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When I left my room in the Absaroka Lodge in Gardiner Montana on June 28, 2019, I found this Cecropia Moth on the outside door frame. Also known as a Robin Moth, Hyalophora cecropia is North America's largest native moth species. This particular moth seemed to be drying its wings in the early morning sun while perched on the door frame.

Cecropia Moth

Hyalophora cecropia, "Robin Moth"

(male)

Cecropia (Robin Moth).

The caterpillars take most of the summer to mature and are up to four inches long when fully developed. They are bluish green, and along the back there is a pair of yellow projections on each body segment. The first three pairs of tubercles are more conspicuous and are in the form of yellow balls with black spines. The cecropia caterpillars feed mainly on cherry, plum, apple, elderberry, box elder, maple, birch and willow, but will also feed on linden, elm, sassafras and lilac.

In early fall the mature caterpillar spines a spindle-shaped cocoon which is about three inches long. The cocoon is attached along its full length to a twig on the host tree. Inside the cocoon the caterpillar changes to a pupa, the life stage in which it spends the winter.

Captive bred on Apple leaves.

 

© Roger Wasley 2014 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

It was a dark, damp, ungodly hour when the alarm clock sounded this morning to alert my wife that she must leave home early for a 150-mile car journey up the M5 and M6 motorways to attend her annual school reunion in Lancashire...

 

Eventually, I managed to go back to sleep... But I was awoken minutes later with the words: "What's that munching noise in the kitchen?"

 

Yes, you've guessed... it was the unmistakable sound of an enormous 6cm long caterpillar enjoying its breakfast.

 

This is without doubt the most fascinating and easiest caterpillar I have reared to date. Point it in the direction of an Apple leaf – and let go...!

 

© Roger Wasley 2014 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

The Cecropia Moth or Robin Moth is North America's largest native moth. It is a member of the Saturniidae family, or giant silk moths. Females with a wingspan of six inches (160 mm) or more have been documented.

 

The female lays up to one hundred eggs, which hatch into tiny black caterpillars.

 

These larvae feed upon many common trees and shrubs, including maple, birch, and apple. As they grow larger, it becomes clear that the black color is actually small black hairs growing from tubercles (small projections) all over the body, which at early stages is yellow-green. As the larvae grow, the coloration becomes green to bluish-green, with the tubercles becoming blue, yellow or orange, depending on body location, while the black hairs are eventually lost. Upon reaching maturity, the caterpillars, now 4 to 4.5 inches long, spin large cocoons on trees or wooden structures to emerge as adults in the first two weeks of seasonally warm weather.

 

This caterpillar is captive bred on Apple leaves.

 

© Roger Wasley 2014 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

Cecropia (Robin Moth).

The caterpillars take most of the summer to mature and are up to four inches long when fully developed. They are bluish green, and along the back there is a pair of yellow projections on each body segment. The first three pairs of tubercles are more conspicuous and are in the form of yellow balls with black spines. The cecropia caterpillars feed mainly on cherry, plum, apple, elderberry, box elder, maple, birch and willow, but will also feed on linden, elm, sassafras and lilac.

In early fall the mature caterpillar spines a spindle-shaped cocoon which is about three inches long. The cocoon is attached along its full length to a twig on the host tree. Inside the cocoon the caterpillar changes to a pupa, the life stage in which it spends the winter.

Captive bred early instar caterpillar on Apple (Malus domestica).

 

© Roger Wasley 2014 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

Eraser- Cocktails are weird Moth. Their names anyway. Sex on the Beach? What’s that about eh? Are you supposed to drink it while having ‘sex on the beach’? That seems impractical. You’d just spill it. You’d get all sticky. Unless that’s the point...

 

Moth- I’m finally gonna do it, Len

 

Eraser- Have sex on the beach? I wouldn’t. Sand has a way of getting in everywhere

 

Moth- Urgh. No, I’m gonna kill the Bat.

 

Eraser- Ah. Glad to see you were listening. So what’s your big plan Drew? Feed him to giant Moths?

 

Moth- Even better. I’m going to become a giant Moth! I call it Charaxes, it’s still in the early stages but once it’s done, I’m going to use it. I’ve nothing to live for, Len. Gar’s gone AWOL. Amanda left. If I’m gonna go out, it’ll be on my own terms y’know? A final battle against that godforsaken vermin

 

Eraser (looking up at the TV)- Yeah. About that, Moth.

 

Moth- What the hell, unmute it!

 

Vicki Vale (on TV)- This is Vicki Vale live from Jezebel Plaza. Just 10 minutes ago pedestrians spotted a gruesome site: a bloodied Batman in the clutches of an enormous assailant. He, the creature I mean, looks like he’s going to say something, Tom are getting this?

 

Bane- I am Bane! This city is mine! Batman is no more. I have destroyed him. I rule these streets! I rule Gotham. Here is your hero. Your protector. Take him and bury him

 

Vicki Vale- Oh my God! He’s going to drop him!

 

THUD

 

Vicki Vale- Commissioner, do you have anything to say?

 

Gordon- Get these cameras out of here! Someone call a-

 

Moth- Shit.

 

Eraser- Drinks on the house! To the fall of Batman!

 

Patrons- Woooo! To the Fall of the Batman!

 

Eraser- Don’t feel too bad Moth, you can still kill Robin

 

Moth- It’s not the same, Len. Another scotch please

 

Tiger Moth- Got a light?

 

Moth- Sorry lady, you want Firefly.

 

Tiger Moth- Heh. Pretty funny

 

Moth- What’s funny about depression? I- ooooh. Hello. I’m Drury Walk- er Cameron. Cameron Van Cleer

 

Tiger Moth- And I’m Bruce Wayne

 

Moth- Well. ‘Bruce Wayne’ you’re pretty attractive.

 

Tiger Moth- You’re not too bad either ‘Cameron Van Cleer’

 

—————————————

Hi, I’m Killer Moth, I’ve been collecting Batman comics and I am shocked that the staff at D.C. Comics have omitted me from a bunch of their stories. Well starting today I am setting that right. Hush, Bloom, Final Crisis I was there in the background.

These are my Moth Stories- The untold tales of Killer Moth

Moths of the Limberlost

Garden City, N.Y.,Doubleday, Page & company,1921.

biodiversitylibrary.org/page/7753948

Cecropia (Robin Moth).

The caterpillars take most of the summer to mature and are up to four inches long when fully developed. They are bluish green, and along the back there is a pair of yellow projections on each body segment. The first three pairs of tubercles are more conspicuous and are in the form of yellow balls with black spines. The cecropia caterpillars feed mainly on cherry, plum, apple, elderberry, box elder, maple, birch and willow, but will also feed on linden, elm, sassafras and lilac.

In early fall the mature caterpillar spines a spindle-shaped cocoon which is about three inches long. The cocoon is attached along its full length to a twig on the host tree. Inside the cocoon the caterpillar changes to a pupa, the life stage in which it spends the winter.

Cecropia (Robin Moth).

The caterpillars take most of the summer to mature and are up to four inches long when fully developed. They are bluish green, and along the back there is a pair of yellow projections on each body segment. The first three pairs of tubercles are more conspicuous and are in the form of yellow balls with black spines. The cecropia caterpillars feed mainly on cherry, plum, apple, elderberry, box elder, maple, birch and willow, but will also feed on linden, elm, sassafras and lilac.

In early fall the mature caterpillar spines a spindle-shaped cocoon which is about three inches long. The cocoon is attached along its full length to a twig on the host tree. Inside the cocoon the caterpillar changes to a pupa, the life stage in which it spends the winter.

The Butterfly Zoo

Tiverton, RI

August 12th, 2014

  

This is a Hyalophora cecropia, larva of the CECROPIA MOTH, Robin Moth

  

This is an incredible place to visit. This time I brought a diffused flash to be able to shoot at very low ISO speeds. Info on the Zoo/Farm:

  

"Welcome to The Butterfly Zoo -- a different and exciting live tropical butterfly exhibit first opened in 1992 . We are the 3rd oldest continuously operated live butterfly exhibit in the United States . The Butterfly Zoo is located in scenic Tiverton, R.I. Our doors are open to visitors only on the sunny days of late May, June, July and August . We are not open on rainy days as the butterflies hide and do not put on their aerial ballets . The Zoo is closed September to mid-May as our cold, miserable New England weather would quickly destroy our heat-loving tropical butterflies.

  

So please come visit our gorgeous butterflies someday this summer and be prepared to meet up-close giant green birdwing butterflies from New Guinea, The Zebras from Costa Rica (claro. esto ariposa habla solomente espagnol !) and many others. And please do not forget to take your cameras ."

  

butterflyzoo.weebly.com/

  

409 Bulgarmarsh Rd

Tiverton, Rhode Island 02878

401-849-9519

 

Cecropia Moth or Robin Moth. A member of the Giant Silkworm family Saturniidae. Wingspan may be 11-15 cm (5-6 in). Often active during the day as well as at night. Distributed across all of Eastern North America west to Rocky Mountains and north to Maritime Canada. Larvae commonly feed on maple, wild cherry and birch as well as other tree leaves, and metamorphosize into a non-feeding adult in a silk cocoon. Adult moths typically live only 7-10 days, and males may detect (and fly to) a female several miles away by following the scent of chemical pheromones that she releases into the air at night. This adult was found and photographed in the wild.

The Robin Moth (Hylaphora cecropia)

The Robin Moth is the largest of the North American Silk Moths (Saturniids). This individual was raised in captivity here in the UK and the larvae were reared on Willow.

The Robin Moth is the largest of the North American Silk Moths (Saturniids). This individual was raised in captivity here in the UK and the larvae were reared on Willow.

Dill is a Cecropia (or Robin) moth caterpillar. He is 3 inches long and about 3/4 inches diameter. He spun a cocoon yesterday and will not emerge as a moth until next spring. When he does, he will be North America's largest moth, with a wingspan of 6 inches or more. His only purpose then will be to ensure the next generation - he will only live about 2 weeks!

The Robin Moth is the largest of the North American Silk Moths (Saturniids). This individual was raised in captivity here in the UK and the larvae were reared on Willow.

So many leaves, so little time.

 

This caterpillar, one of three on this bush, is the larva of the Cecropia moth, also known as the Robin moth. It is one of our largest caterpillars. It feeds on many trees and shrubs. In the late summer or early fall, the larva spins an overwintering cocoon attached to a twig on the plant where the larva fed. The large adult moth emerges May-July. The Cecropia moth, the largest in North America, lives only approximately two weeks. In fact, it has no mouth. It's only purpose is to mate and lay eggs.

 

From the information and photos here, I would say this caterpillar is in it's fourth or fifth instar or skin change and will soon be forming a cocoon. It would be awesome to witness the formation.

More than a mouthful!

The Robin Moth is the largest of the North American Silk Moths (Saturniids). This individual was raised in captivity here in the UK and the larvae were reared on Willow.

The Robin Moth is the largest of the North American Silk Moths (Saturniids). This individual was raised in captivity here in the UK and the larvae were reared on Willow.

The Cecropia Moth is North America's largest native moth. It is a member of the Saturniidae family, or giant silk moths. Females with a wingspan of six inches or more have been documented.

 

This early instal caterpillar is captive bred.

 

© Roger Wasley 2014 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

I'm wondering if it caught a slow worm.

Captive bred on Apple leaves.

 

© Roger Wasley 2014 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

An American Robin catches a moth for an evening snack, along the Mon Rail Trail, Morgantown, WV.

Seen on the boardwalk at the Visitor and Education Center - Horicon Marsh

The Cecropia Moth is North America's largest native moth. It is a member of the Saturniidae family, or giant silk moths. 1st instar, captive bred.

 

© Roger Wasley 2014 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

This has been a fantastic season for Giant Moths so far. My yard seems to be a place they like to visit.

 

This beauty is a Giant Robin Silkworm Moth. I spent a long time photographing and admiring the colours and patterns. These moths are known for their amazing wingspan. This one was a good 4 inches.

 

I love where I live!

 

I really recommend looking at it large to get a good look at the finer details.

  

Please support my work on Patreon! I'm an independent entomologist that studies moths: www.patreon.com/BartButterflies

Battered, but still hangin' on!!

Cocoon in Apple leaves.

 

© Roger Wasley 2014 all rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction for any reason is prohibited.

I posted a picture last week of this same moth, only with its wings closed. Thought you might like to see it with wings wide open, exposing how beautiful this creature is. Mother nature rules!

 

This has been a fantastic season for Giant Moths so far. My yard seems to be a place they like to visit.

 

This beauty is a Giant Robin Silkworm Moth. I spent a long time photographing and admiring the colours and patterns. These moths are known for their amazing wingspan. This one was a good 4 inches. I recommend giving the large version a peek, so you can see the finer details

 

I love where I live!

Phinizy Swamp Nature Park

Augusta (Richmond County), GA

 

This is the first documented time that this species has been observed in the park. This one was feeding on buttonbush.

 

Thanks to the Carolina Leps group on Facebook for ID assistance.

 

It is also known as the Robin Moth.

 

Hodges #7767

Wild Saturniid Silk Moth (Hyalophora cecropia) Caterpillar, aka Cecropia Moth and Robin Moth, 4th Instar Stage - Adeline Jay Geo-Karis Illinois Beach State Park (South Unit), Zion, IL - 12 September 2009

The Robin Moth is the largest of the North American Silk Moths (Saturniids). This individual was raised in captivity here in the UK and the larvae were reared on Willow.

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