flickr-free-ic3d pan white
View allAll Photos Tagged Rhipidurafuliginosa

Warriewood Wetlands, Sydney.

 

Copyright - All Rights Reserved. Not for reproduction or use of any kind without my written permission. Thanks for viewing.

Grey Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) photographed in Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale. These tiny little birds are frenetic in their movement, so I was pleased with this shot.

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

Explore 2013-11-05

 

Ku-Ring-Gai Wildflower Garden, Sydney.

 

All rights reserved. Please do not download or reproduce any of my images without my explicit written permission. Thanks.

There were two of these about, however the other one was quite camera shy.

South Island, New Zealand

To be honest, he was singing to me

Young Grey Fantail, Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

Grey Fantail, photographed at Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

This Grey Fantail was busy flitting around in a boring and very dead bush catching food. It wasn't until I'd been there a while that I realised the boring bush looked quite 'artistic' when framed out, so I took a few more. Here s/he is captured in the moment of waving the fan.

 

Then I discovered s/he wasn't feeding just for itself. Next to the dead bush was a thicket within which I could eventually see him/her feeding two chicks. They were tough to see so deep inside, but I did manage to get a couple of shots of them looking as most babies do - cute. Posted a bit later on my stream.

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

Grey Fantail, Woodlands Historic Park.

You'll have to humour me with these photos... I'm posting them because I loved the experience, and not because they're good photos.... probably not a very good reason for posting to Flickr!!

 

On every bush walk we went on in New Zealand, we saw fantails, a gorgeous little bird that flits about really fast, sometimes getting quite close and making a little chittering noise. But they NEVER came out into the open or into bright light, they were always in deep shade under the canopy, with bright light behind them!

 

On this day we went on a bush walk, and 5 minutes into the walk we saw a fantail. It blithely carried on as if we weren't there, and we saw it go to its nest and feed the chicks, which were very young :o) Once again, adverse conditions for photography, and high ISO shots, but a real joy to watch :o)

 

Exif:

Camera.................................Canon EOS 5D Mark III

Exposure...............................0.001 sec (1/1000)

Aperture................................ f/5.6

Focal Length.........................400 mm

ISO Speed.............................25600

Exposure Bias......................+3 EV

 

Processed in Lightroom 4.2

Lamington National Park, Australia, October 2014

I thought this was a bad shot but then I looked at the bokeh and such...

 

I went for a walk and found this new bird flittering around and I have no idea what it is... but he certainly liked fluttering his tail feathers. I wasnt quick enough to get a shot of him clearly

  

Hail to thee, blithe Spirit!

 

Bird thou never wert,

 

That from Heaven, or near it,

 

Pourest thy full heart

 

In profuse strains of unpremeditated art. -

   

Higher still and higher

 

From the earth thou springest

 

Like a cloud of fire;

 

The blue deep thou wingest,

 

And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest. -

 

from Ode to a Skylark -

- Percy Bysshe Shelley

 

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

Grey Fantail, Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

Pied Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa)

 

70-200mm lens with small extension tube, small amount of fill flash via Better Beamer Flash Extender.

I've been trying for such a long time to get a clear bird shot like this.... I know it could be a lot better, but I'm happy for now... :-)

 

Grey Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) - thank you Ann for the ID!!

 

Young Grey Fantail, Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

A Grey Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) I found in Yallingup Western Australia. There were lots of them about but I had some difficulty finding reference to its exact name - thanks to Olish' and hoeypestypie for putting me on track. I thought it was some sort of warbler! (Too much time looking at insects, I think)

 

It was as cute and as skittish as can be.

 

View Large And On Black

Wamboin, NSW, Australia.

 

A pair of Grey Fantails are building a nest just opposite our front door, on a very exposed dead branch. They (assuming it's the same pair every year) normally build their nest in a thick shrub just to the left of our front door, quite low. Unfortunately it is often unsuccessful due to predation (currawongs, or snakes most likely). Maybe this year's change of strategy might yield better results?

Common native NZ bird, found throughout the country (this one in my garden), absolutely charming tiny little bird that flits from place to place. Feeds on insects as seen in this photo!

Philph, after seeing your example I had to go outside and have a go!! Damn things don't stay still for an instant!!!

Busy little insect eaters, distributed widely throughout mainland Australia and Tasmania. Photos of these little guys are like butts - everyone's got one! Nevertheless, they are such shameless media tarts, you feel obliged to take just one more.

Scientific Name: Rhipidura fuliginosa

Location: War Memorial Park, Te Awamutu, NZ

Date Photographed: 24/09/2012

Image Number: 20120924-0124

 

Photos are available for purchase at: www.geografpix.co.nz

Grey Fantail fluffing out his chest feathers, at the Providence Dam, Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

Known for its friendly ‘cheet cheet’ call and energetic flying antics, the aptly named fantail is one of the most common and widely distributed native birds on the New Zealand mainland.

 

It is easily recognized by its long tail which opens to a fan. It has a small head and bill and has two colour forms, pied and melanistic or black. The pied birds are grey-brown with white and black bands.

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults

Gray Fantail - Rhipidura fuliginosa alisteri Wattles in bloom behind him.

 

The Grey Fantail is most easily recognised by its constantly fanned tail and agile aerial twists and turns. Both sexes are similar in appearance: grey above, with white eyebrow, throat and tail edges. They are quite inquisitive and will closely approach to check you out, but they don't sit still for long.

Here is another image from Tuesday. Grey Fantails can be very inquisitive sometimes, coming to within touching distance of you, but at other times will just fly away at the nearest movement.

 

Pity about the branch in the foreground. The good thing about shooting near sunset is that the colours are all much more interesting. In the background of this, the setting sun illuminates the long grasses behind the bird. Of course, the disadvantage is light (1/100 sec at ISO 800). This wouldnt be a problem with IS (Image Stabilisation) I think, but it is hard with the Bigma. Maybe I should consider the Canon EF 300mm f4L IS USM.

(Rhipidura fuliginosa)

 

2 of 2 photos

 

Maroochydore, Qld. Australia.

 

I haven't seen one of these little fellows for years, so was quite surprised

to see several whilst out walking yesterday.

 

Found throughout Australia, there are a number of races of the Grey Fantail

with slightly different colour patterns and calls. It grows to some 16

centimetres in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name

implies, is often fanned out during display.

 

The Grey Fantail is similar to the Willie Wagtail (Rhipidura leucophrys) but

it's slightly smaller and has shades of grey lighter (often yellowish) below

on the body and wings. There is also a white patch on the throat not seen on

the Willie Wagtail and the tips of most of the tail feathers are also white.

The Grey Fantail frequently fans its' tail, prefers inclined branches and

has a white stripe over the ear.

 

Immature bird. Lake Wendouree.

A gorgeous little Grey Fantail enjoys a drink from the Providence Road dam, Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact,cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

This fantail has lost its entire tail. I am presuming this is part of a natural moult process. The bird appeared to be able to fly quite normally and otherwise appears to be in good condition.

Gray Fantail(Rhipidura fuliginosa)

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

For an hour I followed this bloke and his mates around and every time they fanned their tails I missed the shot.

This was the sharpest of a whole series of pics of this little guy, which were taken quite late on a dull day and obviously lost something because the 55-200mm lens I was using has a 5.6 F-stop at the top of its focal range. Nevertheless, he was so co-operative in sitting still for me, I had to get him on here. The fluffiness of the feathers shows how juvenile he/she is

1 3 4 5 6 7 ••• 15 16