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Grey Fantail

 

Scientific name: Rhipidura fuliginosa

Family: Dicruridae

Order: Passeriformes

Minimum size: 14 cm

Maximum size: 16 cm

Average size: 15 cm

Average weight: 9 g

Breeding season: July to January

Clutch size: 2 to 3

Incubation: 14 days

Time in nest: 12 days

 

Hear its call : birdsinbackyards.net/images/audio/rhipidura-fuliginosa.mp3

 

Source: birdsinbackyards.net/finder/display.cfm?id=113

 

They are delight ful and very curious little birds that will come right up and check you out in the bush - this guy was about 2 metres away having a very good look.

I thought this was a bad shot but then I looked at the bokeh and such...

 

I went for a walk and found this new bird flittering around and I have no idea what it is... but he certainly liked fluttering his tail feathers. I wasnt quick enough to get a shot of him clearly

  

Hail to thee, blithe Spirit!

 

Bird thou never wert,

 

That from Heaven, or near it,

 

Pourest thy full heart

 

In profuse strains of unpremeditated art. -

   

Higher still and higher

 

From the earth thou springest

 

Like a cloud of fire;

 

The blue deep thou wingest,

 

And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest. -

 

from Ode to a Skylark -

- Percy Bysshe Shelley

 

A juvenile grey fantail and a rufous fantail and while I have taken better photos of both species, this is the first time I have got both in the same shots. The grey is a juvenile as can be seen from markings and feather development.

 

Both were bathing in the pond behind the education centre at Mary Cairncross Scenic Reserve.

 

And I think I have fixed the sneaky ISO 6400 hidden default

  

Common native NZ bird, found throughout the country (this one in my garden), absolutely charming tiny little bird that flits from place to place. Feeds on insects as seen in this photo!

Philph, after seeing your example I had to go outside and have a go!! Damn things don't stay still for an instant!!!

This Grey Fantail was busy flitting around in a boring and very dead bush catching food. It wasn't until I'd been there a while that I realised the boring bush looked quite 'artistic' when framed out, so I took a few more. Here s/he is captured in the moment of waving the fan.

 

Then I discovered s/he wasn't feeding just for itself. Next to the dead bush was a thicket within which I could eventually see him/her feeding two chicks. They were tough to see so deep inside, but I did manage to get a couple of shots of them looking as most babies do - cute. Posted a bit later on my stream.

I came upon ten fantails. Argh they're impossible to count. I came upon a flitting of fantails.

One of them stopped and decided to stay awhile.

These moments when the wild world makes a connection are beyond words.

Well ... I can't find them tonight ;-)

 

'Little Bird' by The Weepies

www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1oXfb64Hdo

 

Canon SX10is

f5.6; 1/50; ISO 200.

Some work with levels and curves.

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

There were two of these about, however the other one was quite camera shy.

Grey Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) photographed in Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale. These tiny little birds are frenetic in their movement, so I was pleased with this shot.

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

by fantails.

 

f5.7; 1/30; ISO 80.

Some work with levels.

  

South Island, New Zealand

To be honest, he was singing to me

Grey Fantail, Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

Grey Fantail at Tomato Lake. These are very inquisitive and unafraid little birds much like their close relations the Willy Wagtail but unlike the Wagtails these little birds rarely seem to come out of the shadows.

 

Grey Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) in Canberra Australia. Also called Gray Fantail and Rhipidura albiscapa.

Explore 2013-11-05

 

Ku-Ring-Gai Wildflower Garden, Sydney.

 

All rights reserved. Please do not download or reproduce any of my images without my explicit written permission. Thanks.

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

Gray Fantail - Rhipidura fuliginosa alisteri Wattles in bloom behind him.

 

The Grey Fantail is most easily recognised by its constantly fanned tail and agile aerial twists and turns. Both sexes are similar in appearance: grey above, with white eyebrow, throat and tail edges. They are quite inquisitive and will closely approach to check you out, but they don't sit still for long.

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

Young Grey Fantail, Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

Grey Fantail, photographed at Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

A Grey Fantail, rhipidura fuliginosa, a cousin of the Willie Wagtail, spreading his wings and singing with joy on a beautiful morning. This was taken on film.

Lamington National Park, Australia, October 2014

Another of the older birds -- it was all good photographic practice because as people mentioned, Grey Fantails don't sit still for long. An average stay on a branch would be a bit over a second so lots of lens-swinging and empty-branch photos...

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults

You'll have to humour me with these photos... I'm posting them because I loved the experience, and not because they're good photos.... probably not a very good reason for posting to Flickr!!

 

On every bush walk we went on in New Zealand, we saw fantails, a gorgeous little bird that flits about really fast, sometimes getting quite close and making a little chittering noise. But they NEVER came out into the open or into bright light, they were always in deep shade under the canopy, with bright light behind them!

 

On this day we went on a bush walk, and 5 minutes into the walk we saw a fantail. It blithely carried on as if we weren't there, and we saw it go to its nest and feed the chicks, which were very young :o) Once again, adverse conditions for photography, and high ISO shots, but a real joy to watch :o)

 

Exif:

Camera.................................Canon EOS 5D Mark III

Exposure...............................0.001 sec (1/1000)

Aperture................................ f/5.6

Focal Length.........................400 mm

ISO Speed.............................25600

Exposure Bias......................+3 EV

 

Processed in Lightroom 4.2

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

Grey Fantail, Woodlands Historic Park.

I finally spied this pair perched so cutely deep inside a thicket after their parent fed them for the umpteenth time. It's surprising that I'd been sitting beside this thicket watching their parent and a collection of other small birds for perhaps 15 minutes without having a clue these were here - hmmm.

 

(The parent is the bird in my "golden environment" pic where it is shown fanning and flicking the tail to (they say) disturb insects).

Grey Fantail, Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

A Grey Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) I found in Yallingup Western Australia. There were lots of them about but I had some difficulty finding reference to its exact name - thanks to Olish' and hoeypestypie for putting me on track. I thought it was some sort of warbler! (Too much time looking at insects, I think)

 

It was as cute and as skittish as can be.

 

View Large And On Black

Fantail [Rhipidura fuliginosa] New Zealand (where it is also known by its Maori name, Pīwakawaka or Tīwakawaka the Fantail is plain in colour: mid to dark grey or grey-brown above, lighter (often yellowish) below, with a white throat, white markings over the eye. It grows to some 16cen in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name implies, is often fanned out during display. This reveals that it is only the outer tail feathers that are light; the innermost are dark. Some subspecies are found in a darker plumage, notably in southern New Zealand. During waking hours the bird is almost never still. It flits from perch to perch, sometimes on the ground but mostly on the twigs of a tree or any other convenient object, looking out for flying insects Fantails form a compact, cup-shaped nests, usually in the forks of trees, made from moss, bark and fibre, and often completed with spider's web. They raise several broods per season, usually each of 3-4 cream eggs spotted grey and brown. Incubation period is around two weeks, and incubation and feeding duties are shared by both adults.

Pied Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa)

 

70-200mm lens with small extension tube, small amount of fill flash via Better Beamer Flash Extender.

Grey fantail at Mount Beauty, Victoria, Australia

Taken on a very overcast day in the middle of the Reserve - difficult lighting

I've been trying for such a long time to get a clear bird shot like this.... I know it could be a lot better, but I'm happy for now... :-)

 

Grey Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) - thank you Ann for the ID!!

 

(Rhipidura fuliginosa)

 

1 of 2 photos.

 

Maroochydore, Qld. Australia.

 

I haven't seen one of these little fellows for years, so was quite surprised

to see several whilst out walking yesterday.

 

Found throughout Australia, there are a number of races of the Grey Fantail

with slightly different colour patterns and calls. It grows to some 16

centimetres in length, of which half is the tail, which, as the name

implies, is often fanned out during display.

 

The Grey Fantail is similar to the Willie Wagtail (Rhipidura leucophrys) but

it's slightly smaller and has shades of grey lighter (often yellowish) below

on the body and wings. There is also a white patch on the throat not seen on

the Willie Wagtail and the tips of most of the tail feathers are also white.

The Grey Fantail frequently fans its' tail, prefers inclined branches and

has a white stripe over the ear.

 

Young Grey Fantail, Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale.

Busy little insect eaters, distributed widely throughout mainland Australia and Tasmania. Photos of these little guys are like butts - everyone's got one! Nevertheless, they are such shameless media tarts, you feel obliged to take just one more.

Grey Fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) photographed in Woodlands Historic Park, Greenvale. These are tiny little birds, and frenetic in their movement, so I was pleased with this shot.

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