Press (2015), pp. 1-457 (= preview of the book by Cambridge University Press [2015]) / AMAZON.CO.UK [2017]). www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/35183245800/

 

S.v.,

--- ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA e RESTAURO ARCHITETTURA: Porte aperte alla Basilica Giulia, il tribunale più grande di Roma [Foto 1 di 30], IL MESSAGGERO & ANSA (30|01|2014); LA REPUBBLICA (26/09/2012) & ARCHEO nn. 48 (1989), pp. 68-73.

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/albums/721576...

Bill Christiansen (USGS), Lance Brady (BLM) and Jeff Safran (BLM) setting up ground operations.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Raven A modified with GoPro Hero 2 camera.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Raven A UAS ground control laptops.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Mark Bauer (USGS) flying Raven with hand controller.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Mark Bauer (Parallel, Inc. for USGS), Jeff Safran (BLM) flying Raven with hand controller.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Lance Brady (BLM) hand launching Raven A.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Jeff Safran (BLM) flying Raven A with hand controller.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Bill Christiansen (USGS), Mark Bauer (Parallel, Inc. for USGS) performing pre-flight checks with the Raven A.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Bill Christiansen (USGS) flying Raven A with hand controller. Mark Bauer (USGS) and Jeff Safran (BLM) monitoring Raven flight.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Bill Christiansen (USGS), Mark Bauer ( USGS) and Jeff Safran (BLM) monitoring Raven flight.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Mark Bauer (USGS) hand launching Raven A.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Bill Christiansen (USGS) controlling Raven A with hand controller while viewing video.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Mark Bauer (USGS) with the Raven A

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Lance Brady (BLM), Bill Christiansen (USGS) ground operations for the Raven A UAS.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Bill Christiansen (USGS), Mark Bauer (Parallel, Inc. for USGS) and Jeff Safran (BLM).

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Mark Bauer (USGS) flying Raven with hand controller with viewing download video. Jeff Safran (BLM) observing Raven in flight.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Mark Bauer (Parallel, Inc. for USGS) and Bill Christiansen (USGS) performing pre-flight checks of the Raven A.

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Lance Brady (BLM) and Mark Bauer (Parallel, Inc. for USGS).

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Lance Brady (BLM) and Mark Bauer (Parallel, Inc. for USGS). Performing pre-flight check

 

Abandoned mines can pose serious health and safety hazards, such as landslides, erosion, surface instability, and burning coal refuse, which is why the government is required to inspect Abandoned Mine Land (AML) sites and identify any needed remediation. This means that State and Federal AML departments must spend significant amounts of time and money driving to remote sites through rough terrain in order to perform these inspections. Therefore, in September 2012 a proof of concept mission was performed to determine if the Raven sensors could be used to record the area and identify any AML features, such as portals and other dangerous openings. The ability to use Raven data to perform thorough site inspections would significantly decrease the time and expense needed, as well as help inspectors determine the best course for any needed remediation.

 

This mission was performed by the USGS National UAS Project Office, in cooperation with the Office of Surface Mining, at the Coal Basin mining operation, Pitkin County, Colorado. The topographic basin where the mine facilities were located covers 236 acres and is on the divide that separates the North Fork of the Gunnison watershed from the Crystal River watershed, and drainage from the east side of Huntsman Ridge flows through several tributaries into Coal Creek. All mine portals and surface facilities in the basin are located in Pitkin County, primarily within the White River National Forest, with some interspersed private lands. The underground mine areas extended to the west under Huntsman Ridge into Gunnison County.

 

Mining of the Coal Basin deposits began in 1895 and continued until 1908, and then in 1956 the Mid-Continent Resources began producing coking coal at this location. The Coal Basin Mine consists of five adjacent underground mines, a rock tunnel entry, a preparation plant, two coal waste piles, one development waste pile, an extensive road system and numerous ancillary facilities. There were five drift mines, driven from the outcrop down-dip through the western flank of Coal Basin and under Huntsman Ridge, that were all interconnected. Coal, men and equipment were brought to the surface through one bore of the rock tunnel. The Coal Basin area also has diverse climate characteristics caused by its precipitous rise in elevation, the lowest point was the coal preparation plant at 8,000 feet, while the highest point is along Huntsman Ridge at 11,852 feet. As a result, temperature, precipitation, and wind conditions are quite variable throughout the disturbed area.

 

During this mission a GoPro Hero 2 camera mounted on the Raven was used for the first time. After successfully acquiring this new imagery, it was later evaluated for use in 3D photogrammetric modeling software. As a result it was determined that this type of image data provided a better way to use structure from motion techniques.

 

Overall, this mission successfully demonstrated the value of utilizing sUAS technology with mounted cameras to assist in the extremely vast and difficult job of monitoring and inspecting AML areas. Several technical advances were also shown as part of this mission including the ability to use a retrofitted camera on a Raven and the ability to fly at elevations above 10,000 feet, which is very important to support the many high elevation DOI lands in the western United States.

Very simple and light weight near ortho KAP rig and easy to fly low wind kite. For the rig, jJust tape a CHDK compliant camera to a Gent-X picavet. The Fled kite requires little tuning and will lift a camera in 3mph winds. This configuration of camera, rig, and kite works well for capturing images to process with structure from motion photogrammetry. The fled can fly near vertical, this can be quite useful when working in confined spaces. The image on the right shows the kite flying overhead.

 

Click here to see an example that illustrates the 3D model that was generated from this KAP session.

Online Feedback for Structure-from-Motion Image Acquisition, Christof Hoppe, Manfred Klopschitz, Markus Rumpler, Andreas Wendel, Stefan Kluckner (Siemens AG, Austria), Horst Bischof, Gerhard Reitmayr, Graz University of Technology

  

BMVC 2012 Banquet, Brooklands Museum, Weybridge, Surrey, 5th Sept 2012

Very simple and light weight near ortho KAP rig and easy to fly low wind kite. For the rig, jJust tape a CHDK compliant camera to a Gent-X picavet. The Fled kite requires little tuning and will lift a camera in 3mph winds. This configuration of camera, rig, and kite works well for capturing images to process with structure from motion photogrammetry. The fled can fly near vertical, this can be quite useful when working in confined spaces.

 

Click here to see an example that illustrates a 3D model generated with this kite, camera, rig combination.

 

In March 2014, Cultural Heritage Imaging (CHI) and guest professional trainer Tommy Noble of the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), conducted a photogrammetry training class at the CHI photo studio in San Francisco, CA, USA. The training was titled "Practical, Scientific Use of Photogrammetry and Structure from Motion Technologies in Cultural Heritage."

Dual camera configuration. I am shooting with dual cameras in hopes of increasing the efficiency of making large image collections for structure from motion photogrammetry. The wide angle of the GoPro should compliment the S90.

ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA e RESTAURO ARCHITETTURA: M. Galli, M. Griffo, C. Inglese, T. Ismaelli, “VECCHI SCAVI E NUOVE TECNOLOGIE: PRIMI RISULTATI DEL PROGETTO BASILICA IULIA.” Archeologia e Calcolatori 30 (2019): 229-249 [in PDF].

 

ABSTRACT. The paper presents the first results of the Basilica Julia Project, aimed at the analysis and reconstruction of the transformations affecting the southern side of the Forum Romanum. In the excavation campaigns conducted between 1960 and 1964 beneath the Augustan building, the remains of the basilica of Julius Caesar, the Basilica Sempronia (169 BC), a large house with an atrium dated to the 4th cent. BC, and traces of a 5th cent. BC building were brought to light. During the first phase of the work, the stratigraphic sequences were reconstructed according to the archive documentation and the study of the archaeological materials. In the second phase, a wide-ranging survey campaign was undertaken. The paper examines the methods of acquisition, connected to conservation demands, the lack of natural light and the complex physical configuration of the site. Surveying was undertaken by integrating topographical survey with massive data collection through 3D Laser Scanner and Structure from Motion. The paper also focuses on the process of integration of all these different data-sets into a single model, which produces a considerable quantity of information already translated into a unique system. Finally, thanks to the possibility to explore the 3D model in the restitution phase, the model made it possible to produce a 2D plan and sections in a process that ensured the correct reading of the data.

 

Fonte / source:

--- M. Galli, M. Griffo, C. Inglese, T. Ismaelli, Archeologia e Calcolatori 30 (2019): 229-249 [in PDF].

www.researchgate.net/publication/337022518_Vecchi_scavi_e...

 

Foto / fonte / source:

--- The Basilica Julia, fig. 14.2 / p. 241, in: Gilbert J. Gorski & James E. Packer, The Roman Forum: A Reconstruction and Architectural Guide, Cambridge University Press (2015), pp. 1-457 (= preview of the book by Cambridge University Press [2015]) / AMAZON.CO.UK [2017]). www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/35183245800/

 

S.v.,

--- ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA e RESTAURO ARCHITETTURA: Porte aperte alla Basilica Giulia, il tribunale più grande di Roma [Foto 1 di 30], IL MESSAGGERO & ANSA (30|01|2014); LA REPUBBLICA (26/09/2012) & ARCHEO nn. 48 (1989), pp. 68-73.

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/albums/721576...

ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA e RESTAURO ARCHITETTURA: M. Galli, M. Griffo, C. Inglese, T. Ismaelli, “VECCHI SCAVI E NUOVE TECNOLOGIE: PRIMI RISULTATI DEL PROGETTO BASILICA IULIA.” Archeologia e Calcolatori 30 (2019): 229-249 [in PDF].

 

ABSTRACT. The paper presents the first results of the Basilica Julia Project, aimed at the analysis and reconstruction of the transformations affecting the southern side of the Forum Romanum. In the excavation campaigns conducted between 1960 and 1964 beneath the Augustan building, the remains of the basilica of Julius Caesar, the Basilica Sempronia (169 BC), a large house with an atrium dated to the 4th cent. BC, and traces of a 5th cent. BC building were brought to light. During the first phase of the work, the stratigraphic sequences were reconstructed according to the archive documentation and the study of the archaeological materials. In the second phase, a wide-ranging survey campaign was undertaken. The paper examines the methods of acquisition, connected to conservation demands, the lack of natural light and the complex physical configuration of the site. Surveying was undertaken by integrating topographical survey with massive data collection through 3D Laser Scanner and Structure from Motion. The paper also focuses on the process of integration of all these different data-sets into a single model, which produces a considerable quantity of information already translated into a unique system. Finally, thanks to the possibility to explore the 3D model in the restitution phase, the model made it possible to produce a 2D plan and sections in a process that ensured the correct reading of the data.

 

Fonte / source:

--- M. Galli, M. Griffo, C. Inglese, T. Ismaelli, Archeologia e Calcolatori 30 (2019): 229-249 [in PDF].

www.researchgate.net/publication/337022518_Vecchi_scavi_e...

 

Foto / fonte / source:

--- The Basilica Julia, fig. 14.2 / p. 241, in: Gilbert J. Gorski & James E. Packer, The Roman Forum: A Reconstruction and Architectural Guide, Cambridge University Press (2015), pp. 1-457 (= preview of the book by Cambridge University Press [2015]) / AMAZON.CO.UK [2017]). www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/35183245800/

 

S.v.,

--- ROMA ARCHEOLOGIA e RESTAURO ARCHITETTURA: Porte aperte alla Basilica Giulia, il tribunale più grande di Roma [Foto 1 di 30], IL MESSAGGERO & ANSA (30|01|2014); LA REPUBBLICA (26/09/2012) & ARCHEO nn. 48 (1989), pp. 68-73.

www.flickr.com/photos/imperial_fora_of_rome/albums/721576...

"Incremental Surface Extraction from Sparse Structure-from-Motion Point Clouds" by Christof Hoppe, Manfred Klopschitz, Michael Donoser and Horst Bischof

 

Day 4, Session 09. Thursday 12th September

"Incremental Surface Extraction from Sparse Structure-from-Motion Point Clouds" by Christof Hoppe, Manfred Klopschitz, Michael Donoser and Horst Bischof

 

Day 4, Session 09. Thursday 12th September

This composite image was assembled from an collection of photographs generated for structure from motion processing (Bundler) for topography.

 

Kite: Becot FF 16

Rig: DuneCam Compact

Camera: G11

This composite image was assembled from an collection of photographs generated for structure from motion processing (Bundler) for topography.

 

Kite: Becot FF 16

Rig: DuneCam Compact

Camera: G11

University of South Florida's Digtal Heritage and Humanities Collections and drone survey work

 

SfM 3D model of the north side of the East Commons Building on the SDSU campus. Created using Zephyr 3D Aerial

Example of a very high resolution digital surface model derived from images collected by a UAV in collaboration with dron.uca.es/ and processed using structure from motion techniques.

Creator: Edward P. Morris (UCA)

 

Example of a very high resolution digital surface model derived from images collected by a UAV in collaboration with dron.uca.es/ and processed using structure from motion techniques. Elevation is meters relative to mean sea level.

Creator: Edward P. Morris (UCA)

Title: Multi-scale Erosion dynamics on shore platforms using conventional (micro-erosion meters) and emerging (Structure-from motion photogrammetry) techniques

What is my research on?

Assessing erosion dynamics from weathering patterns (e.g. salt crystallization, wetting, and drying cycles, rock swelling, thermal fatigue) and marine processes (waves and tides) using the micro-erosion meters and photographs subjected to the structure-from-motion algorithm (this is a photogrammetric method that allows real time recording and reconstruction of object(s) from multiple overlapping photographs for measurement and mapping).

Where?

On two tectonically active rock coasts in New Zealand (Figure 1) namely:

· Kaikōura Peninsula, South Island and

· Mahia Peninsula, North Island New Zealand

 

Why?

Because earth systems operate at a range of spatial and temporal scales in space and erosion of coastal landforms takes place in seconds, minutes, years, decades, or even longer. This creates uncertainties for landform stability to more than 50% of the human population living along the coastal margins of the world. Cliffs, shore platforms, marine terraces, coral reefs and notches on rock coasts are affected by gradual and sudden changes from environmental and anthropogenic processes. Though rocky shores are composed of compact materials that change slowly compared to sandy coasts with loose sediments they are still subject to degradation, sometimes catastrophic. No shoreline is resistant to the effects of climate change, even rocky shores.

 

Field work pictures on the Kaikōura Peninsula, December 2019.

On the various field work that I have participated in, I have captured over 1000 images (to cover seasonal and monthly variations) of weathering and erosion in both study sites. These pictures show the process of taking photographs and the Structure-from-motion equipment that are put into use.

Research Outcome

Integrate rock breakdown data from the Micro-erosion meters and SfM over time and space to quantify weathering and erosion forms and rates across multiple scales.

 

Title: Multi-scale Erosion dynamics on shore platforms using conventional (micro-erosion meters) and emerging (Structure-from motion photogrammetry) techniques

What is my research on?

Assessing erosion dynamics from weathering patterns (e.g. salt crystallization, wetting, and drying cycles, rock swelling, thermal fatigue) and marine processes (waves and tides) using the micro-erosion meters and photographs subjected to the structure-from-motion algorithm (this is a photogrammetric method that allows real time recording and reconstruction of object(s) from multiple overlapping photographs for measurement and mapping).

Where?

On two tectonically active rock coasts in New Zealand (Figure 1) namely:

· Kaikōura Peninsula, South Island and

· Mahia Peninsula, North Island New Zealand

 

Why?

Because earth systems operate at a range of spatial and temporal scales in space and erosion of coastal landforms takes place in seconds, minutes, years, decades, or even longer. This creates uncertainties for landform stability to more than 50% of the human population living along the coastal margins of the world. Cliffs, shore platforms, marine terraces, coral reefs and notches on rock coasts are affected by gradual and sudden changes from environmental and anthropogenic processes. Though rocky shores are composed of compact materials that change slowly compared to sandy coasts with loose sediments they are still subject to degradation, sometimes catastrophic. No shoreline is resistant to the effects of climate change, even rocky shores.

 

Field work pictures on the Kaikōura Peninsula, December 2019.

On the various field work that I have participated in, I have captured over 1000 images (to cover seasonal and monthly variations) of weathering and erosion in both study sites. These pictures show the process of taking photographs and the Structure-from-motion equipment that are put into use.

Research Outcome

Integrate rock breakdown data from the Micro-erosion meters and SfM over time and space to quantify weathering and erosion forms and rates across multiple scales.

 

Using PAP for mapping as site by means of structure from motion technology.

Title: Multi-scale Erosion dynamics on shore platforms using conventional (micro-erosion meters) and emerging (Structure-from motion photogrammetry) techniques

What is my research on?

Assessing erosion dynamics from weathering patterns (e.g. salt crystallization, wetting, and drying cycles, rock swelling, thermal fatigue) and marine processes (waves and tides) using the micro-erosion meters and photographs subjected to the structure-from-motion algorithm (this is a photogrammetric method that allows real time recording and reconstruction of object(s) from multiple overlapping photographs for measurement and mapping).

Where?

On two tectonically active rock coasts in New Zealand (Figure 1) namely:

· Kaikōura Peninsula, South Island and

· Mahia Peninsula, North Island New Zealand

 

Why?

Because earth systems operate at a range of spatial and temporal scales in space and erosion of coastal landforms takes place in seconds, minutes, years, decades, or even longer. This creates uncertainties for landform stability to more than 50% of the human population living along the coastal margins of the world. Cliffs, shore platforms, marine terraces, coral reefs and notches on rock coasts are affected by gradual and sudden changes from environmental and anthropogenic processes. Though rocky shores are composed of compact materials that change slowly compared to sandy coasts with loose sediments they are still subject to degradation, sometimes catastrophic. No shoreline is resistant to the effects of climate change, even rocky shores.

 

Field work pictures on the Kaikōura Peninsula, December 2019.

On the various field work that I have participated in, I have captured over 1000 images (to cover seasonal and monthly variations) of weathering and erosion in both study sites. These pictures show the process of taking photographs and the Structure-from-motion equipment that are put into use.

Research Outcome

Integrate rock breakdown data from the Micro-erosion meters and SfM over time and space to quantify weathering and erosion forms and rates across multiple scales.

 

Title: Multi-scale Erosion dynamics on shore platforms using conventional (micro-erosion meters) and emerging (Structure-from motion photogrammetry) techniques

What is my research on?

Assessing erosion dynamics from weathering patterns (e.g. salt crystallization, wetting, and drying cycles, rock swelling, thermal fatigue) and marine processes (waves and tides) using the micro-erosion meters and photographs subjected to the structure-from-motion algorithm (this is a photogrammetric method that allows real time recording and reconstruction of object(s) from multiple overlapping photographs for measurement and mapping).

Where?

On two tectonically active rock coasts in New Zealand (Figure 1) namely:

· Kaikōura Peninsula, South Island and

· Mahia Peninsula, North Island New Zealand

 

Why?

Because earth systems operate at a range of spatial and temporal scales in space and erosion of coastal landforms takes place in seconds, minutes, years, decades, or even longer. This creates uncertainties for landform stability to more than 50% of the human population living along the coastal margins of the world. Cliffs, shore platforms, marine terraces, coral reefs and notches on rock coasts are affected by gradual and sudden changes from environmental and anthropogenic processes. Though rocky shores are composed of compact materials that change slowly compared to sandy coasts with loose sediments they are still subject to degradation, sometimes catastrophic. No shoreline is resistant to the effects of climate change, even rocky shores.

 

Field work pictures on the Kaikōura Peninsula, December 2019.

On the various field work that I have participated in, I have captured over 1000 images (to cover seasonal and monthly variations) of weathering and erosion in both study sites. These pictures show the process of taking photographs and the Structure-from-motion equipment that are put into use.

Research Outcome

Integrate rock breakdown data from the Micro-erosion meters and SfM over time and space to quantify weathering and erosion forms and rates across multiple scales.

 

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