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“Leaked Draft of Executive Order to “Censor the Internet” Sets Off Alarm Bells”

 

truthout.org/articles/leaked-draft-of-executive-order-to-...

 

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Quote: “Last week, the federal court system’s highest arbiter of misconduct complaints, a seven-judge panel—all Republican appointees answerable to Chief Justice John Roberts—washed its hands of the Kavanaugh affair by rejecting nine final appeals.* One of them was mine. The judges ruled that because Supreme Court justices aren’t subject to any code of ethics, the entire body of judicial misconduct law, rules, and precedent for lower-court judges “unequivocally preclude review of the merits” of the issue.”

 

This conclusion is preposterous. In which case, what exactly will they be tied to using when they deciding cases? It is completely antithetical to a fair Democracy. The American Judiciary is an abject joke. Are we are no longer even guaranteed a review of the facts? The judiciary’s only utility is to those who continue to plunge us into a nation of inequality, cancerous capitalism, and fascism. It is institutionalized white nationalism incarnate. If I’m wrong let me know.

 

It is not reasonable to conclude that this would improve the delivery of the service provided by the effected government employees.

 

It is imperative that the People NOT trust either the Democratic or Republican parties to protect their best interests.

 

“Letting Brett Kavanaugh Off the Hook Sets a Dangerous Precedent”

“Ethics rules don’t apply to Supreme Court nominees as long as they get confirmed, a panel of judges concluded.”

slate.com/news-and-politics/2019/08/supreme-court-brett-k...

 

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“Donald Trump Has Used A Secretive Justice System To Keep Lawsuits Against Him Out Of Court”

“Trump, his campaign, and his companies have used arbitration to try to move potentially damaging and embarrassing claims out of the public court process.”

www.buzzfeednews.com/article/zoetillman/donald-trump-laws...

 

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“A Deadly, Drug-Resistant Fungus Could Be The First Infection Spread by Climate Change”

www.sciencealert.com/deadly-fungus-could-be-linked-to-cli...

 

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“Insect 'apocalypse' in U.S. driven by 50x increase in toxic pesticides”

www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/08/insect-apo...

 

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“World food security increasingly at risk due to 'unprecedented' climate change impact, new UN report warns” prices of food are going to continue to grow and reach near astronomical levels

news.un.org/en/story/2019/08/1043921?fbclid=IwAR0lDhmb-Zi...

 

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“A Vegas Man Was Arrested For Plotting A White Supremacist Attack On An LGBTQ Bar And Synagogue”

“Conor Climo told FBI agents he hated blacks, Jewish people, and members of the LGBTQ community, and was planning attacks that involved explosives or snipers.”

(no news on whether or not he was raised on the Christian video games “Left behind” or “Kill the Faggots”)

www.buzzfeednews.com/article/salvadorhernandez/vegas-man-...

 

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“When fighting domestic terrorism, you get what you pay for” and Trump and Bannon know it

www.brookings.edu/blog/order-from-chaos/2018/11/02/when-f...

 

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“Armed and Misogynist: How Toxic Masculinity Fuels Mass Shootings”

“A Mother Jones investigation into nearly two dozen attacks reveals a grim pattern—and key warning signs.”

www.motherjones.com/crime-justice/2019/06/domestic-violen...

 

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“The NRA Is a Symptom of the Racism That Drives Violence in the US”

A personal friend of Wayne LaPierre, Betsy De Vos has been a key financial backer of the NRA. De Vos also funded a Foundation to pass Citizens United. The Foundation used was tax exempt as it declared it had no “political purpose”

truthout.org/articles/the-nra-is-a-symptom-of-the-racism-...

 

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“Watch Donald Trump Boast About His Crowd Size At El Paso Hospital”

www.huffpost.com/entry/trump-boast-crowd-size-el-paso-hos...

 

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“7 ways oil and gas drilling is bad for the environment”

truthout.org/articles/leaked-draft-of-executive-order-to-...

 

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“Backdoor Appointment At Interior Adds To Fears Of A Public Land Sell-off”

“The new acting director of the Bureau of Land Management appears to be another “fox guarding the henhouse” appointment in the Trump administration.”

www.huffpost.com/entry/william-perry-pendley-federal-land...

 

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Amazon Take 2: America:

“Public land sell-off radical named BLM’s acting director—5 reasons to be very worried”

www.wilderness.org/articles/blog/public-land-sell-radical...

 

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“The Great American Lawn: How the Dream Was Manufactured”

www.nytimes.com/2019/08/09/video/lawn-grass-environment-h...

 

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Right to work as a precursor to widespread poverty

www.facebook.com/OccupyDemocrats/photos/a.517901514969574...

 

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“3 NATIVE AMERICAN TRIBES LEADING THE WAY ON CLEAN ENERGY”

(No wonder Trump’s judiciary just striped Native Americans of the Right to vote in North Dakota)

www.climaterealityproject.org/blog/3-native-american-trib...

 

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“Hyundai releases car with solar panel roof”

www.bbc.com/news/technology-49249884?fbclid=IwAR1A-6uEGsK...

 

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“Climate change is making it more dangerous to eat certain fish”

grist.org/article/climate-change-ocean-fish-tuna-mercury-...

 

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“An Inside Look At How Monsanto, A PR Firm And A Reporter Give Readers A Warped View Of Science”

www.huffpost.com/entry/monsanto-public-relations-reporter...

 

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“I’m a journalist. Monsanto built a step-by-step strategy to destroy my reputation”

www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/aug/08/monsanto-ro...

 

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“We may have a future without Joshua trees thanks to climate change, study says”

www.cnn.com/2019/08/02/us/joshua-trees-and-climate-change...

 

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“Two percent of the world’s North Atlantic right whales have died in the last two months”

www.washingtonpost.com/world/the_americas/two-percent-of-...

 

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Trump et. al. are still making trouble internationally.

“Trump’s Embargo Torpedoes Venezuelan Negotiations”

www.theamericanconservative.com/larison/trumps-embargo-to...

 

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“Food Shipment Destined for Venezuela Seized Due to US Blockade”

popularresistance.org/food-shipment-destined-for-venezuel...

 

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“Joe Biden's Latest Gaffes Raise New Questions About His Mental Fitness”

www.truthdig.com/articles/joe-biden-roundly-condemned-for...

 

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“Nancy Pelosi Can't Mask Her Contempt for Progressives”

www.truthdig.com/articles/nancy-pelosi-cant-mask-her-cont...

 

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“How the US Created Violent Chaos in Honduras”

“The US-backed coup in Honduras ten years ago spawned a maelstrom of violence that terrorized ordinary Hondurans and forced caravans of migrants to flee the country. It was just another instance of US imperialism wreaking havoc on the world.”

www.jacobinmag.com/2019/08/us-honduras-coup-manuel-zelaya...

 

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Trump is a textbook example of The Dunning-Kruger Effect.

www.facebook.com/tom.elliott.7121

 

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“Banks just handed over documents that may be related to Trump’s financial ties to Russia”

“The companies complying with subpoenas for the documents include Deutsche Bank, which has financed the Trump Organization.”

thinkprogress.org/major-banks-just-gave-investigators-doc...

 

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“Socialism is the epithet they have hurled at every advance the people have made in the last 20 years.”

“Socialism is their name for almost anything that helps all the people.” President Harry S. Truman

www.facebook.com/berniesanders/photos/a.324119347643076/2...

 

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The People and their governments will need to undertake any and all measures immediately if we are to survive the collapse of our planet’s ability to support life. Full court press on all fronts, not holding anything back.

 

“'Choosing a Plant-Based Diet' Can Help Save Earth — But There's Not Much Time Left, Experts Warn”

"In order to avoid a climate catastrophe," humans "must take immediate action," the NRDC said after the UN released an alarming report”

people.com/human-interest/climate-change-threatens-food-s...

 

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“This is how traffic stops work when you’re white and powerful”

www.facebook.com/NowThisPolitics/videos/464146704424087/U...

 

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“Nearly a third of our carbon emissions are caused by deforestation”

www.facebook.com/bbcearth/videos/356477361716078/UzpfSTE4...

 

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“Trump’s Words Are Poison”

The president has done more than any politician in living memory to fan the flames of ethnic and racial antipathy and nurture a culture of bigotry.”

 

www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/08/what-trump-has-...

 

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“HOMELAND SECURITY REPORT: WHITE SUPREMACISTS BEHIND MOST DOMESTIC TERRORISM INCIDENTS”

popularresistance.org/homeland-security-report-white-supr...

 

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Climate change is adversely impacting the nutritional value of popular agricultural food items.

“Top Scientist Quits USDA, Says Trump Admin Tried to Bury Study Linking Climate and Nutrition”

www.ecowatch.com/scientist-quits-trump-administration-263...

 

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“Former mobster says Bill Bahr made a secret visit to jail before Epstein’s death: ‘Something’s not right there”

www.alternet.org/2019/08/former-mobster-says-bill-barr-ma...

 

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NEW LAW the "McConnell\Pelosi\Trump\Clinton Rule" - the value of all wealth accumulated and consumed by a politician during their term of service that is above and beyond that which could be reasonably achieved from only their govt stipen shall be forfeited.

And now about those foundations....

 

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In addition to raiding a retirement plan for members of our military per Supreme Court approval we now see this:

 

“Senate GOP plans to raid health and education funds to pay for Trump’s wall”

“Instead of Mexico paying for Trump’s wall, Senate Republicans plan to use health and education funding.”

thinkprogress.org/instead-of-mexico-paying-for-trumps-wal...

 

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“Trump administration bows to fossil fuel industry and abandons collaborative plan to save the sage grouse”

www.nrdc.org/trump-watch/trump-administration-bows-fossil...

 

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“Should the government kill wild animals?”

 

Quote: “…United States Department of Agriculture, its trappers and field operatives killed more than 1.5 million native animals last year. The list of the dead includes roughly 515,000 red-winged black birds, 68,000 coyotes, 22,500 beavers, 19,900 mourning doves, 17,000 black-tailed prairie dogs, 10,000 double-crested cormorants, 2,000 mallard ducks, 1,784 gray foxes, 1,300 red-tailed hawks, 1,000 bobcats, hundreds of owls, 357 wolves, 350 black bears, one grizzly bear, and many, many more.”

theweek.com/articles/852116/should-government-kill-wild-a...

 

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“Opinion: The ‘Drill, Baby, Drill’ Crowd Wants Access to this Arctic Reserve”

Quote: “many junkies, before hitting bottom, stoop low enough to steal their mothers’ jewels”

www.nytimes.com/2019/07/18/opinion/arctic-national-wildli...

 

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“Why is this Texas secession group’s flag hanging in Moscow?”

“With years of links in Russia, the Texas Nationalist Movement pushes on.”

thinkprogress.org/texas-nationalist-movement-secession-fl...

 

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“Anthony Scaramucci Warns That Trump Will Turn On Nation As Men Go At It On Twitter”

www.huffpost.com/entry/anthony-scaramucci-trump-will-turn...

 

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“Fox Host MacCallum: Family Separations Are ‘Helping That Child’ ‘In Some Cases’”

crooksandliars.com/2019/08/fox-host-maccallum-family-sepa...

 

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“Norway Becomes First Country to Ban Palm Oil Biofuel Linked to “Catastrophic Deforestation””

returntonow.net/2018/12/13/norway-becomes-first-country-t...

 

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“Trump threatens to retaliate against countries like Japan, Canada, Uruguay that issued travel warnings”

www.alternet.org/2019/08/former-mobster-says-bill-barr-ma...

 

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“If you’re a good worker, papers don’t matter’: How a Trump construction crew has relied on immigrants without legal status”

www.washingtonpost.com/politics/if-youre-a-good-worker-pa...

 

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Discussions are reportedly underway to potentially move the United Nations to China.

 

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“India plants 220 million trees in a single day”

No word on how they plan on keeping them all alive as our atmosphere is no longer maximally conducive to growing trees natural to historical heights, girth, and other proportions – if they live at all.

www.cbsnews.com/news/climate-change-india-plants-220-mill...

 

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“How a Small Group of Pro-Israel Activists Blacklisted MintPress on Wikipedia”

“For over ten years, Wikipedia has been a key focus of right-leaning, pro-Israel groups that have effectively weaponized the online encyclopedia as a means of controlling the narrative when it comes to the state of Israel’s more than 50-year-long military occupation of Palestine.”

www.mintpressnews.com/pro-israel-activists-blacklist-mint...

  

The talking heads have been prating on about how this illiterate douche-trawler can’t even read a TelePrompTer. Everyone simply assumes he misread the script and committed a faux pas.

 

Not me. I think he meant exactly what he said. At a rate of about once every 4 days since his inauguration, he or members of his administration have taken steps to abolish our civil rights. One might argue that the Boy President is not a ‘people of faith’ but one could never argue that he has not been hard at work abolishing civil rights in America. Here is a short list (trust me on this!) of steps they have taken since January 2017:

 

January 27, 2017 Trump signed an executive order — the first version of his Muslim travel ban — that discriminated against Muslims and banned refugees.

 

January 31, 2017 Under new Chairman Ajit Pai's leadership, the Federal Communications Commission refused to defend critical components of its prison phone rate rules in federal court — rules that were ultimately struck down in June.

 

February 3, 2017 Trump signed an executive order outlining principles for regulating the U.S. financial system and calling for a 120-day review of existing laws, like the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. The order was viewed as Trump's opening attack on consumer protection laws.

 

February 3, 2017 The FCC rescinded its 2014 Joint Sales Agreement (JSA) guidance, which had led to the only increase in television diversity in recent years.

 

February 3, 2017 FCC Chairman Pai revoked the Lifeline Broadband Provider (LBP) designations for nine broadband service providers, reducing the number of providers offering broadband and thus decreasing the competitive forces available to drive down prices.

 

February 9, 2017 Trump signed three executive orders "to fight crime, gangs, and drugs; restore law and order; and support the dedicated men and women of law enforcement." The orders, though vague, were viewed suspiciously by civil rights organizations.

 

February 21, 2017 The Department of Homeland Security issued a memo updating immigration enforcement guidance, massively expanding the number of people subject to detention and deportation. The guidance drastically increased the use of expedited removal and essentially eliminated the priorities for deportation.

 

February 22, 2017 The Justice Department's Civil Rights Division and the Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights jointly rescinded Title IX guidance clarifying protections under the law for transgender students.

 

February 23, 2017 Attorney General Sessions withdrew an earlier Justice Department memo that set a goal of reducing and ultimately ending the department's use of private prisons.

 

February 27, 2017 The Department of Justice dropped the federal government's longstanding position that a Texas voter ID law under legal challenge was intentionally racially discriminatory, despite having successfully advanced that argument in multiple federal courts. The district court subsequently rejected the position of the Sessions Justice Department and concluded the law was passed with discriminatory intent.

 

March 6, 2017 Trump signed a revised executive order restricting travel to the United States by citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen and drastically cutting back refugee admissions.

 

March 6, 2017 A week after Trump called on lawmakers to repeal the Affordable Care Act during his address to Congress, House Republicans released a proposal to replace the ACA with a law that would restructure Medicaid and defund Planned Parenthood.

 

March 16, 2017 The Trump administration released a budget blueprint that proposed a $54 billion increase in military spending that would come from $54 billion in direct cuts to non-defense programs. The blueprint also proposed spending $4.1 billion through 2018 on the beginnings of construction of a wall through communities on the U.S.-Mexico border.

 

March 27, 2017 Trump signed a resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act, which repealed a U.S. Department of Education accountability rule finalized last year that would clarify states' obligations under the Every Student Succeeds Act.

 

March 27, 2017 Trump signed a resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act, which repealed the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order. The order, signed by President Obama, represented a much-needed step forward in ensuring that the federal contractor community is providing safe and fair workplaces for employees by encouraging compliance with federal labor and civil rights laws, and prohibiting the use of mandatory arbitration of certain disputes.

 

March 31, 2017 Sessions ordered a sweeping review of consent decrees with law enforcement agencies relating to police conduct — a crucial tool in the Justice Department's efforts to ensure constitutional and accountable policing. The department also tried, unsuccessfully, to block a federal court in Baltimore from approving a consent decree between the city and the Baltimore Police Department to rein in discriminatory police practices that the department itself had negotiated over a multi-year period.

 

April 13, 2017 Trump signed a resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act, which overturned the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' final rule updating the regulations governing the Title X family planning program — a vital source of family planning and related preventive care for low-income, uninsured, and young people across the country.

 

April 26, 2017 Trump released an outline of a tax reform plan that was viewed largely as a tax giveaway for the wealthy and big corporations.

 

April 26, 2017 Trump signed an executive order directing Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to conduct a study on the federal government's role in education.

 

May 4, 2017 Trump signed an executive order that he claimed overturned the Johnson Amendment (though it did not), which precludes tax-exempt organizations, including places of worship, from engaging in any political campaign activity and would curtail the contraception mandate of the Affordable Care Act.

 

May 11, 2017 Trump signed an executive order creating the so-called Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity headed by Vice President Mike Pence and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who has a history of trying to suppress the vote in Kansas.

 

May 12, 2017 Sessions announced in a two-page memo that DOJ was abandoning its Smart on Crime initiative that had been hailed as a positive step forward in rehabilitating drug users and reducing the enormous costs of warehousing inmates.

May 23, 2017 Trump released his fiscal year 2018 budget that included massive, unnecessary tax cuts for the wealthy and large corporations, which would be paid for by slashing basic living standards for the most vulnerable and by attacking critical programs like Social Security Disability Insurance, Medicaid, food assistance, and more.

 

May 23, 2017 Trump's fiscal year 2018 budget proposed eliminating the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) and transferring its functions to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). This would have impeded the work of both the OFCCP and the EEOC as each have distinct missions and expertise, and would have thereby undermined the civil rights protections that employers and workers have relied on for almost 50 years.

 

June 5, 2017 Trump released an infrastructure plan that focuses on putting public assets into private hands, creating another giveaway to wealthy corporations and millionaires at the expense of working families and communities.

 

June 6, 2017 Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos testified before a Senate appropriations subcommittee and made unclear statements about whether she would allow federal funds to go to schools that discriminate against LGBTQ students. She made similarly troubling statements when testifying before a House committee in late March.

 

June 6, 2017 The Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR) issued unclear new instructions on transgender student discrimination.

 

June 8, 2017 OCR's acting head sent a memo to OCR staff discouraging systemic investigations in favor of individual investigations of discrimination.

 

June 14, 2017 DeVos decided to delay implementation of and to renegotiate the Borrower Defense to Repayment and Gainful Employment regulations.

 

June 15, 2017 The administration rescinded President Obama's Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program, an initiative that — had it gone into effect — would have offered a pathway to citizenship for immigrant parents with children who are citizens or residents of the United States.

 

June 27, 2017 Labor Secretary Acosta requested information on the Obama-era overtime rule, signaling his intent to lower the salary threshold of the overtime rule.

 

June 28, 2017 The Justice Department's Civil Rights Division sent a letter to 44 states demanding extensive information on how they maintain their voter rolls. This request was made on the same day that President Trump's so-called Commission on Election Integrity sent letters to all 50 states demanding intrusive and highly sensitive personal data about all registered voters.

 

July 26, 2017 Trump declared in a series of tweets that he was barring transgender people from serving in the military. He followed through with a presidential memo on August 25, though the issue is still being challenged in the courts.

 

July 26, 2017 The Department of Justice filed a legal brief arguing that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 does not prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation — a decision that contravened recent court decisions and Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidance.

 

August 1, 2017 The New York Times reported that the "Trump administration is preparing to redirect resources of the Justice Department's civil rights division toward investigating and suing universities over affirmative action admissions policies deemed to discriminate against white applicants." In a move without recent precedent, this investigation and enforcement effort was planned to be run out of the Civil Rights Division's front office by political appointees, instead of by experienced career staff in the division's educational opportunities section.

 

August 2, 2017 Trump announced his support of Republican-backed legislation that would slash legal immigration in half over a decade.

 

August 7, 2017 The Justice Department filed a brief in the Supreme Court in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute arguing that it should be easier for states to purge registered voters from their rolls — reversing not only its longstanding legal interpretation, but also the position it had taken in the lower courts in that case.

 

August 28, 2017 Sessions lifted the Obama administration's ban on the transfer of some military surplus items to domestic law enforcement — rescinding guidelines that were created in the wake of Ferguson to protect the public from law enforcement misuse of military-grade weapons.

 

August 29, 2017 The administration halted an EEOC rule that required large companies to disclose what they pay employees by sex, race, and ethnicity — a rule that was intended to remedy the unequal pay that remains rampant in the American workplace.

 

September 5, 2017 Sessions announced that the administration was rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

 

September 7, 2017 The Department of Justice filed a brief with the Supreme Court in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission arguing that businesses have a right to discriminate against LGBTQ customers.

 

September 15, 2017 The Department of Justice ended the Community Oriented Policing Services' Collaborative Reform Initiative, a Justice Department program that aimed to help build trust between police officers and the communities they serve.

 

September 22, 2017 DeVos announced that the Department of Education was rescinding guidance related to Title IX and schools' obligations regarding sexual violence and educational opportunity.

 

September 24, 2017 Trump issued the third version of his Muslim travel ban which, unlike the previous versions, was of indefinite duration.

 

September 27, 2017 The Trump administration and Republican leadership in Congress unveiled tax principles that would provide trillions in dollars of unnecessary tax cuts to millionaires, billionaires, and wealthy corporations.

 

October 2, 2017 DeVos rescinded 72 guidance documents outlining the rights of students with disabilities, though it wasn't until October 21 until the public learned of the rescissions.

 

October 4, 2017 The Department of Justice filed a brief in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia asking the court to dismiss a lawsuit against the president's transgender military ban.

 

October 5, 2017 Sessions reversed a Justice Department policy which clarified that transgender workers are protected from discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

 

October 6, 2017 The Department of Justice issued sweeping religious liberty guidance to federal agencies, which will create a license to discriminate against LGBTQ individuals and others.

 

October 8, 2017 The White House released a list of hard-line immigration principles — a list of demands that included funding a border wall, deporting Central American children seeking sanctuary, and curbing grants to sanctuary cities, effectively stalling any possible bipartisan agreement on a bill to protect Dreamers.

 

October 12, 2017 Trump signed an executive order to undermine health care and, later that day, announced that he would end subsidies for certain health care plans.

 

October 27, 2017 The Department of Education announced it was withdrawing nearly 600 policy documents regarding K-12 and higher education.

 

November 1, 2017 Trump signed a resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act, which repealed the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's rule on forced arbitration. Overturning the rule will enable big banks, payday lenders, and other financial companies to force victims of fraud, discrimination, or other unlawful conduct into a "kangaroo court" process where their claims are decided by hired arbitration firms rather than by judges and juries — harming consumers and undermining civil rights and consumer protection laws.

 

November 6, 2017 The Trump administration announced it will terminate the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for Nicaragua.

 

November 16, 2017 The Federal Communications Commission voted to gut Lifeline, the program dedicated to bringing phone and internet service within reach for people of color, low-income people, seniors, veterans, and people with disabilities, with particularly egregious consequences for tribal areas. They also voted to eliminate several rules promoting competition and diversity in the broadcast media, undermining ownership chances for women and people of color.

 

November 20, 2017 The Trump administration announced it would terminate the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation in 18 months for approximately 59,000 Haitians living in the United States.

 

November 24, 2017 Trump appointed Mick Mulvaney as acting director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). As a member of Congress, Mulvaney supported abolishing the consumer bureau and has in the past referred to the CFPB as a "sick, sad" joke.

 

December 4, 2017 The Department of Labor proposed changing its longstanding position codified in regulation that prohibited employers from pooling together tips and redistributing them to workers who don't traditionally earn tips.

 

December 12, 2017 The Department of Justice wrote to acting Census Bureau Director Ron Jarmin requesting a question about citizenship on the 2020 Census. It was an untimely and unnecessarily intrusive request that would destroy any chance for an accurate count, discard years of careful research, and increase costs significantly.

 

December 21, 2017 It was reported that Sessions rescinded 25 guidance documents, including a letter sent to chief judges and court administrators to help state and local efforts to reform harmful practices of imposing fees and fines on poor people.

 

January 4, 2018 Sessions rescinded guidance that had allowed states, with minimal federal interference, to legalize marijuana. This move will further reignite the War on Drugs.

 

January 8, 2018 Trump re-nominated a slate of unqualified and biased judicial nominees, including two rated Not Qualified by the American Bar Association.

 

January 8, 2018 The administration announced it would terminate the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for nearly 200,000 Salvadorans.

 

January 11, 2018 The Trump administration released new guidelines that allow states to seek waivers to require Medicaid recipients to work — requirements that represent a throwback to rejected racial stereotypes.

 

January 12, 2018 The Trump administration approved a waiver allowing Kentucky to require Medicaid recipients to work. ( On June 29, a federal judge struck down Kentucky's Medicaid work requirements.)

 

January 16, 2018 The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau under Mulvaney's leadership announced it would reconsider the agency's payday lending rule.

 

January 17, 2018 The administration announced its decision to bar citizens from Haiti from receiving H2-A and H2-B visas.

 

January 18, 2018 The Department of Health and Human Services announced a proposed rule to allow health care providers to discriminate against patients, and within the department's Office for Civil Rights, a new division — the Conscience and Religious Freedom Division — to address related claims.

 

January 18, 2018 The CFPB abruptly dropped a lawsuit against four online payday lenders who unlawfully made loans of up to 950 percent APR in at least 17 states.

 

January 25, 2018 The Census Bureau announced that the questionnaire for the 2018 End-to-End Census Test will use race and ethnicity questions from the 2010 Census instead of updated questions recommended by Census Bureau staff. This suggests that the Office of Management and Budget will not revise the official standards for collecting and reporting this data, despite recommendations from a federal agency working group to do so.

 

February 1, 2018 The New York Times reported that the Department of Justice was effectively closing its Office for Access to Justice, which was designed to make access to legal aid more accessible.

 

February 1, 2018 Reports surfaced claiming Trump's Labor Department concealed an economic analysis that found working people could lose billions of dollars in wages under its proposal to roll back an Obama-era rule — a rule that protects working people in tipped industries from having their tips taken away by their employers.

 

February 1, 2018 Multiple sources reported that acting Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Mick Mulvaney had transferred the consumer agency's Office of Fair Lending and Equal Opportunity from the Supervision, Enforcement, and Fair Lending division to the director's office. The move essentially gutted the unit responsible for enforcing anti-lending discrimination laws.

 

February 2, 2018 The Trump administration approved a waiver allowing Indiana to require some Medicaid recipients to work.

 

February 12, 2018 The Trump administration released its Fiscal Year 2019 budget proposal, which would deny critical health care to those most in need simply to bankroll the president's wall through border communities. The proposal would also eliminate the Community Relations Service — a Justice Department office established by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 — which has been a key tool that helps address discrimination, conflicts, and tensions in communities around the country.

 

February 12, 2018 The Trump administration released an infrastructure proposal that would reward the rich and special interests at the expense of low-income communities and communities of color and leave behind too many American communities and those most in need

 

February 12, 2018 BuzzFeed News reported that the U.S. Department of Education would no longer investigate complaints filed by transgender students who have been banned from using the restrooms that correspond with their gender identity. On the same day, the department released a statement saying Trump's budget protects vulnerable students" — a dubious claim.

 

February 12, 2018 The Trump administration released its Fiscal Year 2019 budget proposal, which would deny critical health care to those most in need simply to bankroll the president's wall through border communities. The proposal would also eliminate the Community Relations Service — a Justice Department office established by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 — which has been a key tool that helps address discrimination, conflicts, and tensions in communities around the country.

 

February 12, 2018 The Trump administration released an infrastructure proposal that would reward the rich and special interests at the expense of low-income communities and communities of color and leave behind too many American communities and those most in need.

 

February 12, 2018 BuzzFeed News reported that the U.S. Department of Education would no longer investigate complaints filed by transgender students who have been banned from using the restrooms that correspond with their gender identity. On the same day, the department released a statement saying Trump's budget protects vulnerable students" — a dubious claim.

 

February 26, 2018 The U.S. Department of Education proposed to delay implementation of a rule that enforces the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The rule implements the IDEA's provisions regarding significant disproportionality in the identification, placement, and discipline of students with disabilities with regard to race and ethnicity.

 

March 5, 2018 The Trump administration approved Arkansas' request to require some Medicaid recipients to work.

 

March 5, 2018 The Office for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education released a new Case Processing Manual (CPM) that creates greater hurdles for people filing complaints and allows dismissal of civil rights complaints based on the number of times an individual has filed.

 

March 12, 2018 Attorney General Sessions announced the Justice Department's 'school safety' plan — a plan that civil rights advocates criticized as militarizing schools, overpolicing children, and harming students, disproportionately students of color.

 

March 23, 2018 Trump issued new orders to ban most transgender people from serving in the military — the latest iteration of a ban that he had initially announced in a series of tweets in July 2017.

 

March 23, 2018 Trump signed a spending bill that included the STOP School Violence Act, which civil rights organizations are concerned will exacerbate the school-to-prison pipeline crisis, further criminalize historically marginalized children, and increase the militarization of, and over-policing in, schools and communities of color.

 

March 26, 2018 Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced that he had directed the Census Bureau to add an untested and unnecessary question to the 2020 Census form, which would ask the citizenship status of every person in America.

 

April 6, 2018 Attorney General Sessions announced that he had notified all U.S. Attorney's offices along the southwest border of a new "zero tolerance" policy toward people trying to enter the country — a policy that quickly, and inhumanely, separated hundreds of children from their families.

 

April 10, 2018 A federal official announced that the Department of Justice was halting the Legal Orientation Program, which offers legal assistance to immigrants.

 

April 10, 2018 Trump signed an executive order directing federal agencies to push for work requirements for low-income people in America who receive federal assistance, including Medicaid and SNAP.

 

April 25, 2018 Secretary Ben Carson proposed changes to federal housing subsidies that could triple rent for some households and make it easier to impose work requirements.

 

April 26, 2018 The Trump administration announced it would terminate the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation in 12 months for approximately 9,000 Nepalese immigrants.

 

May 4, 2018 The Trump administration announced it would terminate the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation in 18 months for approximately 57,000 Honduran immigrants.

 

May 7, 2018 The Trump administration approved New Hampshire's request to require some Medicaid recipients to work or participate in other "community engagement activities."

 

May 11, 2018 The Federal Bureau of Prisons released changes to its Transgender Offender Manual that rolled back protections allowing transgender inmates to use facilities, including bathrooms and cell blocks, that correspond to their gender identity.

 

May 18, 2018 The Department of Housing and Urban Development announced it would be publishing three separate notices to indefinitely suspend implementation of the 2015 Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing rule.

 

May 21, 2018 Trump signed a resolution of disapproval under the Congressional Review Act, which repealed the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's (CFPB) guidance on indirect auto financing.

 

May 22, 2018 The Trump administration issued a draft Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) designed to block access to health care under Title X and deny women information about their reproductive health care options.

 

May 24, 2018 Trump signed the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief and Consumer Protection Act, which will undermine one of our nation's key civil rights laws and weaken consumer protections enacted after the 2008 financial crisis.

 

June 6, 2018 Mick Mulvaney fired all 25 members of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's Consumer Advisory Board.

 

June 8, 2018 A Department of Justice filing argued that the Affordable Care Act's protections for people with pre-existing conditions are unconstitutional. The brief was signed by Chad Readler, a Justice Department official who Trump nominated to serve on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.

 

June 11, 2018 Attorney General Sessions ruled that fears of domestic or gang violence was not grounds for asylum in the United States.

 

June 11, 2018 U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Director L. Francis Cissna announced the creation of a denaturalization task force in a push to strip naturalized citizens of their citizenship.

 

June 12, 2018 The Department of Justice sued the state of Kentucky to force it to "systematically remove the names of ineligible voters from the registration records." This voter purge lawsuit was filed one day after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Ohio's voter purges in Husted v. A. Philip Randolph Institute.

 

June 18, 2018 Nikki Haley, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, announced that the United States was withdrawing from the UN Human Rights Council.

 

July 3, 2018 Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos rescinded guidance from the Departments of Justice and Education that provides a roadmap to implement voluntary diversity and integration programs in higher education consistent with Supreme Court holdings on the issue.

 

July 10, 2018 The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced cuts to navigator funding for outreach to hard-to-reach communities for the fall 2018 Affordable Care Act open enrollment period.

 

July 25, 2018 The Department of Education proposed new borrower defense rules, which would further exacerbate inequalities — making the already unfair and ineffective student loan servicing system even more harmful to all students, particularly to borrowers of color. The proposal would strip away borrower rights and would not protect students from predatory practices in both higher education and student loan servicing. ( On September 12, a federal judge struck down DeVos' attempt to weaken the rule. In October, the Department of Education said it would no longer try to delay the Obama-era regulation.)

 

July 26, 2018 The Trump administration failed to meet a court-ordered deadline to reunite children and families separated at the border.

 

July 30, 2018 Jeff Sessions announced the creation of a religious liberty task force at the Department of Justice, which many saw as a taxpayer funded effort to license discrimination against LGBTQ people and others.

 

August 13, 2018 Secretary Ben Carson proposed changes to the Obama-era Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) rule, which aimed to combat segregation in housing policy.

 

August 15, 2018 The Federal Register published a Trump administration proposal to restrict protest rights in Washington, D.C. by closing 80 percent of the White House sidewalk, putting new limits on spontaneous demonstrations, and opening the door to charging fees for protesting.

 

August 29, 2018 The New York Times reported that the Department of Education is preparing rules that would narrow the definition of sexual harassment, holding schools accountable only for formal complaints filed through proper authorities and for conduct said to have occurred on their campuses. They would also establish a higher legal standard to determine whether schools improperly addressed complaints."

 

August 30, 2018 The Department of Justice filed an amicus brief opposing Harvard College's motion for summary judgement in Students for Fair Admissions, Inc. v. Harvard, choosing to oppose constitutionally sound strategies that colleges and universities use to expand educational opportunity for students of all backgrounds.

 

September 5, 2018 The Trump administration sent sweeping subpoenas to the North Carolina state elections board and 44 county elections boards requesting voter records be turned over by September 25. Two months before the midterm elections, civil rights advocates worried this effort would lead to voter suppression and intimidation.

 

September 6, 2018 The Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Health and Human Services announced a proposal to withdraw from the Flores Settlement Agreement. The Flores Agreement is a set of protections for underage migrant children in government custody.

 

September 13, 2018 The National Labor Relations Board proposed weakening the "joint-employer standard" under the National Labor Relations Act, which would make it difficult for working people to bring the companies that share control over their terms and conditions of employment to the bargaining table.

 

October 1, 2018 A policy change at the Department of State took effect saying that the Trump administration would no longer issue family visas to same-sex domestic partners of foreign diplomats or employees of international organizations who work in the United States.

 

October 10, 2018 The Department of Homeland Security's proposed 'public charge' rule was published in the Federal Register. Under the rule, immigrants who apply for a green card or visa could be deemed a 'public charge' and turned away if they earn below 250 percent of the federal poverty line and use any of a wide range of public programs.

 

October 12, 2018 The Department of Justice filed a statement of interest opposing a consent decree negotiated by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan to overhaul the Chicago Police Department.

 

October 16, 2018 The administration released its fall 2017 Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions. The document details the regulatory and deregulatory actions that federal agencies plan to make in the coming months, including harmful civil and human rights rollbacks.

 

October 19, 2018 The Department of Justice ended its agreement to monitor the Juvenile Court of Memphis and Shelby County and the Shelby County Detention Center in Tennessee, which addressed discrimination against Black youth, unsafe conditions, and no due process at hearings.

 

October 21, 2018 The New York Times reported that the Department of Health and Human Services is considering an interpretation of Title IX that "would define sex as either male or female, unchangeable, and determined by the genitals that a person is born with" — effectively erasing protections for transgender people.

 

October 22, 2018 The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) issued new guidance on the Affordable Care Act's 1332 waivers that would expand a state's flexibility to establish insurance markets that don't meet the requirements of the ACA.

 

October 24, 2018 The Department of Justice filed a brief with the U.S. Supreme Court arguing that federal civil rights law does not protect transgender workers from discrimination on the basis of their gender identity.

 

October 30, 2018 Axios reported that Trump intends to sign an executive order to end birthright citizenship. In a tweet the following day, Trump said "it will be ended one way or the other."

 

October 31, 2018 The administration approved a waiver allowing Wisconsin to require Medicaid recipients to work. It was the first time a state that did not expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act was allowed to impose work requirements.

 

November 5, 2018 The Department of Justice filed a petition with the U.S. Supreme Court to circumvent three separate U.S. Courts of Appeals on litigation concerning the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program.

 

November 7, 2018 On his last day as Attorney General, Jeff Sessions issued a memorandum to gut the Department of Justice's use of consent decrees.

 

November 8, 2018 The Department of Homeland Security and Department of Justice announced an interim final rule to block people from claiming asylum if they enter the United States outside legal ports of entry.

 

November 8, 2018 The Department of Labor rolled back guidance issued by the Obama administration that clarified that tipped workers must spend at least 80 percent of their time doing tipped work in order for employers to pay them the lower tipped minimum wage.

 

November 16, 2018 The Department of Education issued a draft Title IX regulation that represents a cruel attempt to silence sexual assault survivors and limit their educational opportunity — and could lead schools to do even less to prevent and respond to sexual violence and harassment.

 

December 11, 2018 Trump declared that he would be "proud to shut down the government" — which he did. It resulted in the longest government shutdown in U.S. history (35 days), which harmed federal workers, contractors, their families, and the communities that depend on them.

 

December 18, 2018 The Trump administration's School Safety Commission recommended rescinding Obama-era school discipline guidance, which was intended to assist states, districts, and schools in developing practices and policies to enhance school climate and comply with federal civil rights laws.

 

December 21, 2018 Following the recommendation of Trump's School Safety Commission, the Departments of Justice and Education rescinded the Dear Colleague Letter on the Nondiscriminatory Administration of School Discipline. Both departments jointly issued the guidance in January 2014.

 

January 3, 2019 The Washington Post reported that the Trump administration is considering rolling back disparate impact regulations that provide anti-discrimination protections to people of color, women, and others.

 

January 4, 2019 The Guardian reported that the Trump administration has stopped cooperating with and responding to UN investigators over potential human rights violations in the United States.

 

January 29, 2019 The Department of Justice reversed its position in a Texas voting rights case, saying the state shouldn't need to have its voting changes pre-cleared with the federal government. Career voting rights lawyers at the department declined to sign the brief.

 

February 6, 2019 The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) — under the direction of Trump-appointed Director Kathy Kraninger- released its plan to roll back the central protections of the agency's 2017 payday and car-title lending rule.

  

Source: civilrights.org/trump-rollbacks/

 

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).

 

January

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian television actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3

Don Francks, Canadian actor, musician and singer (b. 1932)

Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress, author, and philanthropist (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress, cabaret performer, underground cartoonist, and activist (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

Rod Temperton, English songwriter, record producer and musician (b. 1949)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi

New English words[edit]

utility token[56]

See also[edit]

List of international years

References[edit]

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^ "2016 to be the International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU)". Archived from the original on January 5, 2016. Retrieved January 7, 2016.

^ AFP news agency [@AFP] (January 3, 2016). "#BREAKING Saudi Arabia severs ties with Iran, foreign minister says" (Tweet) – via Twitter.

^ "'El Chapo': Sean Penn interviewed Guzman before recapture". BBC News. January 10, 2016. Archived from the original on January 10, 2016. Retrieved January 10, 2016.

^ "Iran nuclear deal: 'New chapter' for Tehran as sanctions end". BBC. January 17, 2016. Archived from the original on January 17, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016.

^ "Shih Ming-te fails to meet threshold, ends candidacy". taipeitimes.com.

^ Botelho, Greg (January 28, 2016). "Zika virus spreading explosively". CNN. Archived from the original on January 28, 2016. Retrieved January 28, 2016.

^ "North Korea fires long-range rocket despite warnings". BBC News. February 7, 2016. Archived from the original on February 10, 2016. Retrieved February 12, 2016.

^ "Unity call as Pope Francis holds historic talks with Russian Orthodox Patriarch". BBC. February 13, 2016. Archived from the original on February 12, 2016. Retrieved February 14, 2016.

^ "ESA - Robotic Exploration of Mars: ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO)". Retrieved February 15, 2015.

^ Bowcott, Owen (March 21, 2016). "Congo politician guilty in first ICC trial to focus on rape as a war crime". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on March 25, 2016. Retrieved March 26, 2016.

^ "The Last Time an American President Visited Cuba". ABC News. March 22, 2016. Archived from the original on July 3, 2017. Retrieved June 24, 2017.

^ "Radovan Karadzic jailed for Bosnia war Srebrenica genocide". BBC News. March 24, 2016. Archived from the original on March 24, 2016. Retrieved March 24, 2016.

^ "Nagorno-Karabakh Conflict Situation Report No. 1 (as of 03 Apr 2016)". ReliefWeb. April 3, 2016. Archived from the original on April 4, 2016. Retrieved April 4, 2016.

^ Vasilyeva, Natalya; Anderson, Mae (April 3, 2016). "News Group Claims Huge Trove of Data on Offshore Accounts". The New York Times. Associated Press. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 4, 2016.

^ "EgyptAir flight MS804 from Paris to Cairo crashed - Hollande". BBC News. May 19, 2016. Archived from the original on May 19, 2016. Retrieved May 19, 2016.

^ "Taiwan gets first female President as DPP sweeps election". Channel NewsAsia. Retrieved January 16, 2016.

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^ "Gotthard tunnel: World's longest and deepest rail tunnel opens in Switzerland". BBC News. June 1, 2016. Archived from the original on June 1, 2016. Retrieved June 1, 2016.

^ "Euro 2016 Begins". The Independent. June 10, 2016. Retrieved June 4, 2018.

^ "USA TODAY". USA TODAY. Retrieved June 15, 2018.

^ Erlanger, Steven (June 23, 2016). "Britain Votes to Leave the European Union". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on June 24, 2016. Retrieved June 24, 2016.

^ "Istanbul Ataturk airport attack: 41 dead and more than 230 hurt". BBC News. June 29, 2016. Archived from the original on May 18, 2017. Retrieved May 1, 2017.

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^ "Election 2016: LNP retains Capricornia, gives Coalition 76-seat majority government". ABC News. Australia. July 11, 2016.

^ "2016 Federal Election". Archived from the original on February 26, 2018.

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^ Swatman, Rachel (August 10, 2016). "Pokémon Go catches five new world records". Archived from the original on August 18, 2016. Retrieved January 19, 2018.

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^ Perlez, Jane (July 12, 2016). "Tribunal Rejects Beijing's Claims in South China Sea". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on July 12, 2016. Retrieved July 13, 2016.

^ Wesel, Barbara (July 3, 2017). "France remembers Nice terror attack victims but questions remain". DW. Archived from the original on January 20, 2018. Retrieved January 19, 2018.

^ "Turkey's failed coup attempt: All you need to know". Al Jazeera. July 15, 2017. Archived from the original on August 16, 2017.

^ Overly, Steven (July 22, 2016). "The VCR is officially dead. Yes, it was still alive". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on October 17, 2016. Retrieved September 25, 2016.

^ "Solar Impulse completes historic round-the-world trip". BBC News. July 26, 2016. Archived from the original on July 26, 2016. Retrieved July 26, 2016.

^ "Rio 2016 Olympic Games". Archived from the original on February 24, 2015. Retrieved February 25, 2015.

^ "Brazil impeachment: Key questions". BBC News. August 31, 2016. Archived from the original on August 31, 2016. Retrieved September 5, 2016.

^ "Paris climate deal: US and China announce ratification". BBC News. September 3, 2016. Archived from the original on September 3, 2016. Retrieved September 3, 2016.

^ "NASA's OSIRIS-REx Speeds Toward Asteroid Rendezvous". NASA. September 8, 2016. Archived from the original on September 9, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016.

^ Amos, Jonathan (September 9, 2016). "Asteroid probe begins seven-year quest". BBC News. Archived from the original on September 9, 2016.

^ Hunt, Katie; Kwon, K.J.; Hanna, Jason (September 9, 2016). "North Korea claims successful test of nuclear warhead". CNN. Archived from the original on September 9, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016.

^ "JIT: Flight MH17 was shot down by a BUK missile from a farmland near Pervomaiskyi". Openbaar Ministerie. September 28, 2016. Archived from the original on October 14, 2016. Retrieved October 13, 2016.

^ Kahn, Brian (September 28, 2016). "The world passes 400ppm carbon dioxide threshold. Permanently". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on October 23, 2016. Retrieved October 31, 2016.

^ "Greenhouse gas level highest in two million years, NOAA reports". Phys.org. May 10, 2013. Archived from the original on November 4, 2016. Retrieved November 1, 2016.

^ "Van Gogh paintings stolen from Amsterdam found in Italy". BBC News. September 30, 2016. Archived from the original on July 7, 2017. Retrieved May 1, 2017.

^ "The Maldives decides to leave the Commonwealth; commits to continue with its international engagement". Maldivian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. October 13, 2016. Archived from the original on October 14, 2016.

^ McGrath, Matt (October 15, 2016). "Climate change: 'Monumental' deal to cut HFCs, fastest growing greenhouse gases". BBC News. Archived from the original on October 15, 2016. Retrieved October 15, 2016.

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^ "AFP: We only followed Marcoses' wish to keep burial secret".

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^ "Russian ambassador to Turkey Andrei Karlov shot dead in Ankara". BBC news. December 19, 2016. Archived from the original on December 21, 2016.

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In the aftermath of the Great Revolt, Henry held negotiations at Montlouis, offering a lenient peace on the basis of the pre-war status quo.[299] Henry and Young Henry swore not to take revenge on each other's followers; Young Henry agreed to the transfer of the disputed castles to John, but in exchange the elder Henry agreed to give the younger Henry two castles in Normandy and 15,000 Angevin pounds; Richard and Geoffrey were granted half the revenues from Aquitaine and Brittany respectively.[300][nb 30] Eleanor, however, was kept under effective house arrest until the 1180s.[302] The rebel barons were kept imprisoned for a short time and in some cases fined, then restored to their lands.[303] The rebel castles in England and Aquitaine were destroyed.[304] Henry was less generous to William of Scotland, who was not released until he had agreed to the Treaty of Falaise in December 1174, under which he publicly gave homage to Henry and surrendered five key Scottish castles to Henry's men.[305] Philip of Flanders declared his neutrality towards Henry, in return for which the King agreed to provide him with regular financial support.[92]

 

Henry now appeared to his contemporaries to be stronger than ever, and he was courted as an ally by many European leaders and asked to arbitrate over international disputes in Spain and Germany.[306] He was nonetheless busy resolving some of the weaknesses that he believed had exacerbated the revolt. Henry set about extending royal justice in England to reassert his authority and spent time in Normandy shoring up support amongst the barons.[307] The King also made use of the growing Becket cult to increase his own prestige, using the power of the saint to explain his victory in 1174, especially his success in capturing William.[308]

 

The 1174 peace did not deal with the long-running tensions between Henry and Louis, however, and these resurfaced during the late 1170s.[309] The two kings now began to compete for control of Berry, a prosperous region of value to both kings.[309] Henry had some rights to western Berry, but in 1176 announced an extraordinary claim that he had agreed in 1169 to give Richard's fiancée Alice the whole province as part of the marriage settlement.[310] If Louis accepted this, it would have implied that the Berry was Henry's to give away in the first place, and would have given Henry the right to occupy it on Richard's behalf.[311] To put additional pressure on Louis, Henry mobilised his armies for war.[309] The papacy intervened and, probably as Henry had planned, the two kings were encouraged to sign a non-aggression treaty in September 1177, under which they promised to undertake a joint crusade.[311] The ownership of the Auvergne and parts of the Berry were put to an arbitration panel, which reported in favour of Henry; Henry followed up this success by purchasing La Marche from the local count.[312] This expansion of Henry's empire once again threatened French security and promptly put the new peace at risk

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.[1]

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).[2]

 

Contents

1Events

2Births

3Deaths

4Nobel Prizes

5New English words

6See also

7References

 

Events[edit]

January[edit]

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.[3]

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.[4]

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3 – Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.[1]

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).[2]

 

Contents

1Events

2Births

3Deaths

4Nobel Prizes

5New English words

6See also

7References

 

Events[edit]

January[edit]

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.[3]

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.[4]

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3 – Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi

GUIDE AND SUPERVISION... Holistic Way, Super Vision, Eye Nutrition...pineal gland create inner light and super vision of your dreams...Lighting is a standout amongst the most imperative components in home stylistic layout. A decent lighting makes a feeling of warmth and inviting interest in the house. It likewise empowers you to perform every day errands well, makes you agreeable and above all outwardly upgrades the room.

 

Abstract: Sustainability has the potential to provide a holistic framework that can bridge the gap that is often found between socio-economic justice and environmental discourses. However, sustainability and sustainability education have typically accepted the prevailing socio-economic and cultural paradigm. It is my aim in this paper to demonstrate that a truly holistic and visionary sustainability (education) framework ought to demand radical and critical theories and solutions- based approaches to politicize and interrogate the premises, assumptions, and biases linked to the dominant notion of sustainability. If we are to envision and construe actual sustainable futures, we must first understand what brought us here, where the roots of the problems lie, and how the sustainability discourse and framework tackle—or fail to tackle—them. To do this is to politicize sustainability, to build a critical perspective of and about sustainability. It is an act of conscientização (or conscientization), to borrow Paulo Freire’s seminal term, of cultivating critical consciousness and conscience. In lieu of the standard articulation of politics as centralized state administration, ‘critical sustainability studies’ is based on a framing that gives prominence to a more organic, decentralized engagement of conscientious subjects in the creation of just, regenerative eco-social relations. It illuminates the ideological and material links between society, culture, and ecology by devoting particular attention to how knowledge and discourse around and across those realms are generated and articulated. I believe that future scholarship and activism in sustainability and sustainability-related fields would benefit immensely from dialoguing with this framework.

 

The assumption that what currently exists must necessarily exist is the acid that corrodes all visionary thinking.

 

– Murray Bookchin, The Meaning of Confederalism, 1990

   

Introduction: Why Sustainability (and Sustainability Education)?

 

Despite conflicting opinions over what the terms ‘sustainability’ and its variant ‘sustainable development’ actually mean, the framework of sustainability has gained a lot of traction in the last two decades. Its Western origins can be traced back to the writings of Western philosophers and seminal environmentalists like John Locke and Aldo Leopold (Spoon, 2013). Redclift (2005) asserts that sustainability as an idea was first used during the ‘limits to growth’ debates in the 1970s and the 1972 UN Stockholm Conference. Perhaps the most commonly quoted definition of sustainable development is that of the World Commission on Environment and Development (WCED) who states that “sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” (WCED, 1987, p. 43).

 

Sustainability has the potential to provide a holistic framework that can bridge the gap that is often found between socio-economic justice and environmental discourses. After all, recent scholarship indicates that the issue of environmental quality is inevitably linked to that of human equity (Morello-Frosch, 1997; Torras & Boyce, 1998; see Agyeman, Bullard, & Evans, 2002), and thus they need to be thought about together. I hold that an actual sustainable society is one where wider matters of social and economic needs are intrinsically connected to the dynamic limits set by supporting ecosystems and environments.

 

Sustainability education has emerged as an effort to acknowledge and reinforce these interrelationships and to reorient and transform education along the lines of social and ecological well-being (Sterling, 2001). By being rooted in whole systems thinking, i.e. “the ability to collectively analyze complex systems across different domains (society, environment, and economy) and across different scales (local to global)” (Wiek, Withycombe, & Redman, 2011, p. 207), sustainability education strives to illuminate the complexities associated with the broad, problem-oriented, solution-driven nature of sustainability (Warren, Archambault, & Foley, 2014). If we are to devise cultural systems that are truly regenerative, this “novel” brand of education urges the teaching of the fundamental facts of life by stewarding learning communities that comprehend the adaptive qualities of ecological patterns and principles (Stone, 2012). Sustainability education highlights the centrality of ‘place’ as a unit of inquiry to devise reciprocal—and thus sustainable—relationships where one nourishes and is nourished by their surrounding social and ecological milieus (Williams & Brown, 2012).

 

Additionally, sustainability and, as a consequence, sustainability education are future- oriented and therefore demand ‘futures thinking’: the ability to assess and formulate nuanced pictures of the future vis-à-vis sustainability predicaments and sustainability problem-solving schemes (Wiek, et al., 2011). In a nutshell, futures thinking suggests that we need to imagine the potential ramifications of past and current human activities by critically analyzing them today if we are to conceive of new, more sustainable futures (Warren et al., 2014). Future studies can therefore help people to pursue their “ontological vocation” as history makers (Freire, 1993, p. 66) and to (re)claim their agency as a means of creating the world in which they wish to live (Inayatullah, 2007).

 

However, sustainability and sustainability education have typically accepted the prevailing socio-economic and cultural paradigm despite their apparent holistic intent and(theoretical) efforts to reconcile the three pillars of sustainability—equity, environment, and economy. Whether intentionally or not, they have promoted curative solutions instead of reflecting new, critical mindsets that can actually generate meaningful socio-cultural innovation by naming and discursively dismantling the systems and processes that are the root causes of the complex problems we face. And, as Albert Einstein once put it, “no problem can be solved from the same consciousness that created it.”

 

It is my aim in this paper to demonstrate that a truly holistic and visionary sustainability (education) framework ought to demand radical (of, relating to, or proceeding from a root) and critical (of, relating to, or being a turning point) theories and solutions-based approaches to politicize and interrogate the premises, assumptions, and biases linked to the dominant notion of sustainability.

 

Troubling (Monolithic) Sustainability

 

In order to be able to unveil and critically analyze the propositions and suppositions of what I call ‘the monolithic sustainability discourse,’ it is fundamental to start with the etymology of the word ‘sustainability’ itself. The operationalization of the term can be problematic for it implies prior judgments about what is deemed important or necessary to sustain. While some of these judgements might resonate with an array of environmentalists who perceive that the health of the planet and the well-being of our descendants are being—or are already—compromised by certain human activities, various other perilous premises and assumptions are generally left unacknowledged as a result of the depoliticized character of the dominant discourse of sustainability. Lele and Norgaard (1996) have put forward three questions that can help us to uncover and think more critically about these presuppositions in and across various contexts and scales: (a) what is to be sustained, at what scale, and in what form?; (b) over what time period, with what level of certainty?; (c) through what social process(es), and with what trade-offs against other social goals? (p. 355).

 

By building on these critical questions and clarifications, we can better understand the nuances of how the destructive and thus unsustainable ethos of dehumanization and socio- ecological exploitation may inform and permeate normative notions and articulations of sustainability. Yet, this is only plausible if sustainability is politicized. To politicize is to engage the existing state of socio-political affairs, to problematize that which is taken for granted, to make explicit the power relations that are an innate part of everyday life and experience (Bailey & Gayle, 2003). In an attempt to comprehend why sustainability is typically depoliticized we ought to examine briefly its discursive history.

 

The term ‘sustainable development’ became a part of the policy discourse and almost every day language following the release of the Brundtland Commission’s report on the global environment and development in 1987 (Redclift, 2005). While their definition included a very clear social directive, its human and political dimensions have been largely overlooked amongst references to sustainability, which, due to its environmental origins (Lele & Norgaard, 1996) and neoliberal focus on rights rather than needs (Redclift, 2005), have typically focused on bio- physical, ecological issues (Vallance, Perkins, & Dixon, 2011). Social sustainability, which has been conceptualized in response to the failure of the sustainability approach to engender substantial change (Vallance et al., 2011), is the least developed of the three realms and is frequently framed in relation to ecological and/or economic sustainability (Magis & Shinn, 2013). I assert that the reason for this is twofold: first and foremost, the sustainability agenda was conceived by international committees and NGO networks, think tanks, and governmental structures (Agyeman et al., 2002), which makes it a top-down approach and, consequently, less likely to recognize and address themes such as structural poverty, equity, and justice (Colantonio, 2009); and second, because social sustainability is made subservient to economics and the environment, it fails to examine the socio-political circumstances and elements that are needed to sustain a community of people (Magis & Shinn, 2013).

 

Sustainability, since its inception as a Western construct, has been progressively viewed as a crucial driver in economic development and environmental management worldwide. Nevertheless, as delineated above, its almost universal focus on reconciling the growth model of economics and the environment has served to covertly depoliticize the dominant discourse and therefore render it uncontentious if not intrinsically benign. It is worth further exploring the dynamics of depoliticization for I believe they are at the radicle of the issues sustainability attempts to address in the first place.

 

Bailey and Gayle (2003) identify a series of acts that can be associated with the dynamics of depoliticization, three of which can be observed when examining the monolithic sustainability discourse: (a) eschewing political discourse; (b) removing from the discourse the recognition that social advantages are given to certain constituent groups; (c) not disclosing underlying viewpoints or values. These processes are enmeshed with intricate ideological instances that help to mask the systemic and/or structural nature of a social or cultural matter (Bailey & Gayle, 2003). Further, as Foucault (1984) has stated, “power is everywhere” (p. 93) and it is embodied and enacted in discourse and knowledge. Hence, possessing the analytical tools to name and unpack these discursive ideological formations and power dynamics ought to be a prerequisite to the development of more holistic and critically conscious understandings and applications of sustainability.

 

Politicizing Sustainability

 

If we are to envision and construe actual sustainable futures, we must first understand what brought us here, where the roots of the problems lie, and how the sustainability discourse and framework tackle—or fail to tackle—them. To do this is to politicize sustainability, to build a critical perspective of and about sustainability. It is an act of conscientização (or conscientization), to borrow Paulo Freire’s seminal term, of cultivating critical consciousness and conscience (Freire, 1993). It is a call for the necessity to highlight, problematize, and disrupt what I have termed ‘the ethos of unsustainability’ and its interrelated ideologies of dehumanization and exploitation. Ultimately, to embrace a stance that fails to scrutinize the sources of degradation and exploitation is to uphold the power relations that sustain oppressive structures (Freire, 1993; Perry, 2001). I assert that only by delving into the origins of the ‘ethos of unsustainability’ can we really devise sustainability paradigms that are capable of promoting significant socio-cultural transformation.

 

To comprehend the contours of the predicaments that loom on our horizon as well as their premises and logics, we must go back over 500 years in history to 1492, the year that marks the beginning of the current colonial era and the globalization of the European colonial imaginary (Tuck and Yang, 2012). It is important to note that my intention in doing so is not to provide a sweeping, all-encompassing description of this genealogy/historical process, but rather, to simply name, connect, and emphasize the ideological systems and patterns that have been conceptualized and reconceptualized so as to sustain the ethos of unsustainability and its exploitative power structures. After all, as Freire (1993) has indicated, “to name the world is to change it” (p. 88).

 

(World) Capitalism: A Technology of European Colonialism

 

According to the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), the word ‘colonialism’ stems from the Roman word ‘colonia,’ which meant ‘settlement’ or ‘farm.’ The OED describes it as:

 

… a body of people who settle in a new locality, forming a community subject to or connected with their parent state; the community so formed, consisting of the original settlers and their descendants and successors, as long as the connection with the parent state is kept up.

 

In Colonialism/Postcolonialism, Ania Loomba (2001) points out that this definition fails to link the word ‘colonialism’ to its ideologies of conquest and domination as it eschews any testimonial about those peoples who were already living in the places where the colonies were formalized. She offers another, more nuanced definition that hints to the processes of conquest and control of other peoples’ land and resources (Loomba, 2001, p. 2):

 

The process of ‘forming a community’ in the new land necessarily meant unforming or re-forming the communities that existed there already, and involved a wide range of practices including trade, plunder, negotiation, warfare, genocide, slavement and rebellions.

 

Loomba (2001) illuminates that while European colonialisms from the late fifteenth century onwards included a miscellany of patterns of domination and exploitation, it was a combination of these patterns that generated the economic disparity required for the maturation and expansion of European capitalism and industrial civilization; thus, capitalism demands the maintenance of colonial expansion in order to flourish. In spite of colonialism not being a monopoly of capitalism because it could be—and has been—utilized by so-called ‘socialist’ or ‘communist’ states as well (Dirlik, 2002), capitalism is a technology of colonialism that has been developed and re-structured over time as a means of advancing European colonial projects (Tuck and Yang, 2012). Colonialism was the instrument through which capitalism was able to reach its status as a global, master frame (Loomba, 2001).

 

A distinction between the three historical modes of colonialism might help to further elucidate the interrelationships between capitalism and colonialism.

 

Theories of coloniality as well as postcolonial theories typically acknowledge two brands of colonialism: external colonialism, which involves the appropriation of elements of Indigenous worlds in order to build the wealth and the power of the colonizers—the first world—, and internal colonialism, the bio- and geo-political management of people and land within the borders of a particular nation-state (Tuck and Yang, 2012). A third form, settler colonialism, is more suitable to describe the operationalization of colonialisms in which the colonizers arrive and make a new home on the land (Tuck and Yang, 2012). The settler objective of gaining control over land and resources by removing the local, Indigenous communities is an ongoing structure that relies on private property schemes and coercive systems of labor (Glenn, 2015).

 

In these processes of colonialism, land is conceived primarily if not exclusively as commodity and property, and human relationships to the land are only legitimized in terms of economic ownership (Tuck and Yang, 2012). These combined colonialist ideologies of commodification and private property are at the core of the various political economies of capitalism that are found in today’s globalized world (O’Sullivan, 2005). By relying on the appropriation of land and commodities through the “elimination of the Native” (Wolfe, 2006, p. 387), European colonialisms wind up restructuring non-capitalist economies so as to fuel European capitalism (Loomba, 2001). The globalization of the world is thereby the pinnacle of a process that started with the formation of the United States of America as the epitome of a Euro- centered, settler colonialist world power (Quijano, 2000).

 

Inspired by the European colonial imaginary, which transforms differences and diversity into a hierarchy of values (Mignolo, 2000) as well as by economic liberalism, which erases the production and labor contexts from the economy (Straume, 2011), the capitalist imaginary constitutes a broad depoliticization that disconnects its ‘social imaginary significations’ from the political sphere (Straume, 2011). Given that capitalism is imbued with European diffusionist constructs (Blaut, 1989), namely ‘progress,’ ‘development,’ and ‘modernity,’ the depoliticization of this now globalized imaginary is required not only to maintain the resilience of capitalism as a master frame (Straume, 2011), but also to camouflage its interconnectedness to European colonial systems.

 

Antonio Gramsci’s (1971) study and articulation of the conceptualization and operation of ideologies proves fruitful in terms of understanding how the capitalist imaginary has been used to facilitate processes of globalization that benefit European colonialisms. He argued that ideologies are invaluable when manufacturing consent as they are the means through which certain ideas and meanings are not only transmitted, but held to be true (Gramsci, 1971). Hence, hegemony, the power garnered through a combination of ideologies and coercion, is attained by playing with people’s common sense (Gramsci, 1971) and their lived system of meanings and values (Williams, 1976; see Loomba, 2001). Since subjectivity and ideology are key to the expansionist capitalist endeavor and its interrelated logics of commodification and domination (Gramsci, 1971), it becomes necessary to summon and dissect the colonial ideas and belief systems that have served and continue to serve as its conduits. This can in turn help us to interrogate the value systems and mental models that directly and/or indirectly inform the dominant notion of sustainability (education).

 

White Supremacist, Heteropatriarchal State Capitalism

 

As devised and practiced by Europeans and, later, by other Euro-centered powers such as the United States, colonial ideologies of race and racial structures smooth the way for capitalist production (Wolfe, 2006). The Eurocentric construct of race as “a system of discrimination, hierarchy and power” (Olson, 2004, xvii, p. 127-128) conveys colonial experience and infuses the most essential realms of world power and its hierarchies (Quijano, 2000). The state and its many institutions are particularly pivotal in sustaining these racialized ideologies that are obligatory for the development and continuance of capitalism (Loomba, 2001).

 

Slavery, as the foundation of notions of race and capitalist empire and one of the pillars of white supremacy, marks the concepts of ‘progress’ and ‘development’ as white (Painter, 2010) and renders black people as innately enslaveable, as nothing more than private property (Smith, 2010a). Within the context of the United States, the forms of slavery can and, indeed, have changed—from chattel slavery, to sharecropping, and more recently, to the prison industrial complex, which is still grounded in the premise that black bodies are an indefinite property of the state (Smith, 2010a)—yet, slavery as a logic of white supremacy has persisted (Smith, 2010a). The other two pillars of white supremacy are genocide, which expresses the need for Indigenous Peoples to always be disappearing, and orientalism, which builds on Edward Said’s influential term to explain how certain peoples and/or nations are coded as inferior and, therefore, a constant threat to the security and longevity of imperial states (Smith, 2010a).

 

The pillars of white supremacy may vary according to historical and geographical contexts (Smith, 2010a). Nonetheless, the centering of whiteness is generally what defines a colonial project. The formation of whiteness, or white identity, as a racialized class orientation stems from political efforts by capitalist elites and lawmakers to divide and conquer large masses of workers (Battalora, 2013). White identity is perhaps one of the most successful colonial and capitalist inventions since it “operates as a kind of property … with effects on social confidence and performance that can be empirically documented” (Alcoff, 2015, p. 23). It is a very dynamic category that can be enlarged to extend its privileges to others when white supremacist social and economic relations are jeopardized (Painter, 2010). It sustains itself, at least partially, by evading scrutiny and shifting the discursive focus to ‘non-whites’ (Silva, 2007). Whiteness is to be made invisible by remaining the norm, the standard, that which ought not to be questioned.

 

Capitalism therefore depends on and magnifies these racial hierarchies centered on whiteness. And, since race is imbricated and constructed simultaneously with gender, sexuality, ability, and other colonial categories—a conceptualization that serves to obscure white supremacy in state discourses and interventions (Kandaswamy, 2012)—, it is crucial to investigate the other ideologies that also shape class formation processes.

 

Heteropatriarchy, the combination of patriarchal and heterosexual control based on rigid and dichotomous gender identities—man and woman—and sexual orientations—heterosexual and homosexual—where one identity or orientation dominates the other, is another building block of colonialism. Patriarchy is employed to naturalize hierarchical relations within families and at a larger, societal level (Smith, 2010b). Similarly, heteronormativity paints heterosexual nuclear-domestic arrangements as normative (Arvin, Tuck, and Morrill, 2013) and is thus the bedrock of the colonial nation-state (Smith, 2010b). These social and cultural systems that configure heteropatriarchy are then apprehended as normal and natural whereas other arrangements or proclivities are demonized and perceived as repulsive and abnormal (Arvin et al., 2013). Heteropatriarchy is directly linked to colonial racial relations as it portrays white manhood as supreme and entitled to control over private property and to political sovereignty (Glenn, 2015). This indicates that the process of producing and managing gender frequently functions as a racial project that normalizes whiteness (Kandaswamy, 2012).

 

The laws and policies that were designed to institutionalize the formation of whiteness and white supremacy demonstrate that race, class, and gender are intertwined systems that uphold, constitute, and reconstitute each other (Battalora, 2013). The state and its ideological institutions are therefore major sites of racial struggle (Kandaswamy, 2012); they are responsible for devising and constantly revising the rationale that guides a white supremacist, heteropatriarchal settler colonialism grounded in the need to manufacture collective consent. These discourses are rooted in a pervasive state process that combines coercive state arbitration with societal consent by articulating the ideologies that link racial structure and representation as an effort to reorganize and distribute resources according to specific racial lines (Ferguson, 2012).

 

Despite increasing globalizing neoliberal urges toward deregulation and privatization, capitalism is still enabled and supported by the state. Its ‘ideological apparatuses,’ the state institutions and ideologies that enable and support the classist structure of capitalist societies (Althusser, 1989), is still fundamental to the expansion of capitalist enterprises; the nation-state is capitalism’s atomic component. The neoliberal state has utilized innovations in methods of social discipline and control along with legal practices to facilitate the process of economic globalization (Gill, 1995). Yet, all these schemes that involve retention of power through dominance and manufactured consent are rooted in divide and conquer strategies that cause those in subservient positions in society to engage in conflicts with one another (Hagopian, 2015). The interlinked logics and ideologies of white supremacy and heteropatriarchy conceived by state capitalism serve to spur dissent between potential opponents and thereby further stratify socio-economic classes. This prevents them from building a unified basis that can present a tangible threat to the status quo (Hagopian, 2015). Colonial and neocolonial powers have repeatedly deployed this stratagem to not only increase their geographical reach, but also to normalize and standardize the economic growth model of capitalism.

 

Colonialism is hence not just an ancient, bygone incident. The ideologies and processes delineated above demonstrate that it has remained very much in effect within contemporary capitalist and neoliberal frameworks (Preston, 2013). It then becomes critical to investigate how the dominant sustainability discourse may or may not collude in these schemes so that we may conceive of holistic blueprints that beget positive socio-ecological transformation.

 

Sustainability and Colonialism: Contradiction or Conscious Ideological Maneuver?

 

By unearthing what I believe are the roots of the predicament that sustainability attempts to heal, namely the ethos of dehumanization and exploitation rooted in divide and conquer systems, it becomes easier to analyze how the colonial political economy of capitalism may conserve hegemonic ideologies that pervade social relations and knowledge generating processes.

 

Yet, these ideologies and knowledge schemes have been given minimal attention in sustainability (education) scholarship. Even though some academics have contributed to the generation of a more critical comprehension of the interrelationships between capitalism, environmental degradation, and socio-economic justice (see Cachelin, Rose, & Paisley, 2015; Martusewicz, Edmundson, & Lupinacci, 2011; Pellow & Brulle, 2005), this major blindspot in linking sustainability to the colonial imaginary and its legacies prompts the following questions:(awhy are critiques of colonialism and capitalism so infrequent in the sustainability literature?: (a) why are critiques of colonialism and capitalism so infrequent in the sustainability literature?; and (b) how does that impact the discourse of sustainability?

 

I assert that, in spite of calls for paradigm shifts, the dominant disancourse of sustainability in the West embodies a transnational, globalized standard of economic growth. The promise that economic development can eradicate or at least alleviate poverty and hunger in a sustainable way reflects some of the same goals and values of the optimistic ‘ecological modernization’ concept and perspective, which suggest that the development and modernization of liberal capitalism result in improvements in ecological outcomes (Buttel, 2000). The neoliberal, capitalist overtones of sustainable development not only expose the contradiction inherent in the term, but they also serve to further commodify nature (Cock, 2011). This neoliberalization of nature, which has recently gained a lot of attention in the corporate world and academia under the lexicon of ‘ecosystem services,’ alienates people from their physical surroundings and therefore reinforces the society-nature divide. In short, the sustainability discourse has been appropriated by the capitalist master frame and has transformed most if not all social and ecological relations into financial ones. In lieu of addressing social and environmental justice issues, this form of “green” or “natural” capitalism is responsible for deepening both social and environmental inequalities (Cock, 2011).

 

Since sustainability (education) is (supposed to be) a praxis-oriented framework that symbiotically combines thought and action for transformative, liberatory ends, it ought to embrace this critique of colonial capitalism and the subsequent neoliberalization of the political economy if it is to oppose and resist hegemonic ideologies in its multiple and diverse manifestations. After all, whether intentionally or not, what matters in the end is that those discourses of sustainability that do not take a stance against colonialism and capitalism only serve to preserve them and the status quo. An understanding of these interdependent systems allows for the development of critical sustainability dialogues and actions that can actually promote the paradigmatic shifts required to redress the socio-cultural problems that are at the heart of the environmental crises. Thus, sustainability can and should be reframed to suggest a process of personal, social, and cultural conscientization that is environmentally sound, i.e. one that follows ecological principles and patterns, instead of upholding the dehumanizing, exploitative, and paradoxical ‘development as growth’ standard of global capitalism.

 

The following section combines the analyses and critiques presented in the preceding (sub)sections into a single, cohesive, and holistic framework, and further elucidates the distinctions between monolithic sustainability and critical sustainabilities.

 

The Framework of Critical Sustainability Studies

 

[T]he political cannot be restricted to a certain type of institution, or envisioned as constituting a specific sphere or level of society. It must be conceived as a dimension that is inherent to every human society and that determines our very ontological condition.

 

- Chantal Mouffe, The Return of the Political, 2005

 

‘Critical sustainability studies,’ while not exactly novel in the sense that it draws on principles, concepts, and positions that are foundational to other frameworks and fields—more specifically, critical Indigenous and ethnic studies, postcolonial theory, queer theory, feminist theory, crip theory, social ecology, political ecology, and cultural studies—, presents itself as an alternative to the sustainability theories and conceptualizations that have failed to engage a truly intersectional analysis of dominant sustainability and environmental discourses, policies, and practices. Its primary objective is to rearticulate sustainability as it has the potential to provide a more holistic conception of conscientization that can bridge the gap between social and economic justice and environmental sustainability.

 

The framework indicates a crucial double political intervention: to put sustainability and critical theory in conversation; to embed sustainability and ecology into critical theory and vice- versa. As I discussed in the previous section, sustainability has, for the most part, become a hegemonic and, therefore, highly problematic discourse that refuses to transform the complex ideologies and systems that undergird the ethos of unsustainability and the current socio- ecological crises. On the other hand, critical theory, which seeks to extend the consciousness of the human self as a social being within the context of dominant power structures and their knowledge management operations (Kincheloe, 2005), could benefit from incorporating ecological principles and the sustainability notion of ‘place’ into its analytical toolbox. After all, I am as interested in localizing critical knowledge—without disconnecting it from global matters and realities—as I am in putting forth more critical and radical views of sustainability. Hence, this framework brings together what I believe are some of the most robust and cutting edge theories and methodologies to facilitate the deconstruction of the questionable ideologies that guide Western epistemologies like (hegemonic) sustainability.

 

Critical sustainability studies encourages sustainability scholars and/or educators to move from a defined methodology of problem-solving to the more critical moment of calling something into question (Freire, 1993). By rooting it in conscientization, I propose an orientation to sustainability and sustainable development that politicizes and reveals it as an agenda, discourse, and knowledge system that ought to be contested and rearticulated so that it can incorporate and critically engage with emancipatory understandings of power and power relations. Furthermore, by problematizing and closing the culture-nature divide, it can lay down the groundwork for the paradigmatic changes necessary to heal widespread colonialist alienation from the wider ecological community and to create visions of deep sustainabilities that can engender ecologically sound socio-cultural transformation.

 

I stress that the notion of sustainabilities is necessary if we have the intention of opposing and displacing the monolithic, top-down and now universalized sustainability agenda, which I refer to as ‘big S Sustainability.’ After all, much like science (Parry, 2006), sustainability is not the property of any one culture or language. There are different ways of seeing and knowing sustainability, so it is time to pluralize it in the literature and discourse. This simple act is an extraordinary intervention in itself because within the colonial imaginary “sustainability” means “Western sustainability.” By centering “novel” understandings of sustainability that are concerned with the specificities of geo-political, cultural, and historical contexts and power relations, sustainability scholars and educators can create theories and visions of sustainability that can lead to the development of more just, place-based cultures and social ecologies.

 

Critical sustainability studies as I envision it is a consciousness-raising exercise that is particularly useful in educational settings. It indicates methodology as much as content. This praxis-oriented framework can help teachers and students alike to develop consciousness of freedom and to acknowledge authoritarian socio-cultural tendencies that have toxic environmental ramifications. The next section provides an overview of its tenets, the educational philosophy that underpins it, as well as the four preliminary methodological principles and examples of related pedagogical interventions that directly inform the framework and its liberatory, decolonizing ambitions.

 

Epistemological Position, Preliminary Methodological Principles, and Pedagogical Interventions for Conscientization

 

The epistemological, methodological, and pedagogical implications of critical sustainability studies are rooted in an ethical and political vision, one that is found in the vast majority of social ecology and political ecology projects: that “the domination of nature by man [sic] stems from the very real domination of human by human” (Bookchin, 2005, p. 1). In other words, we cannot overcome the ecological crisis unless we rid ourselves of the colonial ideologies of domination and hierarchy that permeate all forms of systemic and systematic exploitation and dehumanization. While much easier said than done, critical sustainability studies seeks to conceptualize this vision by building on the following tenets:

 

That sustainability and sustainability education are not neutral, they either advance or regress justice and Critical sustainability studies strives to promote justice and ecological regeneration.

That an analysis of power is central to understanding and engendering positive socio-cultural Critical sustainability studies strives to be conscious of power relations and to identify power inequalities and their implications.

That it is crucial to foreground the sociocultural identities and experiences of those who have been (most) oppressed – people of color, people with disabilities, queer and transgender people, the working class and the economically poor, undocumented immigrants, Critical sustainability studies acknowledges that just, healthy cultures and societies can only be cultivated if we examine the circumstances that cause and maintain socio-economic marginalization.

That positive socio-cultural transformation comes from the bottom up. Critical sustainability studies emphasizes and advocates a collective and decentralized approach to sustainable change.

And, finally, that the human community is inherently a part of rather than apart from the wider ecological world. Critical sustainability studies affirms that this relational ethos serves as the epistemological foundation of novel, dynamic worlds where healing and justice are at the front and center of our cultural and ecological identities.

In addition to delineating critical sustainability studies as a praxis that is founded on the above tenets, the framework is guided by a critical constructivist epistemological position. Strongly influenced by Freirean pedagogies and the Frankfurt school of thought, critical constructivism endeavors to dissect the processes by which knowledge is socially constructed; in other words, what we know about the worlds we live in always demands a knower and that which is to be known, a contextual and dialectical process that informs what we conceive of as reality (Kincheloe, 2005). This epistemological position problematizes and extends constructivism by illuminating the need for both teachers and students to develop a critical awareness of self, their perspectives, and ways their consciousness have been shaped and/or reshaped by society (Watts, Jofili, & Bezerra, 1997). Critical constructivists attempt to comprehend the forces that construe consciousness and the ways of seeing and being of the subjects who inhabit it (Kincheloe, 1993, as cited in Watts et al., 1997). This political, counter- Cartesianism, and anti-objectivist philosophy (Kincheloe, 2005) is central to an emancipatory approach to sustainability and sustainability education, and is, therefore, at the root of the critical sustainability studies conception of holistic conscientization.

 

www.susted.com/wordpress/content/critical-sustainability-...

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.[1]

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).[2]

 

Contents

1Events

2Births

3Deaths

4Nobel Prizes

5New English words

6See also

7References

 

Events[edit]

January[edit]

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.[3]

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.[4]

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3 – Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.[1]

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).[2]

 

Contents

1Events

2Births

3Deaths

4Nobel Prizes

5New English words

6See also

7References

 

Events[edit]

January[edit]

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.[3]

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.[4]

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3 – Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi

2016 (MMXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2016th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 16th year of the 3rd millennium, the 16th year of the 21st century, and the 7th year of the 2010s decade.

 

2016 by topic:

Arts

Architecture – Comics – Film – Home video – Literature (Poetry) – Music (Country, Rock, Metal, UK) – Radio – Photo – Television – Video gaming

Politics and government

Elections – International leaders – Sovereign states

Sovereign state leaders – Territorial governors

Science and technology

Archaeology – Aviation – Birding/Ornithology – Palaeontology – Rail transport – Spaceflight

Sports

Badminton – Baseball – Basketball – Volleyball

By place

Afghanistan – Albania – Algeria – Angola – Antarctica – Argentina – Armenia – Australia – Austria – Azerbaijan – Bangladesh – The Bahamas – Barbados – Belgium – Benin – Bhutan – Bosnia and Herzegovina – Brazil – Bulgaria – Burkina Faso – Burundi – Cambodia – Cameroon – Canada – Cape Verde – Central African Republic – Chad – Chile – China – Colombia – Costa Rica – Croatia – Cuba – Cyprus – Czechia – Denmark – Ecuador – Egypt – El Salvador – Estonia – Ethiopia – European Union – Finland – France – Gabon – Georgia – Germany – Ghana – Greece – Guatemala – Guyana – Hong Kong – Hungary – Iceland – India – Indonesia – Iraq – Iran – Ireland – Israel – Italy – Ivory Coast – Japan – Kazakhstan – Kenya – Kosovo – Kuwait – Kyrgyzstan – Laos – Latvia – Lebanon – Libya – Lithuania – Luxembourg – Macau – Madagascar – Malawi – Malaysia – Mali – Mexico – Moldova – Montenegro – Morocco – Mozambique – Myanmar – Nepal – Netherlands – New Zealand – Niger – Nigeria – North Korea – Norway – Oman – Pakistan – Palestine – Peru – Philippines – Poland – Portugal – Romania – Russia – Rwanda – Saudi Arabia – Senegal – Serbia – Singapore – Slovakia – Slovenia – Somalia – South Africa – South Korea – South Sudan – Spain – Sri Lanka – Sudan – Sweden – Switzerland – Syria – Taiwan – Tanzania – Thailand – Tunisia – Turkey – Uganda – Ukraine – United Arab Emirates – United Kingdom – United States – Uruguay – Uzbekistan – Venezuela – Vietnam – Yemen – Zambia – Zimbabwe

Other topics

Religious leaders

Birth and death categories

Births – Deaths

Establishments and disestablishments categories

Establishments – Disestablishments

Works and introductions categories

Works – Introductions

Works entering the public domain

vte

2016 in various calendars

Gregorian calendar2016

MMXVI

Ab urbe condita2769

Armenian calendar1465

ԹՎ ՌՆԿԵ

Assyrian calendar6766

Bahá'í calendar172–173

Balinese saka calendar1937–1938

Bengali calendar1423

Berber calendar2966

British Regnal year64 Eliz. 2 – 65 Eliz. 2

Buddhist calendar2560

Burmese calendar1378

Byzantine calendar7524–7525

Chinese calendar乙未年 (Wood Goat)

4712 or 4652

— to —

丙申年 (Fire Monkey)

4713 or 4653

Coptic calendar1732–1733

Discordian calendar3182

Ethiopian calendar2008–2009

Hebrew calendar5776–5777

Hindu calendars

- Vikram Samvat2072–2073

- Shaka Samvat1937–1938

- Kali Yuga5116–5117

Holocene calendar12016

Igbo calendar1016–1017

Iranian calendar1394–1395

Islamic calendar1437–1438

Japanese calendarHeisei 28

(平成28年)

Javanese calendar1949–1950

Juche calendar105

Julian calendarGregorian minus 13 days

Korean calendar4349

Minguo calendarROC 105

民國105年

Nanakshahi calendar548

Thai solar calendar2559

Tibetan calendar阴木羊年

(female Wood-Goat)

2142 or 1761 or 989

— to —

阳火猴年

(male Fire-Monkey)

2143 or 1762 or 990

Unix time1451606400 – 1483228799

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 2016.

2016 was designated as:

 

International Year of Pulses by the sixty-eighth session of the United Nations General Assembly.[1]

International Year of Global Understanding (IYGU) by the International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Social Science Council (ISSC), and the International Council for Philosophy and Human Sciences (CIPSH).[2]

 

Contents

1Events

2Births

3Deaths

4Nobel Prizes

5New English words

6See also

7References

 

Events[edit]

January[edit]

January 3 – Following the fallout caused by the execution of Nimr al-Nimr, Saudi Arabia and several other countries end their diplomatic relations with Iran.[3]

January 4–5 – The highest ever recorded individual cricket score, 1,009 not out, is made by Pranav Dhanawade.

January 8 – Joaquín Guzmán, widely regarded as the world's most powerful drug trafficker, is recaptured following his escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico.[4]

January 12 – Ten people are killed and 15 wounded in a bombing near the Blue Mosque in Istanbul.

January 16

The International Atomic Energy Agency announces that Iran has adequately dismantled its nuclear weapons program, allowing the United Nations to lift sanctions immediately.[5]

30 people are killed and 56 injured in terrorist attacks in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, targeting a hotel and a nearby restaurant. A siege occurs and 176 hostages are released afterwards, by government forces.

In the general election of the Republic of China (Taiwan), the Democratic Progressive Party, led by Tsai Ing-wen, secured a majority in the Legislative Yuan, resulting in the first majority by a non-KMT party and the first majority won by the DPP. Tsai become the 14th President for Taiwan, and also become the first female leader for China.[6]

January 28 – The World Health Organization announces an outbreak of the Zika virus.[7]

February[edit]

February 7 – North Korea launches a reconnaissance satellite named Kwangmyŏngsŏng-4 into space, condemned as a long-range ballistic missile test.[8]

February 12 – Pope Francis and Patriarch Kirill sign an Ecumenical Declaration in the first such meeting between leaders of the Catholic and Russian Orthodox Churches since their schism in 1054.[9]

March[edit]

March 9 – A total solar eclipse was visible from Indonesia.

March 14 – The ESA and Roscosmos launch the joint ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter on a mission to Mars.[10]

March 21

The International Criminal Court finds former Congolese Vice President Jean-Pierre Bemba guilty of war crimes and crimes against humanity, the first time the ICC convicted someone of sexual violence.[11]

Barack Obama visits Cuba, marking the first time a sitting US president has visited the island nation since president Calvin Coolidge visited in 1928.[12]

March 22 – 2016 Brussels bombings: Suicide bombing attacks at Brussels' Zaventem airport and Maalbeek metro station kill 35 people and injure 300 more.

March 24 – Ex-Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadžić is sentenced to 40 years in prison after being found guilty of genocide and crimes against humanity committed during the Bosnian War.[13]

April[edit]

April 1–5 – 2016 Nagorno-Karabakh clashes: Clashes occur along the Nagorno-Karabakh line of contact with the Artsakh Defense Army, backed by the Armenian Armed Forces, on one side and the Azerbaijani Armed Forces on the other. The US State Department estimates that a total of 350 people have been killed in the clashes, which have been defined as "the worst" since the 1994 ceasefire.[14]

April 3 – The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ) and the German newspaper Süddeutsche Zeitung publish a set of 11.5 million confidential documents from the Panamanian corporate Mossack Fonseca that provides detailed information on more than 214,000 offshore companies, including the identities of shareholders and directors including noted personalities and heads of state.[15]

May[edit]

May 19 – EgyptAir Flight 804 crashes into the Mediterranean Sea en route from Paris to Cairo, killing all 66 people on board.[16]

May 20 – Tsai Ing-wen is sworn in as the 14th President of the Republic of China (Taiwan).[17]

May 28 – Harambe, a 17-year-old western lowland gorilla, is shot and killed after a boy falls into its enclosure in Cincinnati, Ohio, causing worldwide controversy.

May 30 – Former Chadian President Hissène Habré is sentenced to life in prison for crimes against humanity committed during his tenure from 1982 to 1990, the first time an African Union-backed court convicted a former ruler of a country within its jurisdiction.[18]

June[edit]

June 1 – The Gotthard Base Tunnel, the world's longest and deepest railway tunnel, is opened following two decades of construction work.[19]

June 10 – July 10 – France hosts the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament, which is won by Portugal.[20]

June 12 – A gunman claiming allegiance to the Islamic State opens fire at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, killing 49 people and injuring 53 others.[21]

June 23 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union.[22]

June 28 – 2016 Atatürk Airport attack: ISIL is suspected to be responsible for attacking Atatürk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, killing 45 people and injuring around 230 others.[23]

July[edit]

July 1 – Latvia becomes the 35th member of the OECD.[24]

July 2 – 2016 Australian federal election: Malcolm Turnbull's Liberal/National Coalition Government is narrowly re-elected,[25] defeating the Labor Party led by Bill Shorten.[26]

July 5 – NASA's Juno spacecraft enters orbit around Jupiter and begins a 20-month survey of the planet.[27]

July 6 – The augmented reality mobile game Pokémon Go is released, breaking numerous records in terms of sales and revenue.[28]

July 12 – The Philippines wins the arbitration case they filed at the Permanent Court of Arbitration regarding the legality of China's "Nine-Dash Line" claim over the South China Sea under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.[29][30]

July 14 – 2016 Nice truck attack: 86 people are killed and more than 400 others injured in a truck attack in Nice, France, during Bastille Day celebrations.[31]

July 15–16 – In Turkey, a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized themselves as the Peace at Home Council, unsuccessfully stages a coup against the state institutions, resulting in the deaths of at least 240 people and triggering a series of unprecedented purges throughout the country.[32]

July 22 – The final videocassette recorder is manufactured by the Japanese company Funai.[33]

July 26 – Swiss Solar Impulse 2 becomes the first solar-powered aircraft to circumnavigate the Earth.[34]

August[edit]

August 5–21 – The 2016 Summer Olympics are held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, the first time in a South American nation.[35]

August 24 – A 6.2 earthquake hits central Italy, killing 299 people.

August 31 – The Brazilian Senate votes (61–20) to impeach the President of Brazil Dilma Rousseff. The Vice President of Brazil, Michel Temer, who had assumed the presidential powers and duties as Acting President of Brazil during Rousseff's suspension, takes office for the remainder of her term.[36]

September[edit]

September 1 – An annular solar eclipse was visible from Gabon, Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Tanzania, Mozambique and Madagascar.

September 3 – The US and China, together responsible for 40% of the world's carbon emissions, both formally join the Paris global climate agreement.[37]

September 8 – NASA launches OSIRIS-REx, its first asteroid sample return mission. The probe will visit Bennu and is expected to return with samples in 2023.[38][39]

September 9 – The government of North Korea conducts its fifth and reportedly biggest nuclear test. World leaders condemn the act, with South Korea calling it "maniacal recklessness".[40]

September 28

International investigators conclude that Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down by a Buk missile that came from an area controlled by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine.[41]

Global CO

2 levels exceed 400 ppm at the time of year normally associated with minimum levels.[42] A 400 ppm level is believed to be higher than anything experienced in human history.[43]

September 30 – Two paintings by Vincent van Gogh with a combined value of $100 million, Seascape at Scheveningen and Congregation Leaving the Reformed Church in Nuenen, are recovered after having been stolen on December 7, 2002 from the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.[44]

October[edit]

October 7 – Three events that played a significant role in the 2016 United States presidential election all take place on the same afternoon: (1) U.S. intelligence agencies publicly accuse the Russian government of using computer hacking to interfere with the U.S. election process; (2) The Washington Post releases a videotape showing candidate Donald Trump privately bragging about sexual improprieties; (3) WikiLeaks releases thousands of private emails from inside the political campaign of candidate Hillary Clinton.

October 13 – The Maldives announces its decision to withdraw from the Commonwealth of Nations.[45]

October 15 – 150 nations meet at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) summit in Rwanda and agree to phase out hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) as an amendment to the Montreal Protocol.[46]

November[edit]

November 2 – The Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time since 1908, ending the longest championship drought in American sports history.[47]

November 8 – Donald Trump is elected the 45th President of the United States as a Republican after running a campaign widely characterized as populist.[48]

November 14 – The remains of Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos are buried in a private ceremony at the Heroes' Cemetery prompting nationwide protests throughout the Philippines.[49][50]

November 24 – The Colombian government and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army sign a revised peace deal, bringing an end to the Colombian conflict.[51]

November 28 – LaMia Flight 2933 crashes into a mountain near Medellín, Colombia, killing 71 of the 77 people on board, including members of the Brazilian Chapecoense football squad.

December[edit]

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, the Russian ambassador to Turkey, is assassinated by an off-duty Turkish police officer at an art exhibition in Ankara.[52]

December 22 – A study finds the VSV-EBOV vaccine against the Ebola virus between 70–100% effective, and thus making it the first proven vaccine against the disease.[53]

December 23 – The United Nations Security Council adopts Resolution 2334 condemning "Israeli settlements in Palestinian territories occupied since 1967".[54]

December 25 – 2016 Russian Defence Ministry Tupolev Tu-154 crash: A Tupolev Tu-154 jetliner of the Russian Defence Ministry crashes into the Black Sea shortly after taking off from Sochi International Airport, Russia, while en route to Khmeimim Air Base, Syria. All 92 people on board, including 64 members of the Alexandrov Ensemble choir of the Russian Armed Forces, are killed.[55]

December 31 – United States troops withdraw from Afghanistan after 15 years.

Births[edit]

February 5 – Jigme Namgyel Wangchuck, heir apparent to the throne of Bhutan

March 2 – Prince Oscar, Duke of Skåne

April 19 – Prince Alexander, Duke of Södermanland

Deaths[edit]

Further information: Category:2016 deaths

Deaths

January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

January[edit]

Main article: Deaths in January 2016

 

Vilmos Zsigmond

 

Princess Ashraf Pahlavi

 

David Bowie

 

Alan Rickman

 

Glenn Frey

January 1 – Vilmos Zsigmond, Hungarian-American cinematographer (b. 1930)

January 2

Gisela Mota Ocampo, Mexican politician (b. 1982)

Sheikh Nimr, Saudi Shia religious leader (b. 1959)

January 3

Paul Bley, Canadian pianist (b. 1932)

Peter Naur, Danish computer scientist (b. 1928)

January 4 – Michel Galabru, French actor (b. 1922)

January 5 – Pierre Boulez, French composer, conductor and writer (b. 1925)

January 6 – Silvana Pampanini, Italian actress (b. 1925)

January 7

André Courrèges, French fashion designer (b. 1923)

Kitty Kallen, American singer (b. 1921)

Princess Ashraf of Iran (b. 1919)

January 8

Otis Clay, American soul singer (b. 1942)

Maria Teresa de Filippis, Italian racing driver (b. 1926)

January 10

David Bowie, English singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1947)

Michael Galeota, American actor (b. 1984)

Ralph Hauenstein, American philanthropist and businessman (b. 1912)

Yusuf Zuayyin, 51st and 53rd Prime Minister of Syria (b. 1931)

January 11 – Monte Irvin, American baseball player (b. 1919)

January 12 – Meg Mundy, English-born American actress (b. 1915)

January 14

René Angélil, Canadian singer and manager (b. 1942)

Alan Rickman, English actor and director (b. 1946)

January 15 – Dan Haggerty, American actor (b. 1941)

January 18

Glenn Frey, American musician (b. 1948)

Michel Tournier, French writer (b. 1924)

January 19 – Ettore Scola, Italian screenwriter and film director (b. 1931)

January 23 – Jimmy Bain, Scottish musician (b. 1947)

January 24 – Marvin Minsky, American computer scientist (b. 1927)

January 26

Black, English singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

Abe Vigoda, American actor (b. 1921)

January 28

Paul Kantner, American singer and musician (b. 1941)

Signe Toly Anderson, American singer (b. 1941)

January 29

Jean-Marie Doré, 11th Prime Minister of Guinea (b. 1938)

Jacques Rivette, French film director and critic (b. 1928)

January 30

Frank Finlay, British actor (b. 1926)

Francisco Flores Pérez, President of El Salvador (b. 1959)

January 31 – Terry Wogan, Irish-British broadcaster (b. 1938)

February[edit]

Main article: Deaths in February 2016

 

Boutros Boutros-Ghali

 

Umberto Eco

 

Harper Lee

 

Sonny James

February 1 – Óscar Humberto Mejía Victores, 27th President of Guatemala (b. 1930)

February 3 – Joe Alaskey, American voice actor (b. 1952)

February 4

Edgar Mitchell, American astronaut (b. 1930)

Maurice White, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

February 8 – Amelia Bence, Argentine actress (b. 1914)

February 9 – Sushil Koirala, 37th Prime Minister of Nepal (b. 1939)

February 13

Trifon Ivanov, Bulgarian footballer (b. 1965)

Slobodan Santrač, Serbian football player and manager (b. 1946)

Antonin Scalia, American Supreme Court Justice (b. 1936)

February 15

Vanity, Canadian singer and actress (b. 1959)

George Gaynes, Finnish-born American actor (b. 1917)

February 16 – Boutros Boutros-Ghali, Egyptian politician and diplomat, Secretary-General of the UN (b. 1922)

February 17

Jesús Barrero, Mexican actor (b. 1958)

Mohamed Hassanein Heikal, Egyptian journalist (b. 1923)

Tony Phillips, American baseball player (b. 1959)

Andrzej Żuławski, Polish film director and writer (b. 1940)

February 18 – Pantelis Pantelidis, Greek singer, songwriter and lyricist (b. 1983)

February 19

Umberto Eco, Italian writer and philosopher (b. 1932)

Harper Lee, American writer (b. 1926)

February 22

Sonny James, American country singer (b. 1928)

Cara McCollum, American journalist (b. 1992)

Douglas Slocombe, British cinematographer (b. 1913)

February 23 – Donald E. Williams, American astronaut (b. 1942)

February 24 – Peter Kenilorea, 1st Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands (b. 1943)

February 25 – Tony Burton, American actor (b. 1937)

February 28

Frank Kelly, Irish actor (b. 1938)

George Kennedy, American actor (b. 1925)

February 29

Hannes Löhr, German footballer (b. 1942)

José Parra Martínez, Spanish footballer (b. 1925)

March[edit]

Main article: Deaths in March 2016

 

Nancy Reagan

 

Guido Westerwelle

 

Anker Jørgensen

 

Johan Cruyff

 

Patty Duke

March 2 – Berta Cáceres, Honduran environmental activist and indigenous leader (b. 1971)

March 5

Hassan Al-Turabi, Sudanese spiritual leader (b. 1932)

Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Austrian conductor (b. 1929)

Ray Tomlinson, American computer programmer (b. 1941)

March 6 – Nancy Reagan, American actress, First Lady of the United States (b. 1921)

March 8

George Martin, English record producer, composer, arranger and engineer (b. 1926)

Claus Ogerman, German conductor and composer (b. 1930)

March 9

Jon English, English-born Australian singer, songwriter, musician and actor (b. 1949)

Naná Vasconcelos, Brazilian jazz percussionist and vocalist (b. 1944)

March 10

Anita Brookner, British novelist (b. 1928)

Keith Emerson, British musician (b. 1944)

Roberto Perfumo, Argentine footballer and sport commentator (b. 1942)

March 11

Deva Dassy, French opera singer (b. 1911)

Dragan Nikolić, Serbian actor (b. 1943)

March 12 – Lloyd Shapley, American Nobel mathematician (b. 1923)

March 13 – Hilary Putnam, American philosopher, mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1926)

March 14 – Peter Maxwell Davies, English composer and conductor (b. 1934)

March 16 – Frank Sinatra Jr., American singer-songwriter and actor (b. 1944)

March 17

Meir Dagan, Israeli general and former Director of Mossad (b. 1945)

Larry Drake, American actor (b. 1950)

March 18

Lothar Späth, German politician (b. 1937)

Guido Westerwelle, German politician (b. 1961)

March 20 – Anker Jørgensen, Prime Minister of Denmark (b. 1922)

March 21 – Andrew Grove, Hungarian-American electronic executive (b. 1936)

March 22 – Rob Ford, Canadian politician (b. 1969)

March 23 – Ken Howard, American actor (b. 1944)

March 24

Roger Cicero, German jazz and pop musician (b. 1970)

Johan Cruyff, Dutch footballer and manager (b. 1947)

Garry Shandling, American actor and comedian (b. 1949)

March 26 – Raúl Cárdenas, Mexican footballer and coach (b. 1928)

March 29 – Patty Duke, American actress (b. 1946)

March 31

Ronnie Corbett, English comedian (b. 1930)

Georges Cottier, Swiss cardinal (b. 1922)

Hans-Dietrich Genscher, German politician (b. 1927)

Zaha Hadid, Iraqi-British architect (b. 1950)

Imre Kertész, Hungarian Nobel author (b. 1929)

April[edit]

Main article: Deaths in April 2016

 

Merle Haggard

 

Doris Roberts

 

Prince

April 1 – Pratyusha Banerjee, Indian actress (b. 1991)

April 2 – Gato Barbieri, Argentine jazz saxophonist (b. 1932)

April 3 – Cesare Maldini, Italian football player and manager (b. 1932)

April 4 – Chus Lampreave, Spanish actress (b. 1930)

April 6 – Merle Haggard, American country singer (b. 1937)

April 8 – Erich Rudorffer, German fighter ace (b. 1917)

April 10 – Howard Marks, Welsh drug smuggler, writer and legalisation campaigner (b. 1945)

April 12

Anne Jackson, American actress (b. 1925)

Balls Mahoney, American professional wrestler (b. 1972)

Arnold Wesker, British playwright (b. 1932)

April 16 – Louis Pilot, Luxembourgian football player and manager (b. 1940)

April 17 – Doris Roberts, American actress (b. 1925)

April 19

Patricio Aylwin, 32nd President of Chile (b. 1918)

Ronit Elkabetz, Israeli actress and film director (b. 1964)

Walter Kohn, Austrian-born American Nobel physicist (b. 1923)

April 20

Chyna, American professional wrestler (b. 1969)

Guy Hamilton, British film director (b. 1922)

Victoria Wood, British comedian (b. 1953)

April 21

Lonnie Mack, American singer-guitarist (b. 1941)

Prince, American singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist (b. 1958)

April 23 – Banharn Silpa-archa, 21st Prime Minister of Thailand (b. 1932)

April 24

Billy Paul, American soul singer (b. 1934)

Klaus Siebert, German Olympic biathlete (b. 1955)

April 26 – Harry Wu, Chinese human rights activist (b. 1937)

April 27 – Viktor Gavrikov, Lithuanian-Swiss chess Grandmaster (b. 1957)

April 30 – Harry Kroto, English Nobel chemist (b. 1939)

May[edit]

Main article: Deaths in May 2016

 

Nick Lashaway

 

Marco Pannella

 

Loris Francesco Capovilla

 

Mohamed Abdelaziz

May 1 – Solomon W. Golomb, American mathematician (b. 1932)

May 2

Afeni Shakur, American music businesswoman (b. 1947)

Tomohiro Matsu, Japanese light novelist and screenwriter (b. 1972)

May 4

Jean-Baptiste Bagaza, 2nd President of Burundi (b. 1946)

Bob Bennett, American politician (b. 1933)

May 5

Siné, French political cartoonist (b. 1928)

Isao Tomita, Japanese composer (b. 1932)

May 6 – Margot Honecker, East German politician (b. 1927)

May 8

Nick Lashaway, American actor (b. 1988)

William Schallert, American actor (b. 1922)

May 10 – Kang Young-hoon, 21st Prime Minister of South Korea (b. 1922)

May 12 – Giuseppe Maiani, Captain Regent of San Marino (b. 1924)

May 16 – Giovanni Coppa, Italian cardinal (b. 1925)

May 17

Guy Clark, American singer-songwriter (b. 1941)

Yūko Mizutani, Japanese voice actress (b. 1964)

May 19

Alexandre Astruc, French film critic and director (b. 1923)

Marco Pannella, Italian politician (b. 1930)

Alan Young, British-born Canadian-American actor (b. 1919)

May 21

Sándor Tarics, Hungarian Olympic water polo player (b. 1913)

Nick Menza, German-born American drummer (b. 1964)

May 22 – Bata Živojinović, Serbian actor and politician (b. 1933)

May 25 – Yang Jiang, Chinese playwright, author, and translator (b. 1911)

May 26

Loris Francesco Capovilla, Italian cardinal (b. 1915)

Arturo Pomar, Spanish chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

May 28

Giorgio Albertazzi, Italian actor (b. 1923)

David Cañada, Spanish cyclist (b. 1975)

May 31

Mohamed Abdelaziz, 3rd Secretary-General of the Polisario Front (b. 1947)

Corry Brokken, Dutch singer (b. 1932)

Antonio Imbert Barrera, Dominican politician (b. 1920)

June[edit]

Main article: Deaths in June 2016

 

Muhammad Ali

 

Gordie Howe

 

Anton Yelchin

 

Alvin Toffler

June 2 – Tom Kibble, British physicist (b. 1932)

June 3

Muhammad Ali, American Olympic and professional boxer (b. 1942)

Luis Salom, Spanish motorcycle racer (b. 1991)

June 4 – Carmen Pereira, Bissau-Guinean politician (b. 1937)

June 5 – Jerome Bruner, American psychologist (b. 1915)

June 6

Viktor Korchnoi, Russian-born Swiss chess grandmaster (b. 1931)

Theresa Saldana, American actress and author (b. 1954)

Peter Shaffer, British playwright and screenwriter (b. 1926)

Kimbo Slice, Bahamian-American mixed martial artist, boxer, wrestler and actor (b. 1974)

June 7 – Stephen Keshi, Nigerian footballer and manager (b. 1962)

June 8 – Qahhor Mahkamov, 1st President of Tajikistan (b. 1932)

June 9 – Hassan Muhammad Makki, 10th Prime Minister of Yemen (b. 1933)

June 10

Christina Grimmie, American singer (b. 1994)

Gordie Howe, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1928)

June 11 – Rudi Altig, German road racing cyclist (b. 1937)

June 12

Omar Mateen, American mass murderer (b. 1986)

George Voinovich, American politician (b. 1936)

June 14 – Ann Morgan Guilbert, American actress (b. 1928)

June 16 – Jo Cox, English politician (b. 1974)

June 17 – Rubén Aguirre, Mexican actor (b. 1934)[importance?]

June 18 – Vittorio Merloni, Italian entrepreneur (b. 1933)

June 19

Victor Stănculescu, Romanian general and politician (b. 1928)

Anton Yelchin, Russian-born American actor (b. 1989)

June 20 – Edgard Pisani, French politician (b. 1918)

June 23

Michael Herr, American writer, journalist and screenwriter (b. 1940)

Ralph Stanley, American bluegrass musician (b. 1927)

June 25 – Maurice G. Dantec, French writer (b. 1959)

June 27

Bud Spencer, Italian actor, swimmer, and water polo player (b. 1929)

Alvin Toffler, American writer and futurist (b. 1928)

June 28

Scotty Moore, American guitarist (b. 1931)

Pat Summitt, American basketball coach (b. 1952)

June 30 – Martin Lundström, Swedish Olympic cross country skier (b. 1918)

July[edit]

Main article: Deaths in July 2016

 

Elie Wiesel

 

Zygmunt Zimowski

 

Ursula Franklin

 

Piet de Jong

 

Fazil Iskander

July 1 – Yves Bonnefoy, French poet (b. 1923)

July 2

Michael Cimino, American screenwriter and film director (b. 1939)

Rudolf E. Kálmán, Hungarian-born American electrical engineer (b. 1930)

Patrick Manning, Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago (b. 1946)

Michel Rocard, Prime Minister of France (b. 1930)

Elie Wiesel, Romanian-born American Nobel writer and political activist (b. 1928)

Caroline Aherne, English actress, comedian and writer (b. 1963)

July 3 – Noel Neill, American actress (b. 1920)

July 4 – Abbas Kiarostami, Iranian film director (b. 1940)

July 6

John McMartin, American actor (b. 1929)

Turgay Şeren, Turkish footballer (b. 1932)

July 8

Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistani philanthropist, social activist, and ascetic (b. 1928)

William H. McNeill, Canadian-American historian and author (b. 1917)

July 9 – Silvano Piovanelli, Italian cardinal (b. 1924)

July 12 – Goran Hadžić, Serbian politician and convicted war criminal (b. 1958)

July 13

Héctor Babenco, Argentine-Brazilian film director (b. 1946)

Bernardo Provenzano, Italian criminal (b. 1933)

Zygmunt Zimowski, Polish bishop (b. 1949)

July 14 – Péter Esterházy, Hungarian writer (b. 1950)

July 16

Nate Thurmond, American basketball player (b. 1941)

Alan Vega, American vocalist and visual artist (b. 1938)

July 19

Garry Marshall, American film director, television producer and actor (b. 1934)

Anthony D. Smith, British historical sociologist (b. 1939)

July 22 – Ursula Franklin, German-born Canadian scientist (b. 1921)

July 23

Carl Falck, Norwegian businessman (b. 1907)

Thorbjörn Fälldin, 2-Time Prime Minister of Sweden (b. 1926)

July 25

Halil İnalcık, Turkish historian (b. 1916)

Dwight Jones, American basketball player (b. 1952)

Tim LaHaye, American evangelist and author (b. 1926)

July 27

Einojuhani Rautavaara, Finnish composer (b. 1928)

Piet de Jong, Dutch politician and naval officer, Prime Minister of the Netherlands (b. 1915)

July 28

Mahasweta Devi, Indian social activist and writer (b. 1926)

Vladica Kovačević, Serbian footballer (b. 1940)

Émile Derlin Zinsou, 4th President of Dahomey (b. 1918)

July 30 – Gloria DeHaven, American actress (b. 1925)

July 31

Fazil Iskander, Russian writer (b. 1929)

Bobbie Heine Miller, South African tennis player (b. 1909)

Chiyonofuji Mitsugu, Japanese sumo wrestler (b. 1955)

Seymour Papert, South African-born American mathematician and computer scientist (b. 1928)

August[edit]

Main article: Deaths in August 2016

 

Queen Anne of Romania

 

Françoise Mallet-Joris

 

Mohammad Ali Samatar

 

Walter Scheel

 

Juan Gabriel

 

Gene Wilder

August 1 – Queen Anne of Romania, French-born consort of former King Michael of Romania (b. 1923)

August 2

David Huddleston, American actor (b. 1930)

Franciszek Macharski, Polish cardinal (b. 1927)

Ahmed Zewail, Egyptian-American Nobel chemist (b. 1946)

August 3

Chris Amon, New Zealand motor racing driver (b. 1943)

Ricci Martin, American musician and singer (b. 1953)

August 9 – Gerald Grosvenor, 6th Duke of Westminster (b. 1951)

August 13

Kenny Baker, English actor (b. 1934)

Françoise Mallet-Joris, Belgian writer (b. 1930)

August 14

Hermann Kant, German writer (b. 1926)

Fyvush Finkel, American actor (b. 1922)

August 15

Dalian Atkinson, English footballer (b. 1968)

Stefan Henze, German canoeist and coach (b. 1981)

Bobby Hutcherson, American jazz musician (b. 1941)

August 16

Andrew Florent, Australian tennis player (b. 1970)

João Havelange, Brazilian athlete and football executive (b. 1916)

August 17 – Arthur Hiller, Canadian film director (b. 1923)

August 18 – Ernst Nolte, German historian (b. 1923)

August 19

Lou Pearlman, American music manager and record producer (b. 1954)

Nina Ponomaryova, Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1929)

Jack Riley, American actor (b. 1935)

Mohammad Ali Samatar, 5th Prime Minister of Somalia (b. 1931)

August 20 – Louis Stewart, Irish jazz guitarist (b. 1944)

August 22

S. R. Nathan, 6th President of Singapore (b. 1924)

Toots Thielemans, Belgian jazz musician (b. 1922)

August 23

Steven Hill, American film and television actor (b. 1922)

Berit Mørdre Lammedal, Norwegian cross-country skier (b. 1940)

Reinhard Selten, German Nobel economist (b. 1930)

August 24

Michel Butor, French writer (b. 1926)

Walter Scheel, 8th President of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) (b. 1919)

Roger Y. Tsien, American Nobel biologist (b. 1952)

August 25

James Cronin, American Nobel physicist (b. 1931)

Sonia Rykiel, French fashion designer (b. 1930)

Rudy Van Gelder, American recording engineer (b. 1924)

August 26 – Harald Grønningen, Norwegian cross country skier (b. 1934)

August 28

Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, Israeli politician and former Deputy Prime Minister (b. 1936)

Mr. Fuji, American professional wrestler and wrestling manager (b. 1934)

Juan Gabriel, Mexican singer-songwriter (b. 1950)

August 29 – Gene Wilder, American actor (b. 1933)

August 30

Věra Čáslavská, Czech gymnast (b. 1942)

Marc Riboud, French photographer (b. 1923)

September[edit]

Main article: Deaths in September 2016

 

Phyllis Schlafly

 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi

 

C. Martin Croker

 

Shimon Peres

 

Miriam Defensor Santiago

September 1 – Jon Polito, American actor (b. 1950)

September 2

Islam Karimov, 1st President of Uzbekistan (b. 1938)

Daniel Willems, Belgian cyclist (b. 1956)

September 3

Johnny Rebel, American white supremacist singer and songwriter (b. 1938)

Jean-Christophe Yoccoz, French mathematician (b. 1957)

September 5

Hugh O'Brian, American actor (b. 1925)

Phyllis Schlafly, American writer and political activist (b. 1924)

September 7

Norbert Schemansky, American weightlifter (b. 1924)

Joseph Keller, American mathematician (b. 1923)

September 8

Prince Buster, Jamaican singer-songwriter and producer (b. 1938)

Dragiša Pešić, 5th Prime Minister of Serbia and Montenegro (b. 1954)

September 10 – Joy Viado, Filipino comedian and actress (b. 1959)

September 11

Alexis Arquette, American actress (b. 1969)

Ricky Tosso, Peruvian actor (b. 1960)

September 12 – Sándor Csoóri, Hungarian poet (b. 1930)

September 13 – Jonathan Riley-Smith, English medieval historian (b. 1938)

September 16

Edward Albee, American playwright (b. 1928)

Gabriele Amorth, Italian Catholic priest and exorcist (b. 1925)

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, 10th President and 49th Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1920)

António Mascarenhas Monteiro, 2nd President of Cape Verde (b. 1944)

Qiao Renliang, Chinese singer and actor (b. 1987)

September 17

Charmian Carr, American actress (b. 1942)

Sigge Parling, Swedish footballer (b. 1930)

C. Martin Croker, American animator and voice actor (b. 1962)

September 20 – Curtis Hanson, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1945)

September 23 – Marcel Artelesa, French footballer (b. 1938)

September 24

Bill Mollison, Australian researcher, author and biologist (b. 1928)

Bill Nunn, American actor (b. 1953)

September 25

José Fernández, Cuban-American baseball pitcher (b. 1992)

David Padilla, 64th President of Bolivia (b. 1927)

Arnold Palmer, American professional golfer (b. 1929)

Jean Shepard, American honky-tonk singer-songwriter (b. 1933)

September 26 – Herschell Gordon Lewis, American film director and screenwriter (b. 1929)

September 27 – Jamshid Amouzegar, 71st Prime Minister of Iran (b. 1923)

September 28 – Shimon Peres, 9th President and 8th Prime Minister of Israel, Nobel Peace Prize laureate (b. 1923)

September 29 – Miriam Defensor Santiago, Filipino politician (b. 1945)

September 30 – Trịnh Thị Ngọ, Vietnamese radio personality (b. 1931)

October[edit]

Main article: Deaths in October 2016

 

Michal Kováč

 

Andrzej Wajda

 

Bhumibol Adulyadej

October 1 – David Herd, Scottish footballer (b. 1934)

October 2 – Neville Marriner, British conductor (b. 1924)

October 4 – Brigitte Hamann, German-Austrian historian and author (b. 1940)

October 5 – Michal Kováč, 1st President of Slovakia (b. 1930)

October 8

Gary Dubin, American actor and voice actor (b. 1959)

Stylianos Pattakos, Greek military officer (b. 1912)

October 9

Mamadou Dembelé, 3rd Prime Minister of Mali (b. 1934)

Andrzej Wajda, Polish film director (b. 1926)

October 11 – Teatao Teannaki, 2nd President of Kiribati (b. 1936)

October 12 – Thomas Mikal Ford, American actor and comedian (b. 1964)

October 13

Bhumibol Adulyadej (Rama IX), King of Thailand (b. 1927)

Dario Fo, Italian actor, Nobel playwright and comedian (b. 1926)

October 14 – Klim Churyumov, Soviet-Ukrainian astronomer (b. 1937)

October 15 – Bruce Marshall, American ice hockey coach (b. 1962)

October 16

Kigeli V, King of Rwanda (b. 1936)

Viktor Zubkov, Russian basketball player (b. 1937)

October 23 – Khalifa bin Hamad Al Thani, Emir of Qatar (b. 1932)

October 24

Jorge Batlle, 38th President of Uruguay (b. 1927)

Benjamin Creme, Scottish artist, author and esotericist (b. 1922)

Reinhard Häfner, German footballer (b. 1952)

Bobby Vee, American pop singer (b. 1943)

October 25 – Carlos Alberto Torres, Brazilian footballer (b. 1944)

October 27 – Takahito, Prince Mikasa (b. 1915)

October 28 – Nicholas Brathwaite, 3rd Prime Minister of Grenada (b. 1925)

October 29

Roland Dyens, French classical guitarist and composer (b. 1955)

Pen Sovan, 32nd Prime Minister of Cambodia (b. 1936)

October 31 – Silvio Gazzaniga, Italian sculptor (b. 1921)

November[edit]

Main article: Deaths in November 2016

 

Leonard Cohen

 

Sixto Durán Ballén

 

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos

 

Fidel Castro

 

Luis Alberto Monge

November 1 – Bap Kennedy, Northern Irish singer-songwriter (b. 1962)

November 2 – Oleg Popov, Soviet and Russian clown (b. 1930)

November 4

Catherine Davani, first female Papua New Guinean judge (b. 1960)

Jean-Jacques Perrey, French electronic music producer (b. 1929)

November 5 – Marek Svatoš, Slovak ice hockey player (b. 1982)

November 6 – Zoltán Kocsis, Hungarian pianist, conductor and composer (b. 1952)

November 7

Leonard Cohen, Canadian singer, songwriter and poet (b. 1934)

Janet Reno, American lawyer, U.S. Attorney General (b. 1938)

November 11

Ilse Aichinger, Austrian writer (b. 1921)

Željko Čajkovski, Croatian football player (b. 1925)

Robert Vaughn, American actor (b. 1932)

November 12 – Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress (b. 1910)

November 13

Enzo Maiorca, Italian free diver (b. 1931)

Leon Russell, American musician (b. 1942)

November 14 – Gardnar Mulloy, American tennis player (b. 1913)

November 15

Mose Allison, American jazz musician (b. 1927)

Sixto Durán Ballén, 37th President of Ecuador (b. 1921)

November 16

Jay Wright Forrester, American computer engineer (b. 1918)

Melvin Laird, American politician and writer (b. 1922)

Daniel Prodan, Romanian football player (b. 1972)

November 17 – Whitney Smith, American vexillologist (b. 1940)

November 18

Denton Cooley, American heart surgeon (b. 1920)

Sharon Jones, American soul singer (b. 1956)

November 20

Gabriel Badilla, Costa Rican footballer (b. 1984)

Konstantinos Stephanopoulos, 5th President of Greece (b. 1926)

William Trevor, Irish writer (b. 1928)

November 22 – M. Balamuralikrishna, Indian musician, multi-instrumentalist, singer and composer (b. 1930)

November 23

Rita Barberá, Spanish politician (b. 1948)

Andrew Sachs, German-born British actor (b. 1930)

November 24

Florence Henderson, American actress (b. 1934)

Pauline Oliveros, American composer (b. 1932)

November 25

Fidel Castro, 16th Prime Minister and 17th President of Cuba (b. 1926)

Ron Glass, American actor (b. 1945)

David Hamilton, British photographer (b. 1933)

November 27 – Ioannis Grivas, 176th Prime Minister of Greece (b. 1923)

November 28

Cléber Santana, Brazilian footballer (b. 1981)

Mark Taimanov, Russian chess Grandmaster and concert pianist (b. 1926)

November 29 – Luis Alberto Monge, 39th President of Costa Rica (b. 1925)

November 30 – Erdal Tosun, Turkish actor (b. 1963)

December[edit]

Main article: Deaths in December 2016

 

John Glenn

 

Thomas Schelling

 

Zsa Zsa Gabor

 

Andrei Karlov

 

George Michael

 

Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds

December 2 – Sammy Lee, American Olympic diver (b. 1920)

December 4 – Gotlib, French comic artist (b. 1934)

December 5

Geydar Dzhemal, Russian Islamic philosopher (b. 1947)

Jayalalithaa Jayaram, Indian politician (b. 1948)

December 6 – Peter Vaughan, British actor (b. 1923)

December 7

Paul Elvstrøm, Danish Olympic yachtsman (b. 1928)

Greg Lake, British musician (b. 1947)

December 8

John Glenn, American aviator, astronaut and politician (b. 1921)

Joseph Mascolo, American actor (b. 1929)

December 10 – Esma Redžepova, Macedonian-Romani singer (b. 1943)

December 12

E. R. Braithwaite, Guyanese-born British-American novelist, writer, teacher, and diplomat (b. 1912)

Javier Echevarría Rodríguez, Spanish bishop (b. 1932)

December 13

Thomas Schelling, American Nobel economist (b. 1921)

Alan Thicke, Canadian actor and songwriter (b. 1947)

December 14

Paulo Evaristo Arns, Brazilian prelate (b. 1921)

Bernard Fox, Welsh actor (b. 1927)

December 16 – Faina Melnik, Ukrainian-born Russian Olympic discus thrower (b. 1945)

December 17 – Henry Heimlich, American physician (b. 1920)

December 18 – Zsa Zsa Gabor, Hungarian-American actress and socialite (b. 1917)

December 19 – Andrei Karlov, Russian diplomat (b. 1954)

December 20 – Michèle Morgan, French actress (b. 1920)

December 22

Yevgeny Dzhugashvili, Soviet Air Force colonel and grandson of Joseph Stalin (b. 1930)

Miruts Yifter, Ethiopian long distance runner (b. 1944)

December 23

Heinrich Schiff, Austrian cellist (b. 1951)

Piers Sellers, British-American astronaut and meteorologist (b. 1955)

Vesna Vulović, Serbian air disaster survivor (b. 1950)

December 24

Richard Adams, British author (b. 1920)

Rick Parfitt, British musician (b. 1948)

Liz Smith, British actress (b. 1921)

December 25

George Michael, British singer (b. 1963)

Vera Rubin, American astronomer (b. 1928)

December 26 – Ashot Anastasian, Armenian chess grandmaster (b. 1964)

December 27

Carrie Fisher, American actress and writer (b. 1956)

Ratnasiri Wickremanayake, 12th Prime Minister of Sri Lanka (b. 1933)

December 28

Gregorio Conrado Álvarez, President of Uruguay (b. 1925)

Michel Déon, French writer (b. 1919)

Debbie Reynolds, American actress, dancer, and singer (b. 1932)

December 29

Néstor Gonçalves, Uruguayan footballer (b. 1936)

Ferdinand Kübler, Swiss racing cyclist (b. 1919)

December 30 – Tyrus Wong, Chinese-born American artist (b. 1910)

December 31

William Christopher, American actor and comedian (b. 1932)

Henning Christophersen, Danish politician (b. 1939)

Nobel Prizes[edit]

Nobel medal

Chemistry – Ben Feringa, Jean-Pierre Sauvage, Fraser Stoddart

Economics – Oliver Hart, Bengt R. Holmström

Literature – Bob Dylan

Peace – Juan Manuel Santos

Physics – John M. Kosterlitz, Duncan Haldane, David J. Thouless

Physiology or Medicine – Yoshinori Ohsumi